Dies ist eine HTML Version eines Anhanges der Informationsfreiheitsanfrage 'Annual Reports of External Audit Units, personal data protection, FP6 & FP7 programmes. overriding public interest'.
CONFIDENTIAL 
EUROPEAN COMMISSION 
RESEARCH DIRECTORATE-GENERAL 
  
Directorate A - Inter institutional and legal matters – Framework programme 
  A.4 External audits                  A.5 Implementation of audit certification policy and outsourced audits 
 
 
 
 
 
ANNUAL ACTIVITY REPORT ON EXTERNAL AUDITS  
2009 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Commission européenne, B-1049 Bruxelles / Europese Commissie, B-1049 Brussel - Belgium. Telephone: (32-2) 299 11 11 
 
 
AAR_External_Audits_2009_260210_final_expunged.doc 
 

link to page 4 link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 9 link to page 10 link to page 11 link to page 11 link to page 12 link to page 13 link to page 13 link to page 14 link to page 14 link to page 14 link to page 15 link to page 16 link to page 17 link to page 18 link to page 18 link to page 19 link to page 20 link to page 20 link to page 21 link to page 21 link to page 22 link to page 22 link to page 22 link to page 22 link to page 23 link to page 25 link to page 25 link to page 25 link to page 26 CONFIDENTIAL 
ANNUAL ACTIVITY REPORT ON EXTERNAL AUDITS – 2009 
TABLE OF CONTENTS 
Executive Summary  _________________________________________________________ 3 
1. 
Background ____________________________________________________________ 6 
1.1. Introduction ________________________________________________________ 6 
1.2. Legal background  ___________________________________________________ 6 
1.3. The mission of the External Audit Units __________________________________ 6 
1.4. Relation with the control framework activities of DG Research  _______________ 7 
1.5. The audit campaigns _________________________________________________ 7 
1.5.1.  The FP5 audit campaign __________________________________________ 7 
1.5.2.  The FP6 audit campaign __________________________________________ 8 
1.5.3.  The FP7 audit campaign __________________________________________ 9 
2. 
Activities _____________________________________________________________ 10 
2.1. Types and nature of the audits carried out  _______________________________ 10 
2.2. Cross-RDG coordination _____________________________________________ 11 
2.2.1.  Coordination of Audits in the Research family (CAR) __________________ 12 
2.2.2.  Coordination of other Committees and audit reference documents  ________ 12 

2.3. Extrapolation ______________________________________________________ 13 
2.3.1.  Extrapolation policy and coordination  ______________________________ 13 
2.3.2.  Extrapolation management _______________________________________ 13 
2.3.3.  Extrapolation implementation _____________________________________ 14 
2.3.4.  Extrapolation follow-up activities __________________________________ 15 
2.3.5.  Further considerations ___________________________________________ 16 
2.4. Collaboration with the ECA  __________________________________________ 17 
2.5. Reporting activities _________________________________________________ 17 
2.6. OLAF cases _______________________________________________________ 18 
2.7. Quality control tools ________________________________________________ 19 
2.7.1.  Keywords database _____________________________________________ 19 
2.7.2.  The Audit Steering Committee (ASC)  ______________________________ 20 
2.7.3.  The quality review process _______________________________________ 20 

2.8. Collaboration with the DG RTD administration and finance (UAF) network ____ 21 
2.9. Sharing Audit Results (SAR) and other IT developments  ___________________ 21 
2.10. 
FP7 Methodology Certification ____________________________________ 21 
2.10.1. 
General background  __________________________________________ 21 
2.10.2. 
State of play of Certification files as of 31 December 2009 ____________ 22 
2.10.3. 
Supporting IT tools ___________________________________________ 24 
2.10.4. 
Inter-service collaboration ______________________________________ 24 
2.10.5. 
Communication activities ______________________________________ 24 
2.11. 
Coordination of outsourced audits  _________________________________ 25 
 
 

link to page 26 link to page 27 link to page 27 link to page 27 link to page 28 link to page 28 link to page 28 link to page 31 link to page 34 link to page 34 link to page 36 link to page 37 link to page 39 link to page 40 link to page 41 link to page 42 CONFIDENTIAL 
2.12. 
Other activities (Art.169 Initiatives/JTIs/Agencies) ____________________ 25 
2.12.1. 
EURAMET _________________________________________________ 26 
2.12.2. 
Eurostars and Bonus __________________________________________ 26 
2.12.3. 
Executive Agencies – REA and ERCEA  __________________________ 26 
2.12.4.     Joint Technology Initiative (JTIs) _______________________________  27 
2.13. 
Scientific/technical audits ________________________________________ 27 
3. 
Results and Analysis ____________________________________________________ 27 
3.1. Audit numbers _____________________________________________________ 27 
3.2. Audit results  ______________________________________________________ 30 
3.3. Analysis __________________________________________________________ 33 
3.3.1. 
Analysis of error rates  _________________________________________ 33 
3.3.2. 
Analysis of adjustments at cost category level (FP6)__________________ 35 
3.3.3. 
Qualitative analysis of the largest adjustments in absolute terms (FP6) ___ 36 
3.3.4. 
Assessment of the different steps of the control chain _________________ 38 
3.3.5. 
Qualitative analysis of error types (FP6) ___________________________ 39 
3.3.6. 
Audit coverage (FP6) __________________________________________ 40 
ANNEX I: Mission Statements ________________________________________________ 41 
 
 

CONFIDENTIAL 
 
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 
During 2009, the third  year of the multi-annual  FP6 Audit Strategy, the external audit  Units 
have continued to ensure its effective implementation while taking stock at the same time of 
its results and findings for the preparation of the Audit Strategy for FP7, which was agreed in 
September by all Commission services concerned. The FP7 audit campaign was consequently 
launched, and it is expected to last until 2016.   
 
The FP7 Audit Strategy (AS) is a natural progression from the strategy developed for FP6. Its 
objectives are similar and it follows on the statement made in the FP6 Mid-term review that it 
was delivering its expected outcomes. Certain assumptions of the FP6 Strategy have de facto 
been corroborated by results and those assumptions could therefore safely be applied for FP7, 
such  as  the  fact  that  most  errors  found  relate  to  personnel  costs  and  overheads,  or  that 
extrapolation has an important potential 'cleaning' effect of systematic, material errors in the 
budget. 
 
Having  said  that,  there  are  also  important  changes  in  the  FP7  AS.  Some  are  the  result  of 
technical refinements borne out of previous experience and of information about the auditable 
population not available previously, such as the possibility of using actual costs submitted by 
beneficiaries as the basis for sampling instead of theoretical funding estimations made when 
contracts are signed. Other changes relate to the inherent differences between FP6 and FP7 in 
areas such as  requirements for audit certificates (compulsory in  FP6 but  only required when 
the  requested  funding  is  over  375,000  €  in  FP7),  or  the  number  of  Commission  services 
involved (6 Research DGs and 2 Executive Agencies instead of just 4 Research DGs).  
 
Nevertheless,  the  most  important  changes  from the point of view of the  effectiveness  of the 
FP7 AS result from assumptions in the FP6 AS which have been proven erroneous by results, 
in particular the assumption that most material errors in FP6 would be of a systematic nature. 
In  fact,  systematic  errors  so  far  account  for  only  about  40%  of  errors  in  favour  of  the 
Commission.  This  important  finding,  combined  with  the  subsequently  reduced  'cleaning' 
effect  of  extrapolation,  has  to  lead  in  turn  to  a  revision  of  the  expectation  that    effective 
auditing, extrapolation and recovery will lead to a residual error rate of less than 2%. The fact 
that this assumption is to be nuanced was already highlighted in the ABM Progress report(s) 
of 2009. 
 
Another significant finding is that the FP6 representative error rate has stabilised around  3% 
during  the  last  year.  This  result  compares  with  an  overall  3.8%  error  rate  for  FP5,  and  it  is 
based on an auditing volume already five times bigger than for FP5, an enormous proportional 
FP-on-FP increase in auditing efforts. During 2009 we have also seen a high error rate (over 
8%)  in  relation  to  FP6  RISK  audits  which  speaks  for  the  validity  of  the  risk  assessment 
methods employed to date. This is reassuring as we are currently considering risk assessment 
methods to be used in FP7. 
 
During the last  year we also achieved one of the main objectives of the FP6 Audit Strategy, 
namely to 'clean' from systematic material errors at least 50% of the budget. In addition, 908 
FP6  audits  have  been  closed  so  far  by  the  end  of  2009.  This  is  well  above  the  original 
minimum multi-annual target of 750 set in the ABM action plan of 2007, attained more than 
one year ahead of schedule. 
 
 

CONFIDENTIAL 
Other  highlights  of  the  year  include:  the  adoption  by  the  Commission  in  June  2009  of  a 
decision  on  interim  implementation  rules  concerning  acceptability  criteria  for  the  average 
personnel  cost  methodology;  the signature of six  new framework contracts  for the provision 
of  audit  services  by  external  audit  firms  and  the  successful  migration  to  a  new  IT  audit 
management system (AMS), replacing a local tool. 
 
Even though 2009 has been another busy and successful year for the external audit Units, and 
this  report  provides  much  proof  of  that,  it  is  still  worth  mentioning  areas  where  additional 
efforts will be needed during the year ahead. 
 
There  were  examples  during  2009  of  the  limitations  inherent  to  the  current  governance 
structure  in  the  research  family,  with  multiple  AODs,  multiple  external  audit  Units  and  a 
substantial  overlap  of  common  beneficiaries,  when  it  comes  to  effective  implementation  of 
the audit strategies.  
 
For example, much work continued to be done in the last year trying to clarify issues resulting 
from  unclear  or  conflicting  interpretations  of  the  regulatory  framework.  This  has  led  to 
multiple  consultations  with  legal  Units  and  with  other  DGs,  as  well  as  the  preparation  of  a 
number of guidance notes and other instructions. Given the increased number of audits, it is 
essential that coherent and consistent interpretations are taken towards beneficiaries.  
 
Despite  the  development  of  several  IT  tools  for  planning  co-ordination  purposes  during  the 
year,  these  limitations  will  have  a  bigger  impact  in  FP7  considering  the  increase  in  the 
number  of  Commission  services  involved  and  constraints  created  by  certain  technical 
refinements.  
 
These issues were transmitted as cross-cutting risks to central services of the Commission, in 
view of their potential consequences. 
 
Implementing  extrapolation  has  remained  difficult  during  2009,  as  exemplified  by  the  legal 
proceedings  initiated  by  two  of  our  biggest  beneficiaries.  Two  important  actions  have  been 
taken in  this  respect: a  more  centralised system  for reception and processing of revised cost 
statements in our DG, and simplification measures for beneficiaries, but their effect has still to 
be  felt.  In  addition,  follow-up  reviews  and  audits  on  extrapolation  cases  were  launched  in 
order  to  formally  close  older  extrapolation  cases.  At  the  end  of  2009,  DG  RTD  has  185 
extrapolation  cases  on  file;  for  all  RDGs  there  are  429  cases.  In  total,  5220  DG  RTD 
participations  are  affected  by  extrapolation.  The  increase  in  workload  generated  by 
extrapolation for both the Commission services and beneficiaries, together with the request in 
the EP's discharge resolution for the 2008 financial year to reduce the need for beneficiaries to 
re-calculate  cost  statements  already  submitted,  were  at  the  basis  of  the  Commission 
Communication  of  December  15th,  2009  seeking  ways  to  facilitate  the  implementation  of 
extrapolation through, for example, flat-rate corrections. The external audit Units contributed 
to the elaboration of this Communication. 
 
The commitment to the development of a fraud detection strategy for DG RTD has led to an 
increase in activity in RTD A.4, in particular in its dealings with OLAF. These very resource-
intensive files are bound to grow in importance in the years to come and may have resource 
implications. 
 
 

CONFIDENTIAL 
Finally, it is worthwhile referring to the ex-ante assessment that RTD A.4 carried out for the 
EMRP  Art.  169  Initiative,  as  well  as  its  involvement  in  the  pilot-project  for 
scientific/technical audits. 
 
In 2010, efforts will be equally concentrated on FP6 and FP7 audits with a view, on the one 
hand, to bring the implementation of the FP6 AS to completeness and, on the other, to provide 
a first representative indication of the amount of error present in FP7 at this point, as well as 
correcting any errors encountered as early as possible so that they do not reoccur during the 
lifetime of the framework programme. 
 

CONFIDENTIAL 
1. 
BACKGROUND 
1.1.  Introduction 
The purpose of this  document  is  to  report on the ex-post audit activities in  DG RTD during 
2009,  using  the  numerical  results  of  the  verifications  carried  out  and  providing  feedback  on 
any qualitative issues that may have come to light. As such, it also contributes to the opinion 
of  the  Director  General  in  DG  RTD's  Annual  Activity  Report  on  whether  reasonable 
assurance  exists  that  the  legality  and  regularity  of  the  underlying  transactions  have  been 
respected. 
 
1.2.  Legal background 
For FP6, which is still the major source of work for ex-post audit activities, the legal basis for 
the external audit activity is Annex III point 2, paragraph 7 of the Decision n° 1513/2002/EC 
of  the  European  Parliament  and  of  the  Council,  and  Article  18  of  Regulation  (EC)  n° 
2321/2002 of the European Parliament and of the Council. For FP7, reference must be made 
to Article 5 of the Decision n° 1982/2006/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council, 
and  Article  19  of  Regulation  (EC)  n°  1906/2006  of  the  European  Parliament  and  of  the 
Council. 
 
The model contract for the 6th Framework Programme (Annex II, Article 29) states that:  'the 
Commission  may,  at  any  time  during  the  contract,  and  up  to  five  years  after  the  end  of  the 
project,  arrange  for  audits  to  be  carried  out,  either  by  outside  scientific  or  technological 
reviewers or auditors, or by the Commission departments themselves including OLAF
'. 
 
Similar  provisions  are  foreseen  in  the  model  grant  agreement  for  the  7th  Framework 
Programme (Annex II, Article 22).  
 
