Dies ist eine HTML Version eines Anhanges der Informationsfreiheitsanfrage 'Citizenship and residence by investment schemes'.


European Parliament
2019-2024
COMPROMISES by Sophie IN ‘T VELD (Rapporteur)
citizenship and residence by investment schemes (2021/2026(INL))
Updated: 8 February 2022
COMP 1 - Preambles AMs covered: AM1 Yoncheva; AM2 Bricmont; AM3 Bricmont
AMs falling: -
The European Parliament,

having regard to Article 225 of Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union,

having regard to Article 4(3) and Article 49 of the Treaty on European Union,

having regard to Article 21(2), Article 79(2), points (a) and (b), and Articles 80, 82, 87,
114, 311 and 337 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union,

having regard to the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union, in
particular Articles 7, 8 and 20 thereof,

having regard to the European Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and
Fundamental Freedoms, in particular Article 8,

having regard to Council Directive 2003/86/EC of 22 September 2003 on the right to
family reunification1 (the ‘Family Reunification Directive’) 
(AM 1, AM 2),

having regard to Council Directive 2003/109/EC of 25 November 2003 concerning the
status of third-country nationals who are long-term residents2 (the ‘Long-Term
Residence Directive’),

having regard to Regulation (EU) 2018/1806 of the European Parliament and of the
Council of 14 November 2018 listing the third countries whose nationals must be in
possession of visas when crossing the external borders and those whose nationals are
exempt from that requirement3,

having regard to Directive (EU) 2015/849 of the European Parliament and of the
1
OJ L 251, 3.10.2003, p. 12.
2
OJ L 16, 23.1.2004, p. 44.
3
OJ L 303, 28.11.2018, p. 39.

Council of 20 May 2015 on the prevention of the use of the financial system for the
purposes of money laundering or terrorist financing, amending Regulation (EU) No
648/2012 of the European Parliament and of the Council, and repealing Directive
2005/60/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council and Commission Directive
2006/70/EC4,

having regard to the Copenhagen criteria and to the body of Union rules (the acquis)
that a candidate country must adopt, implement and enforce to be eligible to join the
Union, in particular Chapters 23 and 24 thereof,

having regard to the Commission letters of formal notice of 20 October 2020 to Cyprus
and Malta launching infringement procedures with respect to their investor citizenship
schemes,

having regard to the Commission letter to Bulgaria of 20 October 2020 highlighting
concerns regarding an investor citizenship scheme and requesting further details,

having regard to the Commission report of 23 January 2019 entitled ‘Investor
Citizenship and Residence Schemes in the European Union’,

having regard to the Commission presentation 20 July 2021 of a package of four
legislative proposals to strengthen the EU’s anti-money laundering and countering the
financing of terrorism rules,

having regard to its resolution of 16 January 2014 on EU citizenship for sale5, of 26
March 2019 on financial crimes, tax evasion and tax avoidance6, 
(AM 3) of 18
December 2019 on the Rule of Law in Malta following the recent revelations around the
murder of Daphne Caruana Galizia7, of 10 July 2020 on a comprehensive Union policy
on preventing money laundering and terrorist financing - the Commission Action Plan
and other recent developments8, of 17 December 2020 on the EU Security Union
Strategy9, and of 29 April 2021 on the assassination of Daphne Caruana Galizia and the
Rule of Law in Malta10,

having regard to the study by the European Parliamentary Research Service of 17
October 2018 entitled ‘Citizenship by Investment (CBI) and Residency by Investment
(RBI) schemes in the EU’,

having regard to the study by the European Parliamentary Research Service of 22
October 2021 entitled ‘Avenues for EU action in citizenship and residence by
investment schemes - European added value assessment’ (the ‘EPRS EAVA Study’),

having regard to the study by Milieu Ltd of July 2018 for the Commission entitled
‘Factual analysis of Member States Investors’ Schemes granting citizenship or
residence to third-country nationals investing in the said Member State – Study
Overview’,
4
OJ L 141, 5.6.2015, p. 73.
5
OJ C 482, 23.12.2016, p. 117.
6
OJ C 108, 26.3.2021, p. 8.
7
OJ C 255, 29.6.2021, p. 22.
8
OJ C 371, 15.9.2021, p. 92.
9
OJ C 445, 29.10.2021, p. 140.
10
Texts adopted, P9_TA(2021)0148
2


having regard to the activities of the Democracy, Rule of Law and Fundamental Rights
Monitoring Group (DRFMG), set up under its Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and
Home Affairs, on this matter, in particular its exchanges of views with inter alia the
Commission, academics, civil society and journalists on 19 December 2019, 11
September 2020 and 4 December 2020, and its visit to Malta on 19 September 2018;

having regard to Rules 47 and 54 of its Rules of Procedure,

having regard to the report of the Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home
Affairs (A9-0000/2021),
COMP 2 - general provisions CBI/RBI - Recitals B, D, G, P, Ra(new) Paragraphs 1-4
and 7
AMs covered: AM6 Arvanitis; AM10 Yoncheva (partly) AM12 Bilcik; AM23
Yoncheva; AM25 Bilcik (partly); AM26 Pignedoli; AM32 Bilcik (partly); AM51
Yoncheva
AMs falling: AM7 Vandendriessche; AM8 Bilcik; AM9 Jaki; AM11 Vandendriessche;
AM27 Weimers; AM33 Jaki
B.
Whereas Commission President von der Leyen in her State of the Union address on 16
September 2020 stated “Be it about the primacy of European law, the freedom of the
press, the independence of the judiciary or the sale of golden passports, European
values are not for sale.”;
D.
Whereas the existence of CBI schemes affects all Member States because a decision by
one Member State to grant citizenship for investment automatically confers rights in
relation to other Member States, in particular the right to freedom of movement, the
right to vote and stand as a candidate in local and European elections, the right to
consular protection if unrepresented outside the Union and rights of access to the
internal market to exercise economic activities 
(AM6); whereas CBI and RBI schemes
by individual Member States also generate significant externalities on other Member
States, such as corruption and money laundering risks; whereas those externalities
warrant regulation by the Union;
G.
Whereas the operation of CBI schemes lead to the commodification of Union
citizenship; whereas such commodification of rights violates (AM12) Union values, in
particular equality; whereas pathways for legal migration to the Union and the rights
attached to residence are already covered by Union law, such as in the Long-Term
Residence Directive 
(AM 10);
P.
Whereas the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) has
issued guidelines on limiting the circumvention of the Common Reporting Standard
through the abuse of CBI/RBI schemes11;
R a. (new)
Whereas the beneficiaries of CBI/RBI schemes, once granted their new
status of residency or citizenship, immediately start to enjoy freedom of movement12
11
Preventing abuse of residence by investment schemes to circumvent the CRS, OECD, 19 February 2018,
and Corruption Risks Associated with Citizen- and Resident-by-Investment Schemes, OECD, 2019.
12
Since Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Ireland and Romania are not Schengen countries, a third country

