Dies ist eine HTML Version eines Anhanges der Informationsfreiheitsanfrage 'Annual Reports of External Audit Units, personal data protection, FP6 & FP7 programmes. overriding public interest'.

EUROPEAN COMMISSION 
DIRECTORATE-GENERAL FOR RESEARCH & INNOVATION 
  
Directorate M - Management Operational Support - Framework Programme 
  M.1 - External audits 
 
 
 
 
 
 
ANNUAL ACTIVITY REPORT ON EXTERNAL AUDITS  
2012 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
Commission européenne/Europese Commissie, 1049 Bruxelles/Brussel, BELGIQUE/BELGIË - Tel. +32 22991111 
 
Page 2 of 48 

link to page 5 link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 9 link to page 9 link to page 11 link to page 11 link to page 12 link to page 13 link to page 15 link to page 16 link to page 17 link to page 18 link to page 18 link to page 18 link to page 19 link to page 21 link to page 22 link to page 22 link to page 23 link to page 24 link to page 24 link to page 25 link to page 25 link to page 26 link to page 27 link to page 28 link to page 28 link to page 29 link to page 29 link to page 29 link to page 31 link to page 32 link to page 32 link to page 34 link to page 37  
 
Table of contents 
Executive Summary ______________________________________________ 5 
1.  Background _________________________________________________ 7 
1.1.  Introduction ____________________________________________________________  7 
1.2.  Legal background  _______________________________________________________  7 
1.3.  The mission of the external audit units  ______________________________________  7 
1.4.  Role within the overall internal control framework activities of DG Research & 
Innovation  _________________________________________________________________  8
 

2.  Activities ____________________________________________________ 9 
2.1.  Annual Audit Plan 2012 and Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) ________________  9 
2.2.  The audit campaigns ____________________________________________________  11 
2.2.1.  The FP6 audit campaign ___________________________________________ 11 
2.2.2.  The FP7 audit campaign ___________________________________________ 12 
2.2.3.  Additional auditing commitments ____________________________________ 13 
2.3.  Cross-RDG coordination _________________________________________________  15 
2.3.1.  Coordination of audits in the Research family (CAR)  ____________________ 16 
2.3.2.  Other coordination Committees  _____________________________________ 17 
2.4.  Extrapolation __________________________________________________________  18 
2.4.1.  Extrapolation policy and coordination  ________________________________ 18 
2.4.2.  RTD extrapolation cases ___________________________________________ 18 
2.4.3.  Extrapolation implementation _______________________________________ 19 
2.5.  OLAF cases ____________________________________________________________  21 
2.6.  Management and quality control tools ______________________________________  22 
2.6.1.  Management and quality control _____________________________________ 22 
2.6.2.  Keywords Working Group (KWG) ___________________________________ 23 
2.6.3.  The Audit Steering Committee (ASC)  ________________________________ 24 
2.6.4.  Establishment of an Audits' Internal Supervision Committee (AISC) ________ 24 

2.7.  Collaboration with the DG RTD administration and finance (UAF) network______  25 
2.8.  IT developments ________________________________________________________  25 
2.9.  FP7 methodology certification  ____________________________________________  26 
2.9.1.  State of play of certification files as of 31 December 2012  ________________ 27 
2.9.2.  Inter-service collaboration and communication activities (cf. 2.11.) _________ 28 
2.10. 
Coordination of outsourced audits ______________________________________  28 
2.11. 
Communication Campaign ____________________________________________  29 
2.12. 
Other activities ______________________________________________________  29 
2.12.1. 
Art. 185 Initiatives _____________________________________________ 29 
2.12.2. 
Access to documents ___________________________________________ 31 
3.  Results and Analysis  _________________________________________ 32 
3.1.  Audit numbers _________________________________________________________  32 
3.2.  Audit results ___________________________________________________________  34 
3.3.  Audit coverage _________________________________________________________  37 
Page 3 of 48 

link to page 39 link to page 39 link to page 43 link to page 44 link to page 45 link to page 46 link to page 48  
 
3.4.  Analysis _______________________________________________________________  39 
3.4.1.  Analysis of error rates _____________________________________________ 39 
3.4.2.  Assessment of the different steps of the control chain ____________________ 43 
3.4.3.  Qualitative analysis of error types ____________________________________ 44 
3.4.4.  Analysis of adjustments at cost category level __________________________ 45 
3.4.5.  Analysis of the FP7 representative error rate  ___________________________ 46 
ANNEX I: Mission statement  _____________________________________ 48 
 
Page 4 of 48 

 
 
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 
In  2012,  the  emphasis  of  the  work  of  the  external  audit  unit  has  been  on  the  further 
implementation  of  the  FP7  Audit  Strategy.  In  total,  308  audits  were  closed  by  RTD M.1  in 
2012, of which 265 audits were part of the FP7 audit campaign, the remainder being 40 FP6 
audits and three Coal and Steel audits.  
 
2012  was  also  the  year  of  the  first  FP7  Common  Representative  Sample  (CRS)  for  the 
Research family of DGs and Executive Agencies. This new approach to providing assurance 
has  enabled  the  Commission  services  to  reduce  the  total  number  of  planned  FP7  audits  by 
25%. 
 
On 1 February 2013, results were known for 136 out of the 162 cost statements selected in the 
CRS; the resulting common representative error rate was -4.18%. More than 70% of the errors 
stem from the 'Personnel Cost' and 'Indirect Costs' categories. The vast majority of the errors 
are due to a lack of supporting documentation and relate to issues associated with personnel 
cost  (lack  of  contracts,  incorrect  or  irregular  timesheets,  lack  of  extracts  of  payroll,  lack  of 
invoices  for  in-house  consultants,  etc.).  Erroneous  calculations  of  depreciation  charges  or 
their  wrong  application  comes  second.  Errors  related  to  subcontracting  come  third.  These 
findings  are  in  line  with  the  errors  that  we  explain  and  try  to  remedy  through  the 
Communication  Campaign  which  covered  12  countries  in  2012.  This  campaign  focuses  on 
beneficiaries  as  well  as  certifying  auditors,  and  it  is  generally  regarded  as  a  success.  It  will 
continue in 2013. Further analysis of the error rates has also shown that newcomers to the FP 
and SMEs are particularly  error prone. As a result,  additional preventive measures might  be 
usefully considered. 
 
Of  the  closed  audits,  approximately  one  third  are  done  by  in-house  auditors.  For  this  audit 
work, 2012 was  a  year in  which  radical  overhaul of the quality  control arrangements within 
the unit took place. In addition, a set of performance indicators was introduced that will allow 
us  to  track  the  evolution  of  the  unit's  performance  over  the  years  to  come.  Some  of  these 
indicators will have to be refined in the light of the first-year experience.  Additional quality 
assurance  was  introduced  by  setting  up  the  Audit  Internal  Supervision  Committee  (AISC), 
chaired  by  the  Director.  The  final  aim  of  all  these  measures  is  to  increase  productivity, 
efficiency and quality. Timely delivery of audit reports is also a target. 
 
The unit also manages, on behalf of the Research Family, the framework contracts with three 
private audit firms to whom two thirds of the audits are outsourced. The existing framework 
contract expires in June 2013 and, in order to ensure the availability of outsourcing capacity 
following this date, a call for tender for a new framework contract was launched in 2012. The 
closing date for submission of the tenders was 23 November 2012. The tenders received are 
being assessed and it is expected that the new framework contract will be ready by June 2013.  
 
Whilst we are in the middle of the FP7 audit campaign, the FP6 campaign has gradually been 
winding  down  (42  FP6  audits  remain  to  be  closed).  Both  campaigns  have  hitherto  led  to 
proposed adjustments for a total of ± EUR 71 000 000 in favour of the Commission. 
 
In  addition  to  the  FP6  and  FP7  audit  campaigns,  the  unit  manages  a  wide  variety  of  issues 
related to the assurance-gathering process. A significant amount of resources are dedicated to 
cross-RDG coordination (e.g. 32% of the working time of the in-house auditors), which from 
2012 onwards included not only all research Commission services but also RTD's three Joint 
Page 5 of 48 

 
 
Undertakings (IMI, Cleansky, FCH). Also the work with OLAF should be referred to. In that 
context,  efforts  undertaken  by  this  unit  to  implement  plagiarism  detection  and  IT  tools  that 
facilitate  advanced  data  searches  should  be  highlighted,  together  with  the  initiative  to  build 
constructive relations with national research funding organisation with the purpose of jointly 
combatting  fraud.  Effective  audit  management  is  also  underpinned  by  the  development  of 
adequate  IT-tools;  specific  reference  should  be  made  to  our  audit  management  system 
AUDEX, which was greatly improved in the course of 2012. 
 
As a concluding remark, let us underline that in the context of the Declaration of Assurance 
for 2011, the European Court of Auditors concluded that "overall the system of ex-post audits 
[…] was assessed as effective"

Page 6 of 48 

 
 
1. 
BACKGROUND 
1.1.  Introduction 
The purpose of this  document is  to  report on the ex-post audit activities in  DG RTD during 
2012,  using  the  numerical  results  of  the  verifications  carried  out  and  providing  feedback  on 
relevant  qualitative  issues.  Some  of  the  numerical  results  and  some  of  the  qualitative  issues 
included in  this  report  also  contribute to  the assurance statement of the Director  General  on 
the legality and regularity of financial transactions in DG RTD's Annual Activity Report. 
 
1.2.  Legal background 
For FP6, the legal basis for the external audit activity is Annex III point 2, paragraph 7 of the 
Decision n° 1513/2002/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council, and Article 18 of 
Regulation  (EC)  n°  2321/2002  of  the  European  Parliament  and  of  the  Council.  For  FP7, 
reference  must  be  made  to  Article  5  of  the  Decision  n°  1982/2006/EC  of  the  European 
Parliament  and  of  the  Council,  and  Article  19  of  Regulation  (EC)  n°  1906/2006  of  the 
European Parliament and of the Council. 
 
The model  grant agreement for the 7th Framework Programme (Annex II, Article 22) states 
that: 'the Commission may, at any time during the contract, and up to five years after the end 
of  the  project,  arrange  for  audits  to  be  carried  out,  either  by  outside  scientific  or 
technological reviewers or auditors, or by the Commission departments themselves including 
OLAF
'.  
 
Similar  provisions  are  foreseen  in  the  model  contract  for  the  6th  Framework  Programme 
(Annex II, Article 29).  
 
1.3.  The mission of the external audit units 
The  external  audit  unit  provides  a  level  of  reasonable  assurance  to  senior  management  and, 
ultimately,  to  the  Discharge  Authority  (European  Parliament  and  Council)  on  whether  DG 
RTD beneficiaries  are in compliance with  the terms  of  DG RTD's grant  agreements.  This  is 
done  through  the  execution  of  ex-post  financial  audits;  ex-post  audit  results  provide  a 
representative  error  rate  and  initiate  the  budgetary  implementation  of  the  adjustments 
proposed including, where needed, financial recoveries or offsets managed by the operational 
services. Thus, the external  audit  function contributes to  the sound financial management of 
the EU funds and to the protection of the European Union’s financial interests. 
In  2012,  it  was  decided  to  discontinue  the  existence  of  two  units  (formerly  RTD M.1  and 
RTD M.2), and to integrate RTD M.2 as a sector of RTD M.1 from 1 January 20131. The new 
mission statement of the new M.1 unit is in Annex I. 
                                                 
1 As the unit was still split into M.1 and M.2 during 2012, they will be differentiated in that manner throughout 
this annual report where relevant. 
Page 7 of 48 

 
 
1.4.  Role within the overall internal control framework activities of DG Research 
& Innovation 
Ex-post audit activities need to be seen as part of the overall internal control framework put in 
place by the Directorate General, together with ex-ante and ex-post evaluations, financial and 
scientific verifications, and monitoring tools.  
 
In  the  area  of  grant  management  for  research  expenditure,  the  focus  remains  very  much  on 
controls  after  payment  (ex-post),  reducing  controls  before  payment  (ex-ante)  as  much  as 
possible.  This  is  a  conscious  decision  with  the  aim  of  reducing  the  ex-ante  administrative 
burden for the beneficiaries, and therefore shortening the average time-to-grant  and time-to-
pay periods. 
 
This  conception  of  the  internal  control  system  is  regularly  under  discussion  because  the 
results of ex-post controls come relatively late in the process of grant implementation and are 
often  being  contested  by  beneficiaries  who  claim  not  to  have  been  aware  of  certain  aspects 
and  details  of  the  legal  and  regulatory  framework.  This  has  led  to  an  intensification  of  the 
Commission's  communication  efforts  towards  beneficiaries.  This  is  especially  important  in 
FP7,  given  the  above-mentioned  decision  to  limit  ex-ante  verifications:  for  example,  audit 
certificates are only required if the grant amount is above EUR 375 000. In addition, the ex-
ante  certification  procedures  introduced  for  personnel  and  indirect  costs'  methodologies  and 
for average personnel costs have not been taken up by the expected number of beneficiaries. 
 
The  field  experience  gathered  by  the  unit  over  the  years  is  increasingly  considered  as  a 
valuable  asset.  It  is  particularly  appreciated  as  a  useful  source  of  feedback  to  operational 
services,  and  for  its  contribution  towards  the  design  of  better  legislative  measures.  The  best 
example  is  the  input  into  the  Commission  proposal  on  the  future  regulatory  framework  for 
Horizon 2020, in particular on issues such as bonus payments or flat rates for indirect costs. 
 
Finally, and as was the case the previous year, the European Court of Auditors gave a positive 
opinion  in  their  Declaration  of  Assurance  for  20112  of  ex-post  financial  audit  activities,  as 
part  of  their  assessment  of  selected  supervisory  and  control  systems  in  Research  and  other 
internal policies.  
 
                                                 
2 Chapter 8 'Research and other internal policies' of ECA's Annual Report 2011, Annex 8.2. 
Page 8 of 48 

 
 
2. 
ACTIVITIES 
2.1.  Annual Audit Plan 2012 and Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) 
The external audit units organised their work on the basis of an Annual Audit Plan (AAP) for 
the first time in 20123. This document included a summary of the actions to be taken during 
the year as part of the ongoing implementation of the FP6 and FP7 audit strategies, plus any 
other  auditing  commitments.  In  response  to  a  recommendation  from  the  IAS,  the  units 
decided to implement a number of KPIs. 
 
