Dies ist eine HTML Version eines Anhanges der Informationsfreiheitsanfrage 'Generelle Anweisungen'.
 
 
 
European Ombudsman 
 
 
Handbook for Legal Officers 
 
 
 
PROVISIONAL - INTERNAL USE ONLY - JANUARY 2012 
 
This  document  is  for  the  benefit  of  trainees and  LOs  beginning  in  the  office.    It 
contains updates to the last edition, but is still in the process of being updated with 
instructions given to LOs before the current date. In case of doubt, please check the 
LO notes in the folder S:\Legal\Departmental information\notes or consult Isabelle 
Foucaud. 
 
Last revised on 4/6/2012 by JSA
 
 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 
1 
INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................... 7 
1.1 
ABOUT THE HANDBOOK ........................................................................................................7 
1.2 
THE WORK OF THE EUROPEAN OMBUDSMAN .....................................................................7 
1.3 
LANGUAGES ...........................................................................................................................8 
1.4 
THE ROLE OF A LEGAL OFFICER .........................................................................................8 
1.4.1  Mission reports .....................................................................................................................10 
1.4.2  Material for the Website and the Annual Report .................................................................10 
1.4.3  Duty of confidentiality .........................................................................................................12 
1.5 
THE ADMINISTRATION OF COMPLAINTS-HANDLING ........................................................13 
1.5.1  Registration and assignment .................................................................................................13 
1.5.2  Multiple complaints .............................................................................................................14 
1.5.3  Complaint files .....................................................................................................................14 
1.5.4  Confidential complaints .......................................................................................................15 
1.5.5  Statistics ...............................................................................................................................15 
1.5.6  Deadlines ..............................................................................................................................16 
1.6 
OUTGOING COMPLAINTS CORRESPONDENCE ...................................................................17 
1.6.1  Monitoring and prior checking of the work of legal officers and trainees ...........................17 
1.6.2  Standard letters .....................................................................................................................19 
1.6.3  Signature, dispatching and filing ..........................................................................................19 
1.7 
SPECIAL RULES CONCERNING E-MAIL ...............................................................................20 
2 
THE DECISION WHETHER TO OPEN AN INQUIRY ................................. 21 
2.1 
INTRODUCTION ...................................................................................................................21 
2.1.1  Is it a complaint or something else? (for example a request for information) .....................21 
2.1.2  Should it be registered as a new complaint? ........................................................................21 
2.1.3  Other cases ...........................................................................................................................21 
2.1.4  Procedures for dealing with further correspondence from complainants .............................22 
2.2 
SUMMARY AND ANALYSIS IF THERE IS NO INQUIRY..........................................................23 
2.3 
THE REASONS FOR NOT OPENING AN INQUIRY ..................................................................24 
 


2.3.1  Unauthorised complainant....................................................................................................25 
2.3.2  Not against a Union institution, body, office or agency .......................................................25 
2.3.3  CJEU in its judicial role .......................................................................................................27 
2.3.4  Author/object not identified .................................................................................................27 
2.3.5  Court proceedings ................................................................................................................28 
2.3.6  Time limit .............................................................................................................................28 
2.3.7  Lack of prior administrative approaches ..............................................................................29 
2.3.8  Failure to exhaust internal remedies (work relationships with the institutions) ...................30 
2.3.9  Does not concern possible maladministration ......................................................................31 
2.3.10 Insufficient/No grounds........................................................................................................32 
2.4 
COMPLAINTS INVOLVING THE COMMITTEE ON PETITIONS ............................................34 
2.4.1  Complaints against the Committee on Petitions...................................................................34 
2.4.2  Complainants who also submit a petition ............................................................................34 
2.5 
COMPLAINTS INVOLVING DATA PROTECTION ISSUES ......................................................35 
2.6 
TRANSFERS AND ADVICE TO CONTACT OTHER BODIES ....................................................35 
2.6.1 General Principles .................................................................................................................35 
2.6.2 Transfers ................................................................................................................................37 
2.6.3 Transfer of a complaint to be dealt with as a petition by the European Parliament ..............38 
2.6.4  Transfers to SOLVIT ...........................................................................................................39 
2.6.5  Advice ..................................................................................................................................39 
2.6.5.1 Advice to contact a member of the European Network of Ombudsman .............................40 
2.6.5.2 Advice if appropriate administrative approaches have not been made ..............................40 
2.6.5.3 Advice to petition the European Parliament ......................................................................41 
2.6.5.4 Advice to contact SOLVIT ..................................................................................................41 
2.6.6 Exceptions and special arrangements ....................................................................................41 
2.6.6.1 Transfers .............................................................................................................................41 
2.6.6.2 Advice .................................................................................................................................42 
2.6.7  Petitions  transferred  from  the  Committee  on  Petitions  of  the  European  Parliament  to  the  European 
Ombudsman .........................................................................................................................42 
 