within the Schengen area (AM23);
1.
Considers that schemes granting nationality on the basis of a financial investment (CBI
schemes), also known as ‘golden passports’, are objectionable from an ethical, legal
and economic (AM26) point of view and pose several serious security risks for Union
citizens, such as those stemming from money-laundering and corruption 
(AM25);
considers that the lack of common standards and harmonised rules governing RBI
schemes may also pose such security risks, affect the free movement of persons within
the Schengen area 
(AM51) and contribute to undermining the integrity of the Union
(AM32);
2.
Recalls its position that CBI/RBI schemes inherently present a number of serious risks
and should be phased out by all Member States13; reiterates that ever since its resolution
of 16 January 2014 on EU citizenship for sale, insufficient action has been taken by the
Commission and the Member States to counter those schemes;
3.
Holds that CBI schemes undermine the essence of Union citizenship, which represents
one of the foremost achievements of Union integration, granting a unique and
fundamental status to Union citizens and including the right to vote in European and
local elections;
4.
Considers that Union citizenship is not a commodity that can be marketed or sold and
has never been conceived as such in the Treaties;
7.
Considers that CBI schemes need to be distinguished from RBI schemes because of the
difference in the severity of the risks they pose and, hence, necessitate tailored Union
legislative and policy approaches; acknowledges in that respect the link between RBI
schemes and citizenship because acquired residence may ease access to citizenship;
COMP 3 - general provisions on citizenship/nationality - Recitals E, F, Paragraph 5
AMs covered: AM29 Tudorache
AMs falling: AM28 Vandendriessche
Separate vote: AM30 Bricmont
E.
Whereas Union citizenship is a unique and fundamental status that is conferred upon
citizens of the Union, complementary to national citizenship, and represents one of the
foremost achievements of Union integration, conferring equal rights to citizens across
the Union;
F.
Whereas conferring national citizenship is the prerogative of the Member States which
prerogative must, however, be exercised in good faith, in a spirit of mutual respect,
transparently, in accordance with the principle of sincere cooperation and in full respect
of Union law; whereas the Union has enacted measures to harmonise the pathways for
national holding a residence permit issued by any of those Member States does not automatically enjoy
freedom of movement within the Schengen area.

13
Resolutions of the European Parliament of 18 December 2019 on the Rule of Law in Malta following the
recent revelations around the murder of Daphne Caruana Galizia, of 10 July 2020 on a comprehensive
Union policy on preventing money laundering and terrorist financing - the Commission Action Plan and
other recent developments, of 17 December 2020 on the EU Security Union Strategy and 29 April 2021
on the assassination of Daphne Caruana Galizia and the Rule of Law in Malta.
4

legal migration to the Union and the rights attached to residence, such as the Long-
Term Residence Directive;
5.
Acknowledges that regulating the acquisition of nationality is primarily a Member State
competence but stresses that that competence needs to be exercised in good faith, in a
spirit of mutual respect, transparently, with due diligence and proper scrutiny (AM29),
in accordance with the principle of sincere cooperation and in full respect of Union
law14; considers that where Member States do not act in full compliance with those
standards and principles, a legal ground for Union action arises; considers that a Union
competence could arguably also arise on the basis of Article 21(1) of the Treaty on the
Functioning of the European Union (TFEU) with respect to certain aspects of Member
State nationality law15;
COMP 4 - CBI/RBI compared to other migration channels - Recital C, Paragraph 6
AMs covered: AM4 Bricmont; AM5 Arvanitis; AM32 Bilcik (partly)
AMs falling: AM31 Vandendriessche
C.
Whereas several Member States operate citizenship by investment (CBI) and residence
by investment (RBI) schemes that confer citizenship or resident status on third-country
nationals in exchange for primarily financial considerations in the form of ‘passive’
capital investments; whereas such (AM 5) CBI/RBI schemes are characterised by
having minimal to no physical presence requirements and offering a ‘fast track’ to
residency or citizenship status in a Member State compared to conventional channels;
whereas the time used to process applications varies substantially between Member
States16; whereas the ease of obtaining citizenship or residence through the use of
such schemes contrasts dramatically with the obstacles for seeking international
protection, legal migration or naturalisation through conventional channels 
(AM4)
6.
Believes that the advantageous conditions and fast-track procedures set for investors
under CBI/RBI schemes, when compared to the conditions and procedures for other
third-country nationals wishing to obtain international protection, residence or
citizenship, are discriminatory, lack fairness and undermine risk undermining (AM32)
the integrity of consistency of the Union asylum and migration acquis;
14
See the reasoning used in the Commission infringement procedures against Malta and Cyprus with
respect to their investor citizenship schemes
(https://ec.europa.eu/commission/presscorner/detail/en/ip_20_1925) and the case law of the Court of
Justice of the European Union: Judgment of the Court of 7 July 1992, Mario Vicente Micheletti and
others v Delegación del Gobierno en Cantabria
, C-369/90, ECLI:EU:C:1992:295; Judgment of the Court
of 11 November 1999, Belgian State v Fatna Mesbah, C-179/98, ECLI:EU:C:1999:549; Judgment of the
Court of 20 February 2001, Judgment of the Court of 20 February 2001, The Queen v Secretary of State
for the Home Department, ex parte: Manjit Kaur
, C-192/99, ECLI:EU:C:2001:106; Judgment of the
Court of 2 March 2010, Janko Rottman v Freistaat Bayern, C-135/08, ECLI:EU:C:2010:104; and
Judgment of the Court of 12 March 2019, M.G. Tjebbes and Others v Minister van Buitenlandse Zaken,
C-221/17, ECLI:EU:C:2019:189.
15
EPRS EAVA Study, pp. 43-44.
16
EPRS EAVA Study, table 9, p. 28-29.