The AAP included the set of Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) to be achieved by the end of 
the year. These came on top of the indicators already monitored in previous years, such as the 
number  of  audit  reports  closed  (per  unit  and  per  auditor,  in-house  and  outsourced),  and  the 
number of mission days per auditor.  
 
The  KPIs  discussed  below  relate  exclusively  to  in-house  audits.  Outsourced  audits  are 
contracted in batches, normally of seven months (although they can be as long as ten months). 
When the entire batch is not delivered within the contracted period, an audit firm is liable to 
pay liquidated damages. It is therefore its responsibility to ensure the timely delivery of draft 
reports.  
 
The KPIs set in the 2012 Annual Audit Plan are the following: 
 
Key Performance Indicators 
Target 
Actual 
Number of audits launched in the year vs annual target 
250 
321 
Number of audits closed in the year vs annual target 
330 
308 
Average time between the end of the audit  mission and the first draft 
3 months 
51% within 
of the audit report being ready 
(for 80% of FP7 
three months 
audits) 
Number  of  participations  in  communication  events  towards 
11 
11 (covering 
stakeholders  
12 countries)4 
Number  of  events  organised  to  raise  awareness  of  fraud  prevention 


measures 
Number of audits focused on detecting fraud 
12 to 15 
12 
% of draft audit reports sent to Quality Control which need significant 
<5% 
30,5 % 
changes before being sent to operational services 
 
Results related to those KPIs are reported throughout this document where appropriate,  with 
the two most important ones meriting some further explanation: 
 
                                                 
3 Ares(2012)470849 of 17/04/2012 
4 See section 2.11. 
Page 9 of 48 

 
 
KPI-1 - Average time between the end of the on-the-spot mission and the draft audit 
report 
 
Target: less than three months for 80% of FP7 in-house audits closed in 2012 
Result for 2012: 51% within three months 
Average number of days to produce a draft report: 132 calendar days 
 
This KPI focuses on draft audit report delivery delays, as a measure of productivity. There are 
a number of reasons for this relatively poor performance:  
 
  All the audits resulting from the Common Representative Sample had to be closed by 
31  December  2012.  This  required  concentrating  the  planning  of  their  on-the-spot 
missions during the first semester of 2012, hence unavoidably delaying the drafting of 
these and other draft audit reports. 
  The unit is responsible for a heterogeneous number of  horizontal affairs, linked to a 
varying  degree  to  purely  auditing  activities.  These  affairs  account  for  32%  of  the 
auditors'  time.  Auditors  cannot  therefore  always  fully  dedicate  themselves  to  the 
timely drafting of audit reports. 
  When requesting documentation to be sent before the on-the-spot mission or during 
the  elaboration  of  the  draft  report,  the  degree  of  beneficiaries'  cooperation  varies, 
sometimes  causing  considerable  delays  in  the  elaboration  of  draft  reports.  A  more 
forceful  approach  towards  non-cooperative  beneficiaries,  although  permitted  by  the 
legal framework, is mostly considered as non-viable and not appropriate. 
 
A  management  supervision  exercise5  has  been  launched  to  assess  possibilities  for 
improvement.  Elements  under  discussion  include  a  clearer  split  between  staff  involved  in 
horizontal affairs and auditors involved exclusively in audits, setting up a team structure with 
closer supervision of individual audit(ors) and/or increasing the specialisation of the auditors 
(for SMEs, for universities, for industrial companies, etc…). 
 
KPI-2 - % of draft audit reports which need significant changes before being sent to 
operational services 
 
Target: less than 5% 
Result for 2012: 30.5% 
 
This  KPI focuses on the quality of the output. This  relatively  poor  performance  needs  to  be 
qualified by the following remarks: 
 
  The original target of 5% was set out for the first time in 2012 and may need to be 
reconsidered, on the basis of more experience. 
  As a conscious decision, the unit has reinforced its quality control tools at all stages 
(including  the  draft  stage).  This  has  led  to  an  increased  number  of  quality  control 
remarks, including those qualified as 'significant issues'. 
  Moreover,  the  definition  of  'significant  issues'  has  been  broadened,  leading  to 
including a higher proportion of remarks in that category. 
 
                                                 
5 ICS 9 – see http://intranet-rtd.rtd.cec.eu.int/politique/n-ics/docs/Guidance_Supervision.pdf 
Page 10 of 48 

 
 
This KPI will be revised in the AAP 2013. 
 
 
2.2.  The audit campaigns 
2.2.1. 
The FP6 audit campaign  
The overall results of our audit campaign for FP6 are summarised in the following table: 
Table 2.1 - Overall figures for the FP6 audit campaign  
 

EC share of the accumulated 
Number 
EC share of 
adjustments in favour of the EC 
of 
Number of 
the costs 
Annual 
Cumulative 
audits 
participations 
accepted by 
error 
error rate 
Representative 
Residual error 
Year 
closed 
audited 
the FO (€) 
Amount (€) 
rate % 

error rate % 
rate % 
Up to end of 2011 
1161 
2708 
1,114,322,817 
-46,957,043 
  
-4.21% 
 
 
2012 
40 
126 
60,111,417 
-8,579,090 
-14.27% 
-4.73% 
 
 
Total 
1201 
2834 
1,174,434,234 
-55,536,133 
  
  
 
 
of which, TOP + MUS 
553 
1385 
572,552,778 
-19,699,932 
  
  
-3.44% 
-2.47% 
 
The  FP6  Audit  Strategy  (FP6  AS)  was  designed  after  the  critical  Discharge  procedure  in 
2006, and focused on increasing the number of audits, improving the consistency of approach 
and  the  coherence  of  conclusions,  ensuring  more  homogeneous  audit  policies  among  the 
Commission  research  services6,  calculating  reliable  and  representative  error  rates,  and 
introducing the extrapolation of audit results as a corrective measure.  
 
The FP6 AS originally assumed that most of the errors found during the audits would be of a 
systematic nature, and that 750 audits would be sufficient to eliminate them from at least 40% 
of  the  DG  RTD  FP6  budget  and,  in  doing  so,  to  achieve  the  control  objective  of  a  residual 
error rate of 2% or lower at the end of the multiannual FP6 audit campaign. 
 
The mid-term review of the FP6 AS concluded in early 2009 that the proportion of systematic 
errors was much lower than anticipated (at the end of 2012 it is still only 36% of all errors in 
terms  of  amounts  in  DG  RTD).  Increasing  the  total  number  of  audits  was  then  considered 
necessary to keep alive the possibility of still correcting enough errors to be below 2%. This 
decision  was  again  re-assessed  at  the  end  of  2010;  additional  attempts  to  keep  the  residual 
error  rate  below  the  control  objective  of  2%  were  considered  as  not  cost  effective.  It  was 
therefore  decided  that  no  further  FP6  audits  would  be  launched  other  than  those  related  to 
fraud  and  irregularities  investigations,  joint  audits  with  the  European  Court  of  Auditors  or 
audits requested by operational services. 
 
At the end of 2012, 1201 FP6 audits have been closed in DG RTD and, when including the 
audits  still  ongoing,  the  total  will  eventually  be  around  1245.  Audit  coverage7  from  these 
audits  and  those  undertaken  by  other  Commission  services  stands  at  61%  of  the  RTD  FP6 
                                                 
6 The Commission research services are DG RTD, DG CNECT, DG MOVE, DG ENER, DG ENTR, DG EAC 
and the two Executive Agencies ERCEA and REA. The JUs linked to RTD are Clean Sky (Aeronautics and Air 
Transport), IMI (Innovative Medicines Initiative) and FCH (Fuel Cells and Hydrogen Initiative). The one linked 
to ENER/MOVE is SESAR (Single European Sky ATM Research). 
7 Audit coverage includes both the amounts directly audited and the non-audited amounts received by audited 
beneficiaries from which systematic errors have been removed. See table 3.9. 
Page 11 of 48 

 
 
budget, and the residual error rate is -2.47%. This rate has hardly changed since last year and, 
with  so few FP6 audits  still ongoing, it is  fair to  assume that the final  rate at  the end of the 
campaign will be around that value. 
 
Currently, there are still 42 ongoing FP6 audits. The objective is to finalise the large majority 
of them in the course of 2013.  
 
 
2.2.2. 
The FP7 audit campaign  
The overall results of our audit campaign for FP7 are summarised in the following table: 
Table 2.2 - Overall figures for the FP7 audit campaign 
 

EC share of the accumulated 
Number 
EC share of 
adjustments in favour of the EC 
of 
Number of 
the costs 
Annual 
Cumulati
 
 
audits 
participations 
accepted by 
error 
ve error 
Representative 
Residual error 
Year 
closed 
audited 
the FO (€) 
Amount (€) 
rate % 
rate % 
error rate % 
rate % 
Up to the end of 2011 
441 
843 
195,933,944 
-7,384,644 
  
-3.77% 
 
 
2012 
265 
600 
238,001,866 
-7,829,757 
-3.29% 
-3.51% 
 
 
Total 
706 
1443 
433,935,810 
-15,214,401 
  
  
-4.18% 
-3.23% 
 
The FP7 audit campaign completed its third full year in 2012, when 304 audits were launched 
and 265 were closed. 
 
Representative audits 
A relatively small number of audits are undertaken on a regular basis in order to identify the 
percentage of errors affecting the whole budget.  The beneficiaries to be audited are selected 
using statistically  representative sampling methods and, therefore, the results of those audits 
provide error rates which are also statistically representative.  
In the first years of the FP7 campaign, each research Commission service drew and audited its 
own audit samples. Two of these samples were taken in DG RTD, and their results were the 
basis for error rate reporting until the end of 2011.  
However, this approach created a number of planning constraints and administrative burdens 
on beneficiaries, which were considered unnecessary. During 2011, the external audit units in 
RTD launched an initiative to change the assurance system for research Commission services 
towards  a  unique  assurance  model.  After  necessary  discussions  in  the  CAR  (Coordination 
group for external audit in the Research family), the RCC (Research Clearing Committee) and 
the  ABM  (Activity-Based  Management  Steering  Group),  an  agreement  was  reached  in 
November 2011 to use a single representative error rate for all services from  2012 onwards, 
based on the results from a Common Representative Sample. In this CRS, 162 cost statements 
for audit were selected. 
At the end of 2012, the FP7 representative error rate is -4.18%, based on 136 results collected 
so far out of the 162, just over half of which are from other services. The final rate will not be 
known until the whole sample has been audited.  
 
Corrective audits 
 

Page 12 of 48 

 
 
Corrective  audits  are  selected  using  a  variety  of  criteria,  trying  to  maximise  their  potential 
corrective effect, including preventing errors in future. 
 
The  first  selections  of  beneficiaries  in  the  corrective  strand  focused  on  those  which  were 
known  to  participate  in  many  projects  but  for  which  only  a  few  cost  statements  had  been 
received.  The  idea  was  to  prevent  any  errors  that  might  be  discovered  in  these  early  cost 
statements from appearing in subsequent ones.  
 
We  should  see  the  fruits  of  this  preventive  approach  later  on  in  the  FP7  audit  campaign, 
especially if any of those beneficiaries audited early on becomes part of future representative 
samples.  
 
In  any  case,  preventive  efforts  have  a  diminishing  impact  as  the  audit  campaign  progresses 
and  the  number  of  projects  closed  increases  so,  from  mid-2012,  we  have  switched  to  risk-
based selections. An RTD risk-based audit approach document8 was prepared in June 2012 as 
a complement to  the  FP7 AS.  A comprehensive  set  of risk criteria is  listed in  it, which will 
serve  as  the  starting  point  for  RTD  risk-based  selections  for  the  remainder  of  the  FP7 
campaign. 
 
Several  batches  of  audits  from  two  such  selections  are  under  way.  In  these  batches,  we  are 
focusing on instances of proportionally high subcontracting costs, beneficiaries using the 'real' 
cost  model,  third  party  participants,  requested  contributions  just  under  the  EUR 375 000 
certification threshold and newcomers to framework programmes. 
 