1.3.  The mission of the External Audit Units 
Through  the  execution  of  financial  audits  to  the  highest  professional  standards,  the  external 
audit Units provide a level of reasonable assurance to senior management and, ultimately, to 
the Discharge Authority (European Parliament and Council), on whether DG RTD contractors 
are  in  compliance  with  the  terms  of  the  RTD  contract(s).  As  such,  the  ex-post  audit  results 
provide  a  representative  error  note  and  initiate  the  recovery  procedure  managed  by  the 
operational services. By doing so, the external audit function contributes to the protection of 
the European Union’s financial interests. 
The  responsibilities  related  to  external  auditing  are  attributed  to  two  Units:  RTD  A.4  is 
responsible  for  strategy  and  planning  coordination,  in-house  on-the-spot  audits  and  back-
office  work1;  RTD  A.5  is  responsible  for  outsourced  on-the-spot  audits  and  the 
implementation of the audit certification policy.  The mission statements of both  Units are in 
Annex I. 
                                                 
1 Back-office work refers to a number of tasks in support of the auditing function including information systems 
and  data  maintenance,  batch  preparation,  extrapolation,  management  reporting  and  a  variety  of  administrative 
tasks. 
 

CONFIDENTIAL 
1.4.  Relation with the control framework activities of DG Research 
Ex-post audit activities need to be seen as part of the overall integrated control framework put 
in place by the Directorate General. Internal control activities include all ex-ante and ex-post 
evaluations, controls, financial and scientific verifications and monitoring tools.  
 
In the area of grant management for research expenditure, the focus remains very much on ex-
post  controls  after  payment,  avoiding  ex-ante  controls  for  contractors  as  much  as  possible 
before payment. This is a conscious decision with the aim to reduce administrative burden ex-
ante as much as possible, facilitating in general the time-to-grant process. 
 
Accounting  transactions  included  in  the  cost  statements  are  processed  through  the  internal 
control systems of beneficiaries, checked in  FP6  by their certifying auditors, who then issue 
an  audit  certificate.  These  transactions  are  also  monitored  by  the  Commission's  Project 
Officers (scientific and financial) even before the arrival of the cost statements, and thereafter 
checked by means of desk reviews before payments are made. The use of certifying auditors 
is very different under the 7th Framework Programme (FP7). Simulation exercises have shown 
that 82% of the transactions  for which an audit certificate was  needed  under  FP6 would not 
require an audit certificate in FP7. As a conclusion, the internal control system under FP7 will 
rely even more on the ex-post audit activity. 
 
The  control  chain  described  above,  which  operates  before  any  ex-post  financial  audit  is 
carried  out,  has  to  be  considered  in  the  overall  evaluation  of  risk  and  of  the  external  audit 
results.  Close  cooperation  exists  between  auditors  and  Operational  Units  in  the  preparation 
phase of an audit, as well as in the implementation phase of the audit findings, in the form of 
contacts through the Audit Liaison Officer in order to obtain an agreement concerning audit 
findings  and  their  implementation.  No  audit  is  closed  in  DG  RTD  which  has  not  been 
expressly agreed upon by the relevant operational services. 
 
In  2009,  DG  RTD  continued  following  up  the  conclusions  of  the  ad-hoc  working  group 
charged  with  defining  the  scope,  feasibility  and  possible  synergies  with  scientific  and 
technological  audits  (as  opposed  to  project  reviews  and  ex-post  impact  assessments).  RTD 
A.4 carried out the first pilot-projects of technological and scientific audits. 
 
1.5.  The audit campaigns 
Given  the  reliance  on  ex-post  audit  activity,  a  general  approach  was  defined  for  FP5  and 
proper audit strategies have been established for FP6 and FP7.  
 
1.5.1.  The FP5 audit campaign 
For  the  5th  Framework  Programme  (FP5),  DG  RTD's  audit  policy  was  mainly  based  on 
random  sampling,  and  partially  on  risk  assessments.  The  underlying  assumption  was  that, 
provided  that  the  sample  was  large  enough,  conclusions  could  be  drawn  for  the  whole 
population.  DG  RTD  decided  that  a  sample  of  around  10%  of  contractors  would  be  audited 
over the lifetime of the Framework Programme, in order to give a representative picture of the 
population. 
 
It  was  later  recognised  that,  with  the  resources  available  at  the  time,  the  10%  target  was 
unrealistic. At present, there remain only 3 ongoing FP5 audits, which should be the last (with 
the possible exception of the odd audit on request). By the end of the FP5 audit campaign, an 
 

CONFIDENTIAL 
audit coverage of 3.7% of the beneficiaries is expected (compared with the originally foreseen 
10%). Cumulative FP5 results can be found in section 3. 
 
1.5.2.  The FP6 audit campaign 
In  the  three  years  of  implementation  of  the  FP6  Audit  Strategy,  which  covers  four  years  in 
total (2007-2010) and was established after the critical Discharge procedure in 2006, the focus 
has been on increasing the number of audits, improving the consistency of approach and  the 
coherence  of  conclusions,  more  homogeneous  audit  policies  (including  reporting  and 
documenting),  calculating  reliable  and  representative  error  rates,  and  introducing  the 
extrapolation procedure.  
 
The Mid-term review of the FP6 Audit Strategy, finalised in the beginning of 2009, concluded 
that  all  the  RDGs  believed  that  the  corporate  FP6  Audit  Strategy  is  delivering  its  expected 
auditing output satisfactorily. However, a number of issues had to be either addressed or taken 
as a given: 
 
1.  Despite  constant  coordination  efforts,  the  'corporate'  character  of  the  Audit  Strategy 
reaches its limits in the independence of the four AODs.  
 
2.  The  reinforcement  of  the  process  of  extrapolation  has  turned  out  to  be  very  time-
consuming and labour-intensive (see section 2.3.3)  
 
3.  The  increased  number  of  audits  and  the  effectiveness  of  the  audit  approaches  are 
generating  a  higher  number  of  contested  cases,  some  of  which  are  leading  to  legal 
cases. These will require more attention of the Commission services in order to defend 
its financial interests. 
2009 has been the third year of implementation of the multi-annual FP6 Audit Strategy. The 
strategy is now well advanced, as exemplified by the fact that the DG RTD overall minimum 
target  of  750  audits  over  its  four-year  lifespan  has  already  been  comfortably  surpassed  (see 
section 3.1 Table 3.6). 
 
Audit results have shown, for example, that systematic errors do not appear to be as prevalent 
as  originally  thought.  Reviewing  this  important  premise  of  the  FP6  Audit  Strategy  has 
resulted  in  changes  to  the  formula  used  to  calculate  the  FP6  residual  error  rate  for  the 
Declaration of Assurance of the Director General.  
 
This  is  an  important  finding,  because  it  was  the  assumption  that  the  very  large  majority  of 
errors  was  systematic.  This,  combined  with  the  coverage  'cleaning'  effect  of  extrapolation, 
made decision-makers conclude that effective auditing, extrapolation and recovery would lead 
to  a  residual  error  rate  of  less  than  2%.  The  fact  that  this  assumption  is  to  be  nuanced  was 
equally highlighted in the ABM Progress report(s) of 2009. 
 
The RDGs also investigated how to best address this issue from an ex-post view, although this 
may require the revision of the internal control framework as a whole, as well as taking into 
account the costs and the benefits of any possible additional controls, ex-post or ex-ante, since 
it  is  clear  now  that  the  Audit  Strategy  and  recovery  procedures  by  themselves  might  not 
suffice to bring the residual error rate to 2% or lower. 
 

CONFIDENTIAL 
From an ex-post control point of view, additional efforts could consist of: 
 
1.  Randomly seeking non-systematic errors in order to reduce the error rate. As there is 
no systematic way of doing this, this was thought not to be sufficiently cost-effective. 
 
2.  Extending the list  of top-beneficiaries beyond  what  is  covered today, seeking further 
errors of systematic nature, with extrapolation as a potential consequence. In this latter 
scenario,  the  corrective  effect  on  the  budget  would  become  of  course  increasingly 
marginal since the biggest beneficiaries have already been covered. 
 
Given the ongoing debate on the 'tolerable rate of error' and doubts on the cost-effectiveness 
of  additional  controls,  no  clear  decision  has  been  taken.  Indeed,  the  presence  of  a  material 
level  of  non-systematic  errors  on  contracts  with  audited  beneficiaries,  which  cannot  be 
corrected by means of extrapolation, is relevant for the ongoing work for the determination of 
the 'tolerable error rate' in the research area. This technical work is due to be concluded in the 
course of 2010 so as to adopt a Commission communication to the Budgetary Authority and 
the European Court of Auditors (ECA) during the first half of the year. 
 
Audit results have also shown that most errors in FP6 relate to personnel costs and overheads, 
and  that  the  effect  of  ex-ante  controls  between  the  receipt  of  the  cost  statements  and  their 
payment has been limited.  
 
Although these and other insights result from a body of over 900 closed audits, there are still 
250  ongoing  FP6  audits  at  this  point.  It  is  therefore  too  early  to  draw  final  conclusions  for 
FP6, but the experience so far of implementing the FP6 Audit Strategy has been invaluable in 
designing the strategy for FP7. 
1.5.3.  The FP7 audit campaign 
2009 has seen the start of the FP7 audit campaign. Several months of cross-RDG discussions 
resulted in a common Strategy document for all RDGs and Executive Agencies being adopted 
at  the end of September  2009 but,  even though  160  FP7 audits have already been launched, 
the number of them closed so far is too small and not representative enough to say anything 
substantial at this stage. 
 
The  start  of  the  campaign  was  also  delayed  by  the  natural  time  lag  between  the  start  of  a 
framework programme and the point in time at which it begins to become 'auditable'. During 
2008 and 2009, RTD A.4 run four checks at different points in time to assess the 'maturity' of 
the FP7 auditable population, and after the last one of these, carried out in May 2009, it was 
considered that a first set of FP7 audits would be cost-effective and material  
 
Compared  with  the  FP6  Strategy,  the  most  important  differences  of  the  FP7  Audit  Strategy 
are  that,  with  the  creation  of  the  executive  agencies,  the  FP7  Strategy  now  concerns  six 
Commission  services  instead  of  four,  and  that  ex-ante  certification  controls  will  have  to  be 
taken into account when carrying out ex-post audits. 
 
On a more technical level, as well as already taking advantage of the refinements introduced 
to  the  formulae  for  the  calculation  of  error  rates  in  FP6,  the  FP7  Strategy  introduces 
qualitative improvements in several areas. It removes the stratification of the population used 
in  FP6  and  aims  to  provide  a  more  accurate  representative  error  rate  by  1)  taking 
representative  sample(s)  from  the  whole  population,  not  just  one  stratum,  2)  using  a 
 

CONFIDENTIAL 
population  of  individual  cost  statements,  rather  than  participations  in  projects,  and  3) 
considering the actual amounts claimed by beneficiaries in  each reporting period rather than 
expected EC contributions during the lifetime of the project. 
 
Improvements  have  also  been  introduced  to  the  way  in  which  representative  samples  are 
selected and audited. The selection parameters have been brought more in line with those used 
by  the  ECA,  and  the  sample  units  are  individual  cost  statements.  The  possibility  of  taking 
multiple samples over the expected implementation of the Strategy  (2009-2016) is  foreseen, 
as  well  as  a  mathematical  method  for  combining  their  respective  error  rates  without 
introducing a bias.  
  
Increased  efforts  in  cross-RDG  co-ordination  will  be  needed  for  an  appropriate 
implementation of the FP7 Strategy. This issue has been brought to the attention of the central 
Commission services as a cross-cutting risk shared by the RDGs. 
2. 
ACTIVITIES 
2.1.  Types and nature of the audits carried out 
The external audit Units select the ex-post audits in accordance with the methods described in 
the Audit Strategies.  
 
For FP6, this means according to three strategic strands: 
 
  TOP: this is a selection of the beneficiaries which receive the most money from the 
Commission. The DG RTD list of top beneficiaries consists of 243 contractors which 
receive 50% of the FP6 budget managed by DG RTD. All beneficiaries in this sample 
have been audited at least once (on at least three participations) and, where necessary, 
further  audits  are  carried  out  in  order  to  confirm  the  presence  or  not  of  systematic 
material errors for each beneficiary. 
  MUS:  using  the  monetary  unit  sampling  technique  to  ensure  statistical 
representativity,  a  selection  of  161²  beneficiaries  was  made  from  the  non-TOP  DG 
RTD population. One audit is carried out for each of them.  
  RISK: a number of different criteria have been used to select the beneficiaries in this 
strand. The audits of this strand are intended to have a corrective effect on the amount 
of errors present in the DG RTD population.  The results of these audits are not taken 
into account for the calculation of the representative error rate. 
For FP7, the strategic strands are: 
  REPRESENTATIVE:  using  statistically  representative  sampling  methods,  a  number 
of  audits  will  be  undertaken  for  the  purpose  of  accurately  identifying  the  amount  of 
error present in the population (i.e. representative error rate).   
  CORRECTIVE: audits will be selected using a variety of criteria trying to maximise 
their potential corrective effect. 
In addition, there are additional auditing commitments in the following areas:  
 
  FUSION: the current arrangement with RTD J is to audit all FUSION associations on 
a  cyclical  basis.  The  intention  is  to  conduct  one  audit  per  association  at  least  every 
three years. 
 

CONFIDENTIAL 
  COAL AND STEEL (C&S): in 2009 a small number of audits were again launched on 
beneficiaries  who receive  funds  from  the Research  Fund for Coal  and  Steel  (RFCS), 
which  is  managed  by  RTD  K.  Following  an  agreement  to  make  the  selection  of 
beneficiaries more representative in the future, a wider sample will be taken in 2010. 
RFCS  contracts  do  not  follow  the  provisions  of  the  Framework  Programmes,  and 
therefore these audits are considered as not FP-related.  
  AUDITS ON REQUEST: audits in this category are performed at the request of the 
operational  services,  and  they  are  normally  quite  specific  in  their  scope.  These 
requests are discussed in regular meetings, and not all are accepted. Usually, they are 
counted as risk-related audits under FP6 or corrective audits under FP7. 
In 2009, comparable with previous years, four meetings were held to deliberate audit 
requests. These meetings are attended by members of RTD A.4 and the Audit Liaison 
Officers of those Directorates who requested audits.  
 