COMP 5 - MS operating CBI/RBI schemes - Recitals H, I, L, T, Paragraphs 8, 14
AMs covered: AM13 Bricmont; AM14 Bilcik; AM43 Pignedoli
AMs falling: AM44 Jaki
H.
Whereas Bulgaria, Cyprus and Malta currently have legislation in place enabling CBI
schemeswhereas the Bulgarian government has tabled legislation to end its CBI
scheme; 
whereas the Cypriot government announced on 13 October 2020 that it would
suspend its CBI scheme, only processing applications received before November 2020;
whereas some other Member States also reward big investors with citizenship, using
extraordinary procedures 
(AM13);
I.
Whereas Bulgaria, Cyprus, Estonia, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Luxembourg, Malta,
the Netherlands, Portugal and Spain currently operate RBI schemes with minimum
investment levels ranging from EUR 60 000 (Latvia) to EUR 1 250 000 (the
Netherlands); whereas attracting investment is a usual method of maintaining well-
functioning economies of Member States, but as such should not pose legal and
security risks to Union citizens 
(AM14);
L.
Whereas the Commission has launched infringement procedures against Cyprus and
Malta on the grounds that the granting of Union citizenship for pre-determined
payments or investments without any link with the Member States concerned
undermines the essence of Union citizenship;
T.
Whereas the Cypriot authorities on 15 October 2021 announced that they would revoke
the citizenship of 39 foreign investors and six members of their families who had
become Cypriot citizens under a CBI scheme; whereas just over half of the 6 779
passports issued by Cyprus under that scheme between 2007 and 2020 were issued
without having carried out sufficient background checks on the applicants17;
8.
Notes that three Member States have legislation in place enabling CBI schemes,
namely Bulgaria (although a legislative proposal has been tabled by the Bulgarian
government to end its CBI scheme), 
Cyprus (currently only processing applications
submitted prior to November 2020) and Malta, and that 1Member States have RBI
schemes, all with diverging amounts and options of investment and with diverging
standards of checks and procedures; regrets that that could trigger a competition for
applicants among Member States and risks creating a race to the bottom in terms of
lowering vetting standards and decreasing due diligence to increase the uptake of the
schemes18;
14.
Welcomes the infringement procedures launched in October 2020 by the Commission
against Cyprus and Malta concerning their CBI schemes; calls on the Commission to
advance those procedures, as they could further clarify how CBI schemes may be
tackled in addition to the legislative action proposed here, 
and to initiate further
infringement procedures against Member States for RBI schemes, where justified; calls
on the Commission to carefully monitor, report and take action on all CBI/RBI
schemes across the Union 
(AM43);
COMP 6 - regulation of intermediairies - Recital K, Paragraph 9, Annex I, Proposal 2,
indent 6
17
https://agenceurope.eu/en/bulletin/article/12814/25.
18
EPRS EAVA Study, p. 57; Preventing abuse of residence by investment schemes to circumvent the CRS,
OECD, 19 February 2018
6


AMs covered: AM34 Bilcik (partly), AM99 Bricmont; AM100 Arvanitis AM101
Bilcik; AM103 Arvanitis; AM105 Bilcik (partly); AM109 Bilcik (partly);
AMs falling: AM97 Bilcik; AM98 Bilcik; AM102 Bilcik; AM104 Jaki; AM106 Jaki;
AM107 Bilcik; AM108 Jaki
K.
Whereas applications under CBI/RBI schemes are often processed with aid from
commercial intermediaries who might receive a percentage of the application fee;
whereas in some Member States commercial intermediaries have played a role in
developing and promoting the CBI/RBI schemes;
9.
Considers that the role of intermediaries in developing and promoting CBI/RBI
schemes, as well as in preparing individual applications, often in the absence of
transparency or accountability, represents a conflict of interest prone to abuse and that a
strict and binding regulation of such intermediaries, beyond mere self-regulation and
codes of conduct is therefore required; asks for the cessation of the services of
intermediaries in case of CBI schemes; (AM34)

Annex I, Proposal 2, indent 6

An important element of the regulation, possibly complemented by other legislative
measures, where needed, should be the regulation of intermediaries. The following should
be included:
(a)
a Union-level licensing procedure for intermediaries containing a thorough
procedure with due diligence and auditing of the intermediary company, its
owners and its related companies. The license should be subject to renewal every
second year and be featured in a public Union register for intermediaries. Where
intermediaries are involved in applications, Member States should only be
allowed to process such applications when prepared by Union-licensed
intermediaries. Applications for licensing should be made to the Commission, to
be supported by the relevant Union agencies in carrying out the checks and
procedure;
(b)
specific rules for the activities of intermediaries. Those rules should include
detailed rules concerning the background checks, due diligence and security
checks that the intermediaries are to carry out on applicants; including the
obligation for them to contract independent third parties to verify those checks.
(AM101)
(c)
a Union-wide prohibition on marketing practices for RBI schemes that use the
Union flag or any other Union-related symbols on any materials, website or
documents or that associate the RBI schemes to any benefits linked to the
Treaties and the acquis 
(AM103);
(d)
clear rules on transparency of intermediaries and their ownership;
(e)
anti-corruption measures and best due diligence practices (AM105) to be adopted
within the intermediary, including on appropriate staff remuneration, the two-
person rule (that every step is checked by at least two persons) and provisions for a
second opinion when preparing applications and carrying out checks on
applications, and a rotation of staff members across the countries of origin of
applicants under RBI schemes;