 
2.2.3. 
Additional auditing commitments 
There are additional auditing commitments in the following areas:  
 
  Fusion: the current arrangement with RTD K is to audit all Fusion associations on a 
cyclical  basis.  Each  association  is  audited  once  every  four  years.  According  to  the 
Annual  Audit  Plan,  seven  in-house  audits  were  planned  for  2012.  Due  to  planning 
constraints  and  the  priority  given  to  the  closures  of  the  Common  Representative 
Sample  audits,  three  of  these  audits  (Hungary,  Greece  and  Latvia)  were  postponed 
until  early  2013.  Three  other  audits  (Czech  Republic,  Portugal  and  Finland/Estonia) 
were executed as planned9.  
Fusion  expenditure  was  subject  to  an  audit  by  DG  RTD's  Internal  Audit  Capability. 
This  internal  audit  was  finalised  in  December  2012  and  resulted  in  one  important 
recommendation  issued  to  RTD  M  regarding  the  degree  of  detail  in  reporting. 
Relevant  actions  were  taken,  with  further  measures  to  be  completed  by  the  end  of 
March 2013. 
  Coal and Steel (C&S): a number of audits are launched every year on beneficiaries 
who  receive  funds  from  the  Research  Fund  for  Coal  and  Steel  (RFCS),  which  is 
managed  by  RTD  G.  RFCS  projects  do  not  receive  funding  from  the  Framework 
Programmes  and  are  therefore  not  FP-related.  For  2012  (in  line  with  the  planning 
established  in  2010),  a  selection  of  contractors  was  made  according  to  the  following 
                                                 
8 Ares(2012)732355 
9 The remaining audit (CEA France) could not be launched as the previous Fusion audit remains open. 
Page 13 of 48 

 
 
principles:  a list of all RFCS contract  payments  done in  2011 was obtained from  the 
responsible  unit  (RTD  G.5)  by  the  RTD M.1  back-office.  Only  mid-term  and  final 
payments  (i.e.  only  the  ones  for  which  financial  reports  had  been  submitted)  were 
considered.  The  sum  of  these  payments  was  established  for  each  contractor  in  the 
database  and  the  five  biggest  amounts,  representing  the  biggest  contractors,  were 
selected.  The  contractors  already  covered  by  previous  Coal  &  Steel  audits  were 
excluded from this selection. Each audit covers a maximum of three randomly selected 
projects from each selected contractor. From this selection, two audits were executed 
in 2012 and three were postponed to early 2013, due to the priority given to the CRS 
audits.  The  objective  for  2013  is  to  clean  up  this  backlog  while  at  the  same  time 
auditing the 2013 selection. 
Coal  and  Steel  expenditure  was  subject  to  an  audit  by  DG  RTD's  Internal  Audit 
Capability in 2012, but the audit report is still awaited.  
  Audits on Request (AoR): audits in this category are performed at the request of the 
operational services, and they are normally quite specific in their scope. Following the 
reception  of  such  a  request,  RTD M.1  gathers  detailed  information  from  the 
operational service, which is combined with information from other sources. 
If  needed,  an  ad-hoc  meeting  with  the  Audit  Liaison  Officer  of  the  Directorate  from 
which  the  audit  request  originated  is  organised.  The  project  officer  as  well  as  the 
financial officer is invited to this meeting. The meeting allows getting a clearer view 
of the issue and/or reaching a common position on the measures to be taken. 
Audits on request are included in the category  'risk-based' under FP6 and 'corrective' 
under FP7. 
The full process is customer–oriented. For requests which are not accepted, RTD M.1 
provides  the operational  service with  advice/recommendations concerning alternative 
measures  they  may  wish  to  undertake  in  order  for  them  to  ensure  that  costs  are 
eligible. 
In 2012, eleven requests were accepted. In one case, the need to carry out a financial 
or scientific audit was  not  confirmed and in  another  case the  request  was withdrawn 
by the operational service. 
If the audit-on-request relates to a potential irregularity, the opinion of the RTD M.1's 
'OLAF'-team is gathered before taking a final decision.  Two such cases are currently 
being analysed by the 'OLAF'-team; in two other cases operational services have been 
requested to provide additional information or to carry out supplementary steps to first 
clarify the matter. These cases will be further followed up in 2013. 
The units that request the audits are systematically informed about the decision taken. 
Page 14 of 48 

 
 
  Joint Audits with the European Court of Auditors (ECA):  
 
Table 2.3: Joint audits with the ECA in 2011 and 2012  
 
Audits by ECA 
Joint Audits 

Disagreement on conclusions 
2011 
32 
21 
66% 

2012 
41 
24 
59% 

 
In  order  to  increase  harmonisation  of  audit  techniques  and  results,  and  to  improve 
consistency of audit findings and conclusions, RTD auditors continued their efforts to 
join ECA auditors on as many missions as possible during 2012. The total number of 
joint  audits  during  2012  was  24,  above  the  estimated  figure  of  20  outlined  in  the 
Annual  Audit  Plan  for  201210.  The  experience  gathered  prior  to  2012  showed  that 
carrying  out  joint  audits  helps  to  (a)  enhance  convergence  of  views  and  results 
regarding  the  audit  findings  and  (b)  better  prepare  DG  RTD's  comments  in  case  of 
disagreement on the conclusions. 
 
The procedures for joint audits prepared during 2011 have been updated during 2012 
and are being followed up by all RTD auditors involved in these joint audits.  
 
  Technical  Audits:  The  Commission's  Internal  Audit  Service  recommended 
implementing, where applicable, on-site technological and scientific audits as foreseen 
by  Art.  II.23,  Annex  II  of  the  FP7  Grant  Agreement  and  Art.  II.29,  Annex  II  of  the 
FP6  Contract.  The  objective  of  these  technological  and  scientific  audits  is  to  look  at 
research projects from a scientifically independent point of view, and as a complement 
to the usual project reviews that take place during the lifetime of a project. 
During  the  period  2010-2011,  RTD M.1  closed  two  pilot  technical  audits,  had  two 
requests  for  joint  financial  and  scientific  audits,  and  was  asked  for  support  on  three 
scientific audits.  In 2012, by comparison, RTD M.1 did not receive any new request 
for scientific audits, while only one technical audit was initiated and is still ongoing. 
2.3.  Cross-RDG coordination 
In  2012,  coordination  of  the  common  corporate  audit  strategies  of  the  Research  services 
continued.  DG  RTD  -  as  leading  DG  -  is  the  chair  of  various  committees  for  which  it  also 
provides the secretariat. Under the present governance, DG RTD devotes significant resources 
to  coordination  tasks,  with  the  main  objectives  of  ensuring  (a)  the  co-ordination  of  audit 
policy, planning and operational matters related to the implementation of the audit strategies 
and (b) a coherent and consistent interpretation of audit results.  
 
In  2012,  these  efforts  focused  especially  on  the  first  Common  Representative  Sample  for 
which the results had to be available by the end of 2012. 
 
                                                 
10 Ares(2012)470849 of 17/04/2012 
Page 15 of 48 

 
 
2.3.1. 
Coordination of audits in the Research family (CAR)  
The  main  coordination  forum  is  the  'Coordination  group  for  external  audit  in  the  Research 
family' (CAR). It covers the audit activities of the research Commission services and as from 
2012,  of  the  Joint  Technology  Initiatives  (JUs)  linked  to  DG  RTD  and  DG  ENER/MOVE. 
Chaired by DG RTD M.1, the CAR convened 15 times in 2012. 
 
The large majority of topics discussed by the CAR in 2012 related to the implementation of 
the FP7 Audit  Strategy,  and  of  the Common Representative Sample  in  particular. The CAR 
group also dealt with wrapping up the FP6 audit campaign and with upcoming audit activities 
for Horizon 2020. 
 
The following paragraphs list – by way of example – the topics discussed in the CAR: 
  Planning  of  audits.  On  top  of  the  overall  planning  coordination,  the  CAR 
continuously  monitored  the  implementation  of  the  CRS.  In  order  to  use  resources 
efficiently  and  keep  the  audit  burden  for  beneficiaries  low,  the  Research  audit 
services carried out any audits to common beneficiaries as joint audits.  
RTD  and  CNECT  visited  the  ECA  in  Luxembourg  in  early  2012  to  discuss  the 
possibility  of  ECA  using  the  results  for  the  assurance  they  provide  of  audits  carried 
out  by  Commission  services.  Although  the  visit  went  well,  the  initiative  has  not 
progressed any further.  
The  JUs  participating in the CAR are not  part of the CRS, as their legal  framework 
differs  from  the  one  of  the  Commission  Services.  The  JUs  therefore  continued  to 
follow  their  own  targets  for  representative  audits,  which  resulted  in  a  number  of 
planning clashes with other services. The CAR tried to prevent the clashes in the best 
possible  way  by  exchanging  information  on  the  past,  present  and  planned  audits  on 
the beneficiaries in question.  
  The CAR updated the Common FP7 Audit Strategy. The Strategy now reflects the 
introduction  of  the  CRS  and,  as  a  result  of  this,  the  total  number  of  planned  FP7 
audits under the Strategy for the period 2009-2016 was reduced by 25%. On 12 July 
2012, the Secretariat-General circulated the updated Strategy to the ABM. 
  The  CAR  was  consulted  on  the  preparation  of  the  public  tender  for  the  new 
framework  contract  for  audit  services.  The  existing  framework  contract  runs  until  9 
June 2013. An important milestone in this process was the adoption by the CAR of a 
common audit report template to be used by the external auditors. This new reporting 
template has been in use for in-house audits since September 2012. The JUs will also 
participate in this new common framework contract for the first time. 
  The  CAR  also  dealt  with  numerous  issues  related  to  the  eligibility  of  costs
complementary  contracts  and  bonuses,  self-employed  persons  operating  as 
subcontractors  but  claimed  as  personnel,  EU-supported  national  subsidy  schemes 
(Torres Quevedo in Spain, 'WBSO' in the Netherlands), conflicts of interest, research 
outsourced by SMEs to 'RTD-performers', depreciation, provisions for remuneration, 
changes to cost models (actual indirect costs versus flat-rate for indirect costs). These 
discussions are based on the analysis performed by the Key Words Group (see section 
2.6.2.), and then submitted to the CAR for further debate and endorsement. 
Furthermore, the CAR issued a note on the fair allocation of indirect costs. A list of 
national  subsidy  schemes  (mostly  based  on  tax  incentives),  and  of  their  compliance 
Page 16 of 48 

 
 
with  FP7  grants,  was  published  on  CORDIS  as  a  result  of  the  eligibility  issues 
discovered by audits in a number of Member States.  
  The FP Audit Manual, part of the audit procedures and tools, was updated after the 
publication  of  the  revised  FP7  Guide  to  Financial  Issues  on  16 January  2012.  The 
CAR  added  as  an  optional  document  to  the  Audit  Process  Handbook  (APH)  a 
template letter, to be sent to certifying auditors whenever there is a deviation of more 
than 2% between their audit and an audit carried out by the Research services. RTD 
decided to send this letter in all applicable instances.  
  As  recommended  by  the  Internal  Audit  Service11,  the  Commission  Research  audit 
services  performed  peer  reviews  of  audit  procedures  and  files.  The  results  were 
satisfactory (see section 2.6.1.). DG RTD introduced a procedure for the examination 
of audit reports with significant audit adjustments by the Audits Internal Supervision 
Committee  (AISC).  The  CAR  proposed  to  extend  this  procedure  also  to  the  CRS 
audits of the other participating Research DGs. 
  The CAR  contributed to some  of the Horizon 2020 proposals, and in particular to 
the  acceptance  of  bonuses  as  eligible  personnel  costs,  and  discussions  around  flat 
rates  for  indirect  costs.  The  group  also  considered  the  impact  of  the  revision  of  the 
Financial Regulation of 1 January 2013 on auditing activities. 
  In line with a recommendation of the European Court of Auditors in its 2010 annual 
report,  DG  RTD  initiated  preparations  to  review  the  work  of  the  external  audit 
firms
 in early 2013. The CAR was involved in the approval of the audit programme 
that will guide reviewers during this process.  
 
2.3.2. 
Other coordination Committees  
DG RTD chairs a number of other coordination Committees: 
  Extrapolation Steering Committee (ESC, see section 2.4.1),  
  Frauds and Irregularities Committee (FAIR, see section 2.5.),  
  Joint Assessment Committee (JAC, see section 2.9.)  
  Working Group on Certification of Methodology (WGCM, see section 2.9.); 
  Coordination of relations with the external audit firms, including the Monthly Audit 
Status Meeting (MASR, see section 2.10.). 
 
Coordination  is  also  supported  by  a  number  of  IT  tools  known  as  SAR  (Sharing  Audit 
Results) tools (see section 2.8.). 
 
 
                                                 
11  Final  Audit  Report  on  DG  RTD’s  Control  Strategy  for  on-the-spot  controls  and  fraud  prevention  and 
detection
, recommendation 4.4, Ares(2011)1039870 of 30/09/2011. 
 
 
Page 17 of 48 

 
 
2.4.  Extrapolation  
Extrapolation remains a key component of the common audit strategy because of its essential 
role in cleaning the budget from systematic material errors which, in turn, results in lowering 
the residual error rate.  
 
2.4.1. 
Extrapolation policy and coordination 
The Extrapolation Steering Committee (ESC) has now been working for five years. It ensures 
a  common  approach  to  decisions  related  to  extrapolation.  The  ESC,  in  which  all  research 
Commission  services12  are  represented,  is  chaired  by  RTD M.1  and  discusses  and  evaluates 
potential  extrapolation  cases  put  forward  by  individual  Commission  services.  Its  main  aim 
and mandate is to confirm or deny the systematic nature of the errors reported by the auditors.  
 
The confirmation of the systematic nature of an error triggers a number of coordinated actions 
both for the beneficiary in question, and for the Commission services managing the projects in 
which it participates. 
 
In its 11 meetings in 2012, the ESC discussed a total of 118 extrapolation cases, 101 of which 
were  approved  for  extrapolation.  The  following  table  provides  an  overview  of  the  ESC 
decisions per Commission service. Since 2008, a total of 869 cases have been dealt with, 662 
of which have been agreed for extrapolation.  
 
Table 2.4 - ESC decisions taken in 2012 
 
ESC 
DG 
DG 
 
DG 
DG 
DG 
Total 
RE
Cumulative 
Decision 
ENER 
ENTR 
ERCEA 
CNECT 
MOVE 
RTD 
2012 

Agreed 
13 


25 


43 
101 
662 
On-Hold or  
No 
Extrapolation  0 

 0 




17 
207 
Total 2012 
13 


29 
12 

49 
118 
869 
 
Experience  gathered  by  the  ESC  allows  for  continuous  improvements  to  the  underlying 
extrapolation procedures and principles. Any new issues are often brought to the attention of 
the CAR.  
 
The introduction of the new Financial Regulation, now referring to the extension of the audit 
findings,  will  require  adaptation  of  some  procedures  and  terminology  to  the  new  legal 
framework. 
 
2.4.2. 
RTD extrapolation cases 
Over the last five years, DG RTD has put 377 extrapolation cases on file, of which  nine are 
still under preparation, 24 are on hold and are 'centrally managed' by RTD M.1, 76 have been 
                                                 
12 As of September 2009, representatives from the agencies (ERCEA and REA) have been participating in the 
ESC.  They  play  a  full  role  in  the  extrapolation  process  under  FP7.  JUs  do  not  participate,  since  no  cross-
extrapolation takes place to JU contracts, or vice versa. 
 
Page 18 of 48 

 
 
implemented throughout the Research Family, and 158 are currently on-going in DG RTD or 
other Research DG.  
 
In 110 cases extrapolation did not apply for various reasons: there were no other projects to 
extrapolate  to,  the  systematic  errors  were  not  relevant  in  the  remaining  projects,  the 
beneficiary  had  already  implemented  the  extrapolation,  the  errors  were  not  considered 
systematic in nature, the errors were below the materiality threshold, etc. 
 