2.6.8  Transmission to the Ombudsman of the file on a petition. ..................................................43 
3 
CARRYING OUT INQUIRIES ........................................................................... 44 
3.1 
THE BASICS ..........................................................................................................................44 
3.1.1  The procedures in outline .....................................................................................................44 
3.1.2  Fair procedure ......................................................................................................................44 
3.1.3  Three essential rules .............................................................................................................45 
3.1.4  Further correspondence from complainants .........................................................................45 
3.2 
SUMMARY AND ANALYSIS FOR AN INQUIRY ......................................................................45 
3.2.1  Drafting the summary ..........................................................................................................45 
3.2.2  Terminology .........................................................................................................................47 
3.3 
SENDING THE COMPLAINT FOR AN OPINION .....................................................................48 
3.3.1  Letter to the institution .........................................................................................................48 
3.3.2  Letter to the complainant......................................................................................................49 
3.3.3. Information letter to national/regional ombudsmen in infringement cases ..........................49 
3.3.4  Multiple complaints .............................................................................................................50 
3.3.5  'Simplefied procedures  ("telephone procedures") ...............................................................50 
3.4 
CHECKING THE OPINION ....................................................................................................51 
3.4.1 Issues concerning admissibility or the Ombudsman’s competence ......................................52 
3.4.2  Possible maladministration outside the scope of the complaint ...........................................53 
3.4.3 Documents that the institution considers to be confidential/non-public................................53 
3.5 
THE COMPLAINANT'S OBSERVATIONS ...............................................................................53 
3.6 
THE NEXT STEP ...................................................................................................................54 
3.7 
FURTHER INQUIRIES BY LETTER ........................................................................................54 
3.8 
INSPECTION OF DOCUMENTS ..............................................................................................55 
3.8.1  Procedure for inspection of documents ................................................................................56 
3.9 
THE TAKING OF ORAL EVIDENCE .......................................................................................57 
3.10  SEARCHING FOR FRIENDLY SOLUTIONS ............................................................................58 
4 
WHAT IS MALADMINISTRATION? ............................................................... 60 
4.1 
DISCRETIONARY POWERS ..................................................................................................61 
4.2 
TENDERS AND CONTRACTS .................................................................................................61 
 


5 
DECISIONS CLOSING INQUIRIES ................................................................. 63 
5.1 
BASIC PRINCIPLES ...............................................................................................................63 
5.2 
THE POSSIBLE REASONS FOR CLOSING A CASE .................................................................63 
5.2.1  Dropped by the complainant ................................................................................................63 
5.2.2  Settled by the institution .......................................................................................................64 
5.2.3  No maladministration ...........................................................................................................64 
5.2.4  Friendly solution ..................................................................................................................64 
5.2.5  Critical remark .....................................................................................................................65 
5.2.6  Draft recommendation(s) accepted or partially accepted by the institution .........................67 
5.2.7  Following a special report ....................................................................................................68 
5.2.8  Other .....................................................................................................................................69 
5.3 
FURTHER REMARKS ............................................................................................................69 
5.4 
PROCEDURE FOR PREPARATION OF DECISIONS ................................................................69 
5.5 
FOLLOW UP BY INSTITUTIONS ON CRITICAL REMARKS OR FURTHER REMARKS ...........71 
5.6 
PROCEDURES IF THE COMPLAINANT WISHES TO CONTEST A DECISION OF THE 
OMBUDSMAN, OR COMPLAIN AGAINST THE RESPONSIBLE LO ........................................72
 