26  audit  requests  were  put  forward  to  RTD  A.4.  In  13  (out  of  26)  cases,  the  audit 
request  was  accepted  and  the  related  audit  mission  integrated  into  the  usual  audit 
planning of RTD  A.4. Priority is  given to  these  audits and, hence,  more  than half of 
the accepted audits have been carried out and ended in 2009.  
 
In  4  (out  of  26)  cases,  the  need  to  carry  out  a  financial  or  scientific  audit  was  not 
recognized  or,  in  one  case,  the  audit  request  was  withdrawn.  In  9  further  cases,  the 
audit  request  was  considered  either  incomplete  or  premature,  so  that  these  audit 
requests are considered 'on hold' and can be renewed at any time.  
 
The figures  are in  line  with  previous  years.  It  is to  be noted that for the  first  time,  2 
Scientific  Audits  have  been  carried  with  participation  of  Unit  A.4  in  2009  (these  are 
included in the 13 accepted audit requests). 
  Joint audits with the ECA (see section 2.4). 
  TECHNICAL AUDITS: a new DG RTD-wide procedure for the undertaking of audits 
of a scientific nature, with or without the involvement of the financial audit Units, has 
been developed by RTD A.6. The first pilot-projects have been launched during 2009.  
  Some beneficiaries can be in non-EU countries ('third country audits'), although there 
is  no  specific  commitment  to  do  a  certain  number  of  these  and  they  are  done  when 
they are part of wider selections. 
Audits can be either done by the European Commission auditors (in-house) or outsourced to 
an  external  audit  firm  (batch),  under  a  framework  contract.  The  aim  is  to  have  25%  of  the 
audits carried out in-house. For FP7, there has been a change of main supplier for the external 
audits.  
 
2.2.  Cross-RDG coordination 
The  adoption  of  common  corporate  Audit  Strategies  means  closer  coordination  between  the 
RDGs in a significant number of areas. DG RTD is the chair of a number of committees, and 
also  provides  the  secretariat.  This  requires  a  significant  investment  of  resources,  given  the 
present  RDG  governance.  Indeed,  DG  RTD  felt  that  the  Commission  is  running  a  serious 
cross-cutting  risk  in  relation  to  the  co-ordination  of  audit  planning  and  a  coherent  and 
 

CONFIDENTIAL 
consistent  presentation  of  audit  results.  This  cross-cutting  risk  has  been  brought  to  the 
attention of the central services during the recent risk assessment exercise.  
 
2.2.1.  Coordination of Audits in the Research family (CAR) 
The RDGs have established a 'Coordination group for External Audit in the Research family' 
(CAR) in order to coordinate strategic and policy matters and to ensure a coherent approach to 
contractors  and  to  the  external  audit  firms.  Chaired  by  RTD  A.4,  the  CAR  convenes  on 
average once every three weeks. 
  
The scope of the group is to realise: 
 
  Common positions and communication towards internal and external parties. 
  Common guidelines to auditors on specific audit issues requiring an interpretation. 
  Update  of  the  audit  related  common  documents  such  as:  Audit  Strategy,  Audit 
Manual, Audit Certificate Handbook and Guidance Notes. 
  Agreement  on  professional  issues  such  as  selection  methodologies  and 
tender/procurement  procedures,  technical  audit  procedures,  issues  related  to  the 
extrapolation policy, IT modules facilitating co-ordination. 
  Common training for staff/external auditors. 
In  2009,  the  CAR  met  18  times.    The  focus  throughout  2009  was  on  the  finalisation  of  the 
FP6 Audit Strategy and the preparation of the FP7 Audit Strategy.  
 
The  CAR  further  adopted  five  Guidance  Notes  on  audit  issues  and  several  updates  of  the 
common audit documents.   
 
2.2.2. 
Coordination of other Committees and audit reference documents 
In addition  to  the  CAR, DG RTD chairs and coordinates a number of other Committees,  all 
with  a  view  to  ensure  cross-RDG  coordination.  These  committees  are  the  Extrapolation 
Steering  Committee  (ESC,  see  section  2.3),  the Frauds  and  Irregularities  Committee  (FAIR, 
see  section  2.6),  the  coordination  of  relations  with  the  external  audit  firms,  including  the 
Monthly  Audit  Status  Meeting  (MASR,  see  section  2.11),  the  Joint  Assessment  Committee 
(JAC, see section 2.10.1.) and the Working Group on Certification of Methodology (WGCM, 
see section 2.10). 
 
DG RTD is also in the lead for coordinating the information and documents on audit-related 
matters to be provided by all RDGs to the ABM. 
 
Since 2008, all RDGs are using the common 'Audit Process Handbook' for FP6 audits. This 
handbook contains all the procedural steps and the templates relating to the performance of an 
external audit with own resources. The objective is to ensure a common approach for all audit 
tasks and the application of generally accepted auditing standards. 
 
In 2009, the handbook has been updated regularly. After the summer break a working group 
involving  all  Research  DGs  and  the  two  executive  agencies  was  created  to  update  the 
 

CONFIDENTIAL 
handbook  for  FP7  audits.  Several  documents  are  already  available  but  work  continues. 
Updates are posted on the SAR Wiki2 as and when they occur. 
 
Furthermore,  for  FP6,  the  Audit  Certificate  Handbook  (for  internal  use)  and  the  Audit 
Certificate  Guidance  Notes  (a  guidance  tool  for  external  certifiers  of  audit  certificates)  are 
available.  For  FP7  'Guidance  notes  for  beneficiaries  and  auditors  on  certificates  issued  by 
external auditors' have been posted on the Cordis website. 
 
2.3.  Extrapolation 
Extrapolation is a key component of the common audit strategies because , its essential role in 
'cleaning' the budget from systematic material errors must have its maximum effect in order to 
see a significant reduction from the representative error rate to the residual error rate. 
 
2.3.1. 
Extrapolation policy and coordination 
In the very beginning, the implementation of extrapolation was carried out separately by each 
RDG. This resulted in different practices in the four RDGs towards common contractors. 
 
Therefore, in February 2008, the Extrapolation Steering Committee (ESC) was set up in order 
to  ensure  a  common  approach.  The  ESC,  in  which  all  RDGs  are  represented,  discusses  and 
evaluates potential extrapolation cases put forward by an individual RDG or as a result of an 
audit of the ECA. ESC meetings are organised and chaired by RTD.A.4. They take place on a 
regular basis. If a case receives the approval of the ESC, a number of procedures are launched 
to  implement  the  extrapolation  for  all  contracts  of  all  research  family  DGs  for  a  specific 
contractor. 
 
As of September 2009, representatives from the agencies (ERCEA and REA) are participating 
in the ESC. They play a full role in the extrapolation process under FP7. 
 
2.3.2. 
Extrapolation management 
During  2009,  the  ESC  met  10  times.  A  total  of  217  extrapolation  cases  were  discussed  of 
which  183  were  approved.  Since  the  start  of  the  ESC  in  2008,  in  total  429  cases  have  been 
discussed,  of  which  323  have  been  agreed.  This  highlights  the  in-depth  analysis  undertaken 
prior to launching the procedure for any extrapolation case. The following table provides an 
overview of the ESC cases per RDG: 
 
Table 2.1 - ESC results in 2009 (as of 31/12/2009) 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cumulated 
Agreed 
19 
43 
75 
46 
183 
 
323 
No Extrapolation 



10 
31 
 
49 
On Hold 


  
  

 

Other* 
  

  
  

 
55 
Total 2009 
28 
52 
81 
56 
217 
 
  
Total cumulated 
72 
96 
185 
76 
429 
 
429 
* Before ESC cases or under preparation cases 
                                                 
2 Web-based collaborative tool for the exchange of information amongst the external audit services of the 
Research DGs. 
 

CONFIDENTIAL 
 
So far, DG RTD has put 185 extrapolation cases on file, of which 107 are currently ongoing, 
12 are under preparation, 17 have been suspended and are centrally managed by RTD A.4 and 
RTD A.5, 7 have been closed, and for 42 extrapolation appeared during the process not to be 
due (no other cost periods to extrapolate to, update of audit results, etc.). 
 
Table 2.2 - Current status of the DG RTD extrapolation cases 2009 (as of 31/12/09)  
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cancelled 
11 
20 
11 
42 
Closed 




On Hold (centrally managed) 



17 
Ongoing 

49 
52 
107 
Submitted 
  

10 
12 
Grand Total 
22 
82 
81 
185 
 
This overview shows that extrapolation frequency has remained stable over 2008 and 2009. 
 
2.3.3. 
Extrapolation implementation 
As each individual extrapolation case can potentially affect many projects across a number of 
RTD  Directorates,  ongoing  extrapolation  cases  require  a  significant  amount  of  effort, 
attention and supervision by the operational services responsible for the follow-up actions, as 
well  as  by  the  external  audit  Units.  The  experience  acquired  so  far  has  underlined  the 
challenges  in  this  area,  especially  with  regard  to  following  up  the  reception  of  revised  cost 
statements. 
 
To address this issue, a new Unit (RTD R.7 'Management of debts and guarantee funds') was 
created to act as a central reception point and deals with all extrapolation cases launched as of 
13/03/2009. In addition, to improve the coordination of the implementation process, this new 
service  is  in  charge  of  monitoring  those  beneficiaries  that  do  not  react  promptly  to 
Commission  requests  through  reminder  letters,  or  those  who  request  an  extension  of 
deadlines. 
 
Experience shows that cases where systematic errors can be extrapolated without any further 
information  from  the  contractor  are  a  minority.  In  some  cases,  the  contractor  wishes  to 
establish a dialogue and  to  provide additional documentation and evidence. Currently,  17 of 
such cases, usually for larger beneficiaries, are centrally managed by the audit Units. 
 
For  all  DG  RTD-led  extrapolation  cases,  (i.e.  initiated  by  DG  RTD),  so  far  4567 
participations have been identified as potentially affected by the application of extrapolation. 
Among  these,  194  have  been  implemented  (i.e.  amount  due  adjusted),  1963  are  currently 
under  implementation,  1959  relate  to  the  extrapolation  cases  currently  'on  hold'  (i.e.  the 
centrally  managed cases) and  451 have been cancelled (since according to the contractor no 
extrapolation is required). 
 
In  addition,  54  cases  initiated  by  other  RDGs  have  an  impact  on  DG  RTD  because  the 
beneficiaries  participate  in  653  RTD  projects,  of  which  14  have  been  implemented,  615  are 
currently  under  implementation  and  24  relate  to  cases  for  which  the  audit  results  are  under 
discussion ('on hold' cases). 
 
 

CONFIDENTIAL 
Table 2.3 – DG RTD contracts affected by extrapolation 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
On Hold 
1959 
 
24 
 
24 
1983 
Closed 
194 



14 
208 
Ongoing 
1963 
104 
474 
37 
615 
2578 
Cancelled 
451 
 
 
 
 
451 
Total 
4567 
108 
505 
40 
653 
5220 
 
Moreover for 70 RTD-led cases, 1056 participations managed by other RDGs are equally to 
be revised in the extrapolation process.  
 
A clear step forward to better coordinating the extrapolation process across the four RDGs has 
been  made  through  the  introduction  of  the  first  release  of  SAR-EAR  (cross-RDG 
extrapolation IT tool launched in September 2009) (see section 2.9). 
 
2.3.4. 
Extrapolation follow-up activities 
During  2008,  and  on  the  initiative  of  RTD  A.4,  6  extrapolation  follow-up  meetings  were 
organised  in  order  to  ensure  better  coordination  within  DG  RTD.  Given  the  decentralised 
structure  in  DG  RTD  financial  management,  this  has  been  an  essential  initiative.  During 
another 2 meetings  in  2009, representatives of operational  RTD  Directorates responsible for 
the  implementation  of  extrapolation  have  discussed  the  status  of  ongoing  cases  and  any 
further actions to be taken, based on the latest information collected by all stakeholders. The 
meetings  also  allow  for  useful  discussions  of  practical  issues  (i.e.  registering  and  analysing 
revised cost statements, development of software tools to monitor follow-up, issues relating to 
the  recovery  procedure,  possibility  of  global  recovery  orders,  legal  issues,  etc.).  The  last 
meeting chaired by RTD A.4 took place in July 2009. From September 2009 onwards, these 
coordination tasks  have  been handed over to RTD R.7  which  initiated a number of  working 
groups involving UAFs . 
 
Monitoring  the  actual  implementation  of  the  extrapolation  is  carried  out  by  RTD  R  via  the 
ASUR-EXTRA  tool  where  the  services  encode  the  actual  implementation  information  for 
each  participation  involved.  The  audit  Units  base  themselves  on  this  information  to  further 
decide on any appropriate follow-up action to be undertaken. 
 
RTD  R.7  did  not  take  over  the  management  of  the  extrapolation  cases  of  before  13  March 
2009,so  a  follow-up  campaign  was  initiated  in  September  2009  on  all  RTD  extrapolation 
cases launched before 13/03/2009 in order to ensure that extrapolation adjustments have been 
properly applied by beneficiaries. Each case has been analysed through either a detailed or a 
global  desk  review  with  a  focus  on  the  contractor's  cooperation  level,  number  of  corrected 
cost statements received, amount of the adjustments etc.  
 
Currently, 63 cases have been selected for further analysis, excluding the 'on hold' cases. Of 
these,  9  follow-up  audits  on  the  spot  have  been  decided  and  scheduled.  For  24  audits,  no 
follow-up  was  required  at  this  stage  but  rather  an  action  at  Operational  Units'  and/or  RDG-
level  before  allowing  the  external  audits  to  take  an  appropriate  cost-effective  decision.  For 
this  part  of  the  process  the  audit  Units  rely  on  the  other  services.  For  the  remainder,  the 
analysis is ongoing. 
 
 

CONFIDENTIAL 
In the course of 2010, this closing follow-up per individual extrapolation case will continue. 
 