(f)
prohibition on combining the consultation of governments on the establishment
and maintenance of RBI schemes with involvement in the preparation of
applications. Such a combination creates a conflict of interest and provides the
wrong incentives. Furthermore, intermediaries should not be allowed themselves to
implement RBI schemes for Member State authorities. Intermediaries should only
be allowed to act as intermediaries in individual applications and only when being
approached by individual applicants. General public affairs activities of
intermediaries should be organisationally separated from their other activities
and should comply with all legal requirements and codes of conduct at Union
and national level regarding transparency;

(g)
a monitoring, investigations and sanctions framework to ensure that intermediaries
comply with the regulationThe relevant law enforcement authorities should be
able to conduct undercover investigations, including by posing as potential
applicants. Sanctions should include dissuasive fines and should, where
infringements are established twice, lead to the revocation of the Union license to
operate. (COMP proposal following AM109)
COMP 7 - security checks & reporting Recitals M, N, O, Ta Paragraph 10, Annex I,
Proposal 2, indents 7 & 8
AMs covered: AM16 Bilcik (partly); AM17 Bricmont (partly); AM20 Bilcik; AM21
Yoncheva; AM24 Bilcik; AM35 Arvanitis; AM36 Bricmont; AM37 Pignedoli; AM38
Bilcik (partly); AM110 Bilcik (partly); AM111 Bricmont; AM112 Arvanitis;
AMs falling: AM15 Yoncheva; AM18 Yoncheva; AM19 Yoncheva; AM113 (Jaki);
AM114 Bilcik; AM115 Jaki
M.
Whereas CBI and RBI schemes pose risks to different extents, including risks of
corruption, money laundering, security threats, tax avoidance, macro-economic
imbalances, pressure on the real estate sector, thereby diminishing access to housing,
and the erosion of the integrity of the internal market
; whereas it is difficult to
substantiate the scale of those risks due to limited data and transparency, 
and those
risks 
are currently not sufficiently managed, resulting in weak vetting and a lack of due
diligence with respect to applicants under CBI/RBI schemes in Member States; whereas
all the resulting risks should be properly assessed, and transparency with regard to
the implementation and consequences of the schemes should be increased 
(AM16);
N.
Whereas research suggests that Member States with CBI/RBI schemes are more
prone to risks related to financial secrecy and corruption
;
O.
Whereas Member States do not always consult existing Union databases law does not
provide for systematic consultation of the Union large-scale IT systems 
for
background checks on applicants under CBI/RBI schemes; whereas the existing Union
and national rules do not require any vetting procedures to be performed before
granting citizenship or residency under a CBI/RBI scheme 
(AM21); whereas Member
States do not always consult databases, do not always apply thorough procedures
and do not always 
share the results of checks and procedures systematically;
Ta.(new) Whereas in 2019 the Commission concluded that clear statistics on CBI/RBI
applications received, CBI/RBI applications accepted and CBI/RBI applications
rejected are missing or insufficient 
(AM24);
8



10.
Deplores the lack of comprehensive security checks, vetting procedures and due
diligence in Member States that have CBI/RBI schemes in place; regrets notes that
Member States do not always consult the available Union databases and do not always
exchange information on the outcome of such checks and procedures, allowing for
successive applications for CBI/RBI schemes (AM38) across the Union; calls on the
Member States to do so 
(AM38)considers that Member States' authorities must have
in place adequate processes for vetting CBI/RBI applicants as granting residency and
citizenship rights is the responsibility of the State and must not rely on background
checks and due diligence procedures carried out by non-state actors, although
Member States may use relevant information from independent non-state actors
(AM35, AM36); expresses concern regarding some Member States where
applications for citizenship were reported to be accepted even when the applicants do
not meet the security requirements 
(AM37);
Annex I, Proposal 2, indent 7 and 8

A duty for Member States to report to the Commission regarding their RBI schemes
should be introduced. The Member States should submit a detailed annual report
reports (AM111, AM112) to the Commission on the overall institutional and
governance elements of their schemes, as well as on the monitoring mechanisms in
place 
(AM112). They should also report on individual applications, including on
rejections and approvals of applications, and the reasons for approvals or for
rejections, such as non-compliance with anti-money laundering provisions. Statistics
should include a breakdown of the applicants by the country of origin and data on
family members and dependents who have gained rights via an applicant under a RBI
scheme
(AM111). The Union-level final check will also help to highlight several
unsuccessful applications by the same individuals. (AM110). The Commission should
publish those annual reports, where needed redacted in line with data protection
regulations and the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union, and
should publish alongside those annual reports its assessment of them 
(AM111,
AM112).


A system, managed at Union level, for prior notification to and consultation with all
other Member States and the Commission, prior to granting residence under an RBI
scheme, should be set up. If Member States do not object within 20 days, that would mean
that they have no objection to the granting of residence19. That would allow all Member
States to detect double or subsequent applications and to conduct checks in national
databases. Within these 20 days, the Commission should also carry out, in cooperation
with the relevant Union bodies, offices and agencies (including through their liaison
officers in third countries), Union-level final checks of applications against the
relevant Union and international databases and further security and background
checks. On that basis, the Commission should issue an opinion to the Member State.
The competence to grant residence or not under RBI schemes should remain with the
Member States. The Commission should provide any relevant information to help
highlight when the same individuals have made several unsuccessful applications.