5.6.1  Requests for information about how to contest a decision of the Ombudsman ...................72 
5.6.2 Complaints against the LO responsible .................................................................................73 
6 
OWN-INITIATIVE INQUIRIES ......................................................................... 74 
7 
QUERIES FROM NATIONAL OMBUDSMEN ................................................ 75 
8 
PUBLIC ACCESS TO DOCUMENTS ................................................................ 76 
8.1 
GENERAL PRINCIPLES ........................................................................................................76 
8.2 
REQUESTS FOR ACCESS TO COMPLAINTS-RELATED DOCUMENTS ...................................76 
8.2.1  Written requests ...................................................................................................................76 
8.2.2  Oral requests .........................................................................................................................76 
8.3 
REQUESTS FOR ACCESS TO NON COMPLAINTS-RELATED DOCUMENTS ...........................77 
8.3.1  Written requests ...................................................................................................................77 
8.3.2 Oral requests ..........................................................................................................................77 
8.4 
REQUESTS INVOLVING LARGE NUMBERS OF DOCUMENTS ...............................................77 
8.5 
ON-THE-SPOT ACCESS ........................................................................................................77 
 


APPENDIX 1: TREATY ARTICLES........................................................................... 78 
APPENDIX 2: KEYWORDS ......................................................................................... 80 
APPENDIX 3: THE FORMAT OF A DECISION LETTER ..................................... 82 
APPENDIX 4: HOW TO PREPARE A DECISION SUMMARY ............................. 85 
APPENDIX  5:  DRAFT  STANDARD  LETTER  TO  BE  USED  WHERE  A 
COMPLAINANT  ASKS  HOW  TO  CONTEST  A  DECISION  OF  THE 
OMBUDSMAN ON A COMPLAINT (please also see section 5.6.1 of the 
handbook for further elements that may be included in the letter)
 ...................... 87 
APPENDIX 6: CHECK LIST FOR COMPLAINTS LETTERS PRESENTED 
FOR THE EO’S SIGNATURE. ........................................................................... 88 
APPENDIX 7: PRESENTATION OF DOCUMENTS IN SIGNATAIRES .............. 92 
APPENDIX 8: DIRECT TRANSMISSION OF CERTAIN DOCUMENTS TO 
CONTACT PERSONS IN COMMISSIONERS' CABINETS. .......................... 94 
APPENDIX  9:  ON-THE-DESK  GUIDELINES  FOR  DIFFICULT  PHONE 
CALLS. ................................................................................................................... 96 
 
 



INTRODUCTION 
1.1 
ABOUT THE HANDBOOK 
This  handbook  is  for  the  guidance  of  Legal  Officers  (LOs)  and  trainees  in  the  office  of  the 
European Ombudsman. It is intended both as an aid to those who are beginning work and as a 
reference manual for experienced LOs.  
The handbook is an internal guide and is not intended to have any legal effects. It is based on 
the working practices of the Ombudsman’s office. The Ombudsman may revise these working 
practices at any time. 
The  Ombudsman  is  the  ‘Guardian  of  good  administration'  and  his  staff  must  therefore  be 
particularly careful to follow the European Code of Good Administrative Behaviour. The Code 
is published on the Ombudsman's Website. 
The  Handbook  contains  references  to  the  Legal  section  of  the  Intranet  system  of  the  Office 
SISTEO  (LOIS), which is accessible through Internet Explorer on your computer. 
1.2 
THE WORK OF THE EUROPEAN OMBUDSMAN 
The  work  of  the  Ombudsman  is  based  on  Article  228  TFEU,  the  Statute  of  the  Ombudsman 
and  the  revised  implementing  provisions  adopted  by  the  Ombudsman  in  accordance  with 
Article 14 of the Statute. Both texts are also available in the legal section of SISTEO. 
The  possibility  to  complain  to  the  Ombudsman  is  one  of  the  rights  of  citizens  of  the  Union 
under Article 21 EC. Non-citizens who live in a Member State and companies, associations, or 
other  bodies  with  a  registered  office  in  the  Union,  may  also  complain.  Complaints  may  be 
made either directly, or through a Member of the European Parliament. The Ombudsman also 
has the power to conduct own-initiative inquiries. 
The Ombudsman investigates possible maladministration in the activities of Union institutions, 
bodies, offices or agencies, other than the Court of Justice of the European Union acting in its 
judicial role. No action by any other authority or person may be the subject of a complaint to 
the  Ombudsman.  The  Ombudsman  normally  deals  with  complaints  publicly,  unless  the 
complainant requests that the complaint be treated as confidential.  
The  European  Ombudsman  co-operates  closely  with  a  network  of  ombudsmen  and  similar 
bodies in the Member States.  Each national ombudsman office appoints a liaison officer (an 
up-to-date list is available through SISTEO/LOIS).  
The  European  Ombudsman  deals  with  queries  from  national  and  regional  ombudsmen  on 
questions of Union law and transfers complaints to them in appropriate cases.  
The  Treaty  requires  the  European  Ombudsman  to  be  completely  independent  in  the 
performance of his duties and to neither seek nor take instructions from any body. 
The Ombudsman reports annually to the European Parliament. The Annual Report is published 
as a printed document and electronically on the Website. An announcement is also published 
in the Official Journal. 
 