2.3.5. 
Further considerations 
Overall,  as  already  highlighted  in  previous  year's  reports,  it  can  be  concluded  that  the 
extrapolation  process  and  its  follow-up  remain  complex  and  time-consuming,  still  requiring 
substantial  resources.  Moreover,  disputes  related  to  interpretations  of  the  regulatory 
framework have resulted in two beneficiaries initiating legal proceedings during 2009. 
 
In the case of CEA, the dispute concerns the eligibility of a social tax that the Legal Service 
considers explicitly as not eligible, and the consequences of this on all their FP6 projects, due 
to extrapolation, as well as on the certificate on the methodology submitted under FP7. The 
CNRS case concerns a number of personnel cost items considered ineligible by the EC which, 
because of their systematic nature, when adjusted in non-audited projects have a very 
substantial effect. The legal challenge on their part is on the administrative procedures used 
by the EC for the subsequent recoveries. 
 
Indeed, extrapolation is an important management tool which requires an active and extensive 
co-operation  of  beneficiaries  and,  in  the  case  of  projects  for  which  the  financial  statements 
have  already  been  finalised  and  reimbursed,  it  is  very  resource  intensive  for  both  the 
Commission  services  and  the  beneficiaries.  These  circumstances,  in  combination  with  the 
increased  number  and  extent  of  audits,  have  led  in  2009  to  criticism  from  Members  of  the 
European  Parliament,  stakeholders  and  Member  States.  Following  these  criticisms,  a  lot  of 
effort  has  been  put  into  analysing  the  ongoing  extrapolation  cases  and  the  underlying 
systematic audit findings.  
 
In this respect  and in the framework of an overall simplification process  for the contractors, 
the possibility of flat rate calculations to establish the outstanding debt has been introduced3 
as  of  15/12/2009.  Furthermore,  eligibility  criteria  of  certain  expenditure  (direct  taxes  and 
social charges), having led to numerous discussions, have been more explicitly defined. This 
should make it simpler to decide on the  eligibility  (or not) of these types of expenditure.  In 
collaboration with RTD R, the actual implementation of these simplification measures for the 
extrapolation process is currently under way. It is expected that these simplification measures 
will lead to  a  more cost efficient  use of human resources both  for  Commission  services and 
for beneficiaries, while safeguarding the principle of sound financial management. 
 
The  overall  financial  result  of  actual  recoveries/adjustments  related  to  extrapolation  is 
potentially  very  important.  However,  given  the  fact  that  most  of  the  extrapolation  cases  are 
still ongoing, the financial impact to date of extrapolation remains modest. It is important to 
note that the time needed  to  actually implement  the financial  adjustments and to  initiate the 
related recoveries can be up to two years or more in difficult cases as the end of subsequent 
cost reporting periods is awaited. This is likely to be even longer in FP7 as the cost reporting 
periods are longer.  
 
Table 2.4 - Overall adjusted amounts due to extrapolation 
 
 
Euros 
(-) Adjustments in favour of the Commission 
-2.707.061,00 
                                                 
3 Commission Communication SEC(2009)1720, 15 December 2009. 
 

CONFIDENTIAL 
(+) Adjustments in favour of the beneficiaries 
140.983,00 
 
It  will  be  necessary  to  improve  further  the  working  procedures,  and  –  as  already  mentioned 
before  -  commit  appropriate  resources  to  the  follow-up  of  extrapolation  cases,  as  well  as 
improve  the  IT  systems  used  to  register,  manage  and  monitor  extrapolation  cases. 
Furthermore, it is necessary to further centralise and improve the coordinated approach of the 
follow-up activities, within DG RTD and with the other RDGs. 
 
2.4.  Collaboration with the ECA 
During  2009,  our  collaboration  with  ECA  continued  on  the  strengthened  basis  developed 
during the previous years. Better planning co-ordination has allowed a much earlier awareness 
of audits carried out  by  both  sides on beneficiaries audited previously by either. In turn, the 
subsequent  exchange  of  previous  audit  findings  and  results  in  these  cases  has  proven 
extremely useful, and it has been made much easier for the ECA by RTD A4 arranging access 
for them to the central repository of audits of the RDGs, the SAR Wiki (see section 2.2.3). 
 
For a number of reasons, including scheduling and resource constraints, not many joint audits 
with  ECA  were  carried  out  in  2009.  On  the  other  hand,  RTD  A.4  carried  out  some  audits 
which were directly triggered by previous audits by ECA, mostly in cases where extrapolation 
was proposed by the ECA for which DG RTD sought to confirm and reinforce its assessment 
on  the  basis  of  a  bigger  sample.  This  approach  will  be  continued  in  the  future  as  a  way  of 
increasing the corrective effect of the auditing efforts. 
 
More  generally,  referring  to  the  observations  in  the  ECA’s  Report  on  2008,  the  ECA 
confirmed  that  the  FP6  Audit  Strategy  is  a  sound  one  because  it  addresses  the  risks  of  cost 
overstatement,  but  underlined  that  significant  challenges  remain  such  as  recoveries  and 
simplification.  
 
The  new  FP7  Audit  Strategy  was  presented  to  ECA  representatives  at  the  end  of  October 
2009. 
 
2.5.  Reporting activities  
The external audit Units are asked to report throughout the year in quite a different number of 
formats  and  to  a  variety  of  audiences:  monthly  reports  to  the  Director  General,  quarterly 
reports to  the Commissioner, progress  reports  for the ABM  and the ECA, plus a substantial 
number  of  ad-hoc  requests  for  information  derived  from  the  auditing  activities,  both 
quantitative and qualitative. 
 
As  well  as  fulfilling  these  reporting  requirements,  and  as  stated  in  the  external  audit  Units' 
Annual Activity Report (AAR), a more in-depth analysis of results was to be a priority during 
2009.  This  has  required  a  series  of  improvements  in  the  tailor  made  layout  of  information 
allowing  a  better  understanding  of  aggregated  audit  results  and,  in  turn,  for  better  decision-
making.  For  example,  it  has  been  extremely  important  in  the  preparation  of  the  FP7  Audit 
Strategy,  and  also  in  initiatives  to  identify  FP6  instruments  with  a  higher  risk  profile  or  to 
measure the extent to which systematic errors are present in our population.  
 
These improvements could not have been achieved without changes to various IT systems and 
tools which are used for data collection, together with laborious one-off exercises collecting 
 

CONFIDENTIAL 
historical  data  retrospectively.  Recent  improvements  in  the  quality  of  FP6  data  at  DG  level 
contribute to the fact that FP6 audit findings can be measured more and more accurately. 
 
2.6.  OLAF cases 
RTD  A.4,  in  charge  of  relations  with  OLAF  on  external  enquiries4  since  February  2008, 
transmitted  eleven  new  cases  of  suspected  irregularities  to  OLAF  in  2009.  In  four  cases, 
suspicion  of  irregularities  was  reported  by  the  operational  services  in  charge  of  the  projects 
and contracts; in three cases, the decision to transfer the case to  OLAF was taken following 
on-the-spot audits performed by RTD A.4 auditors. In four cases, the allegations of potential 
irregularities were made by external informants (one anonymous). Another case in the area of 
research  was  directly  opened  by  OLAF  on  the  basis  of  information  received  from  an 
individual. One of the above cases concerns aspects of intellectual property rights, one case is 
related to scientific fraud whilst the other nine cases refer to financial irregularities. 
 
In 2009, OLAF classified ten DG RTD cases as 'non-cases'5. OLAF closed six cases for which 
the  allegations  of  irregularities  were  confirmed  in  their  investigations.  These  cases  are 
currently followed up at administrative, financial and/or judicial levels. 
 
With  regard  to  the  total  number  of  OLAF  cases  relevant  to  DG  RTD,  including  those  from 
previous  years,  as  of  31  December  2009,  RTD  A.4  manages  23  open  cases  as  well  as  13 
closed cases which are still in administrative, financial and/or judicial follow-up. 
 
RTD  A.4  further  intensified  the  cooperation  with  OLAF  services.  RTD  A.4  colleagues 
participated  in  more  than  20  meetings  with  OLAF  investigators  and  DG  RTD  operational 
services to discuss specific cases. 
 
At the beginning of 2009, DG RTD and OLAF launched the CHARON cooperation project, 
an  initiative  to  support  a  risk-based  audit  efforts  in  DG  RTD.  CHARON  will  introduce 
possibilities  for  advanced  data  mining  on  RDG  data  available  in  different  information 
systems.  A  number  of  technical  meetings  between  DG  RTD  and  OLAF  were  held  and 
progress  was  made  towards  the  implementation  of  CHARON,  which  is  expected  to  be 
operational in spring 2010.  
 
As  a  result  of  the  experience  gathered  in  2008,  two  further  initiatives  were  implemented  in 
2009.  First,  the  setting  up  of  the  FAIR  Committee,  whose  main  objective  is  the  exchange 
between the RDGs and Executive agencies of information, experiences and best practices on 
ongoing  and  potential  irregularities  and  fraud  cases  with  beneficiaries  of  the  Framework 
Programme. Two FAIR Committee meetings were held in 2009. Second, RTD A.4 introduced 
an additional step in the quality review procedure to considered, for every draft audit report, 
whether there are potential irregularities which deserve to be studied in more detail. 
 
Last  but  not  least,  it  is  worth  mentioning  that  OLAF  finalised  its  'Intelligence  analysis  of 
irregularities  and  suspected  fraud  in  the  Research  sector'  and  presented  the  report  to  the 
Director-General of DG RTD on 30 September 2009. As a consequence, DG RTD identified 
the issues where support from OLAF would be helpful in view of the development of a fully 
                                                 
4 Internal enquiries relating to individuals are dealt with by RTD.01. 
5  A  matter  is  classified  as  a  non-case  where  there  is  no  need  identified  by  OLAF  to  go  further  with  the 
investigation.  Non-cases  result  from  assessments  that  conclude  that  EU  interests  appear  not  to  be  at  risk  from 
irregular activity. 
 

CONFIDENTIAL 
fletched  'Fraud  prevention  and  detection  strategy'  in  DG  RTD,  in  which  RTD  R.5  is 
responsible for prevention measures and RTD A.4 for detection measures. 
 
2.7.  Quality control tools 
2.7.1.  Keywords database 
RTD A.4 and RTD A.5 established a Keywords Working Group (KWG) at the end of 2007 to 
address the need for harmonisation in the treatment of the increasing number and complexity 
of audit findings. The KWG consists of 6 members and is chaired by RTD A.4.It is involved 
in  the  replies  to  questions  raised  by  auditors  of  the  RDGs,  the  external  audit  firms,  the 
research helpdesk, operational services and framework programme beneficiaries.  
 
The most important KWG activities are:  
 
1.  Guidance  notes:  Guidance  notes  are    formally  adopted  by  the  CAR  and  provide 
specific instructions for auditors on issues of contention KWG is responsible for their 
drafting,  legal  consultation,  formal  adoption  and  disclosure  in  the  Wiki  database, 
accessible to the research DG services and ECA. 
2.  Development and maintenance of the keywords database  The 'keywords database' 
is  a  compilation  of  all  previous  positions  taken  in  the  past  on  various  interpretative6 
issues,  providing  guidance  to  auditors  and  helping  to  maintain  a  coherent  approach 
towards external parties.  
3.  Consultancy services:  
a)  External  helpdesk:  KWG  works  in  close  cooperation  with  the  research  helpdesk 
administered by RTD A.2, providing advice particularly on accounting issues. 
b)  External auditors: guidance is given on everyday auditing issues raised by auditors 
and questions asked by beneficiaries. 
 
The  need  to  'speak  with  one  voice'  towards  beneficiaries  is  essential.  This  'one 
voice' is to be agreed first among the RTD audit Units, and then across all RDGs. 
Knowing  that  beneficiaries  will  consider  replies  as  a  formal  position  of  the 
European Commission services, all formal replies are approved by the KWG prior 
to sending them, ensuring legal compliance and a coherent approach.  
 
Guidance notes adopted in 2009: 
 
  Owners-managers 
  In-house consultants and teleworking 
  Academic fees 
  Internally invoiced costs 
  Tax on salaries  
 
The possibility of publishing the principles adopted in these guidance notes for a wider public 
is being analysed in cooperation with RTD A.2. 
                                                 
6  An  'interpretative  issue'  is  any  issue  which  requires  harmonisation  given  the  risk  of  different  assessments 
amongst auditors about the (non-)eligibility of the costs. The legal unit of DG RTD is often consulted on these 
issues. 
 

CONFIDENTIAL 
 
2.7.2. 
The Audit Steering Committee (ASC) 
The  ASC  exists  to  assess  the  substance  of  proposals  for  large  audit  adjustments  and 
interpretative issues. It provides the opportunity of a peer review by fellow auditors on these 
issues. Adjustments are considered to be large when they are above 100,000 € and represent 
5% or more of the costs claimed, or when they are above 30,000 € and represent 30% or more 
of the costs claimed.  
 
The ASC considers both in-house and outsourced DG RTD audits and helps to ensure equal 
treatment and the coherence of audit work.  
 
The number of cases dealt with in the ASC has grown  from 2008 due to the increased audit 
activity: 
 
Table 2.5 - ASC cases 
 

 
 
 
2005 


2006 


2007 


2008 
12 
26 
2009 
14 
20 
 
2.7.3. 
The quality review process 
The quality review process for the audit reports done by  the European Commission auditors 
was strengthened in 2009. 
 
According to the Audit Process Handbook, RTD A4 adopts an 'Audit Closing Memorandum', 
which  involves  two  quality  control  checks.  The  first  check  is  on  the  substance  of  the  draft 
audit  report  before  it  is  sent  to  the  Operational  Directorate(s)  and  the  auditee  for  their 
comments. This substance check concentrates on three main questions: 
  
  Are the adjustments sound and well explained in the audit report? 
  Has the audit revealed systematic errors and will an extrapolation case be proposed? 
  Has the case given rise to a potential irregularity? 
 