Table 2.5 - Current status of the DG RTD-led extrapolation cases (as of 31/12/2012)  
Current Status 
Grand Total 
CLOSED 
76 
ONGOING 
158 
ON HOLD 
(centrally managed) 
24 
NOT APPLICABLE 
(no extrapolation) 
110 
SUBMITTED 
(audit not yet closed) 

Grand Total 
377 
 
2.4.3. 
Extrapolation implementation 
Each  extrapolation  case  can  potentially  affect  numerous  projects  across  the  research 
Commission  services.  The  experience  acquired  so  far  within  DG  RTD  has  underlined 
substantial  challenges  in  this  area,  especially  with  regard  to  following  up  the  reception  of 
revised  cost  statements  and  coordinating  their  implementation.  To  address  this  issue,  RTD 
M.5  (RTD  M.4  as  of  1  January  2013)  'Management  of  debts  and  guarantee  funds'  acts  as  a 
central  reception  point  dealing  with  all  extrapolation  cases  launched  from  13  March  2009 
onwards. 
 
In a number of extrapolation cases, beneficiaries wish to establish a dialogue and to provide 
additional  documentation  and  evidence.  Currently,  24  such  cases  are  'centrally  managed'  by 
the audit unit: the extrapolation process is therefore put 'on hold' and all operational services 
in the research Commission services are requested not to act individually to avoid incoherent 
actions. 
 
Table 2.6 – Centrally Managed Cases by DG  
DG 
DG 
 
DG 
DG 
 
DG 
Total  
ENER 
ENTR 
ERCEA 
CNECT 
MOVE 
REA 
RTD 






24 
28 
 
For  all  DG  RTD-led  extrapolation  cases,  (i.e.  triggered  by  a  DG  RTD  audit),  so  far  9823 
participations  have  been  identified  as  potentially  affected  by  extrapolation.  Among  these, 
1728 have been implemented (i.e. amount adjusted), 5155 are currently under implementation 
and for 2940 recommendations the extrapolation turned out not to be due.  
 
In addition,  169 cases  resulting from  audits of the other  research Commission  services have 
an  impact  on  5272  RTD  participations,  of  which  1465  have  been  implemented,  2253  are 
Page 19 of 48 

 
 
currently  under  implementation  and  for  1554  recommendations  the  extrapolation  turned  out 
not to be due. 
 
Table 2.7 – DG RTD participations affected by extrapolation (cumulative, FP6 & FP7) 

Non-RTD-led Cases 
Total 
RTD-
non-
Implementation 
DG 
Grand 
led  
 
DG 
DG 
 
RTD-
Status 
MOVE-
Total 
Cases 
ERCEA  ENTR  CNECT 
REA 
led 
ENER 
Cases 
Not applicable 
2940 
142 
122 
1050 
181 
59 
1554 
4494 
Closed 
1728 

184 
1063 
181 
35 
1465 
3193 
Ongoing 
5155 
567 
189 
957 
407 
133 
2253 
7408 
Total 
9823 
711 
495 
3070 
769 
227 
5272 
15095 
 
Moreover,  for  the  377  DG  RTD-led  cases,  2201  participations  managed  by  other  research 
Commission services are also being revised as part of the extrapolation process.  
 
Regarding  the  adjusted  amounts  following  extrapolation  the  table  below  provides  the 
cumulative proposed adjustments as a result of systematic errors. 
 
Table 2.8 – Cumulative overall adjusted amounts due to extrapolation 
 
2009 
2010 
2011 
2012 
(-) 
Adjustments  in 

€ -2 707 061 
€ -10 409 202 
€ -16 433 637 
€ -32 477 500 
favour  of  the 
Commission 
(+) 
Adjustments  in 

€ 140 983 
€ 563 244 
€ 1 207 039 
€ 1 479 002 
favour  of  the 
beneficiaries 

 
This table relates to the implementation of extrapolations managed by RTD M.5 (RTD M.4 as 
of 1 January 2013). Therefore only overall information is provided here. 
 
Extrapolation  remains  a  cornerstone of the  Audit  Strategies. Having said  that, the figures  in 
the tables above clearly show that extrapolation is a complex and resource-intensive process. 
 
 
Page 20 of 48 

 
 
2.5.  OLAF cases  
Table 2.9 - Situation of the OLAF cases on 31/12/2012 
Number  of  new  cases  DG  RTD  transmitted  to  OLAF 

in 2012 
Number of new cases relevant to DG RTD that OLAF 

initiated directly in 2012  
Cases  relevant  to  DG  RTD  that  OLAF  dismissed  in 
17 
2012  
OLAF investigations relevant to DG RTD closed with 

administrative/financial/judicial follow-up in 2012 
Total ongoing OLAF investigations (initial assessment 
22                                          (including 6 cases 
/external  investigation  opened,  including  cases  of 
initiated by DGs CNECT, ENER and REA on 
previous years) 
common beneficiaries) 
Number 
of 
closed 
cases 
in 
administrative/ 
financial/judicial  follow-up  managed  by  RTD M.1 
19 
(including cases from previous years)  
 
RTD M.1,  in  charge  of  relations  with  OLAF  on  external  investigations13,  transmitted  eight 
new  cases  of  suspected  irregularities  to  OLAF  in  2012.  In  three  cases,  the  suspicion  of 
irregularities was reported by the operational services in charge of the projects; in four cases, 
the decision  to  transfer the case to  OLAF was taken following on-the-spot  audits performed 
by RTD M.1  auditors or by an external  audit firm.  In one case, an external informant raised 
allegations  of  potential  irregularities.  In  addition,  according  to  our  knowledge,  OLAF 
received  eight  complaints  directly  from  (sometimes  anonymous)  informants  concerning 
potential irregularities in EU-funded research projects managed by DG RTD. 
 
In 2012, OLAF dismissed 17 cases14 relevant  to  DG RTD; four further  cases, for which the 
allegations  of  irregularities  were  confirmed  in  the  OLAF  investigation,  were  closed  and  are 
currently being followed up at administrative, financial and/or judicial level. 
 
Taking into account also the OLAF cases relevant to DG RTD from previous years, as of 31 
December 2012, RTD M.1 manages 22 open cases in total (six of them are cases initiated by 
DGs CNECT, ENER or REA on common beneficiaries), as well as 19 cases which OLAF had 
closed  with  administrative,  financial  and/or  judicial  follow-up,  requiring  follow-up  and/or 
monitoring at DG RTD level. 
 
RTD M.1 has been actively involved in the revision and implementation of the DG Research 
& Innovation Anti-Fraud Strategy and Action Plan, in particular as regards the fraud detection 
part.  
 
In this respect, the unit has intensified its fraud detection activities, notably through extensive 
use  of  CHARON/DAISY  (see  2.8.),  an  advanced  IT  tool  which  facilitates  investigating, 
analysing  and  displaying  complex  information  and  relationships  between  Framework 
Programme data, to select and prepare fraud risk-based audits. Several targeted data searches 
and  inquiries  were  performed  with  CHARON/DAISY  on  the  basis  of  different  risk  criteria 
                                                 
13 Unit RTD.01 is in charge of internal investigations relating to staff. 
14 A matter is classified by OLAF as 'case dismissed' where there is no need identified by OLAF to open an 
investigation or coordination case or when an investigation did not confirm the suspicion of irregularity or fraud.  
Page 21 of 48 

 
 
(e.g. dependency on EU funding, collusion). In 2012, the unit initiated eight fraud risk-based 
audits. 
 
RTD M.1 made further progress on the development and operation of tools and procedures to 
detect plagiarism and double funding in research projects, in close cooperation with the other 
Research DGs. To this end, RTD M.1 operates an IT tool which allows to carry out plagiarism 
checks against a database of FP6 and FP7 deliverables. RTD M.1 has also signed a contract 
with a service provider to carry out plagiarism checks against external data repositories.  
 
RTD M.1 auditors participated in the monthly training sessions organised by RTD M.4 (RTD 
M.3 as of 1 January 2013) to raise fraud awareness among DG RTD staff, in particular project 
and financial officers, and to identify and mitigate fraud risks in RTD projects.  
 
Two FAIR (Fraud and Irregularities in Research) Committee meetings were held in 2012 with 
representatives from the other Research DGs and Executive Agencies to coordinate activities, 
exchange  information,  and  share  experiences  and  best  practices  on  OLAF-related  matters. 
Fraud prevention and detection, and ongoing and potential irregularities and fraud cases were 
also covered. 
 
RTD M.1  is  closely  cooperating  with  OLAF.  Regular  contacts  and  meetings  at  operational 
level  took  place  between  DG  RTD  staff  and  OLAF  investigators  to  discuss  and  exchange 
information  on  specific  cases.  Furthermore,  RTD M.1  attended  three  meetings  of  the  Fraud 
Prevention  and  Detection  Network  (FPDNet).  Representatives  of  the  various  Commission 
services and Executive Agencies participate in this forum chaired by OLAF.  
 
With regard to our objective to reinforce cooperation at European level, RTD M.1 participated 
in  a  Workshop  organised  by  RTD  M.4  in  Brussels  from  31  May  to  1  June  2012,  which 
brought  together  representatives  from  different  Member  States'  Research  Funding  bodies  to 
discuss  and  exchange  information,  experiences  and  best  practice  on  risk  management, 
controls  and  anti-fraud  matters.  In  addition,  several  visits  to  national  research  funding 
organisations took place to explore the possibilities of closer collaboration with these bodies.  
 
2.6.  Management and quality control tools 
2.6.1. 
Management and quality control  
A time recording system was put in place from September 2012 onwards in order to monitor 
time  spent  in  the  different  phases  of  the  audit  process  as  well  as  time  spent  on  horizontal 
tasks. 
 
It  has  allowed  to  establish  that  32%  of  auditors'  time  is  dedicated  to  'horizontal  affairs', 
covering  various  domains  such  as  audit  policies  and  strategies,  extrapolation,  coordination 
with OLAF on irregularities and fraud cases etc., largely explained by the fact that DG RTD 
is the lead DG amongst Research services on audit policy. 
 
2.6.1.1.  Reinforcement  of  the  quality  and  the  supervision  of  in-house 
audit reports 
The process of monitoring audit reports has been redesigned during 2012. The quality control 
steps  at  the  draft  stage  of  the  audit  have  been  strengthened,  with  a  special  focus  on  giving 
Page 22 of 48 

 
 
additional assurance on substance. To that end, a standard control matrix has been introduced 
for the quality controllers to follow.  
 
2.6.1.2.  Organisation of peer reviews 
In line with an IAS recommendation15, a number of top, risk and representative DG CNECT 
audits  were  selected  and  checked  against  the  key  control  points  of  the  RTD  quality  control. 
The same process was followed by DG CNECT when reviewing RTD files. The outcome of 
the peer reviews was satisfactory for both DGs, as no significant observations were raised. 
 
2.6.1.3.  Mentoring 
A mentoring system has been introduced in which newcomers are assigned to a mentor with 
the intention to: 
  answer the many legitimate questions raised by newcomers, 
  facilitate their integration into the unit, 
  enable them to promptly acquire the knowledge necessary to carry out their functions 
within the unit, and 
  guide their first audits insofar as the preparation, fieldwork, reporting and follow up 
are concerned. 
 
2.6.2.  Keywords Working Group (KWG) 
The Keywords Working Group (KWG) is a consultative group comprising 7 members, all of 
them DG RTD auditors. 
The  aim  of  the  KWG  is  to  analyse  audit  and  accounting  issues  in  a  harmonised  manner,  in 
compliance  with  the  relevant  applicable  rules  and  regulations.  The  group  promotes  the 
principle  that  all  Research  services  should  'speak  with  one  voice'  to  stakeholders.  Although 
the KWG is internal to DG RTD, when needed agreement from other Research audit services 
is sought, mostly via the CAR. 
The  main  task  of  the  KWG  is  to  provide  assistance  following  enquiries  received  both  from 
internal and external stakeholders. More than 60 individual requests were processed in 2012. 
This  assistance  results  in  the  preparation  of  replies  or  guidance  notes  on  contentious  topics. 
Any action taken by the KWG is integrated in the keywords database, which is a compilation 
of all positions expressed by the group on various topics. 
The most frequently discussed topics were: 
  Personnel  costs:  eligible  costs  included  in  the  calculation,  productive  hours' 
determination,  personnel  costs  in  case  of  an  SME  owner/manager,  calculation  of  the 
hourly rate, cumulative contracts and bonus payments…, 
  Eligibility  of  specific  taxes:  WBSO  (tax  benefit  scheme  for  research  (NL)),  tax 
'versement transport' (FR), non-domestic property Tax (UK)…, 
                                                 
15 Final Audit Report on DG RTD’s Control Strategy for on-the-spot controls and fraud prevention and 
detection
, recommendation 4.4, Ares(2011)1039870 of 30/09/2011 
Page 23 of 48 

 
 
  Indirect cost methodologies: specific cases (e.g. teleworking), classification of costs as 
direct or indirect, eligibility (e.g. freight costsbank charges)…, 
  Cost  eligibility  and  classification  criteria:  internal  production  of  consumables, 
external  facilities  costs,  subcontracting  outside  EU,  subcontracting  of  minor  tasks, 
depreciation rules (e.g. prototypes,…), teacher replacement costs…, 
  Audit topics: auditable periods, format of auditable documents/receipts… 
Questions  concern  a  variety  of  topics  and  may  go  into  a  great  level  of  detail.  The  positions 
taken are available to all the auditors. 
 
2.6.3. 
The Audit Steering Committee (ASC) 
The  ASC  provides  peer  reviews  by  fellow  auditors  and  is  organised  at  the  request  of  the 
individual  auditor  according  to  the  relevant  procedure.  It  assists  in  the  assessment  on 
substance  of  proposals  for  large  audit  adjustments.  Adjustments  are  considered  to  be  large 
when they are above EUR 100 000 and represent 5% or more of the costs claimed, or when 
they are above EUR 30 000 and represent 30% or more of the costs claimed.  
 
The  ASC  considers  both  in-house  and  outsourced  DG  RTD  audits,  and  it  contributes  to 
ensuring equal treatment of beneficiaries and the coherence of audit work.  
 