1.3 
LANGUAGES 
Complaints may be submitted to the European Ombudsman in any of the official languages of 
the EU. 
The  working  language  of  the  office  is  English.  Correspondence  with  institutions,  bodies, 
offices or agencies of the Union is normally conducted in English.  
All  correspondence  with  the  complainant  is  conducted  in  the  language  of  the  complaint.  If 
necessary,  the  responsible  LO  provides  the  Ombudsman  with  an  unofficial  translation  of 
letters presented for signature. 
If  an  LO  needs  assistance  in  reading  or  writing  the  language  of  a  complaint,  he/she  should 
consult  with  his/her  HLU  in  order  to  first  find  a  competent  person  within  the  office.  This  is 
usually  quicker  than  using  the  European  Parliament's  translation  service.  It  can  also  be  more 
effective,  since  there  is  greater  opportunity  for  discussion.  The  colleague  assisting  in  the 
language  in  question  should  however  not  be  requested  to  provide  a  translation,  as  such,  or  a 
detailed analysis, and should limit his/her assistance to the provision of basic information and 
the simple and quick adaptation of standard letters. If a translation is needed for the purpose of 
complaint dealing or drafting of a detailed reply, the LO or trainee in charge of the complaint 
will  request  a  translation  from  the  European  Parliament's  translation  service,  after  having 
obtained the approval from his/her HLU  
If the official language of the complaint is not covered by the Office, the translation is made 
by  the  European  Parliament's  translation  service.  In  order  to  ensure  the  coherence  of  the 
translation, it is better to ask for the translation of the whole correspondence, even if a standard 
letter in the language of the complaint already exists. However, if available, the latter should 
be sent to the EP's translation service for information. The LO should send the English version 
of the correspondence to be translated, together with the standard letter in the language of the 
complaint, if available, to the assistant of the Head of Legal Department, who will ensure that 
the necessary documents are transmitted to the 'TranslationEO' mailbox.  
The Ombudsman’s letters should not contain grammatical or spelling errors. A letter drafted 
by  a  non-native  speaker  should  be  checked  either  by  a  colleague  native  speaker  of  that 
language or by the lawyer linguists.   
Letters,  which  may  be  complaints,  are  sometimes  addressed  to  the  European  Ombudsman  in 
non-Union  languages.  These  letters  receive  a  standard  response  in  three  languages  (EN,  FR, 
DE).  
1.4 
THE ROLE OF A LEGAL OFFICER 
The main functions of an LO are to: 
  deal with complaints and own-initiative inquiries  
  monitor and manage his/her caseload and ensure a sustained pace in each inquiry, avoiding 
delays and backlogs 
  propose own-initiative inquiries  
  supply information for statistics  
 