The second check takes place before the audit is closed. It looks at completeness, correctness 
and coherence, and it is both on format and on substance: 
 
  Are all relevant documents attached, ensuring that appropriate procedures have been 
respected? 
  Have  the  templates  in  the  Audit  Handbook  been  used  or,  if  not,  is  such  deviation 
justified? 
  Have the audit results been presented in all documents in a coherent way? 
  Did the auditee express remarks of substance and have those been duly considered? 
 

CONFIDENTIAL 
  Are the deviations between amounts stated by the certifying auditor and those stated in 
the Audit Report so important that the certifying auditor should be informed? 
 
Outsourced  audits  procured  as  batch  assignments  are  monitored  by  a  dedicated  team 
regarding  milestones  and  deliverables  in  accordance  with  A5's  batch  audit  procedures 
handbook. 
 
2.8.  Collaboration with the DG RTD administration and finance (UAF) network 
Throughout 2009, the external audit Units have strengthened close working relationships with 
the  administration  and  finance  Units  during  planning  and  preparing  new  audit  campaigns, 
during the audits (in order to obtain feedback on draft audit conclusions), and after the audits 
(for the implementation of the final audit conclusions). 
 
Moreover, ad-hoc bilateral meetings have been held whenever appropriate to discuss specific 
files.  The  external  audit  Units  also  participate  in  the  monthly  UAF  meetings  to  present  and 
clarify matters linked to audit and financial issues. 
 
2.9.  Sharing Audit Results (SAR) and other IT developments 
Where  IT  developments  are  concerned,  throughout  2009  the  external  audit  Units  were 
focused, on the one hand on a more optimal sharing of audit results (SAR)  with the rest of the 
RDG family and, on the other, on the migration and centralization of local applications. The 
highlights were: 
 
  Audit  Management  System  (AMS)  in  DG  RTD  –  AMS  was  put  in  production  in 
August  2009  (Phase  1)  and  it  has  replaced  Aubase  (the  former  audit  management 
system that was developed locally by the external audits unit). 
  Extrapolation of Audit Results (SAR EAR) – SAR EAR was put in production in 
September 2009 in order to coordinate extrapolation cases among different RDGs.  
  Planning  of  Audit  Activities  (SAR  PAA)  –  SAR  PAA  was  put  in  production  in 
December 2009, and full deployment will be completed by February 2010. 
  Extrapolation  (EXITs)  -  To  address  the  acute  need  for  the  administration  and 
management of the work created by extrapolation, a new application called EXITs was 
developed by Unit A.4. It is currently using AMS data tables. The plan is to include its 
functionality in AMS Phase 2. 
  Pluto/CHARON Project – The CHARON project consists in tailoring an IT market 
product  called  i2  iBase  in  view  of  identifying  potential  candidates  for  fraud  and 
irregularities investigations (see section 2.6). 
 
2.10.  FP7 Methodology Certification 
2.10.1.  General background 
The Certification policy for the FP7 Grant Agreements was designed with the aim to correct 
the  most  common  errors  identified  in  the  past,  and  in  particular  those  related  to  personnel 
costs and indirect costs. In this context, FP7 introduced, in addition to the Certificates on the 
Financial  Statements  
(known  under  FP6  as  'audit  certificates'),  two  new  types  of  ex-ante 
 

CONFIDENTIAL 
certificates  on  the  methodology  which  may  be  submitted  prior  to  the  costs  being  claimed: 
the Certificate on Average Personnel Costs (CoMAv) and the Certificate on the Methodology 
for Personnel and Indirect costs (COM)
.
 
 
The  acceptability  of  the  methodology  certificates  is  decided  by  an  inter-service  Joint 
Assessment  Committee  (JAC),  which  involves  DG  RTD's  external  audit  Units  and  DG 
INFSO. In 2009, 6 JAC meetings were held. 
 
In June 2009, the Commission adopted a decision on interim implementation rules concerning 
acceptability  criteria  for  the  average  personnel  cost  methodology7.  These  criteria  enable  the 
JAC to approve or reject the accounting methodologies of beneficiaries who declare average 
personnel costs.  
 
2.10.2.  State of play of Certification files as of 31 December 2009 
At the end of December 2009, the state of play of submitted requests for eligibility and 
certificates is as follows:  
 
 
Eligibility Requests 
Certificates 
Type of Certificate 
Submitted 
Accepted 
Submitted 
Accepted 
Rejected 
Withdrawn 
Pending 
CoM Average Personnel Costs 
and Indirect Costs 
15 
0 
6 
2 
7 
88 
54 
CoM Real Personnel Cost and 
Indirect Costs 
9 
2 
1 
1 
5 
Certificate Average Personnel 
Costs (CoMAv) 
N/A 
37 
3 
4 
7 
23 
TOTALS 
61 
5 
11 
10 
35 
 
The  figures  indicate  that  the  certification  activity  started  slowly  yet  an  increasing  trend  is 
noted.  The  graph  below  indicates  the  evolution  over  time  of  the  methodology  certification 
activity  between  July  2007  and  December  2009.  There  is  an  uninterrupted  increase,  both  in 
eligibility requests and submissions. Where initially they were mainly CoM, the CoMAv has 
surpassed the CoM.  This indicates that beneficiaries are finding out  that this is  a mandatory 
requirement  to  claim  average  personnel  costs.  In  the  last  months  of  2009  an  increased 
submission activity can be noted which may predict a likely uptake of submissions for 2010.  
 
                                                 
7 Commission Decision C(2009)4705 
 


CONFIDENTIAL 
 
 
When  judging  the  limited  number  of  methodology  certificates  approved  so  far  it  should  be 
borne  in  mind  that  FP7  introduced  the  requirement  for  'full  cost'  accounting  for  all 
beneficiaries.  This  means  that  all  beneficiaries  previously  participating  under  the  'additional 
cost'  regime  –  mostly  universities  and  public  research  organizations  without  analytical 
accounting,  or  even  cash-based  accounting  –  now  must  account  for  the  full-costs  of  their 
research. Feedback obtained from many stakeholders indicates that most are in a preparatory 
or, at best, transition phase due to which their cost accounting methodology is not in  'steady 
state' and accordingly no methodology is yet presented for certification. RTD A.5 services are 
however in contact with a number of European universities (currently from UK, DE, NL, FR, 
IT  and  BE)  who  are  getting  prepared  and  are  strongly  motivated  to  seek  approval  of  their 
methodology. 
 
As regards the certification of average personnel cost methodologies, the delayed adoption of 
acceptability  criteria  has  certainly  impacted  negatively  the  take-up  of  the  FP7  cost 
methodology  certification.  Since  the  criteria  have  been  settled,  experience  shows  that  they 
rather  create  entry  barriers  for  many  FP7  participants  who  apply  personnel  cost  accounting 
practices with higher deviation tolerances. At the level of the Commission services this is not 
at all satisfactory yet not entirely unexpected. While the average cost accounting requirements 
thus  settled for  FP7  allow by their design to  contain the risk of deviations from actual  cost, 
they  in  reality  prove  to  be  overly  demanding  for  many,  thereby  effectively  neutralizing  the 
simplification  and  error-reducing  potential  initially  aimed  for.  The  time-recording  constraint 
is another example of this. 
 
The upcoming Communication to the Council and the European Parliament on simplification 
will  explore  options  for  further  simplification  in  research  funding.  This  communication 
should  launch  a  broad  inter-institutional  discussion  and  will  permit  the  Commission  to 
consider  new  concepts  for  research  funding,  including  a  broader  approach  towards  actual 
costs and recognition of usual accounting practices. Also, in this context, the parallel work on 
the  concept  of  tolerable  risk  of  error  to  ensure  the  right  balance  between  control  costs  and 
error rates, sound financial management and simplification could be referred to. 
 
 

CONFIDENTIAL 
2.10.3.  Supporting IT tools 
The  development  of  the  central  IT  tool  in  OMM  to  support  the  management  of  the  FP7 
certification activities was started in the third quarter of 2007 under the responsibility of RTD 
R.4. Due to resource constraints, this project was no longer considered by  RTD R.4 as an IT 
priority and was finally abandoned due to the implementation of PDM/URF in replacement of 
OMM.  
 
From  June  2008  onwards  a  new  web-based  project  was  launched,  promoted  by  ITPO.  This 
project  aims  to  provide  a  central  web-based  IT  tool,  solely  dedicated  to  supporting  the  FP7 
methodology  certification.  In  2009  Unit  R.4  initiated  a  contract  with  an  external  service 
provider  for  the  development  of  the  web-based  system.  Design  and  analysis  phases  were 
carried  out  in  the  last  quarter  of  2009.  Until  the  finalisation  and  deployment  in  production 
environment  of  the  new  tool,  the  local  MS  Access  database  initially  developed  in  2007  still 
supports the certification activities.  
 
2.10.4.  Inter-service collaboration 
An  inter-service  Working  Group  on  FP7  Certificates  on  the  Financial  Statements  (WGCFS) 
has  been  established  involving  representatives  from  the  research  DGs  and  REA  and  ERC 
Executive Agencies. The aim of the Working Group was to develop guidance and support for 
the  Operational  Units  and,  in  particular,  for  the  Financial  Officers  who  handle  the  FP7 
Certificates  on  the  Financial  Statements  (CFS).  Its  purpose  was  to  ensure  a  coherent, 
harmonised  and  consistent  approach  on  CFS-related  matters  throughout  the  Research  and 
Executive  Agencies.  The  prepared  Internal  Guidance  Notes  on  FP7  Certificates  on  the 
Financial Statements and a detailed Check list aims at supporting the Operational Units and in 
particular the financial  officers of the Administrative and  Finance Units in  the evaluation  of 
Certificates  on  the  Financial  Statements  (CFS)  under  the  European  Community's  DG  RTD 
FP7. 
2.10.5.  Communication activities 
These matters of ex-ante certification have also required intensive communication: 
  Handling  questions  submitted  through  the  Research  Enquiry  Service  on  Europe 
Direct.  Approximately  100  questions  concerning  average  personnel  costs  were 
answered in 2009. 
  An  internal  awareness-raising  campaign  on  FP7  Certification  issues  leading  to 
meetings with Operational and UAF Units. 
  Participation in seminars, conferences, bilateral meetings and pilot reviews (around 50 
events in total).  
  Posting of certification-related documents on www.cordis.europa.eu (FAQ document, 
specific  certification-dedicated  pages,  'Guidance  notes  for  Beneficiaries  and 
Auditors'). 
  Regular meetings with NCPs for legal and financial issues. 
 

CONFIDENTIAL 
2.11.  Coordination of outsourced audits 
Six new framework contracts for the provision of audit services were signed during the year 
dealing with audit services on FP6 and FP7 grants respectively. The new framework contracts 
covering FP6 audits were signed in February 2009 and the ones for FP7 audits in June 2009. 
These  framework  contracts  cover  the  outsourcing  of  audits  on  FP6  and  FP7  grants  for  the 
period  2009-2012  with  a  potential  market  value  amounting  to  16,5m  €  and  42m  € 
respectively. 
 
Each of these framework contracts is signed with three different audit firms to be used under a 
'cascade' principle, i.e. when the first on the list cannot execute the audit, the second, possibly 
the third company on the list is taken. 
 
The new framework contracts brought new firms to the scene and extensive efforts were made 
by RTD A.5 to prepare these firms for the EC's audit requirements and expectations. 
 
Due to the audit targets  of the FP6 and  FP7 audit strategies there is a strong dependence on 
the external audit firms,  as approx. 75% of the target is achieved through outsourced audits. 
The  external  audit  firms  operate  according  to  established  professional  audit  practice  and 
standards  and  provide  a  necessary  complement  to  DG  RTD's  in-house  audit  expertise  and 
capacity. 
 
RTD A.5 closely monitors the performance of the audit firms ensuring that, as far as possible, 
all audits are completed and closed within the contracted time frame. In addition to the daily 
follow-up of individual audit assignments, this monitoring involves the following processes: 
  Monthly  Audit  Status  Reporting  (MASR)  meetings  chaired  by  the  RTD  A5  HoU, 
covering  the  progress  of  all  on-going  batches,  technical  issues,  invoicing  and  future 
audit planning. 
  Occasional accompanying of external audit firms on on-the-spot audits. 
  Providing guidance and clarification on specific problems. 
  Maintenance of the Audit Review Assessment (ARA) to follow-up the quality of the 
services provided.  
  A batch audit processing manual including checklists for the different deliverables. 
  Normal  contract  management  issues,  such  as  setting  up  contracts,  amendments, 
payments, penalties etc. 
RTD  A.5  manages  the  public  procurement  procedures  for  the  new  framework  contracts  for 
audit services on FP6 and FP7 research grants on behalf of all RDGs and related agencies.  
 
2.12.  Other activities (Art.169 Initiatives/JTIs/Agencies) 
With regard to the Art. 169 Initiatives for which dedicated implementation structures are set 
up, RTD A.4 carries out the ex-ante assessments. RTD A.4 is therefore involved in the three 
Art. 169 Initiatives currently ongoing. 
 
 

CONFIDENTIAL 
2.12.1.  EURAMET 
EURAMET  e.V.  (EURAMET)  was  established  in  2007  under  German  law  as  a  non-profit 
association.  EURAMET  is  the  European  regional  metrology  organisation  and  is  responsible 
for the   co-ordination and  cooperation of National  Metrology  Institutes (NMI)  in Europe. A 
grant to EURAMET was proposed in the Cooperation work programme 2007 as an ERA-NET 
Plus bridging measure to prepare and test the dedicated implementation structure for the Art. 
169 Initiative 'European Metrology Research Programme' (EMRP). 
 
Pursuant to the Financial Regulation  (FR) applicable to the General Budget of the European 
Communities  (Art.  54),  and  following  the  opinion  of  DG  BUDG8,  the  EMRP  Initiative 
corresponds to what is called 'indirect centralised management'. According to Art. 56(1) of the 
FR,  where  the  Commission  uses  a  system  of  'indirect  centralised  management',  it  must  first 
obtain evidence of the existence and proper operation within the entity to which it entrusts the 
implementation,  including  an  effective  and  efficient  internal  control  system,  as  well  as  of  a 
number  of  requirements  to  ensure  that  the  structure  is  mature  enough  for  the  financial 
management  of  EU  funds.  This  was  the  objective  of  the  ex-ante  assessment  of  RTD  A.4, 
which led to the adoption of an action plan by EURAMET, its implementation being followed 
up by RTD A.4. 
 