19
Similar to the system set out in Article 22 of Regulation (EC) No 810/2009 of the European Parliament
and of the Council of 13 July 2009 establishing a Community Code on Visas (Visa Code) (OJ L 243,
15.9.2009, p. 1).


COMP 8 - Member State Group of Experts - Recital Q, Paragraph 11
AMs covered: AM22 Yoncheva;
Separate vote: AM39 Bilcik
Q.
Whereas the Commission initiative to establish a Group of Experts on Investor
Citizenship and Residence Schemes was aimed at Member States’ representatives
agreeing on a common set of security checks but that group did not propose such a
common set of security checks 
(AM22); whereas that group has not met since 2019;
11.
Regrets that the Group of Experts on Investor Citizenship and Residence Schemes,
composed of Member State representatives, has not agreed on a common set of security
checks as it was mandated to do by the end of 2019; finds that that shows the limits of
adopting an intergovernmental approach as regards the matter and underlines the need
for Union action; finds that that shows the limits of adopting an intergovernmental
approach as regards the matter and underlines the need for Union action;
COMP 9 - physical residency requirements - Paragraphs 12 & 13 & Annex I, Proposal
2, indent 9 (first sentence)
AMs covered: AM40 Yoncheva; AM41 Bilcik; AM117 Arvanitis (partly)
AMs falling: AM42 Yoncheva
12.
Deplores the fact that residency requirements to qualify under the RBI/CBI schemes of
Member States do not always include continuous and effective physical presence and
are difficult to monitor, thereby potentially attracting bad faith applicants who purchase
national citizenship purely for the access it grants to the Union territory and its internal
market 
(AM40) without any attachment to the Member State in question;
13.
Is concerned that where continuous and effective Calls on the Member States to
effectively enforce the necessary 
physical residence is not enforced by Member States,
for third-country nationals could wishing to obtain long-term residence status under the
Long-Term Residence Directive without the five years of continuous and legal
residence that is a requirement under that Directive (AM41);
Annex I, Proposal 2, indent 9, first sentence
 Member States should be required to effectively check physical residence, including by
using the option of establishing minimum physical presence requirements (AM117),
on their territory and to keep a record of it, which the Commission and Union agencies
can consult.
COMP 9 A - physical residency requirements - Annex I, Proposal 2, indent 9, (second
sentence: ‘That should include ... the individuals concerened.’)
AM falling: AM116 Bilcik
Annex I, Proposal 2, indent 9, second sentence
That should include at least biannual in-person reporting appointments and on-site visits to
the domicile of the individuals concerned.
10


COMP 10 - revision AML and LTR Directive - Recital X(new), Paragraphs 15, 22,
Annex I, Proposal 4, indent 15, Annex I, Proposal 4, indents 16, 17
AMs covered: AM77 Bilcik (partly); AM79 Yoncheva; AM129 Bricmont; AM132
Bricmont;
AMs falling: AM45 Bilcik; AM46 Pignedoli; AM78 Jaki; AM130 Jaki; AM131 Jaki;
AM134 Jaki;
X (new).
Whereas RBI schemes are highly specific in nature; whereas any changes to
Union law introduced for applicants to RBI schemes should be targeted to that
particular type of residency status and should not adversely affect the rights of
applicants for other types of residency statuses, such as students, workers and family
members; whereas higher levels of security checks for applicants under RBI schemes
should not be applicable to those who apply for residency in the Union under
residency schemes already covered by existing Union law 
(AM79);
15.
Considers that Union anti-money laundering law is a crucial element to counter the
risks posed by CBI/RBI schemes; welcomes the fact that the Commission’s package of
legislative proposals of 20 July 2021 on anti-money laundering and on countering the
financing of terrorism addresses RBI schemes, most notably by promoting the inclusion
of intermediaries on the list of obliged entities; considers, however, that gaps will still
remain, such as the fact that public entities that process CBI/RBI applications will not
be included on the list of obliged entities;
22.
Requests that the Commission include in its proposal targeted revisions of existing
Union legal acts that could help to dissuade Member States from establishing harmful
RBI schemes, such as further by (AM77) strengthening legal acts in the field of anti-
money laundering, and targeted changes to and by strengthening relevant provisions in
(AM77) the Long-Term Residence Directive;
Annex I, Proposal 4, indent 15
Proposal 4: a targeted revision of legal acts in the area of anti-money laundering and
countering the financing of terrorism

The Commission has made a welcome step by including RBI schemes prominently in its
package of legislative proposals of 20 July 2021 to revise legal acts in the area of anti-
money laundering and countering the financing of terrorism, especially where it concerns
intermediaries. Three (AM129) further elements should be included:
(a)
public authorities engaged in processing applications under RBI schemes to be
included on the list of obliged entities under legal acts in the area of anti-money
laundering and countering the financing of terrorism, specifically in Article 3, point
(3), of the proposal for a regulation on the prevention of the use of the financial
system
for
the
purposes
of
money
laundering
or
terrorist
financing
(2021/0239(COD));
(b)
a greater exchange of information on applicants under RBI schemes between the
Member State authorities under legal acts in the area of anti-money laundering and
countering the financing of terrorism, specifically between the Financial
Intelligence Units;
(c)
enhanced due diligence measures recommended by the OECD to mitigate the




risks posed by RBI schemes to be foreseen for all obliged entities involved in the
RBI process 
(AM132);
Annex I, Proposal 5, indents 16-17
Proposal 5: a targeted revision of the Long-Term Residence Directive

The Commission should, when it comes forward with its expected proposals for the
revisions of the Long-Term Residence Directive, limit the possibility of third-country
nationals who have obtained residence under an RBI scheme from benefitting from more
favourable treatment under that Directive. That could be achieved by amending Article
13 of the current Long-Term Residence Directive to narrow its scope of application by
expressly excluding beneficiaries of RBI schemes.