The number of ASC meetings and of cases submitted increased in 2012. 
 
Table 2.10 - ASC cases 
Year 
Meetings 
Cases 
2009 
14 
20 
2010 
18 
32 
2011 
15 
22 
2012 
19 
27 
 
 
The  existence  of  the  ASC  was  put  into  question  with  the  establishment  of  the  AISC  (see 
section  2.6.4.).  Yet  the  majority  of  auditors  felt  the  need  for  the  continuation  of  the  ASC, 
since it is comforting for the auditor to have additional assurance of his peers. 
 
2.6.4. 
Establishment of an Audits' Internal Supervision Committee (AISC) 
Quality management was further enhanced by the establishment of the AISC. 
 
The  AISC  Committee  was  set  up  with  the  aim  of  reinforcing  coherence  among  RDGs,  in 
particular now that all RDGs have introduced the CRS. Its specific mandate is to review the 
proposals  made  by  the  responsible  units  just  before  the  release  of  the  Letter  of  Conclusion 
(LoC)  and  the  Final  Audit  Report,  and  ensure  that  they  are  sound,  in  line  with  established 
administrative practices, and consistent with similar cases. 
 
During  2012,  the  AISC  Committee  held  15  meetings  and  41  files  underwent  its  review  (30 
RTD, six CNECT, four REA, one ERCEA). 
 
 
Page 24 of 48 

 
 
2.7.  Collaboration with the DG RTD administration and finance (UAF) network 
A continuous inter-service collaboration has been established to provide guidance and support 
to  the  operational  units  and,  in  particular,  to  the  financial  officers  who  handle  the  FP7 
Certificates  on  the  Financial  Statements  (CFS).  By  doing  so,  a  coherent,  harmonised  and 
consistent  approach  on  CFS-related  matters  is  ensured  across  the  research  Commission 
services. 
In  2012,  the  external  audit  units  have  continued  to  uphold  their  close  working  relationships 
with  the  administration  and  finance  units  during  the  planning  and  preparation  of  new  audit 
campaigns,  during  the  audits  themselves  (in  order  to  obtain  feedback  on  the  draft  audit 
conclusions),  and  after  the  audits'  closure  (for  the  implementation  of  the  final  audit 
conclusions  and  results).  With  regard  to  the  internal  consultation,  whenever  an  operational 
unit  fundamentally  disagrees  with  a  draft  report,  the  hierarchy  is  consulted  before  the  audit 
can  be  processed  further.  Although  from  a  Commission  reputational  point  of  view  it  is 
understandable that this  instruction  has been  given,  this has led to  additional internal  delays 
for a number of audit reports. 
 
Several ad-hoc bilateral meetings have been held whenever discussions on specific files were 
needed.  The  external  audit  units  also  participate  in  meetings  between  the  UAFs  and 
contractors  for  cases  where  the  contractor  continues  to  contest  the  audit  findings  after  audit 
closure.  They  also  participate  in  the  monthly  UAF  meetings  to  present  and  clarify  matters 
linked to auditing and financial issues. 
 
 
2.8.  IT developments 
During 2012, the external audit units focused on the following IT developments: 
 
  AUDEX  (Audit  Management  System)  is  a  web-based  application  that  supports  the 
management of the external audits carried out by DG RTD, as well as the management 
of  the  extrapolation  process  of  the  audit  findings.  During  2012,  it  has  been  greatly 
improved, positioning it as one of the best  candidates for external  audit management 
in the EC IT rationalisation process:  
  New modules have been included to manage the extrapolation of audit results, to 
review  the  work  of  external  audit  firms  and  to  provide  audit  and  error  rate 
dashboards.  
  New  functionalities  have  been  implemented  to  improve  the  management  of  the 
joint audits with the Court of Auditors, the fusion audits, the recording of the audit 
results.  Furthermore,  the  e-mailing  system  of  AUDEX  has  been  adapted,  and  the 
AUDEX services have been aligned to the new ASUR16 requirements. 
  The  integration  of  AUDEX  with  other  corporate  IT  systems  (ASUR, 
CPM/PCM/Force, SAR) has been tightened.  
                                                 
16 Audit and Supervision Management Application. ASUR is primarily an application to manage 
recommendations formulated by the Internal Audit Service, Internal Audit Capability, Court of Auditors, 
external audit unit, etc..., and to support ex-post control activities (external audits, audit extrapolation cases, 
supervision campaigns, etc...). 
Page 25 of 48 

 
 
  The  workflow  reporting  based  on  indicators  and  milestones  has  been  redesigned, 
resulting  in  a  new  module  that  will  replace  the  local  Scoreboard  module  when  it 
goes in production during the first quarter of 2013.  
  The architecture of the application has been redesigned to support operations at cost 
statement  level  instead  of  at  participation  level,  ensuring  a  better  integration  with 
the financial workflows of DG RTD. 
  The security layer has been redesigned in order to allow deployment of AUDEX in 
the Executive Agencies. The first tests have been carried out, but the data migration 
has  been  postponed  until  the  first  quarter  of  2013  when  new  IT  resources  will  be 
made available. REA and ERCEA are expected to become full AUDEX users in the 
course of the first quarter of 2013.  
  SAR (Sharing of Audit Results) is the information system that supports the sharing of 
audit-related  information  within  the  research  family.  It  comprises  SAR-Wiki  (report 
sharing),  SAR-EAR  (extrapolation)  and  SAR-PAA  (audit  planning  &  clash 
management). The main activities in 2012 concentrated on giving access to the JUs to 
SAR-PAA and SAR-Wiki in order to harmonise their audit work with the rest of the 
research  family,  migrating  SAR-WiKi  to  the  new  Confluence  platform,  aligning  the 
SAR modules with the NOAP/Exchange platform requirements,  and performing data 
analysis and consolidation for the future convergence of the three systems. 
In the course of 2012, SAR-Wiki reached its technical and functional limits. Therefore 
DIGIT  has  been  asked  to  make  a  proposal  for  a  replacement  system,  preferably  a 
proper document management system.  
  CoMET, which provides a central web-based IT tool dedicated to supporting the FP7 
methodology certification, was in maintenance mode during 2012. 
 
2.9.  FP7 methodology certification 
The Certification policy for the FP7 Grant Agreements was designed with the aim to correct 
the  most  common  errors  identified  in  the  past,  and  in  particular  those  related  to  personnel 
costs  and  indirect  costs.  In  this  context,  and  in  addition  to  the  Certificates  on  the  Financial 
Statements  (CFS)  known  under  FP6  as  'audit  certificates',  two  new  types  of  ex-ante 
certificates on the methodology were introduced in FP7 which may be submitted prior to the 
costs being claimed: the Certificate on Average Personnel Costs (CoMAv) and the Certificate 
on the Methodology for Personnel and Indirect costs (COM)

The acceptability of the methodology certificates submitted by beneficiaries is decided by an 
inter-service Joint Assessment Committee (JAC), which is made up of staff from the external 
audit units of DG RTD and DG CNECT. In 2012, five JAC meetings were held. 
Page 26 of 48 

 
 
2.9.1. 
State of play of certification files as of 31 December 2012 
Table 2.11 - State of play of all FP7-certification files 31 December 2012 
Eligibility Requests 
Requests for 
Type of Certificate 
Accepted 
Rejected 
Withdrawn 
Ongoing 
Submitted 
Accepted 
certificate(*) 
COM  Average  Personnel 
23 

10 


Costs and Indirect Costs 
124 
74 
COM  Real  Personnel  Cost 
27 
18 



and Indirect Costs 
Certificate 
for 
Average 
N/A 
88 
49 
10 
28 

Personnel Costs (CoMAv) 
TOTAL 
138 
73 
22 
37 

(*) Not all accepted eligibility requests resulted in a request for a certificate. 
 
The  relevance  of  the  CoMAv  diminished  considerably  in  the  light  of  the  Commission 
Decision  C(2011)174  of  24  January  2011,  which  introduced  three  measures  for  simplifying 
the implementation of FP7. The first of these measures was the definition of new criteria for 
average  personnel  costs,  whereby  the  usual  accounting  practices  of  beneficiaries  would 
become acceptable under certain general and less restrictive conditions. 
Thereafter,  beneficiaries  were  no  longer  required  to  submit  a  Certificate  on  Average 
Personnel  Costs  (CoMAv)  for  approval  as  a  prior  condition  for  the  eligibility  of  such  costs. 
Nevertheless, the CoMAv remains as an option, offering beneficiaries the possibility to obtain 
prior  assurance  on  the  compatibility  of  the  methodology  in  place  with  the  FP7  eligibility 
requirements.  During  2012,  the  decline  in  the  number  of  applications  for  Certificates 
continued. 
Prior to the same decision on simplification measures, the value of the work of SME owners 
and natural persons who do not receive a salary could only be reimbursed if they requested an 
ex-ante  certificate  of  an  average  cost  methodology  that  had  to  be  approved  by  the 
Commission. A very low number of certificates were issued, which lead to the situation where 
SME  owners  or  other  natural  persons,  who  did  not  obtain  a  certificate,  could  not  be 
reimbursed because the value of their work was not registered as a cost item in their accounts. 
The  same  Commission  Decision  C(2011)174  of  24  January  2011  established  rules  allowing 
for  SME  owners  and  natural  persons  who  do  not  receive  a  salary  to  charge  flat  rates  in 
accordance  with  the  Peoples  Programme  (Marie  Curie).  The  submission  of  a  Certificate  on 
Average personnel costs is no longer possible for SME owners, but remains available to other 
participants. Compared with 2011, there was  only one request  for a CoMAv in 2012, which 
was accepted. 
The  pattern  of  CoM  submission  remained  steady  throughout  2011.  However,  increased 
activity was noted from beneficiaries who previously submitted applications for CoM but had 
not  pursued  their  requests  due  to  the  existing  stringent  requirements  (essentially  the 
requirements  related  to  average  personnel  costs).  As  already  mentioned,  Commission 
Decision  C(2011)174  made  the  application  process  easier  for  those  beneficiaries  who  use 
average  personnel  costs.  As  such,  these  beneficiaries  became  more  active  and  were  also 
seeking  to  obtain  a  CoM.  This  may  be  due  to  the  fact  that  at  this  stage  of  the  Framework 
Programme, beneficiaries  are reaching the threshold  of EUR 375 000 of EU funding, where 
they  are  expected  to  submit  CFS.  In  order  to  benefit  from  the  waiver  of  submitting  a  CFS, 
they became interested in obtaining a CoM. 
In  summary,  it  can  be  stated  that  following  the  adoption  of  Commission  Decision 
C(2011)174,  the  CoMAv  lost  its  initial  value,  since  it  became  optional  for  entities  using 
Page 27 of 48 

 
 
average personnel costs and is no longer accessible to SME owners and natural persons who 
do  not  receive  a  salary.  However,  the  CoM  -  a  certificate  which  offers  the  benefit  of  not 
having  to  submit  intermediate  CFS  -  has  become  easier  to  obtain  and  remains  attractive  for 
eligible beneficiaries, in particular those who use average costing methodologies. 
 
2.9.2. 
 Inter-service collaboration and communication activities (cf. 2.11.) 
Ex-ante certification also requires intensive communication efforts: 
  Handling  questions  submitted  through  the  Research  Enquiry  Service  on  Europe 
Direct. Approximately 120 questions concerning the certification on the methodology 
were answered in 2012. 
  Internal  awareness-raising  on  FP7  certification  issues,  leading  to  meetings  with 
operational and UAF units. 
  Publishing  certification-related  documents  on  CORDIS  'Guidance  notes  for 
Beneficiaries  and  Auditors'  were  revised  following  the  publication  of  the  revised 
Guide to Financial Issues. 
  Internal training sessions dedicated to FP7 certification on the methodology are given 
quarterly. 
  Regular meetings with National Contact Points (NCPs) for legal and financial issues. 
 
2.10.  Coordination of outsourced audits 
Six  framework  contracts  for  the  provision  of  audit  services  are  available  to  procure  audit 
services  on  FP6  and  FP7  grants  during  the  period  2009-2013,  with  a  potential  market  value 
amounting to EUR 16.5 million and EUR 42 million respectively. They are managed by RTD 
M.2 on behalf of all research Commission services. These framework contracts are used under 
a  'cascade'  principle,  i.e.  when  the  first  contractor  on  the  list  cannot  execute  an  audit  (as  a 
result of a conflict of interest or capacity issues), the second or possibly the third company on 
the list are taken. 
The  framework  contract  for  FP6  has  not  been  used  by  DG  RTD  since  2011  due  to  the 
phasing-out of FP6 audits. Any new FP6 audits are done internally. This framework contract 
expired on 20 February 2013. 
The framework contract for FP7 expires on 9 June 2013. In order to ensure the availability of 
a framework contract after that date, a new Call for Tender was launched in 2012. This new 
framework  contract  will be  used  not  only  by  the  research  Commission  services,  but  also  by 
the  Joint  Undertakings.  The  deadline  for  submitting  tenders  was  23  November  2012.  10 
tenders  were  received.  The  evaluation  committee  expects  to  issue  its  report  by  the  end  of 
March 2013. 
Throughout  2012,  the  batch  audit  campaigns  outsourced  to  the  service  providers  (KPMG, 
Ernst  &  Young,  and  Lubbock  Fine)  were  closely  monitored  by  RTD M.2  in  terms  of 
timeliness and quality. There continues to be a strong dependence on the external audit firms, 
as around two thirds of the DG RTD audit target is achieved through outsourced audits. 
As part of the DAS 2011, the Court of Auditors decided to review the working papers of the 
outsourced auditors, as well as the Commission services' monitoring of them. Although minor 
weaknesses were detected, the overall conclusion is that the monitoring of outsourced auditors 
work is  effective.  In addition,  the Court recommended that the Commission services initiate 
Page 28 of 48 

 
 
their  own  review  of  the  outsourced  auditors'  working  papers.  DG  RTD,  together  with  DG 
CNECT,  have  undertaken  the  first  missions  to  this  end  in  January  2013.  The  review  was 
limited to FP7 files.  
In addition to the daily follow-up of individual audits, this monitoring involves the following 
business processes: 
  Monthly Audit Status Reporting (MASR) meetings chaired by RTD M.2, covering the 
progress of all ongoing batches, technical issues, invoicing and future audit planning. 
  Occasionally accompanying external audit firms on on-the-spot missions. 
  Providing guidance and clarification on specific problems. 
  Using the Audit Review Assessment (ARA) to follow-up the quality of the services 
provided. 
  A batch audit processing manual including checklists for the different deliverables. 
  Normal  contract  management  issues,  such  as  setting  up  contracts,  amendments, 
payments, penalties, etc. 
 