In  addition,  RTD  A.4  was  asked  to  participate  in  the  drafting  of  the  delegation  agreement 
between  the  European  Commission  and  EURAMET,  which  specifies  the  tasks  entrusted  to 
EURAMET, the rules for their implementation and the relations between EURAMET and the 
Commission.  The  delegation  agreement  also  determines  EURAMET's  rights  and 
responsibilities.  
 
2.12.2.  Eurostars and Bonus 
In  2008,  RTD  A.4  also  participated  in  the  setting  up  and  the  ex-ante  assessment  of  the 
Eurostars  Art.  169  Initiative.  During  2009  some  exchanges  with  the  operational  Directorate 
took  place  on  the  implementation  of  the  Action  Plan  proposed  by  the  dedicated 
implementation structure, EUREKA, in response to the conclusions of the ex-ante assessment. 
 
RTD  A.4  has  also  participated  in  the  drafting  of  a  proposal  for  a  co-decision  on  the 
participation by the Community in a Joint Baltic Sea Research and Development Programme 
(BONUS-169),  undertaken  by  several  Member  States.  Following  the  same  procedure  as 
applied for EMRP (see point 2.13.1), an ex-ante assessment will be performed in the future.  
 
2.12.3.  Executive Agencies – REA and ERCEA 
The external audit Units were also involved in the process of setting up of the two 'DG RTD' 
Executive Agencies, in particular where the Audit Strategy is concerned. 
 
The  relationship  between  the  Agencies  and  DG  RTD  has  been  laid  down  in  Memoranda  of 
Understanding.  
 
 
 
 
                                                 
8 Note from M Romero Requena to MM Silva Rodriguez and Colasanti, n° 2267 dated 19.3.2007.  
 

CONFIDENTIAL 
2.12.4. Joint Technology Initiative (JTIs) 
 
RTD A.4 has also been involved in the process of defining parts of the internal control system 
of  the  JTIs,  in  particular  concerning  ex-post  audit  issues.  Working  groups  exist  under  the 
chairmanship  of  RTD  R.  RTD  A.4    participated  mostly  in  the  definition  of  the  ex-post 
auditing  features,  the  reporting  requirements  and  the  procedures  to  assess  'in-kind' 
contributions. 
 
2.13.  Scientific/technical audits 
 
The focus in financial audits on compliance with the legal and regulatory framework has led 
auditors  (cf.  Recommendation  No.  8  of  the  IAS  audit  on  'ex  post  control'  of  2006)  to 
recommend  to  undertake,  where  applicable,  on-site  technological  and  scientific  audits  as 
foreseen by Art. 11.23, Annex II of the FP7 Grant Agreement and Art. 1129, Annex II of the 
FP6  Contract.  The  aim  is  to  look  at  the  projects  from  an  independent  scientific  view  and 
independently from the project reviews that take place during the lifetime of a project. 
 
As no formal guidance existed in this area, a working group composed of representatives from 
RTD  A,  RTD  R  and  four  thematic  Directorates  was  set  up  in  February  2009  to  elaborate  a 
methodology,  which  was  completed  by  the  end  of  2009.  This  document  served  as  a  basis  for 
launching  pilot  projects9  in  two  thematic  Directorates  in  order  to  test  the  methodology  prior  to  a 
possible  wider  use  of  such  technological  audits.  These  cases  may  be  either  generated  from 
specific  requests  from  the  operational  Units  when  doubts  occur  with  regard  to  the 
scientific/technical deliverables (3 cases) or as a follow-up to previous financial audit findings 
(1 case). In some cases, underperformance of a beneficiary can also be reported by the project 
coordinators. 
 
Despite the difficulty of this type of scientific audits, they may gain importance in the course 
of the following years. 
 
3. 
RESULTS AND ANALYSIS 
The quantitative results of the activities of the external audit Units are presented in this part, 
together with analysis and commentary where appropriate. 
 
3.1.  Audit numbers 
This section presents results related to the number of audits and participations audited in 2009 
and cumulatively, with breakdowns by a number of categories. The most interesting points are 
summarised below each table. 
                                                 
9 The two pilot projects have been launched within RTD E.3 and RTD G.3 and were concluded in September and 
October 2009 respectively. Both technical audits have been performed with the support of the external financial audits unit 
(RTD A.4). 
 

CONFIDENTIAL 
Table 3.1 - Audits closed and participations audited (2009 and cumulative, ALL audits) 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
FP6 
TOP 
131 
385 
349 
965 
  
MUS 


154 
341 
  
RISK 
165 
388 
376 
769 
  
FUSION 

11 
27 
38 
  
OTHER 




Total FP6 
  
309 
793 
908 
2113 
FP7 
CORRECTIVE 




FP5 
N/A 


703 
875 
Coal & Steel 
N/A 

17 

22 
Grand totals 
319 
820 
1622 
3019 
 
  319 audits in total were closed during 2009, including the first 3 FP7 audits. 
  908 FP6 audits have been closed so far by the end of 2009. This is above the original 
minimum  multi-annual  target  of  750  set  in  the  ABM  action  plan  drawn  up  in  2007. 
The main reasons for this are extrapolation follow-up audits and additional risk-related 
audits  aimed  at  further  reducing  the  residual  error  rate  for  FP6.  At  the  beginning  of 
2010 there are still 248 FP6 ongoing audits.  
  The ratio of participations covered per audit is 1,24 for FP5 and 2,32 for FP6 at this 
point.  This  indicates  a  substantial  increase  in  the  cost-effectiveness  of  audits  in  FP6, 
and it is the result of improvements in planning and audit preparation.  
 
Table 3.2 - Audits of specific types (2009 and cumulative, FP6 and Coal & Steel audits) 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
FUSION 


27 
Coal & Steel 
N/A 


Joint audits with ECA 



Third country audits 


12 
Audits on request 

21 
46 
 
For more details on these audits, please see sections 2.1 and 2.4. 
 
Table 3.3- Audits closed, outsourced and in-house (2009 and cumulative, FP6 only) 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total Outsourced 
211 
68.3% 
658 
72.5% 
In-house 
98 
31.7% 
250 
27.5% 
Grand totals 
309 
100.0% 
908 
100.0% 
 

CONFIDENTIAL 
 
  Batches  75,  76,  78  (FP6),  82,  83  and  88  (FP7)  were  launched  during  2009,  while 
batches 46, 51, 53, 57 and 60 were completed in 2009. 
  The  percentages  of  in-house  and  externalised  audits  were  31.7%  and  68.3% 
respectively  in  2009.  This  shows  an  increase  in  the  percentage  of  in-house  audits  of 
6.2% from last year.  
 
Table 3.4 - Audits launched and closed (2007-2008-2009, ALL audits) 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
FP5 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
FP6 
280 
192 
423 
372 
284 
309 
987 
873 
FP7 
 
 
 
 
160 

160 

C&S10 
 
 




11 

Totals 
291 
305 
433 
383 
451 
319 
1175 
1007 
 
  451 audits were launched in 2009, as opposed to 433 in 2008, an increase of 4.2%. In 
the  last  two  years,  having  launched  more  audits  than  have  been  closed  means  that 
2010  starts  with  a  substantial  body  of  ongoing  audits,  many  of  which  are  well 
advanced. 
  For  closed  audits,  the  figures  are  319  (2009)  and  383  (2008),  a  decrease  of  16.7%. 
This can be explained by problematic files needing unforeseen additional work before 
and/or  after  their  closure,  and  by  the  introduction  of  new  external  audit  firms.  It  is 
worth  noting  that,  despite  the  decrease  in  the  overall  number  of  audits  closed,  audit 
coverage year on year has increased (see section 3.2).  
 
Table 3.5 - Audits closed by country (2009, FP6) 
 

 
 
 
 
 
DE 
Germany 
48 
15.5% 
13,4% 
UK 
United Kingdom 
48 
15.5% 
12,7% 
FR 
France 
37 
12.0% 
10,2% 
IT 
Italy 
23 
7.4% 
8,3% 
NL 
Netherlands 
23 
7.4% 
5,9% 
ES 
Spain 
23 
7.4% 
6.6% 
BE 
Belgium 
10 
3.2% 
3.8% 
AT 
Austria 
10 
3.2% 
2.5% 
CH 
Switzerland 

2.6% 
2,6% 
EL 
Greece 

2.6% 
2.5% 
SE 
Sweden 

2.6% 
3.6% 
 
Others (EU & non-EU) 
63 
20.4% 
27.9% 
Total 
309 
100,0% 
100,0% 
 
                                                 
10 Coal and Steel audits were not yet done by DG RTD's external audit units before 2008. 
 

CONFIDENTIAL 
  The 11 countries listed above received almost 80% of all the FP6 audits carried out in 
2009. This can be partially explained by the emphasis of the FP6 Audit Strategy on the 
biggest beneficiaries (217 of our top 243 beneficiaries are in these 11 countries). 
 
Table 3.6 - Participations audited by DG RTD Directorate (2009, FP6) 
 

 
 
 
 

ERA: Research programmes and capacity 
35 
4.4% 

ERA: Knowledge-based economy 

0.1% 

International cooperation 
15 
1.9% 

Biotechnologies, agriculture, food 
79 
10.0% 

Health 
156 
19.7% 

Industrial technologies 
103 
13.0% 

Transport 
113 
14.2% 

Environment 
86 
10.8% 

Energy (EURATOM) 
34 
4.3% 

Energy 
32 
4.0% 

Science, economy and society 
23 
2.9% 

'Ideas' programme 
14 
1.8% 

Implementation of activities to outsource 
102 
12.9% 
Total 
 
793 
100.0% 
 
  It is important to note that the sampling methods used by the external audit Units do 
not presently provide statistical representativity per Directorate. Samples are taken per 
RDG for the FP as whole. 
  Additional  information  shows  that  the  percentage  of  participations  audited  which 
belong  to  each  of  the  Directorates  is  roughly  in  line  with  the  percentage  of  all  FP6 
participations they manage. 
 
3.2.  Audit results 
This  section  presents  audit  results  in  monetary  terms,  including  an  attempt  to  compare  the 
effect of ex-ante and ex-post controls. The most interesting points are summarised below each 
table. 
 
Please  note  that  all  figures  representing  adjustments  (to  the  costs  claimed)  in  this  part 
are estimates that might or might not correspond with the eventual financial recovery or 
offset amount applied by operational services. 
Proposed adjustments are calculated on the 
basis of cost model and instrument type but there might be variations of the actual percentage 
of  EC  contribution  for  specific  contracts.  This  information  is  not  available  in  central  RTD 
information systems for FP6, although it will be for FP7. 
 
In any case, in 2008, the method for calculating proposed adjustments was refined to take into 
consideration instrument types as well as cost models. In addition, we now seek more detailed 
percentages of EC contribution from the operational services for audited participations where 
the proposed adjustment is  over  100000€ in  favour of the Commission.  This  has resulted in 
more accurate error rate calculations.  
 
 

CONFIDENTIAL 
Table 3.7 - Audit results in monetary amounts (2009, ALL audits) 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
FP5 

47,305 
43,410 
39,190 
-4,220 

FP6 
793 
519,807,096 
519,069,183 
505,030,211 
-23,430,703 
9,392,730 
FP7 

2,029,713 
2,029,713 
1,917,907 
-111,806 

C&S 
17 
8,380,466 
8,361,060 
8,126,961 
-235,975 
1,876 
Totals 
820 
530,264,580 
529,503,366 
515,114,269 
-23,782,704 
9,394,606 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
FP5 

47,305 
43,410 
39,190 
-4,220 

FP6 
793 
381,237,722 
380,554,588 
370,087,126 
-16,269,066 
5,801,604 
FP7 

1,144,051 
1,144,051 
1,061,696 
-82,355 

C&S 
17 
5,392,957 
5,382,855 
5,211,871 
-172,110 
1,126 
Totals 
820 
388,707,697 
388,010,566 
377,256,094 
-16,557,202 
5,802,730 
 
  In 2009, a total of over 530m€ in costs were audited by the external audit Units. Of 
this amount, the EC contribution was almost 389m€ (370m€ in 2008). Almost all costs 
audited corresponded to FP6, and they represented 2.9% of the whole FP6 budget (see 
table 3.17). 
  The  total  amount  of  adjustments  in  favour  of  the  Commission  at  funding  level 
proposed by the auditors was roughly 16.6m€ (11.4m€ in 2008).  
 
Table 3.8 - Audit results in monetary amounts (cumulative, ALL audits) 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
FP5 
876 
358,247,777 
352,137,653 
349,524,169 
-12,835,453 
10,390,030 
FP6 
2,113 
1,796,133,771 
1,794,237,709 
1,763,235,855 
-47,567,046 
16,565,192 
FP7 

2,029,713 
2,029,713 
1,917,907 
-111,806 

C&S 
22 
20,267,182 
20,243,841 
20,029,873 
-236,916 
22,948 
Totals 
3,020 
2,176,678,443 
2,168,648,916 
2,134,707,804 
-60,751,221 
26,978,170 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
FP5 
876 
214,782,328 
211,084,886 
208,928,662 
-8,025,512 
5,950,712 
FP6 
2,113 
954,583,034 
953,437,033 
934,002,258 
-30,231,609 
10,796,834 
FP7 

1,144,051 
1,144,051 
1,061,696 
-82,355 

C&S 
22 
11,336,315 
11,324,246 
11,163,327 
-172,581 
11,662 
Totals 
3,020 
1,182,731,390 
1,177,875,878 
1,156,012,154 
-38,541,508 
16,759,208 
 
 

CONFIDENTIAL 
  Concerning cumulative results, the auditors have so far checked nearly 2.2bn€ in costs 
claimed over the FP5, FP6, FP7 and C&S audit campaigns.  
  Of that amount, 1.80bn€ is FP6 costs, compared to 358m€ for FP5. This represents an 
increase  of  over  500%,  at  a  point  in  time  when  the  FP5  audit  campaign  is  almost 
complete while the FP6 campaign has at least another year to  go. This highlights the 
enormous proportional FP-on-FP increase in auditing efforts.   
  In relation with the previous point, the cumulative amount of proposed adjustments at 
funding level for FP6 is already over 30m€. 
 