  prepare decision summaries for the Annual Report and other publications  
  put complaint summaries, decisions and decision summaries on the S:\ drive  
  attend and contribute to LO meetings organised in his/her unit 
  keep  up-to-date  with  legal  and  other  important  developments  in  the  Union  and  in  their 
respective Member State and inform the office about them  
  submit reports to the Ombudsman on missions, visits and meetings  
  participate in information campaigns in relation to his/her Member State.  
Each complaint is registered by the Registry Unit. The Registry sorts out the complaints which 
are  outside  the  European  Ombudsman's  mandate.  These  complaints  are  dealt  with  by  the 
Registry according with the procedure described under section ....... below. Complaints which 
are within the Ombudsman's mandate are assigned by one of the two Directors to a particular 
LO.  The LO examines every complaint promptly and contacts the Registry immediately if it 
has been wrongly classified as a complaint, in order to prevent the acknowledgement of receipt 
from being sent and to have the correspondence properly classified. 
Otherwise, the LO analyses the complaint and prepares a summary in accordance with section 
2.1 below. 
When dealing with a complaint or own-initiative inquiry, the LO's task is to make proposals to 
the Ombudsman and to implement the latter’s instructions. Decisions on complaints within the 
mandate are decisions signed by the Ombudsman: except for the acknowledgement of receipt 
of a complaint, all outgoing correspondence bares the Ombudsman's signature1.  
Each LO deals personally with the complaints that are assigned to him/her. The LO must not 
ask another member of staff to make proposals for dealing with the case. If the LO considers 
that another LO should deal with the case, for example, because of the assignment of similar 
cases,  a  proposal  may  be  made  to  the  HLU  and  then  to  the  competent  Director.  The  only 
exception to this rule is that a trainee’s tutor may ask the trainee to make proposals on a case. 
However,  the  LO  remains  responsible  for  checking  the  proposal  and  presenting  it  to  the 
Ombudsman.  
The  acknowledgement  of  receipt  informs  the  complainant  of,  among  other  things,  the  name 
and telephone number of the LO who is dealing with the complaint. This allows complainants 
the possibility to obtain information easily concerning the handling  of their complaint at any 
stage. Where an inquiry has been opened and the complaint is  transferred to another LO, the 
new LO promptly drafts a letter for the Ombudsman’s signature informing the complainant of 
the  change.  The  LO  is  responsible  for  updating  data  in  SUPERVISEO  concerning  his/her 
cases  and  has  a  duty  to  amend,  delete  and  supplement  data  in  order  to  keep  information  on 
his/her cases up-to-date. This should normally be done immediately after an action has taken 
place.  SUPERVISEO  records  the  progress  of  each  case  and  enables  the  LO  to  monitor  the 
deadlines  involved.  The  LO  informs  the  Registry  promptly  of  changes  and  developments 
which should be included in the database for complaints. See also section 1.5.3 below. 
                                              
1  The LO should consult his or her supervisor or HLU before initiating any telephone contacts with the complainant or institution 
(see telephone procedures under section.1.5.3. ) 
 
 


LOs deal with telephone inquiries from complainants in accordance with Articles 12 and 22 of 
the Code of Good Administrative Behaviour.  
The  LO  deals,  as  far  as  possible,  with  complaints  in  date  order,  unless  the  Ombudsman,  the 
Directors or the HLU decides that a particular case should be given priority. A request from a 
complainant  for  priority  treatment  for  his/her  case  should  receive  a  reasoned  reply  from  the 
Ombudsman.   
1.4.1  Mission reports 
LOs  must  submit  to  the  Ombudsman  a  concise  written  report  on  each  mission  where  he/she 
has  accompanied  the  Ombudsman.  If  appropriate,  the  report  should  include  a  short  text 
suitable  for  publication  in  the  Annual  Report  (see  the  next  section).  After  approval  by  the 
Ombudsman,  the  report  is  usually  made  available  to  all  staff  through  SISTEO/Legal-
Lois/Mission reports.  Mission reports are normally drafted "for internal use only".  However, 
LO's should bare in mind that such report can become public documents if somebody ask for 
public access to those documents. 
In  the  case  of  information  visits  coordinated  by  the  Communication  Unit,  the  latter  is 
responsible for the follow-up, including the text to be included in the Annual Report. 
See below for reports on inspections of documents or the taking of oral evidence. 
When  an  LO  attends  a  conference  or  seminar,  the  programme  and  any  papers  from  the 
conference or seminar should be deposited in the library or by made available on SISTEO. The 
mission  report  should  provide  information  on  any  important  legal  points  which  arose  and 
identify  any  interesting  papers.  LOs  should  also  take  the  opportunity  of  such  missions  to 
distribute  information  material  about  the  European  Ombudsman.  They  should  identify  in 
advance the quantity and nature of the material to be distributed. 
1.4.2  Material for the Website and the Annual Report 
Publication of decisions on the website 
Since 1 July  1998, all  of the Ombudsman’s decisions and draft recommendations have been 
published  in  full  on  his  website  in  English  and  also  in  the  language  of  the  complainant,  if 
different.  A  number  of  earlier  decisions,  which  are  frequently  requested  by  researchers,  are 
also available on the website. Special Reports  are published on the website in all the official 
languages of the Union if the budget allows this. The only exception applies to inquiries closed 
after  a  'telephone  procedure',  or  when  the  complaint  has  been  dropped  by  the  complainant 
without the European Ombudsman having conducted any inquiry. 
In the case of a non-confidential decision, the LO saves the decision in both English and the 
language  of  the  complainant  under  S:\Legal\Decisions\Decis[Year]\[LO's  first  name].  The 
Communication 
Unit 
uses 
the 
texts 
of 
the 
decisions, 
as 
saved 
under 
S:\Legal\Decisions\Decis[Year]\[LO's  first  name],  to  prepare  the  versions  displayed  on  the 
website. Before putting the decision on the website, the complainant’s address is removed and 
the complainant’s name is replaced with an initial. 
 