2.11.  Communication Campaign 
Towards  the  end  of  2011,  the  audit  units  prepared  a  list  of  the  10  most  common  financial 
errors in cost claims that are detected during the audits. This resulted in the document “How 
to  avoid  common  errors  identified  in  cost  claims
”,  which  was  sent  to  all  registered  FP7 
beneficiaries  and  was  used  to  launch  a  Communication  Campaign  aimed  at  improving  the 
reliability of the ex-ante certificates and thereby – hopefully – reducing the number of errors 
in  cost  claims.  This  campaign  is  aimed  at  both  beneficiaries  and  certifying  auditors  (both 
private  audit  firms  and  certified  public  officials),  and  is  hosted  by  the  NCPs  in  the  various 
Member States or associated Countries. 
In 2012, training events were held in: 
 
  Sweden 
  Germany 
 Spain 
  Ireland 
  Finland 
 Czech Republic / Slovakia 
  Austria 
  Italy 
 Denmark 
  Poland 
  Switzerland 
 
Additional  training  sessions  are  foreseen  for  Cyprus,  France,  Germany,  the  Netherlands, 
Portugal and the UK during the first semester of 2013. 
Based on feedback from the organisers of these events, the overall reaction to these training 
sessions  has  been  very  positive.  However,  it  is  important  to  stress  that  the  impact  of  the 
training sessions on the correctness of submitted cost claims, cannot be quantified. 
 
2.12.  Other activities 
2.12.1.  Art. 185 Initiatives 
Art. 185 of the EU Treaty foresees the participation of the EU in the joint implementation of 
(parts of) research and development national programmes. Implementing Art. 185  Initiatives 
implies  that  the  participating  Member  States  integrate  their  research  efforts  into  a  joint 
research  programme.  The  EU  provides  financial  support  to  the  joint  implementation  of  the 
Page 29 of 48 

 
 
(parts  of  the)  national  research  programmes  involved,  based  on  a  joint  programme  and  on 
setting  up  a  so-called  dedicated  implementation  structure.  The  role  of  RTD M.1  involves 
carrying  out  the  ex-ante  assessments  required  by  the  Financial  Regulation  (Art. 56)  before 
implementation. 
 
Agreements  are  concluded  between  the  Commission  and  the  dedicated  implementation 
structure. At present, there are three which are followed up by this unit: 
 
1. EUROSTARS 
 
The ex-ante assessment of EUREKA, the dedicated implementation structure of the Eurostars 
Initiative  (Decision  n°  743/2008/EC)  was  carried  out  in  2008.  A  follow-up  audit  of  the 
EUREKA Secretariat was carried out in 2010, resulting in a set of recommendations on their 
internal control systems and a request for re-submission of a revised statement of expenditure. 
RTD M.1 analysed EUREKA's  report on the implementation  of these recommendations and 
on  the  revised  statement  of  expenditure  during  the  first  quarter  of  2012.  While  the  revised 
statement  of  expenditure  was  considered  adequate,  the  follow-up  of  the  implementation  of 
certain recommendations remains ongoing. 
 
2. EMRP 
 
The  ex-ante  assessment  of  EURAMET  e.V.,  the  dedicated  implementation  structure  of  the 
EMRP  Initiative  (Decision  n°  912/2009/EC),  was  conducted  by  RTD M.1  in  2009.  The 
outcome  was  a  list  of  recommendations  to  be  implemented  through  a  jointly-agreed  action 
plan. The implementation of this action plan by EURAMET e.V was reviewed in 2010.  
 
It  was originally  planned to execute a proper follow-up audit in the course of 2012, but this 
was postponed until 2013. The scope of the audit will be twofold: 
 
  The Ex-post verification of the running expenditure; 
  A further assessment of the implementation of the recommendations according to the 
action plan. 
 
3. BONUS 
 
In  2011,  RTD M.1  conducted  an  ex-ante  assessment  of  BONUS  EEIG,  the  dedicated 
implementation  structure  of  the  BONUS  Initiative  (Decision  n°  862/2010/EC).  This 
assessment identified several critical weaknesses and resulted in a list of recommendations for 
their internal control system.  
 
The actions foreseen by BONUS EEIG to respond to these recommendations were set up in 
an  action  plan  and  reviewed  by  RTD M.1  in  January  2012.  In  order  to  support  RTD  I.3  in 
monitoring  the  implementation  of  the  action  plan  for  those  recommendations  that  had  been 
qualified  as  critical,  and  before  signing  the  Implementation  Agreement,  RTD M.1  was 
requested  to  perform  an  additional  assessment.  This  follow-up  assessment  was  performed 
mid-2012.  Its  conclusions  were  reported  to  RTD  I.3,  resulting  in  a  list  of  additional 
recommendations to be addressed to BONUS EEIG.  
 
Page 30 of 48 

 
 
2.12.2.  Access to documents 
In 2012, the request for access to documents (Audit Manual, Audit Process Handbook, Letter 
of Announcement…) by external  parties increased sharply.  Information  on the requests for 
access was coordinated within the CAR amongst the RDGs (see section 2.3.1.). 
Page 31 of 48 

 
 
3. 
RESULTS AND ANALYSIS 
The quantitative results  of the activities of the  external audit units are presented in this part, 
together  with  analysis  and  commentary  where  appropriate.  The  most  interesting  points  are 
summarised below each table or graph. 
 
3.1.  Audit numbers 
This  section  presents  results  related  to  the  number  of  audits  and  of  participations  audited  in 
2012 and cumulatively, with breakdowns by a number of categories.  
 
Table  3.1  -  Audits  closed  and  participations  audited  (2012  and  cumulative,  ALL 
audits17) 

  
  
2012 
Cumulative 
No. 
No. 
audits 
No. audited 
audits 
No. audited 
FP 
Strategy strand 
closed 
participations 
closed 
participations 
FP6 
TOP 


399 
1044 
  
MUS 


154 
341 
  
RISK 
32 
114 
618 
1404 
  
FUSION 


30 
45 
Total FP6 
  
40 
126 
1201 
2834 
FP7 
CORRECTIVE 
212 
510 
640 
1329 
  
REPRESENTATIVE 
47 
84 
54 
100 
  
FUSION 



14 
  
OTHER 




Total FP7 
  
265 
600 
707 
1443 
Coal & Steel 
N/A 


17 
49 
Totals 
308 
735 
1925 
4326 
 
  The target of 330 audits closed set for 2012 was not quite achieved. The main reason for 
this  was  that  fewer  FP6  audits  were  closed  than  anticipated  (40  instead  of  69).  On  the 
other hand, the closing target for FP7 audits was surpassed. This being said, cumulatively 
speaking, the FP7 Audit Strategy is on track. 
  The cumulative average of participations covered per audit has increased since last year to 
2 for FP7 and to 2.4 for FP6. At the end of the FP5 campaign it was just 1.2. The increase 
in  the  cost-effectiveness  of  audits  in  the  last  few  years  is  evident  from  these  figures,  a 
result of improvements in planning and audit preparation.  
  1201 FP6 audits have been closed in the period 2007-2012. There remain 42 FP6 ongoing 
audits so,  at  the end of the FP6 audit campaign,  the total  number of audits will be more 
than  60%  higher  than  the  original  minimum  multi-annual  target  of  750  set  in  the  ABM 
action plan drawn up in 2007. This increase has been due to additional risk-related audits 
aimed at further reducing the residual error rate for FP6, follow-up audits on extrapolation 
cases,  joint  audits  with  the  ECA,  and  the  results  of  the  mid-term  review  which  showed 
                                                 
17 Throughout section 3, 'ALL audits' means all FP6, FP7 and Coal and Steel (C&S) audits. 
Page 32 of 48 

 
 
that  the  share  of  the  systematic  error  'cleaned'  through  extrapolation  was  not  as  large  as 
originally assumed (see also section 2.4.). 
 
 
Table 3.2 - Audits closed of specific types18 (2012, ALL audits) 
 
 
Audit type 
2012 
 
The number of closed audits on request, joint 
Audits on request 
17 
audits with ECA and audits devoted to fraud 
FUSION 

detection were similar to 2011 figures.  
Coal & Steel 

Joint audits with ECA 
18 
 
Audits in non-EU 
28 
For more details on these audits, please see 
countries 
the relevant sections in part 2. 
Fraud detection (OLAF) 
10 
 
Desk reviews 

Art. 185 

Technical audits 

 
 
Table 3.3 - Audits closed, outsourced and in-house (2012 and cumulative, ALL audits) 
  
2012 
Cumulative 
  
No. audits closed 

No. audits closed 

Total Outsourced 
210 
68.2% 
1337 
69.5% 
In-house 
98 
31.8% 
588 
30.5% 
Totals 
308 
100.0% 
1925 
100.0% 
   The proportion of audits closed in-house was slightly higher in 2012 (31.8%) than the 
historical average (30.5%). Cumulatively, in-house audits account for almost a third of all 
audits closed. 
 
                                                 
18 An individual audit might fall into more than one of these categories (e.g. an audit on request in a non-EU 
country). 
Page 33 of 48 

 
 
Table 3.4 - Audits closed by country (2012, ALL audits) 
   

Over 80% of all the audits carried out 
  
Country 
No. audits 

closed 
in  2012  took  place  in  the  10  listed 
DE 
Germany 
44 
14.3% 
countries.  The  percentage  two  years 
IT 
Italy 
41 
13.3% 
ago  was  87%.  We  continue  to  see 
more  diversity  as  the  implementation 
FR 
France 
36 
11.7% 
of  the  FP7  AS  progresses,  which 
UK 
United Kingdom 
33 
10.7% 
reflects 

proportionally 
higher 
ES 
Spain 
30 
9.7% 
participation  of  new  member  states  in 
NL 
The 
17 
5.5% 
FP7. 
Netherlands 
FI 
Finland 
14 
4.5% 
 
BE 
Belgium 
12 
3.9% 
CH 
Switzerland 
10 
3.2% 
SE 
Sweden 
10 
3.2% 
  
Others (EU & 
61 
19.8% 
non-EU) 
Total 
  
308 
100.0% 
 
 
3.2.  Audit results 
This  section  presents  audit  results  in  monetary  terms.  The  most  interesting  points  are 
summarised below each table. 
 
Please note that all figures related to adjustments in this part are estimates that may or 
may  not  correspond  with  the  eventual  financial  recovery  or  offset  amount  applied  by 
operational services19. 
 
 
                                                 
19 For FP6, the EC share of proposed adjustments is calculated on the basis of cost model and instrument type, 
but there might be variations of the actual percentage of EC contribution for specific contracts. For FP7, this 
information is available in central DG RTD information systems, so the calculations are more accurate. 
Page 34 of 48 

 
 
Table 3.5 - Audit results in monetary amounts (2012, ALL audits) 
Results at Cost Level 
  
Audited 
Costs claimed 
Costs 
Costs 
Adjustments in 
Adjustments in 
participations  and audited 
accepted by 
accepted by 
favour of the 
favour of the 
Financial 
Auditor 
Commission 
beneficiary 
Officers 
FP6 
126    164,826,600  
  163,046,761  
  150,549,665  
   -12,642,820  
      145,724  
FP7 
600    478,656,957  
  478,532,965  
  473,908,226  
   -11,893,071  
    7,280,867  
C&S 
9      2,488,663  
    2,508,229  
    2,506,485  
       -1,744  
          -   
Totals 
735    645,972,220  
  644,087,955  
  626,964,376  
   -24,537,635  
    7,426,591  
Results at Funding Level (estimated EC share) 
  
Audited 
Costs claimed 
Costs 
Costs 
Adjustments in 
Adjustments in 
participations  and audited 
accepted by 
accepted by 
favour of the 
favour of the 
Financial 
Auditor 
Commission 
beneficiary 
Officers 
FP6 
126     61,046,901  
   60,111,417  
   51,605,322  
    -8,579,090  
      72,996  
FP7 
600    238,093,805  
  238,001,866  
  235,537,109  
    -7,829,757  
    5,374,402  
C&S 
9      1,493,198  
    1,504,938  
    1,503,891  
       -1,046  
          -   
Totals 
735    300,633,904  
  299,618,221  
  288,646,322  
   -16,409,893  
    5,447,398  
 
  Even  though  in  2012  fewer  audits  were  closed  than  in  2011,  the  amounts  audited 
were  57%  higher.  In  2012,  a  total  of  almost  EUR  645  million  in  costs  was  audited, 
compared  to  EUR 410  million  in  2011.  Of  this  amount,  the  EC  contribution  was  over 
EUR 300 million (EUR 223 million in 2011).  
  The total amount of adjustments in favour of the Commission at funding level proposed 
by the auditors was more than EUR 16.4 million (EUR 12.4 million in 2011).  
 