Table 3.9 - Results by instrument type (cumulative, FP6). All amounts are EC share 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
IP 
Integrated Project 
871 
41.2% 
-13,788,277 
45.6% 
STREP 
Specific Targeted Research Project 
427 
20.2% 
-4,471,606 
14.8% 
NOE 
Network of Excellence 
351 
16.6% 
-6,236,687 
20.6% 
IA-I3 
Integrating activities implemented as Integrated 
84 
4.0% 
-1,508,531 
5.0% 
Infrastructure Initiatives 
CA 
Coordination action 
67 
3.2% 
-640,723 
2.1% 
SSA 
Specific Support Action 
57 
2.7% 
-993,765 
3.3% 
EST 
Early-stage Training 
50 
2.4% 
-394,042 
1.3% 
FUSION 
FUSION programme 
45 
2.1% 
-147,048 
0.5% 
CRAFT 
Co-operative research projects 
40 
1.9% 
-554,774 
1.8% 
RTN 
Research Training Networks 
38 
1.8% 
-323,778 
1.1% 
EXT 
Grants for Excellent Teams 
17 
0.8% 
-70,097 
0.2% 
CLR 
Collective research projects 
12 
0.6% 
-57,037 
0.2% 
EIF 
Intra-European Fellowships 
12 
0.6% 
-23,284 
0.1% 
CNI-SSA 
Construction of new infrastructures 

0.4% 
-914,241 
3.0% 
implemented as Specific Support Actions 
Other 
 
34 
1.6% 
-107,718 
0.4% 
Grand Total 
  
2113 
100.0% 
-30,231,609 
100.0% 
 
Even  though  we  do  not  select  representative  samples  per  FP6  instrument,  the  volume  of 
results  to  date  gives  insights  as  to  whether  the  incidence  of  errors  is  higher  for  some 
instruments than it is for others. The results, however, are not sufficiently conclusive.  
 
Table 3.10 - Results by cost model (cumulative, FP6). All amounts are EC share. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
AC 
1078 
51.0% 
-13,154,006 
43.5% 
FC 
695 
32.9% 
-12,104,489 
40.0% 
FCF 
276 
13.1% 
-4,660,523 
15.4% 
N/A 
64 
3.0% 
-312,591 
1.0% 
 

CONFIDENTIAL 
Grand Total 
2113 
100.0% 
-30,231,609 
100.0% 
 
The same analysis can be performed on cost models. Here, the FC model receives a share of 
adjustments which is noticeably higher than the proportion of participations audited using that 
cost model. 
 
3.3.  Analysis 
This  section  attempts  to  provide  a  more  in-depth  and  qualitative  analysis  of  certain  aspects 
and results of the work of the external audit Units, particularly in relation to error rates, error 
types,  most  prevalent  errors  at  cost  category  level  and  a  more  detailed  look  at  the  highest 
adjustments proposed so far in FP6.  
 
3.3.1. 
Analysis of error rates  
Table 3.11 - Error rates (2009, FP6 audits). All amounts are EC share 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
FP6 
TOP 
275,648,663 
-7,785,642 
-2.82% 
-2.90% 
  
MUS 
738,762 
-239,778 
-32.46%11 
  
RISK 
100,565,933 
-8,159,748 
-8.11% 
 
  
FUSION 
3,601,230 
-83,897 
-2.33% 
 
Total FP6 
380,554,588 
-16,269,066 
-4.28% 
 
 
Table 3.12 - Error rates (cumulative, FP5 and FP6 audits). All amounts are EC share 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
MUS 
69,702,383 
-2,791,622 
-4.01% 
  
RISK 
189,454,580 
-11,329,833 
-5.98% 
 
  
FUSION 
144,528,587 
-323,778 
-0.22% 
 
Total FP6 
953,437,033 
-30,231,609 
-3.17% 
 
FP5 
N/A 
211,084,887 
-8,025,512 
-3.80% 
 
 
  The FP6 TOP cumulative rate has gone down during last year, from -2.99% to -2.87%. 
This  has  also  resulted  in  a  reduction  of  the  overall  representative  rate12,  which  has 
gone  down  from  -3.13%  at  the  end  of  2008  to  -3.00%  at  the  end  of  2009.  This  will 
have a direct impact on the residual error rate. 
  More than half of the  FP6 audits closed in 2009 belonged to the RISK strand. This 
volume,  together  with  an  increase  of  the  error  rate  in  this  strand,  has  resulted  in  an 
increase also of the cumulative overall FP6 error rate, which has gone up from -2.47% 
in 2008 to -3.17% in 2009. 
                                                 
11 Only five MUS audits were closed in 2009. 
12  The  representative  error  rate  is  a  combination  of  results  in  the  TOP  and  MUS  strands,  and  it  is  so  called 
because the samples of these strands are statistically representative (MUS) or cover 100% of the budget (TOP). 
 

CONFIDENTIAL 
  The  fact  that  the  overall  FP6  RISK  error  rate  stands  at  almost  -6%,  while  the 
representative rate is exactly -3%, is an indication of the validity of the risk assessment 
methods  employed  to  date.  This  is  reassuring  and  useful  as  we  are  currently 
considering risk assessment methods to be used in FP7.  
 
The following charts illustrate the evolution of cumulative overall error rates in FP5 and FP6 
up to the end of 2009. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  FP5 annual error rates have reached a plateau in the last three years. Considering that 
only two FP5 audits remain open and there are no plans to launch any more, the -3.8% 
cumulative  rate  may  be  considered  as  almost  final.  It  is  interesting  to  note  that  it 
remains very close to what it was in 2002. 
  The picture is different for FP6, with a clear year-on-year regular increase. However, 
this increase can now be linked to the success of RISK audits and is no longer a 
reflection of the amount of error detected in the population as measured by the 
representative error rate, which has now also stabilised around -3%.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  Again of particular interest here is the difference in the RISK strand, which suggests 
that  enhanced  criteria  for  the  selection  of  beneficiaries  with  a  high-risk  profile  are 
bearing fruit.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

CONFIDENTIAL 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  A series of analyses during 2009 on the share of overall errors represented by those of 
a  systematic  nature  led  to  a  realisation  that  they  were  not  as  prevalent  as  assumed 
when  the  FP6  Audit  Strategy  was  prepared.  This  has  resulted  in  changes  to  the 
formula for the calculation of the residual error rate in order to make it more accurate, 
and  it  has  also  been  an  important  consideration  in  preparing  the  FP7  Strategy  (see 
section 1.7). As one can derive from the pie chart, less than half of the errors found in 
monetary value are considered as systematic. 
 
3.3.2. 
Analysis of adjustments at cost category level (FP6) 
This section provides analysis of the incidence of errors at cost category level. Costs claimed 
by beneficiaries are ascribed to one of a number of defined cost categories. When audit results 
are  compiled,  they  are  presented  and  implemented  for  an  audited  participation  as  a  whole, 
with  results  in  different  cost  categories  being  netted  off.  However,  it  can  be  of  value  to 
consider  errors  at  cost  category  level,  particularly  in  order  to  identify  in  which  areas  of 
expenditure errors are found most often, in terms of number and value.  
 
Table 3.13 - Proportion of adjustments by cost category (cumulative, FP6) 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Adjustments to costs previously reported 
189 
4.8% 
3.3% 
160 
9.0% 
4.1% 
Consumables 
252 
6.4% 
2.7% 
61 
3.4% 
1.5% 
Durable equipment 
115 
2.9% 
2.5% 
42 
2.4% 
0.4% 
Personnel 
787 
19.9% 
49.5% 
393 
22.0% 
19.0% 
Subcontracting 
163 
4.1% 
9.5% 
331 
18.6% 
6.2% 
Travel & subsistence 
490 
12.4% 
1.0% 
89 
5.0% 
0.4% 
Other direct costs 
813 
20.6% 
14.1% 
195 
10.9% 
10.6% 
Indirect costs (overheads) 
1132 
28.7% 
17.2% 
506 
28.4% 
57.8% 
Various others 

0.2% 
0.1% 

0.4% 
0.1% 
Grand Total 
3948 
100.0% 
100.00% 
1783 
100.0% 
100.00% 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

CONFIDENTIAL 
 
For adjustments in favour of the Commission: 
 
  As in previous years, the highest number of errors in terms of recurrence can be found 
in  the  Indirect  costs/Overheads,  Other  direct  costs,  Personnel  and  Travel  and 
subsistence  cost  categories.  The  percentages  have  not  varied  significantly  from  the 
situation at the end of 2008.  
  In terms of monetary impact, the same cost categories have the highest share of errors. 
The  proportions,  however,  are  quite  different  and  significant.  Adjustments  to 
personnel costs, for example, represent almost half of all the adjustments proposed, in 
terms  of  amounts,  but  only  about  20%  in  terms  of  numbers.  On  the  other  hand, 
although we identify many errors in Travel and subsistence, they only represent 1% of 
the overall amount. Although this is not a finding made this year, it remains significant 
and  it  could  inform  future  audit  efforts  by,  for  example,  concentrating  on  auditing 
personnel costs across a higher number of projects and ignoring other cost categories 
as they are not cost effective to audit. 
 
For adjustments in favour of the beneficiaries: 
 
  Like for negative adjustments, the situation at the end of 2009 fairly mimics previous 
cumulative results.  
  However,  the  category  with  the  highest  cumulative  adjustments  is  Indirect 
costs/Overheads  (57.8%  in  value,  28.4%  in  number),  followed  by  Personnel  (only 
19% in value but 22% in number). 
3.3.3. 
Qualitative analysis of the largest adjustments in absolute terms (FP6) 
The 10 biggest negative adjustments proposed in audits closed in 2009 are listed below, and 
there  is  also  a  brief  explanation  of  the  nature  of  the  errors  found  in  each  case.  These  10 
adjustments plus the 10 top adjustments in 2008 represent about 26% in monetary value of all 
adjustments  in  favour  of  the  Commission  proposed  so  far  in  FP6  audits,  although  they  are 
only 20 out of 1310 adjustments in favour of the Commission proposed to date. 
 

CONFIDENTIAL 
Table 3.14 -  Details  of the 10 largest adjustments  per audited  participation  in absolute 
terms in 2009 (all figures are EC share)  
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


INSTITUTE OF 
RU 
515703 
RISK 

1,401,573.36 
1,401,573.36 
606,846.20 
-794,727.16 
SPECTROSCOPY OF RUSSIAN 
ACADEMY OF SCIENCE 

GABO GMBH & CO. KG 
DE 
LSHM-CT-
RISK 

678,170.85 
678,170.85 
146,642.45 
-531,528.40 
2004-503039 

UNIVERSITAET ZU LUEBECK 
DE 
37593 
RISK 

1,760,317.36 
1,749,026.16 
1,284,225.60 
-464,800.56 

SNECMA MOTEURS SA 
FR 
506154 
TOP 

962,887.18 
962,887.18 
536,980.81 
-425,906.37 

PEPSCAN SYSTEMS B.V. 
NL 
LSHG-CT-
RISK 

529,821.70 
529,821.70 
136,875.90 
-392,945.80 
2005-018683 

GOETEBORG UNIVERSITY 
SE 
512013 
RISK 

1,279,186.25 
1,279,186.25 
898,405.69 
-380,780.56 

HET NEDERLANDS KANKER 
NL 
LSHC-CT-
TOP 

372,402.28 
372,402.28 
892.28 
-371,510.00 
INSTITUUT / ANTONI VAN 
2004-503426 
LEEUWENHOEK HOSPITAL 

CENTRE NATIONAL DE LA 
FR 
505390 
TOP 

979,308.39 
979,308.39 
645,729.97 
-333,578.42 
RECHERCHE SCIENTIFIQUE 

AIRBUS UK LIMITED 
UK 
AIP4-CT-
TOP 

4,929,718.50 
4,929,718.50 
4,599,141.30 
-330,577.20 
2005-516092 
10 
CONSEJO SUPERIOR DE 
ES 
NMP3-CT-
TOP 

1,528,562.65 
1,528,562.65 
1,266,278.42 
-262,284.23 
INVESTIGACIONES 
2005-515784 
CIENTIFICAS 
 
Details about each case (numbers as in table above): 
 
1.  The  'Institute  of  Spectroscopy  of  the  Russian  Academy  of  Sciences'  sign  contracts 
under  the  AC  cost  model.  Nevertheless,  costs  for  permanent  employees  have  been 
charged,  which  were  rejected  by  the  auditors  (-172000€).  Further  to  this,  the 
contractor  charged  the  full  cost  for  the  purchase  of  equipment  in  one  go,  instead  of 
depreciating  it  (which  is  foreseen  in  their  own  accounting  rules).  Subsequently,  the 
auditors  have  disallowed  a  further  483000€.  The  remainder  concerns  small  sums  of 
VAT. The total adjustment is - 794727,16€. 
2.  The contractor which signed this contract was a company called 'GABO Gesellschaft 
für  Ablauforgansation,  Informationsverarbeitung  und  Kommunikationsorganisation 
GmbH  &  Co.  KG'  ('GABO').  On  January  1st,  2005  GABO:mi  Gesellschaft  für 
Ablauforganisation:  millarium  GmbH  &  Co.  KG  ('GABO:mi')  was  founded  and  the 
assets  and  liabilities  related  to  the  management  of  process  and  projects  were 
transferred  from  GABO  to  GABO:mi  including  on  the  above  mentioned  contract. 
Under German legislation this form of transfer needs the agreement of the contracting 
third parties. There was no amendment to the research contracts with the Commission. 
Costs  were  henceforth  incurred  by  GABO:mi  but  claimed  as  being  costs  of  GABO. 
The auditors disallowed the costs. 
3.  With  regard to  Lübeck University, eight invoices totalling some EUR 390K incurred 
at  the  end  of  period  1  were  'double  claimed'.  This  adjustment  was  increased  by  the 
20% claimed for indirect costs.  
4.  The major part of the adjustments for SMECMA is due to (1) the absence of an audit 
trail allowing the auditors to reconcile the indirect costs charged to the contracts with 
the contractor's accounts and (2) the disallowance of the subcontracting not foreseen in 
Annex 1 of the contracts. 
 