The Commission should take the steps necessary to ensure that the legal and continuous
residence of five years, required by Article 4(1) of the Long-Term Residence Directive,
is not circumvented through RBI schemes, including by ensuring that the Member States
enforce stronger controls and reporting obligations on applicants under RBI schemes.
COMP 11 - Family applications/reunification Paragraph 16 & Annex I, Proposal 2,
indent 5
AMs covered: AM47 Arvanitis; AM48 Bricmont; AM96 Bricmont
AMs falling: -
16.
Notes that applications under CBI/RBI schemes are particularly difficult to monitor and
assess where they concern joint applications that include different family members;
notes that under certain national RBI schemes residency rights may be granted based
on family, personal or other ties to the main applicants 
(AM47, AM48); notes that
family reunification rights under the Family Reunification Directive apply after
obtaining residency status in a Member State, thus allowing family members to enter
the Union without further specific checks normally required under RBI schemes;
Annex I, Proposal 2, indent 5

The practice of joint applications, where a main applicant and family members can be
part of the same application, should be forbidden: only individual applications subject to
individual and rigorous checks should be allowed, while taking into account the links
between applicants. Rigorous checks should also apply when residency rights can be
pursued by family members of successful applicants under family reunification rules
or other similar provisions 
(AM96).
12

COMP 12 - third countries operating CBI/RBI schemes Paragraphs 17, 23 & Annex I,
Proposal 6, indents 18, 19 (first part) and 20
AMs covered: AM49 Bilcik; AM50 Arvanitis; AM80 Bilcik (partly); AM81 Bricmont;
AM137 Bricmont; AM138 Bilcik (partly)
AMs falling: AM82 Jaki; ; AM136 Jaki; AM139 Jaki
Separate vote: AM135 Bricmont
R.
Whereas some third countries included in Annex II of Regulation (EU) 2018/1806,
whose citizens have visa-free access to the Union, operate CBI schemes with low or no
residence requirements and weak security checks, particularly with respect to anti-
money laundering legislation; whereas such CBI schemes are advertised as ‘golden
passports’ with the express purpose of facilitating visa-free travel to the Union; whereas
some candidate countries operate similar schemes with the added expected benefit of
future Union membership;
S.
Whereas the right of third countries to allow their citizens to change their name poses a
risk because third-country nationals could acquire citizenship of a third country under a
CBI scheme and then change their name and enter the Union under that new name;
X (new).
Whereas the Montenegrin government has not decided to discontinue its
CBI scheme, although it had signalled the importance of phasing out the CBI scheme
in Montenegro fully and effectively as soon as possible 
(AM49); calls upon the
Montenegrin government to do so without delay;

17.
Notes that a risk stems from third countries that have CBI schemes and that benefit
from visa-free travel to the Union20 because third-country nationals can purchase
citizenship of those third countries with the sole purpose of being able to enter the
Union without any additional screening; stresses that risks are exacerbated for Union
candidate countries that have CBI/RBI schemes21 because the expected benefits of
future Union membership and visa-free travel within the Union area (AM50) may be a
factor;
23.
Requests that the Commission exert as much pressure as possible to ensure that third
countries that have CBI/RBI schemes in place and that benefit from visa free travel
under Annex II to Regulation (EU) 2018/1806 abolish their CBI schemes and reform
their RBI schemes to bring them in line with Union law and standards, and that the
Commission submit in 2022, on the basis of Article 77(2), point (a), TFEU, a proposal
for an act that would amend Regulation (EU) 2018/1806 in that regard; requests that
specific attention in that regard be paid to notes that under the revised Union
enlargement methodology, issues linked to CBI/RBI schemes are considered to be
complex and are dealt with across various negotiating clusters and chapters;
underlines the importance of gradual and diligent alignment to Union law of such
schemes by candidate and potential 
(AM80; AM81) candidate countries; proposes that
it be cessation of CBI schemes and regulation of RBI schemes be included in the
accession criteria;
Proposal 6: ensuring that third countries do not administer harmful RBI/CBI schemes
20
Antigua and Barbuda, Dominica, Grenada, Saint Kitts and Nevis and Saint Lucia.
21
Serbia, Albania, Turkey, Montenegro and North Macedonia.




Annex I, Proposal 6, indent 18, 19 (first part), 20

Third-country CBI schemes should be included in Regulation (EU) 2018/1806 as a
specific element to take into account when deciding on whether to include a particular
third country in the annexes to that Regulation, i.e. as a factor when deciding on the third
countries whose nationals are exempt from visa requirements. That element should also
be embedded in the visa suspension mechanism set out in Article 8 of that Regulation and
in the planned monitoring.

A new article should be added to Regulation (EC) No 810/2009 of the European
Parliament and of the Council of 13 July 2009 establishing a Community Code on Visas
(Visa Code)22 on cooperation with third countries on phasing out their CBI schemes and
bringing their RBI schemes in line with the new Regulation proposed under proposal 2
above. Such a new article could follow the logic of Article 25a of the current Visa Code,
providing for positive and negative incentives for third countries, aiming to limit the risks
of third-country CBI and RBI schemes.

For candidate countries and potential (AM137; AM138) candidate countries, the
complete phase-out of CBI schemes and the strict (AM138) regulation of RBI schemes
should be a prominent an integral (AM138) part of the accession criteria.
COMP 12A - third countries operating CBI/RBI schemes Annex I, Proposal 6, indent
19 (last part)
AMs falling: AM135 Bricmont
Annex I, Proposal 6, indent 19 (second part)
Such a new article could follow the logic of Article 25a of the current Visa Code,
providing for positive and negative incentives for third countries, aiming to limit the
risks of third-country CBI and RBI schemes.
COMP 13 - phase-out of CBI schemes - Paragraph 18-19 & proposal 1
AMs covered: AM55 Arvanitis; AM56 Bricmont; AM87 Arvanitis;
AMs falling: AM52 Jaki; AM53 Jaki; AM54 Yoncheva; AM57 Bilcik; AM85 Jaki;
AM86 Jaki; AM88 Bilcik;
18.
Considers that, in light of the particular risks posed by CBI schemes and their inherent
incompatibility with the principle of sincere cooperation, as acknowledged by the
Commission’s ongoing infringement procedures against two Member States, CBI
schemes should be phased out fully across the Member States and requests that the
Commission submit, before the end of its current mandate, a proposal for an act to that
end that could be based on Article 21(2), Article 79(2), Article 114, or Article 352
TFEU;
19.
Believes Considers that the phasing out of CBI schemes will require a transitional
period and believes 
(AM55, AM56) that, as CBI/RBI schemes constitute free riding
and produce severe consequences for the Union and the Member States, a financial
contribution to the Union budget is warrantedalso for both CBI schemes and RBI
schemes, for the CBI schemes until they are completely phased out 
(AM55; AM56) as
22
OJ L 243, 15.9.2009, p. 1.
14