10 

In  the  case  of  a  confidential  decision,  the  LO  saves  the  decision  under 
S:\Legal\Decisions\Decis[Year]\[LO's  first  name].  In  addition,  the  LO  produces  an 
anonymised  version  in  English  and  in  the  language  of  the  complainant,  if  different.  The 
anonymised versions are saved under S:\Legal\Decisions\Decis[Year]\Anonymised
In the anonymised version of the decision, the complainant is referred to as 'X' and considered 
to be masculine. Furthermore, any element which could identify the complainant is modified 
or removed. For instance, instead of saying that "the complainant worked for the Commission 
Delegation  in  Nairobi",  we  might  say  that  "the  complainant  worked  for  a  Commission 
delegation in an African country." 
The  anonymisation  of  a  confidential  decision  is  carried  out  by  the  LO  concerned  because  it 
requires knowledge of the case and the exercise of judgement. 
It is important that these instructions are correctly followed, so that the complainant’s request 
for confidentiality and his/her personal data are protected. 
If the LO has a query as to how to anonymise a particular case, he/she should consult the Head 
of the Legal Department.  
NB: It might be appropriate, in certain circumstances, to invite the complainant to give his/her 
comments  on  the  draft  anonymised  decision.  A  template  letter  can  be  found  on 
SISTEO/resources/drafting templates ???????: 
As  you  are  aware,  your  complaint  referred  to  above  has  been  dealt  with  as  confidential. 
Confidentiality  implies  that  there  is  no  public  access  to  the  complaint  or  to  other 
documents  contained  in  the  file.  The  Ombudsman's  decisions  on  confidential  complaints 
are published on his website, after the removal of any information which is likely to lead to 
the  identification  of  the  complainant  ('anonymisation').  This  implies,  among  other  things, 
that the masculine form is used throughout the anonymised version of the decision.    

My decision on your complaint, sent to you on [date], has been anonymised by my services 
according to the standard practice. However, in light of the circumstances of your case, I 
have decided to send you a copy of the anonymised version before publication, in order to 
allow you to express your view as to whether the anonymisation is adequate. Please  find 
enclosed a copy of the anonymised version of my decision.  

I would be grateful to receive your reply by [one month].  THIS COULD BE REMOVED 
from the handbook and put in the templates 
Publication of summaries of decisions on the Ombudsman's website 
A summary  must be produced  in English  for every decision closing an inquiry,  except when 
the inquiry was closed after a 'telephone procedure', or when the complaint was dropped by the 
complainant without the Ombudsman having conducted any inquiry. All such summaries are a 
vital  communication  tool  in  that  they  explain  clearly  and  simply  the  Ombudsman's  work  to 
citizens and highlight the results he obtains. 
The Directors and the  Secretary-General select individual summaries  to be translated into all 
the official languages of the Union. These selected summaries are published on the website in 
all official languages and constitute the main news items on the Ombudsman's website. 
 