CONFIDENTIAL 
5.  The  contractor  which  signed  this  contract  was  a  company  called  Pepscan  Systems. 
There was a reorganisation within the group in 2006 and part of the research activities 
were transferred to other companies within the group called Pepscan Therapeutics and 
Pepscan Presto, which incurred the costs of the project. Costs were however claimed 
by  Pepscan  Sysytems.  There  has  been  no  amendment  to  the  contract  and  these 
associated companies  are not  mentioned as third parties in  the contract.  The auditors 
disallowed the costs. 
6.  The main adjustment for Gothenburg University relates to personnel costs. In one case 
no reasonable assurance could be given on the claimed salary costs, and in other cases 
costs  were  related  to  another  project  or lack  of a  contract  was  noticed. 
Regarding the other direct  costs,  an  adjustment  was  proposed as  the  contractor  was 
unable to substantiate the different cost elements taken into consideration for internal 
invoicing. The adjustments in the direct costs resulted in an adjustment of the indirect 
costs.  
7.  The main  cause of the adjustment  at  this Dutch hospital is the ineligibility  of certain 
other  direct  costs  that  could  not  be  substantiated  by  invoices  or  subsequent  payment 
but only by a purchase order. Additional findings refer to the fact that the supplier for 
the related goods or services is at the same time partner of the very same project. 
8.  The  CNRS  adjustments  on  this  single  participation  are  mainly  due  to  (1)  the  lack  of 
reliability  of  the  time  recording  system  and  (2)  the  fact  that  the  provision  for 
unemployment is  not  an eligible  cost,  the latter  being subject  to  legal  scruting  in  the 
light of the recent Commission Communication. 
9.  AIRBUS  claimed  costs  on  the  basis  of  cost-centre  averages.  The  applied  averages 
included indirect costs. The audit proposed adjustments for the difference between the 
cost  centre  based  average  costs  and  the  actual  personnel  actual  costs.  In  addition, 
indirect  costs  claimed  as  direct  personnel  costs  were  reclassified  to  indirect  costs. 
There were also disallowances for travel expenditure that could not be substantiated. 
10. The  main  reason  for  the  CSIC  adjustment  is  the  lack  of  accounting  records  for 
depreciation, affecting both direct costs for durable equipment, and the indirect costs 
calculation. 
 
3.3.4. 
Assessment of the different steps of the control chain 
Table 3.15 - Net effect of ex-ante and ex-post controls (cumulative, FP5 and FP6 audits). 
All amounts are EC share 
 

  
 
 
 
Costs claimed and audited (A) 
214,782,328 
954,583,034 
1,169,365,362 
Costs accepted by Financial Officers (B) 
211,084,886 
953,437,033 
1,164,521,919 
Net effect of ex-ante controls (B-A) 
-3,697,442 
-1,146,001 
-4,843,443 
Costs accepted by Auditor (C) 
208,928,662 
934,002,258 
1,142,930,920 
Net effect of ex-post controls (C-B) 
-2,156,224 
-19,434,775 
-21,590,999 
 
The net  effect  of ex-ante and ex-post controls  is shown above. By  ex-ante, one refers to  the 
corrections  made  by  financial  officers  to  costs  claimed  when  they  are  received,  and  by  ex-
post, reference is made to the adjustments proposed by the auditors. 
 
 

CONFIDENTIAL 
  Interestingly,  ex-ante  controls  have  had  a  bigger  cumulative  effect  for  FP5  than  ex-
post  controls.  However,  for  FP6,  the  opposite  is  true,  and  the  difference  is  quite 
significant. The most likely explanation for this is the introduction of audit certificates 
in  FP6.  This  introduction  might  have  led  to  the  fact  that  most  part  of  the  errors  are 
detected and corrected before sending the cost statement to the Commission, an effect 
also suggested by the comparison between the FP5 and FP6 cumulative error rates (see 
table 3.12).  
 
3.3.5. 
Qualitative analysis of error types (FP6) 
Each time an audit is closed, it is given two ratings related to 'Seriousness' and 'Nature' of the 
errors  found  by  the  auditors,  if  any.  By  using  a  combination  of  these  two  ratings,  a  better 
understanding of the incidence of errors and their importance can be obtained, as shown in the 
table below13. 
 
Table 3.16 - Types and incidence of errors found at participation level (cumulative, FP6) 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Small 
0.5% 
1.1% 
53.4% 
0.2% 
55.2% 
Medium 
0.1% 
0.9% 
21.2% 
0.3% 
22.5% 
High 
0.0% 
0.2% 
5.3% 
1.1% 
6.6% 
Totals 
12.6% 
2.5% 
83.3% 
1.6% 
100.0% 
 
  Most  of  the  adjustments  proposed  by  the  external  audit  Units  are  due  to 
straightforward errors of small or medium seriousness. Discoveries of fraud are rare. 
This situation is reflected by this table in the 53.4% of participations showing SMALL 
ERROR. This is in line with the ECA findings in their DAS reports. 
  The  percentage  of  participations  where  potential  irregularities  and  highly  serious 
problems are found remains fairly low, at 1.1%, although it is worth mentioning that it 
was just 0.5% at the end of 2008. 
  In 12% of the cases, there were no findings. This figure was 17.3% at the end of 2008.  
                                                 
13 'Seriousness' refers to the severity of problems found (NONE, SMALL, MEDIUM or HIGH), while 'Nature' 
reflects the character of those errors (NONE, QUALITATIVE, ERROR or IRREGULARITIES).  
 
 

CONFIDENTIAL 
 
3.3.6. 
Audit coverage (FP6) 
Table 3.17 - Audit coverage (cumulative, FP6) 
 

Total number of 
 
participations 
 
(eCORDA, 
01/12/09) 
 
56,085 
 
Audit coverage by 
Audited 
number of audited 
participations  
3.8% (2.4% by 
 
participations 
2,113 
end of 2008) 
 
 
Audit coverage by amounts audited ('direct' 
9.1% (6.2% by 
 
coverage) 
953,437,033 
end of 2008) 
 
Audit coverage of non-audited amounts 
 
received by audited beneficiaries ('indirect' 
 
coverage')14 
5,176,173,928 
43.5% 
 
 
Total audit coverage ('direct' and 'indirect') 
6,129,610,961 
52.6% 
 
 
Total FP6 RTD payments as of end 2009 
10,443,540,000 
100.0% 
 
 
 
 

  During 2009, one of the main objectives of the FP6 Audit Strategy, namely to 'clean' 
from systematic material errors at least 50% of the budget was achieved. The current 
figure is 52.6% and, considering there are still about 250 ongoing FP6 audits, the final 
result will be significantly higher than the original target. 
  Almost 10% of our budget and almost 4% of the participations have been directly 
audited to date. 
                                                 
14 The non-audited budget received by audited beneficiaries is considered 'clean' from systematic material errors 
either because none were detected or through extrapolation. 
 

CONFIDENTIAL 
 
ANNEX I: MISSION STATEMENTS 
MISSION STATEMENT RTD A.4: EXTERNAL AUDITS 
 
The Unit contributes to the assessment of the legality and regularity of the DG RTD payment 
transactions  by  means  of  ex  post  financial  audits,  thereby  providing  a  basis  of  reasonable 
assurance  to  senior  management  and  other  stakeholders  (including  the  budget  discharge 
authorities) that RTD contract  participants  are in  compliance with  the financial terms of the 
RTD contract.  The corrective actions and follow-up measures which result from the ex post 
audit activity contribute to the protection and safeguarding of the European Union’s financial 
interests in the research area. 
 
  RTD  A.4  performs,  mainly  with  own  audit  staff  and  occasionally  through  independent 
professional  audit firms, a number of  audits ('on-the-spot-controls')  each  year, which are 
selected from the 'auditable population' of RTD contractors, and ensures that these audits 
are professionally managed and supervised. 
  RTD  A.4  evaluates,  reports,  and  monitors  on  a  regular  basis  the  requests  for  financial 
audits  made  by  the  DG  RTD  Directorates  or  other  relevant  parties.   RTD  A.4  evaluates 
these requests and carries out financial audits as necessary with the required priority and 
urgency. 
  RTD A.4 uses and maintains specific tools and methodologies for the selection of RTD 
contractors  to  be  audited.   The  selection  is  based  on  the  multi-annual  Audit  Strategy  as 
endorsed by the DG, and focuses on achieving sufficient and representative audit coverage 
to support the DGs annual assurance declaration. 
  RTD  A.4  provides  on  regular  basis  management  information  as  a  result  of  the  'on-the-
spot-controls'.  For those  RTD contractors who fail to  comply with  the  contract  the  RTD 
A.4 recommends  financial adjustments  and in  case of systematic errors,  extrapolation  of 
such adjustments towards non-audited transactions.  
  RTD  A.4,  after  analysis  and  synthesis  of  audit  results,  gives  feedback  on  corrective 
actions,  and centralises  the regular  reporting of actions taken or to  be taken by the RTD 
Directorates on the basis of the information available in the Audit Back-Office. 
  RTD  A.4,  through  close  co-operation  and  harmonisation  with  the  other  DGR’s  and 
Executive Agencies, takes the lead in establishing relevant audit policies and strategies. It 
therefore  organizes,  chairs  and  ensures  the  secretariat  for  the  monthly  CAR  group 
meetings. 
  RTD  A.4  contributes  to  the  understanding  and  application  of  the  legal  RTD  framework 
through  interpretation  and  guidelines  on  FP  RTD  financial  and  accounting  matters. The 
Unit  also  contributes  in  an  advisory  capacity  not  only  to  auditing  and  accountancy 
questions and tasks, but also to the legal developments of (future) participation rules and 
model RTD grant agreements. 
  RTD A.4 liaises with R5 to provide a timely input for the interactions with the ECA. 
 

CONFIDENTIAL 
  RTD  A.4  ensures  the  'Back-Office'  function  for  the  DG  RTD  external  audit  activity  by 
maintaining  an  audit  workflow  application  and  database,  and  ensuring  the  lead  on  the 
development  of  tools  and  procedures  for  the  sharing  of  audit  results  and  follow-up 
measures  with  other  Research  DGs  and  beyond,  for  example  through  the  ABAC  audit 
module. 
  RTD  A.4  coordinates  the  relations  with  OLAF  on  irregularities  and  fraud  cases  which 
concern  beneficiaries  of  DG  RTD  expenditure  (external  investigations).  It  ensures  the 
liaison between OLAF and the operational services on OLAF related matters, manages the 
OLAF case files relevant to DG RTD and chairs and provides the secretariat of the FAIR 
Fraud  and  Irregularities  Committee  with  the  other  RDGs  and  Executive  Agencies.  It 
performs  risk-based  audits  and  conducts  specific  inquiries  in  case  of  suspicion  of 
irregularities.  RTD  A.4  ensures  the  regular  reporting  to  DG  RTD  hierarchy  and  the 
Commissioner  on  irregularities  and  fraud  cases.  Moreover,  it  actively  contributes  to  the 
implementation of a Fraud prevention and detection strategy in DG RTD. 
 

CONFIDENTIAL 
 
MISSION  STATEMENT  RTD  A.5  'Implementation  of  Audit  certification  policy  and 
outsourced audits' 
 
RTD A.5 contributes to the assessment of the legality and regularity of the DG RTD payment 
transactions  by  means  of  ex  post  financial  audits,  thereby  providing  a  basis  of  reasonable 
assurance  to  senior  management  and  other  stakeholders  (including  the  budget  discharge 
authorities) that RTD contract  participants  are in  compliance with  the financial terms of the 
RTD contract.  The corrective actions and follow-up measures which result from the ex post 
audit activity contribute to the protection and safeguarding of the European Union’s financial 
interests in the research area.  
 
Through the certification function for FP7, the unit aims to contribute in an ex ante manner to 
the legality and regularity of future DG RTD payment transactions by ensuring that the cost 
methodology systems of FP7 beneficiaries are in compliance with the rules, thereby resolving 
main errors observed in the past from the outset.  
 
RTD A.5 missions can be broken down as follows: 
 
  To perform, exclusively through independent professional audit firms, a number of batch 
audits  each  year,  which  are  selected  from  the  'auditable  population'  of  RTD  contractors, 
and  ensure  that  these  audits  are  professionally  managed  and  supervised,  by  proper 
planning and follow-up of audit assignments, quality control of deliverables, liaison with 
external audit firm representatives and other DGs of the 'research family'.  
  On the basis of the audit reports of the professional audit firms, for those RTD contractors 
that fail to adhere to the contract, the Unit recommends financial adjustments and, in case 
of systemic errors, the extrapolation of such adjustments to non-audited transactions.  
  To  manage  the  public  procurement  and  follow-up  of  the  audit  service  framework 
contracts. 
  To ensure support to the implementation of the audit certification, focusing  in particular 
on  the  cost  methodology  certification  process  introduced  under  FP7.    Upon  request,  the 
Unit  also  offers  advice  and  guidance  on  the  implementation  of  the  FP6  audit  certificate 
function. 
  To monitor the implementation of the audit certificate policy in general and co-ordinate all 
matters  related  to  audit certification  with  other DGs  of  the  research  family  and  vis-à-vis 
DG  BUDG.  Where  applicable,  the  Unit  ensures  liaison  with  national  or  international 
professional audit bodies. 
  RTD A.5 liaises with R5 to provide a timely input for the interactions with the ECA for 
matters linked to audit certification and audit service framework contract matters.  
  RTD  A.5  contributes  in  an  advisory  capacity  to  the  legal  developments  of  (future) 
participation  rules  and  model  RTD  grant  agreements,  in  particular  based  upon  the 
knowledge gained in the certification process.