a concrete expression of solidarity following from, inter alia, Article 80 TFEU;
requests, therefore, that the Commission in 2022, on the basis of Article 311 TFEU,
submit a proposal for the establishment of a new category of the Union’s own
resources, consisting of a ‘CBI & RBI Adjustment Mechanism’ that would place a levy
of a meaningful percentage on the investments made in Member States as part of
CBI/RBI schemes, reasonably estimated on the basis of all negative externalities for
the Union as a whole identified in the schemes
;
Proposal 1: a Union-wide gradual phasing out of CBI schemes by 2025
Annex I, Proposal 1, indent 1

A Union-wide notification system, with measurable targets, strictly applicable to the
existing programmes only and thus not allowing for new programmes to be legitimised
by this system 
(AM87)for the maximum number of citizenships to be acquired under
CBI schemes across the Member States should be established with the number to be
gradually lowered each year, reaching zero in 2025, thereby leading to the complete
phasing out of CBI schemes. Such a gradual phasing out will allow the Member States
that maintains CBI schemes to find alternative means to attract investment and sustain
their public finances. Such a phasing out is in line with the previous position of Parliament
expressed in several resolutions and is necessary in light of the profound challenge that
CBI schemes pose to the principle of sincere cooperation under the Treaties (Article 4(3)
TEU).

This proposal could be based on Article 21(2), Article 79(2) and, because CBI schemes
affect the single market, Article 114 TFEU.
COMP 14 - RBI regulation - Paragraph 21, 21a, Annex I, Proposal 2, indents 3, 4 & 12
AMs covered: AM60 Arvanitis; AM64 Yoncheva; AM65 Tudorache; AM66 Bilcik;
AM67 Yoncheva; AM68 Bilcik; AM69 Tudorache; AM70 Tudorache; AM73
Yoncheva; AM74 Tudorache; AM75 Yoncheva (partly); AM76 Bricmont; AM93
Bilcik (partly); AM94 Bricmont; AM95 Tudorache; AM133
AMs falling: AM61 Yoncheva; AM62 Jaki; AM63 Bilcik; AM71 Yoncheva; AM72
Yoncheva; AM89 Bilcik; AM90 Jaki; AM91 Jaki; AM92 Bilcik;
21.
Requests that the Commission submit, in 2022before the end of its current mandate, a
proposal for an act a regulationpossibly complemented by other legislative measures
where needed, which could be based on Article 79(2) and Articles 80, 82, 87 and 114
TFEU 
that would comprehensively regulate various aspects of RBI schemes with the
aim of harmonising standards and procedures and strengthening the fight against
organised crime, money laundering, corruption and tax evasion, covering, inter alia, the
following elements:
(a)
increased due diligence and rigorous background checks of the applicants and,
where necessary, their family members, including the sources of their funds,
mandatory checks against the Union large-scale justice and home affairs IT
systems and vetting procedures in third countries 
(AM64; AM65; AM66;
AM67)
;
(b)
the regulation and, proper certification and scrutiny of intermediaries as well as




(AM69) limitation of their activities and, in the case of CBI schemes, the
cessation of their services 
(AM68);
(c)
harmonised rules and (AM70) obligations on Member States to report to the
Commission regarding their RBI schemes and applications thereunder;
(d)
minimum physical residence requirements as a condition and minimum active
involvement in the investment, quality of investment, added value and
contribution to the economy as conditions 
(AM74) for acquiring residence under
RBI schemes;
(d a) a monitoring mechanism for the ex post control of successful applicants’
continued compliance with the legal requirements of RBI schemes; (AM73;
AM75);

21a Requests the Commission to ensure and uphold the high regulatory standards for
both CBI and RBI schemes in case a comprehensive regulation would apply to RBI
schemes before the complete phase-out of CBI schemes 
(AM60; AM71; AM76);
Proposal 2: a comprehensive regulation covering all schemes in the Union
Annex I, Proposal 2, indents 3, 4, 12

To address the specificities and widespread occurrence of RBI schemes across the
Member States, a dedicated Union legal framework in the form of a regulation is
necessary. Such a regulation will ensure Union harmonisation, limit the risks posed by
RBI schemes and make RBI schemes subject to Union monitoring, thereby enhancing
transparency and governance. It is also meant to discourage Member States from
establishing harmful RBI schemes.