11 

See Appendix 4 below for information on how to prepare a summary. 
Submitting the summary for approval 
Once the competent HLU has approved a draft decision, the LO prepares a draft summary of 
the  decision  and  the  usual  accompanying  letters.  He/she  then  sends  them  all  for  approval  to 
his/her Director for approval.  
Once approved by the competent Director, the LO sends the summary, the draft decision and 
the usual letters to the lawyer-linguist for checking. The EO requires that the lawyer-linguists' 
previous visa is apparent from the e-mail. A copy of the summary is sent to the SG. 
Once  the  Ombudsman  has  approved  the  various  drafts,  the  LO  sends  it  to  the  Directors' 
assistant, who saves the summaries in the appropriate folder. 
Material for the Annual Report 
The Annual Report may include references to presentations made by the Ombudsman's staff. 
This  is  based  on  the  visiting  group  information  gathered  by  the  responsible  members  of  the 
Communication Unit. Where LOs make presentations that are not coordinated by these Units, 
they should inform the Head of the Communication Unit by e-mail so that this information can 
be  taken  into  account  for  the  Report.  The  same  applies  when  LOs  participate  in  interesting 
events. In both cases, LOs should indicate the title of the event, as well as the date, location, 
nature of their participation (speech, etc), and the approximate number of participants. 
As mentioned in section 1.4.1 above, where LOs accompany the Ombudsman to an event (on 
mission  or  otherwise),  a  short  text  suitable  for  publication  in  the  Annual  Report  should  be 
prepared and sent to the Head of the Communication Unit by e-mail. 
1.4.3  Duty of confidentiality 
LOs should familiarise themselves with the provisions of: 
  Article  339  TFEU  and  Article  4  of  the  Statute  of  the  Ombudsman  concerning 
confidentiality;  
  Article 4a of the Statute of the Ombudsman and Articles 13 and 14 of the implementing 
provisions  concerning  the  complainant’s  access  to  his  or  her  file  and  public  access  to 
documents.  
LOs should also be aware of the provisions of Regulation (EC) 45/2001 of 18 December 2000 
on  the  protection  of  individuals  with  regard  to  the  processing  of  personal  data  by  the  Union 
institutions, bodies, offices or agencies and on the free movement of such data (2001 OJ L8/1 
and should consult the Ombudsman’s data protection officer when appropriate. LOs should be 
aware  that  the  Ombudsman  has  signed  a  Memorandum  of  Understanding  (MOU)  with  the 
European  data  Protection  Supervisor  (EDPS).  The  text  of  this  MOU  is  available  on  the 
Ombudsman's Website and on SISTEO. 
Although  complainants  are  made  aware  that  their  complaint  will  be  dealt  with  openly  unless 
they  request  confidentiality,  some  complainants  might  be  surprised  if  their  names  and 
addresses  are  revealed  to  e.g.  journalists  without  asking  their  permission.  The  names  and 
 
12 

addresses  of  complainants  should  not  therefore  be  revealed  to  third  parties,  unless  the 
complainant has given his or her express consent. 
Any confidential documents in the possession of an LO must be kept securely under lock and 
key.  
In  case  of  doubt  about  issues  of  confidentiality,  the  LO  should  promptly  consult  his  or  her 
HLU or the competent Director. 
In  order  to  preserve  space  for  negotiation  and  discussion,  correspondence  concerning  a 
possible  friendly  solution  is  confidential,  except  vis-à-vis  the  complainant,  until  the  case  is 
finally closed.  
1.5 
THE ADMINISTRATION OF COMPLAINTS-HANDLING 
1.5.1  Registration and assignment 
All complaints are transmitted to the Registry, who gives it a unique registration code based on 
the  number  of  complaints  received,  the  year  and  the  initials  of  the  responsible  LO;  for 
example, 1399/2002/IJH. The Registry also enters details of the complaint in the database. The 
Head of the registry identifies, assigns to a member of his unit and deals with the complaints 
which are outside the mandate of the Ombudsman. The assignment of complaints identified as 
being  within  the  mandate  of  the  Ombudsman  is  carried  out  by  one  of  the  Directors,  or 
delegate. 
Complaints inside the mandate and admissible should always be assigned to LOs. 
Where  an  admissible  complaint  contains  allegations  against  more  than  one  institution,  there 
will be a different registration number for each of the institutions concerned.  
Once  the  complaint  has  been  registered  and  assigned,  the  Registry  transmits  a  digital  copy 
electronically  to  the  responsible  person.  The  Registry  also  prepares  a  standard 
acknowledgement  of  receipt,  signed  by  the  Head  of  the  Registry,  in  the  language  of  the 
complaint. 
The acknowledgement of receipt informs the complainant of: 
  the procedure for considering the complaint  
  our publicity practices  
  the fact that time limits for administrative or judicial proceedings are not suspended while 
the Ombudsman deals with the complaint (Statute, Article 2.6).  
  the  name  and  telephone  number  of  the  LO  who  is  dealing  with  the  complaint  (see  also 
section 1.5.3 on notes of telephone calls).  
For outgoing correspondence see section 1.6 below. 
Correspondence  addressed  to  an  individual  member  of  staff  is  transmitted  promptly  to  the 
Registry for registration.  
 