 

Table 3.6 - Audit results in monetary amounts (cumulative, ALL audits) 
Results at Cost Level 
  
Audited 
Costs claimed 
Costs accepted 
Costs accepted 
Adjustments in  Adjustments in 
participations  and audited 
by Financial 
by Auditor 
favour of the 
favour of the 
Officers 
Commission 
beneficiary 
FP6 
2834   2,456,340,988    2,448,373,016    2,381,374,995      -89,616,743  
   22,913,643  
FP7 
1443    810,767,777  
  810,811,867  
  801,802,169  
   -22,494,380  
   13,534,906  
C&S 
49     27,878,325  
   27,825,888  
   27,295,547  
     -556,129  
      25,788  
Totals 
4326   3,294,987,090    3,287,010,771    3,210,472,711     -112,667,252      36,474,337  
Results at Funding Level (estimated EC share) 
  
Audited 
Costs claimed 
Costs accepted 
Costs accepted 
Adjustments in  Adjustments in 
participations  and audited 
by Financial 
by Auditor 
favour of the 
favour of the 
Officers 
Commission 
beneficiary 
FP6 
2834   1,178,844,232    1,174,434,234    1,131,563,128      -55,536,132  
   12,811,987  
FP7 
1443    433,873,688  
  433,935,810  
  428,311,283  
   -15,214,401  
    9,627,542  
C&S 
49     16,726,995  
   16,695,533  
   16,377,328  
     -333,678  
      15,473  
Totals 
4326   1,629,444,915    1,625,065,577    1,576,251,739      -71,084,211  
   22,455,002  
 
  Concerning cumulative results, the auditors have so far checked almost EUR 3.3 billion in 
costs claimed as part of the FP6, FP7 and C&S audit campaigns.  
  The cumulative amount of proposed adjustments at funding level for FP6 so far is over 
EUR 55 million in favour of the Commission. 
Page 35 of 48 

 
 
 
Table 3.7 - Results by instrument type (cumulative, FP6).  
FP 
Instrument / Project Type 
% Costs audited 
% Adjustments in 
favour of the 
Commission 
CA 
Coordination Action 
1.1% 
2.1% 
II 
Specific actions to promote 
5.6% 
6.5% 
research infrastructures 
IP 
Integrated Project 
45.5% 
44.6% 
MCA 
Marie Curie Actions 
5.8% 
3.4% 
FP6 
NOE 
Network of Excellence 
7.4% 
10.5% 
SME 
Specific actions for SMEs 
1.5% 
7.2% 
SSA 
Specific Support Action 
8.5% 
12.9% 
STP 
Specific Targeted Project 
10.6% 
12.3% 
FUSION 
FUSION 
13.9% 
0.5% 
FP6 Total 
  
  
100.0% 
100.0% 
 
Even though we do not select representative samples per instrument, the volume of results to 
date gives some insights as to whether the incidence of errors is higher for some instruments 
than it is for others.  
 
  In FP6, the instrument with the highest ratio of errors to amounts is the specific actions for 
SMEs.  This  may  still  to  be  the  case  in  FP7,  but  it  is  not  reflected  in  the  table  above 
because the equivalent instrument is managed and audited by REA. 
 
Table 3.8 - Results by instrument type (cumulative, FP7). 
FP 
Instrument / Project Type 
% Costs audited 
% Adjustments in 
favour of the 
Commission 
CP 
COLLABORATIVE PROJECT 
2.0% 
3.3% 
(GENERIC) 
CP-CSA-
INTEGRATING ACTIVITIES / E-
9.2% 
16.5% 
Infra 
INFRASTRUCTURES / 
PREPARATORY PHASE 
CP-FP 
SMALL OR MEDIUM-SCALE 
26.0% 
27.4% 
FOCUSED RESEARCH 
PROJECT 
CP-IP 
LARGE-SCALE INTEGRATING 
25.4% 
34.0% 
PROJECT 
CP-SICA 
SPECIFIC INTERNATIONAL 
1.3% 
1.0% 
FP7 
COOPERATION ACTIONS 
CP-TP 
COLLABORATIVE PROJECT 
3.3% 
4.5% 
TARGETED TO A SPECIAL 
GROUP (SUCH AS SMEs) 
CSA-CA 
COORDINATION (OR 
2.4% 
3.5% 
NETWORKING) ACTIONS 
CSA-ERA-
ERANETPLUS 
6.7% 
0.9% 
Plus 
CSA-SA 
SUPPORT ACTIONS 
9.8% 
7.8% 
NoE 
NETWORK OF EXCELLENCE 
0.3% 
0.2% 
FUSION 
FUSION 
13.5% 
0.9% 
FP7 Total 
  
  
100.0% 
100.0% 
Page 36 of 48 

 
 
 
  In  FP7,  the  instruments  with  the  highest  ratio  of  errors  to  amounts  are  the  support  for 
infrastructures  and  the  large-scale  integration  projects.  This  was  already  the  case  at  the 
end of last year. It is worth noting also that ERANETPLUS projects show particularly low 
error  levels,  although  this  finding  is  based  on  a  small  number  of  results  (only  12 
ERANETPLUS participations have been audited to date).  
  The low incidence of error in the audits of Fusion associations witnessed in FP6 continues 
in FP7. 
 
3.3.  Audit coverage 
Ensuring sufficient audit coverage is an essential concept behind the audit strategies, and the 
key to detecting and correcting as many errors as possible. This section shows the level of 
coverage achieved by the end of 2012. 
 
Table 3.9 - Audit coverage (cumulative, FP6 & FP7) 

FP6 
FP7 
 
 
Total number 
Audit coverage by 
of 
55,879 
48,410 
number of audited 
participations 
5.1% 
3.0% 
participations 
Audited 
2,834 
1,443 
participations  
Audit coverage by amounts audited 
1,174,434,234 
9.9% 
433,935,810 
7.0% 
('direct' coverage) 
Audit coverage of non-audited 
amounts received by audited 
6,050,635,230 
51.2% 
3,041,179,808 
49.1% 
beneficiaries ('indirect' coverage') 
Total audit coverage ('direct' and 
7,225,069,464 
61.1% 
3,475,115,618 
56.1% 
'indirect') 
Total RTD expected EC 
11,827,435,215 
100.0% 
6,197,294,558 
100.0% 
contributions as of the end of 2012 
 
Page 37 of 48 

 
 
Figure 3.1 – Comparison of audit coverage 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  One of the main objectives of the FP6 Audit Strategy was achieved already during 2009: 
to 'clean' from systematic material errors at least 50% of the budget. In 2012, the 'cleaning' 
effect  has  reached  61.1%  and,  with  42  FP6  audits  still  ongoing,  the  final  result  will  be 
significantly higher than the original target. 
  For FP7, audit coverage of RTD cost statements is 56.1%, with 7% of the amounts audited 
directly.  While  the  FP6  auditable  population20  stopped  growing  at  the  end  of  2010,  the 
FP7 population continues to grow over time and therefore audit coverage is only relative 
to  the  size  of  that  population  at  a  given  point  in  time.  With  that  in  mind,  it  is  worth 
pointing  out  that,  proportionally,  audit  coverage  grew  much  quicker  in  2012  than  the 
population  itself:  at  the  end  of  2011,  total  audit  coverage  was  only  35.6%;  now  it  is 
56.1%. 
 
                                                 
20 The auditable population is the portion of a programme's budget which is auditable at a given point in time. In 
FP7, it consists of the cost statements submitted to the EC. 
Page 38 of 48 

 
 
3.4.  Analysis 
This section provides more in-depth analysis of certain aspects and results of the work of the 
external audit units, particularly in relation to error rates, error types, and the most prevalent 
errors at cost category level. 
 
3.4.1. 
Analysis of error rates  
Table 3.10 - Error rates (2012, FP6 & FP7). All amounts are EC share 
FP 
Strategy strand 
Costs accepted by 
Adjustments in 
Overall error rate 
Financial Officers 
favour of the 
Commission 
FP6 
TOP 
     5,156,007  
       -417,735  
-8.10% 
  
MUS 
       453,513  
        -31,213  
-6.88% 
  
RISK 
    33,729,019  
     -8,127,409  
-24.10% 
  
FUSION 
    20,772,877  
        -2,734  
-0.01% 
Total FP6 
   60,111,417  
    -8,579,090  
-14.27% 
Total FP7 
  238,001,866  
    -7,829,757  
-3.29% 
 
FP6 error rates in 2012 were again higher than in previous years. Contributing factors to this 
result were:  
 
  The  proportion  of  proposed  adjustments  over  EUR  -100,000  was  much  higher  in  2012 
(10.3%) than in previous years (3.7%). 
  There was a single result in 2012 which was the biggest proposed adjustment at funding 
level ever (over EUR 2.6 million, more than a million higher than the previous 'record'). 
 
On the other hand, the FP7 rate was similar to last year's. The evolution of error rates year-on-
year can be seen in the graphs below. 
 
Table 3.11 - Error rates (cumulative, FP6 & FP7). All amounts are EC share 
FP 
Strategy strand 
Costs accepted by 
Adjustments in 
Overall error 
Representative 
Financial Officers 
favour of the 
rate 
error rate 
Commission 
FP6 
TOP 
    503,058,279  
    -16,878,495  
-3.36% 
-3.44% 
  
MUS 
    69,494,498  
     -2,821,437  
-4.06% 
  
RISK 
    438,240,333  
    -35,537,669  
-8.11% 
  
  
FUSION 
    163,641,123  
       -298,532  
-0.18% 
  
Total FP6 
 1,174,434,234  
   -55,536,132  
-4.73% 
  
Total FP7 
  433,935,810  
   -15,214,401  
-3.51% 
-4.18%* 
*  This  year,  the  FP7  representative  error  rate  is  the  result  of  auditing  the  first  Common 
Representative  Sample  together  with  the  other  research  Commission  services  (see  section 
2.2.2.). It is based on the 136 results collected so far, and just over half of them are from other 
services.  Another  peculiarity  is  that  it  has  been  calculated  using  a  different  cut-off  date 
(01/02/2013)  from  the  rest  of  the  figures  in  this  report  in  order  to  take  as  many  results  as 
possible into account. The final error rate will not be known until the whole sample has been 
audited. 
 
Page 39 of 48 

 
 
  High FP6 error rates during 2012 have pushed the cumulative overall FP6 error rate up 
again, from -4.21% at the end of 2011 to -4.73%.  
  The  cumulative  overall  FP7  error  rate  is  slightly  lower  than  at  the  end  of  last  year. 
However,  it  is  expected  that  this  downward  trend  will  reverse  in  future,  as  we  have 
reached  the  mid-point  in  the  FP7  audit  campaign,  and  we  are  switching  now  from 
preventive efforts to auditing beneficiaries with a higher risk profile. 
 
 
Figure 3.2 - Evolution of FP6 error rates up to the end of 2012 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  As can be seen in figure 3.2, FP6 cumulative overall error rates have seen a year-on-year 
regular increase. This increase can be linked to the outcome of RISK-based audits: most 
of the audits closed in the first year of the FP6 campaign were part of the initial TOP and 
MUS  selections,  and  audits  from  the  first  RISK  assessment  were  not  launched  until 
February 2008.  
  Although it is difficult to quantify, there is also an effect on error rates from audits which 
have required long discussions with beneficiaries and which are typically closed towards 
the end of the audit campaign. These audits usually result in above-average rates of error. 
This effect is particularly visible in the annual rates for 2011 and 2012. 
  The FP6 representative error rate has been quite stable between -3% and -3.5% since Q3 
2009, when it was calculated for the first time. It is  -3.44% at the moment, with only 13 
FP6 representative audits still to be closed before we know the definitive figure. 
 
Page 40 of 48 

 
 
Figure 3.3 - Evolution of FP7 error rates up to the end of 2012 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   The final representative error rate will still evolve. Based on preliminary results, it is 
expected that it will be higher once all audits in the common sample are closed. 
  For  non-representative  rates,  the  progression  so  far  has  been  downwards.  There  were  a 
number of audits with unusually high errors early on in the FP7 campaign, which meant 
that early rates were higher than expected. However, as the body of results has grown and 
the effect of outliers has been cancelled out, rates have gone down as can be seen in the 
figure above. In any case, in the last two years rates seem to have stabilised. 
 
Figure 3.4 - Error rates by strategy strand (cumulative, FP6 and FP7) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 41 of 48 

 
 
  The fact that the overall FP6 RISK error rate stands at  -8.11%, while the representative 
rate  is  much  lower  (-3.44%),  is  an  indication  of  the  validity  of  the  risk  assessment 
methods employed to date.  
  On the other hand, and although one could expect to see the same effect from the audits of 
the FP7 corrective strand, corrective and representative rates have been very similar up to 
now.  The  explanation  is  that  the  first  selections  of  beneficiaries  in  the  corrective  strand 
focused on those which were known to participate in many projects but for which only a 
few cost statements had been received. The idea was to prevent any errors that might be 
discovered  in  these  early  cost  statements  from  appearing  in  future  ones.  Although  this 
kind  of  preventive  approach  has  been  worthwhile,  selections  on  this  basis  cannot  be 
considered strictly speaking as risk-based, which is reflected in an error rate lower than if 
the approach had been purely corrective instead of preventive. 
 
 
Figure 3.5 – Split of adjustments by type of error (cumulative, FP6 & FP7) 

 
 
(1) 
 
 
A  series  of  analyses  in  2009  on  the  share  of 
systematic  errors  compared  to  overall  errors 
led  to  the  realisation  that  they  were  not  as 
prevalent  as  assumed  when  the  FP6  Audit 
Strategy  was  prepared.  This  resulted  in 
changes  to  the  formula  for  the  calculation  of 
the residual error rate in order to make it more 
accurate,  and  was  also  an  important 
consideration in preparing the FP7 Strategy.  
 
As  can  be  seen  in  figure  3.5,  about  one  third 
of  the  errors  found  so  far  in  monetary  value 
have  been  systematic.  The  proportion  is 
roughly the same in FP6 and FP7. 
 
 
 
 
Table 3.12 – Error rates per type of beneficiary: newcomers (cumulative, FP7) 

  
Number 

ER 
All beneficiaries 
683 
100.0% 
-3.51% 
New participants only 
134 
19.6% 
-8.32% 
Recurrent participants only 
549 
80.4% 
-2.94% 
 
We have carried out for the first time a comparison between the amounts of error present in 
the costs statements submitted by beneficiaries which have never participated in a framework 
programme, and those present in the cost statements of experienced participants. The results 
show that newcomers are more prone to errors
 
 
Page 42 of 48 

 
 
Table 3.13 – Error rates per type of beneficiary: SMEs (cumulative, FP7) 
  
Number 

ER 
All beneficiaries 
683 
100.0% 
-3.51% 
SMEs 
164 
24.0% 
-6.61% 
Non-SMEs 
519 
76.0% 
-3.07% 
 
We have also looked at the incidence of errors depending on whether a beneficiary is an SME 
or not. SMEs appear to be more prone to errors than other types of beneficiaries.  
 