The regulation should contain Union-level standards and procedures for increased due
diligence and rigorous background checks for applicants and of the source of their
wealth 
(AM95). A proposal for a regulation is more than warranted, especially in light of
the fact that the Group of Experts on Investor Citizenship and Residence Schemes never
made any progress as regards those elements. (AM93) In particular, all applicants should
be structurally crosschecked against all relevant national, Union (SIS, VIS, ECRIS-TCN,
ETIAS) and international (Interpol) (AM93) databases by the Member State authorities
while respecting fundamental rights standards (AM94). There should be an independent
verification of documents submitted, a full background check of all police records and
involvement in previous and current civil and criminal litigation, in-person interviews
with the applicants and a thorough verification of how the applicant’s wealth was
accumulated and is related to the reported income. The procedure should allow sufficient
time for the proper due diligence process and should foresee the possibility to annul
positive decisions retroactively in cases of substantiated misrepresentation or fraud
(AM94).
 This Regulation could be based on Article 79(2) and Articles 80, 82, 87 and, because RBI
schemes affect the single market, 114 TFEU.
16




(new indent) In case a regulation or any other legislative act concerning RBI schemes
comes into force before the complete phase-out of CBI schemes, all rules applicable to
RBI schemes shall apply to CBI schemes as well in order to avoid less strict controls
for CBI schemes than for RBI schemes 
(AM133).
COMP 15 - limited contributions CBI/RBI schemes to economy Recital J, Paragraph
20, Annex I, Proposal 2, indents 10, 11
AMs covered: AM59 Bilcik (partly)
AMs falling: AM58 Jaki; AM118 Jaki; AM119 Jaki; AM120 Bilcik
J.
Whereas the EPRS EAVA Study estimates that, from 2011 to 2019, 42 180 applications
under CBI/RBI schemes have been approved and more than 132 000 persons, including
family members of applicants from third countries, have obtained residence or
citizenship in Member States via CBI/RBI schemes with the total investment estimated
at EUR 21,4 billion23;
20.
Considers that the contribution of the CBI/RBI schemes should seek to bring greater
and measurable added value 
to the Member States’ real economy is limited and does
not sufficiently add to in terms of job creation, innovation (AM59) and
growthconsiders that the contribution of CBI/RBI schemes to the Member States’ real
economy is limited because and that considerable amounts of investment are made
directly into the real estate market or into funds; considers that the large investments
associated with CBI/RBI schemes could impact financial stability, particularly in small
Member States where inflows could represent a large share of GDP or foreign
investment24; requests that the Commission submit, in 2022, on the basis of Article
79(2) and Articles 80, 82, 87 and 114 TFEU, a proposal for an act that would include
Union-level rules on investments under RBI schemes in order to strengthen their added
value to the real economy and provide links to the priorities for the economic recovery
of the Union;
Annex I, Proposal 2, indents 10 & 11
 To combat tax avoidance, specific Union measures to prevent and tackle the
circumvention of the Common Reporting Standard through RBI schemes, in particular
the enhanced exchange of information between tax authorities and Financial
Intelligence Units (FIUs), 
should be introduced25.
 Rules on the types of investments required under RBI schemes should be introduced. A
significant majority of the required investment should consist of productive investments
in the real economy, in line with the priority areas of the green and digital economic
activity under the Recovery and Resilience Facility. Investment in real estate, investment
funds or trust funds or in government bonds or payments directly into the Member State
budget should not represent more than 25 % of the be limited to a minor part of the
invested amount. Furthermore, any payments directly into the Member State budget
23
EPRS EAVA Study.
24
EPRS EAVA Study, p. 36-39.
25
See Preventing abuse of residence by investment schemes to circumvent the CRS, OECD, 19 February
2018; Council Directive 2014/107/EU of 9 December 2014 amending Directive 2011/16/EU as regards
mandatory automatic exchange of information in the field of taxation (OJ L 359, 16.12.2014, p. 1).


should be limited so as not to create budgetary dependence on this source, and the
Commission should request Member States to assess such payments in the context of
the European Semester.

COMP 16 - CBI RBI new Union own resources - Annex I, Proposal 3, indents 13, 14
AMs covered: AM125 Bilcik (partly)
AMs falling: AM121 Weimers; AM122 Jaki; AM123 Jaki; AM124 Weimers; AM126
Jaki; AM127 Weimers; AM128 Bilcik
Proposal 3: a new category of the Union’s own resources, consisting of a ‘CBI and RBI
adjustment mechanism’

-

As all Member States and the Union institutions are confronted with the risks
and costs of the CBI and RBI schemes operated by some Member States, a common
mechanism, based on appropriate data and information (AM125)to offset the
negative consequences of CBI and RBI schemes to the Union as a whole is justified.
Moreover, the value of selling Member State citizenship or visas is inherently linked to
the Union rights and freedoms that come with it. By establishing a CBI and RBI
adjustment mechanism, the negative consequences borne by all Member States are
compensated through that a fair (AM125) contribution to the Union budget. It is a
matter of solidarity between the Member States having operating (AM125) CBI and
RBI schemes, the other Member States and Union institutions. In order for that
mechanism to be effective, the levy payable to the Union should be set at a meaningful
percentage of the investments made in Member States as part of CBI/RBI schemes,
reasonably estimated on the basis of all negative externalities identified in the
schemes
;
COMP 17 - Inter-institutional elements - Recital A, Paragraphs 24-26
AMs covered: AM84 Bilcik;
AMs falling: AM83 Bilcik
A.
Whereas Commission President von der Leyen, prior to her confirmation by Parliament,
pledged in the Political Guidelines for the next European Commission 2019-202426 to
support a right of initiative for Parliament and committed to respond with a legislative
act when Parliament adopts resolutions requesting that the Commission submit
legislative proposals;
24.
Reminds the Commission President of her commitment to Parliament’s right of
initiative and of her pledge to follow Parliament’s own-initiative legislative reports up
with a legislative act
in line with Union law principles, contained in the Political
Guidelines for the next European Commission 2019-2024; expects, therefore, the
Commission to follow up on this resolution with concrete legislative proposals;
25.
Considers that any financial implications of the requested proposals will be positive;
26
‘A Union that strives for more - My agenda for Europe - Political Guidelines for the next European
Commission 2019-2024’ by candidate for President of the European Commission Ursula von der Leyen,
p. 20, https://ec.europa.eu/info/sites/default/files/political-guidelines-next-commission_en_0.pdf. See also
Article 225 TFEU.
18

(AM84)
26.
Instructs its President to forward this resolution and the accompanying proposals to the
Commission and the Council.