These beneficiary types were already considered as a potential risk factor21, and actions have 
been taken to gather deeper information through a number of targeted audits.  
 
The results shown in tables 3.12 and 3.13 highlight an opportunity to ensure that newcomers 
and SMEs have better knowledge of the programme rules before submitting costs. Even if our 
internal  control  system  is  consciously  very  much  based  on  ex-post  controls,  increasing  our 
efforts in error prevention for those types of beneficiaries is being considered.  
 
 
3.4.2. 
Assessment of the different steps of the control chain 
Table 3.14 - Net correction of ex-ante and ex-post controls (cumulative, FP5, FP6 & 
FP7). All amounts are EC share22 
 
  
FP5 
FP6 
FP7 
Totals 
Costs claimed and audited (A) 
216,647,644 
1,178,844,232 
433,873,688 
1,829,365,564 
Costs accepted by Financial Officers (B) 
212,579,288 
1,174,434,234 
433,935,810 
1,820,949,332 
Net correction from ex-ante controls (B-A) 
-4,068,356 
-4,409,998 
62,122 
-8,416,232 
Costs accepted by Auditor (C) 
209,979,355 
1,131,563,128 
428,311,283 
1,769,853,766 
Net correction from ex-post controls (C-B) 
-2,599,933 
-42,871,106 
-5,624,527 
-51,095,566 
Effect of ex-post controls as a % of all 
39% 
91% 
100% 
86% 
controls 
 
The net  effect  of ex-ante and ex-post controls  is shown above. By  ex-ante, one refers to  the 
corrections  made  by  financial  officers  to  costs  claimed  when  they  are  received,  and  by  ex-
post, reference is made to the adjustments proposed by the auditors. 
 
  This  table  clearly  illustrates  the  fact  that  the  internal  control  system  in  DG  RTD  is 
consciously very much based on ex-post controls and corrections.  
  Ex-ante controls had a bigger cumulative effect for FP5 than ex-post controls. However, 
both for FP6 and FP7, the opposite is true, and the difference is quite significant. The most 
likely explanation for this is that more details were required in the FP5 cost statements so 
that ex-ante controls in FP5 were more effective. 
  These results also raise questions on the reliability and real effect of the Certificates on the 
Financial  Statements,  introduced  since  FP6.  It  explains  why  the  Communication 
Campaign is also geared towards certifying auditors. 
                                                 
21 E.g. being an FP newcomer has already been identified as a risk factor in the RTD Risk-based audit approach 
(section 3.1.6.), Ares(2012)732355 of 19/06/2012. 
22 Positive and negative adjustments, both in the ex-ante and ex-post stages, have been netted off for this table. 
Page 43 of 48 

 
 
 
3.4.3. 
Qualitative analysis of error types 
Each time an audit is closed, it is given two ratings related to the 'Seriousness' and 'Nature' of 
the errors found by the auditors23, if any. By using a combination of these two ratings, a better 
understanding of the incidence of errors and their importance can be obtained, as shown in the 
table below. 
 
Table 3.15 - Seriousness and nature of errors (cumulative, FP6 & FP7, aggregated at 
audit level) 
FP 
  
Nature 
  
Seriousness 
None 
Qualitative 
Error 
Irregularities 
 Totals 
None 
6.3% 
0.4% 
N/A 
N/A 
6.6% 
Small 
N/A 
0.1% 
39.7% 
0.2% 
40.0% 
FP6 
Medium 
N/A 
0.2% 
31.2% 
0.4% 
31.8% 
High 
N/A 
0.6% 
17.9% 
3.1% 
21.6% 
Totals 
6.3% 
1.3% 
88.7% 
3.7% 
100.0% 
None 
5.7% 
2.1% 
N/A 
N/A 
7.8% 
Small 
N/A 
1.3% 
38.5% 
0.1% 
39.8% 
FP7 
Medium 
N/A 
1.0% 
40.1% 
0.3% 
41.4% 
High 
N/A 
0.3% 
10.5% 
0.3% 
11.0% 
Totals 
5.7% 
4.7% 
89.0% 
0.6% 
100.0% 
 
  Most of the adjustments proposed by the external audit units are due to straightforward 
errors of varying seriousness.  
  The percentage of audits resulting in no findings at all is slightly lower in FP7 (5.7%) than 
in FP6 (6.3%).  
  The percentage of audits resulting in highly serious errors or irregularities in FP7 (11%) is 
almost half of FP6 (21.6%). 
  The  percentage  of  participations  where  potential  irregularities  and  serious  problems  are 
found remains fairly low in FP6, at 3.7%, although it is worth mentioning that it was just 
2.5%  at  the  end  of  2012  and  1.1%  at  the  end  of  2009.  In  FP7  it  is  only  0.6%  so  far. 
However,  conclusions  on  the  likely  incidence  of  fraud  cannot  be  drawn  from  this 
table
,  since  our  audits  are  not  designed  with  the  purpose  of  discovering  fraud,  with  the 
exception of those carried out by the M.1 'OLAF' team. When looking only at the results 
from fraud detection, error rates and adjustments are much higher than average: 
Table 3.16 - Error rates (OLAF audits). All amounts are EC share  
FP 
Costs accepted 
Adjustments in 
Overall error rate 
by Financial 
favour of the 
Officers 
Commission 
FP6 
   26,148,056  
    -6,849,689  
-26.20% 
FP7 
      965,133  
      -53,187  
-5.51% 
Total 
   27,113,188  
    -6,902,876  
-25.46% 
 
                                                 
23 'Seriousness' refers to the severity of problems found (NONE, SMALL, MEDIUM or HIGH), while 'Nature' 
reflects  the  character  of  those  errors  (NONE,  QUALITATIVE,  ERROR  or  IRREGULARITIES).  The  criteria 
used for these categorisations are described in section 6.2.1 of the Audit Process Handbook. 
Page 44 of 48 

 
 
3.4.4. 
 Analysis of adjustments at cost category level 
This section provides analysis of the incidence of errors at cost category level. Costs claimed 
by beneficiaries are ascribed to one of a number of defined cost categories. When audit results 
are  compiled,  they  are  presented  and  implemented  for  an  audited  participation  as  a  whole, 
with  results  in  different  cost  categories  being  netted  off.  However,  it  can  be  of  value  to 
consider  errors  at  cost  category  level,  particularly  in  order  to  identify  in  which  areas  of 
expenditure errors are found most often, both in terms of number and in monetary value.  
 
Table 3.17 - Proportion of adjustments by cost category (cumulative, FP6 & FP7) 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Personnel 
21.9% 
26.4% 
43.0% 
34.5% 
23.5% 
38.1% 
14.7% 
29.5% 
Subcontracting 
4.4% 
2.8% 
5.0% 
4.2% 
17.4% 
5.2% 
4.9% 
5.8% 
Other direct costs 
37.7% 
33.7% 
17.4% 
24.4% 
18.2% 
14.2% 
31.1% 
11.6% 
Adjustments to costs previously reported (FP6) 
4.8% 
 
18.1% 
 
8.2% 
 
3.3% 
 
Total indirect costs 
29.8% 
33.7% 
16.1% 
31.4% 
30.8% 
41.0% 
44.2% 
43.1% 
Receipts 
0.4% 
0.6% 
0.2% 
2.3% 
0.5% 
0.2% 
1.5% 
0.1% 
Interest on pre-financing 
0.9% 
2.7% 
0.2% 
1.0% 
1.3% 
1.0% 
0.3% 
0.2% 
Other (FP7)24 
 
0.2% 
 
2.3% 
 
0.2% 
 
9.6% 
Totals 
100.0% 
100.0%  100.0% 
100.0% 
100.0%  100.0% 
100.0%  100.0% 
 
  The  level  of  detail  provided  in  this  analysis  is  limited  by  the  fact  that  a  breakdown  of 
'Other  direct  costs'  into  sub-categories  (travel,  consumables,  durable  equipment)  is  not 
available for most outsourced audits.  
 
  The  monetary  amounts  related  to  errors  in  favour  of  the  EC  in  FP7  personnel  costs  are 
higher  (34.5%  of  the  total)  than  the  number  of  times  we  find  those  errors  in  our  audits 
(26.4% of the total). This is not a new finding, but it remains significant, and even more 
pronounced  in  FP6  (43%  and  21.9%  respectively).  At  the  same  time,  the  opposite  is  the 
case when considering errors in personnel costs in favour of the beneficiary. For FP7, for 
example, they  constitute 38.1% of  all errors but  only account  for 29.5%  of the amounts.  
 
One  can  conclude  that,  when  beneficiaries  commit  errors  in  personnel  costs,  they  are 
generally  more  beneficial  to  them  in  monetary  value  when  they  are  in  their  favour  than 
when they are not.  
 
  The incidence of errors in indirect costs is higher in FP7 than in FP6, both in number and 
in volume. 
 
                                                 
24 Lump sums / flat rate / scale of unit declared / access costs, and Total Funding of the Joint Selection List of 
Trans-National Projects. 
Page 45 of 48 

 
 
3.4.5. 
Analysis of the FP7 representative error rate 
The  Common  Representative  Sample  of  the  FP7  audits  performed  by  the  RDG  family  has 
been  examined  in  order  to  further  analyse  the  error  rate,  which  as  of  1  February  2013  is  -
4.18%.  Each  cost  statement  in  the  CRS  which  has  been  subject  to  an  audit  adjustment  has 
been  examined  per  cost  category,  using  a  standardised  typology  to  classify  the  underlying 
reasons for each error.  
 
The  synthesis  below  reflects  the  consolidated  outcome  of  the  analyses  performed  by  each 
research Commission service on their share of the CRS.  
 
3.4.5.1.   Error by cost category25 
The analysis confirmed that the errors which have the higher weight in monetary terms within 
the -4.18% rate occur within the personnel cost category (41%), followed by errors within the 
Indirect  Cost  category  (31.7%).  The  remaining  27.3%  occurs  mainly  in  the  cost  category 
Other Direct  Cost,  with a  mistaken calculation and/or application of the depreciation charge 
being particularly present. 
 
Table 3.18 – Errors by Cost Category 
 
 
 
 
These results are somehow obvious because Personnel and Indirect Costs are the largest Cost 
categories in terms of budget allocation. 
 
3.4.5.2.  Errors by type 
In an attempt to analyse further the underlying elements that triggered the errors presented in 
the previous table, we also examined the reasons for the occurrence of the errors.  
 
                                                 
25 The Common Representative Sample has been drawn using the Monetary Unit Sampling (MUS) methodology. 
This means that every cost statement in the sample represents the same portion of the FP7 budget, regardless of 
the amounts audited. In order to analyse correctly the composition of the representative error rate in the tables 
below, a weighting factor consistent with the MUS methodology has been applied to each representative audit 
finding. 
Page 46 of 48 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  One fifth of the errors, namely in Indirect Costs, is an automatic consequence of the errors 
encountered under total Direct Cost (in other words, it is the direct effect of errors in the 
direct Cost category, accounting for 20.55%).  
  The vast majority of the errors associated with a lack of supporting documentation relates 
to  issues  associated  with  personnel  cost  (lack  of  contracts,  incorrect  or  irregular 
timesheets, lack of extracts of payroll, lack of invoices for in-house consultants, etc.). All 
cost  categories  concerned, the errors  associated  with  a lack of supporting documentation 
represent 17.44% of the errors. 
  A  mistaken  calculation  of  the  depreciation  charge  or  its  wrong  application  represents 
13.38%  of  the  errors  encountered  in  terms  of  weight,  although  only  2.6%  in  terms  of 
frequency. 
  Errors associated with mistakenly charged subcontracting account for 7.89% of the total, 
but only 1.5% in terms of frequency.  
  The remaining errors accumulated under the header 'Other' refer to several types of errors 
that individually are immaterial. 
 
3.4.5.3.   Consequent actions 
All the errors encountered above and their typologies are already known to our services, and 
these results confirm the outcome of similar exercises made in past years. For this reason we 
continue the Communication Campaign exercise which mainly focuses on the major reasons 
for errors in  FP7, i.e.: errors  encountered under  Personnel,  Depreciation  charge and  Indirect 
Costs. The Communication Campaign is an ongoing process that started last year; however its 
results are  not  expected  to  materialise immediately,  due to  the  geographical  coverage of the 
campaign and the time lag between the campaign and the consequent reporting.  
 
Finally,  since  most  errors  in  Indirect  Costs  are  due  to  root  causes  in  the  Direct  Cost 
categories,  we  expect  a  decrease  in  Indirect  Cost  errors  consequent  to  Direct  Cost  error 
prevention measures. 
Page 47 of 48 

 
 
ANNEX I: MISSION STATEMENT 
Unit RTD M.1 - External audits 
(including Sector Outsourced audits and audit certification policy) 
 
The  unit  contributes  to  the  assessment  of  the  legality  and  regularity  of  DG  RTD  payment 
transactions  by  means  of  ex-post  financial  audits  performed  either  by  in-house  auditors  or 
through  independent  professional  audit  firms.  It  thereby  provides  a  basis  for  reasonable 
assurance  to  the  management  and  other  stakeholders  (including  the  budget  discharge 
authorities)  that  research  grant  beneficiaries  are  in  compliance  with  the  financial  rules. 
Through  close  co-operation  and  harmonisation  with  the  other  Research  DGs,  Executive 
Agencies and Joint Undertakings, the unit takes the lead in establishing relevant audit policies 
and  strategies  and  chairs  the  Extrapolation  Steering  Committee  through  which  a  coherent 
Research  DG  approach  is  defined  on  the  extension  of  audit  results  with  regard  to 
beneficiaries. The unit defines and implements the cost methodology certification function for 
FP7,  contributing  in  an  ex-ante  manner  to  the  legality  and  regularity  of  future  DG  RTD 
payment transactions. The unit manages the relations with OLAF on irregularities and fraud 
cases  concerning  research  grant  beneficiaries.  The  unit  also  contributes  in  an  advisory 
capacity  to  the  developments  of  future  policy  rules  (in  particular  rules  for  participation  and 
model grant agreement provisions) and business processes, based upon the knowledge gained 
in the audit and certification process. 
Page 48 of 48