13 

If one of the Directors transfers a complaint from one LO to another during the course of an 
inquiry, the complainant is informed of the change and the initials of the new LO are added to 
the registration number. 
1.5.2  Multiple complaints 
When  complaints  are  signed  by  different  persons  but  with  exactly  the  same  content,  the 
following rules apply : 
If the postal addresses are different, the complaints are registered separately.  
If there is only one postal address, the complaints all receive the same number. 
However,  if  more  than  10  complaints  on  the  same  subject  are  received,  the  11th  and 
subsequent  complaints  are  registered  under  the  same  number,  in  order  to  avoid  distortion 
of statistics. For the sake of efficiency, such complaints are normally assigned to the same 
LO, unless there are different languages involved. If there is an inquiry, the complaints are 
treated jointly. In order to avoid complaints received in one  year being registered under a 
previous  year’s  number,  the  procedure  for  numbering  multiple  complaints  on  the  same 
subject is re-started at the beginning of each year.  
1.5.3  Complaint files 
The  file  on  each  complaint  is  maintained  by  the  Registry.  After  closure  of  the  complaint  the 
file is transferred to the archives. 
Complaints related correspondence 
The Registry adds to the relevant file copies of all incoming and outgoing correspondence, as 
well as all other documents relevant to the inquiry and the eventual decision: e.g. notes relating 
to the inspection of documents, hearing of witnesses, or meetings to discuss a possible friendly 
solution. The LO who is dealing with the case  is responsible for transmitting the appropriate 
other documents to the Registry for registration and filing. 
Notes of telephone calls 
LOs  and  trainees  should  draft  a  written  note  of  any  telephone  conversations  relating  to 
complaints,  unless  the  contents  of  the  telephone  communication  are  clearly  insignificant  for 
the Ombudsman's inquiry (this does not apply to telephone calls relating to a new complaint, 
which can simply be referred to in the relevant summary). 
Such notes should contain at least the following information: 
1- The complaint reference 
2- The date and time of the call 
3- The name of the correspondent 
4- Who initiated the call  
5- The points made by the correspondent and the LO  
 
14 

6- The LO's name and the date of the note.  
LOs  and  trainees  should  consult  their  relevant  HLU  before  initiating  a telephone  call  in 
relation to a complaint.    
Trainees should always submit to their relevant HLU notes of telephone calls.  LOs should do 
so if the telephone call raises an important issue concerning the handling of the case, or if the 
call is from anyone other than the complainant.  
Such notes should be given to the Registry to be registered as part of the file on the complaint. 
Working notes 
LOs also normally keep working notes on each complaint with which they are dealing. These 
are not part of the file, though they normally contain copies of documents contained in the file.  
The  LO  concerned  should  dispose  securely  of  the  working  notes  when  they  are  no  longer 
required.  Relevant  working  notes  should  however  be  registered  and  joined  to  the  file  as 
preparatory documents. 
1.5.4  Confidential complaints  
A complaint is treated as confidential if the complainant so requests, or if the Ombudsman so 
decides on his own initiative in accordance with Article 10 of the Implementing Provisions.  
The  standard  acknowledgement  of  receipt  informs  complainants  of  our  publicity  practices. 
Normally, therefore, it is the complainant's responsibility to ask for confidentiality.  
However,  if  there  appear  to  be  grounds  for  the  Ombudsman  to  treat  the  complaint  as 
confidential on his own initiative (e.g. if it appears that the complainant may be mentally ill, or 
if  a  complaint  contains  allegations  against  a  third  party)  the  LO  makes  a  proposal  to  the 
Ombudsman accordingly.  
The  Registry  maintains  the  files  on  confidential  complaints  separately  for  greater  security.  
LOs should pay special attention to the security of their working notes on confidential cases. 
1.5.5  Statistics 
Statistics about our work are of great importance. They are included in the Annual Report and 
other publications, as well as being used for management purposes.  
Legal officers provide the necessary data by supplying the Registry with completed statistical 
information sheets as follows: 
  statistical sheet 1, for every new complaint where no inquiry is opened  
  statistical sheet 2, for every new complaint where an inquiry is opened  
  statistical sheet 3, for every case closed after an inquiry  
  Statistical sheets 1 and 2 ask the LO to assign keywords to the complaint.  
 
15 

There  are  four  key-word  fields  for  complaints  which  are  within  the  mandate  and  admissible, 
even if there are no grounds for an inquiry. Three are completed in every case, the fourth only 
where appropriate. Multiple entries in each field are possible.  
There is only one key-word field for cases that are outside the mandate, or inadmissible,  
For further explanation of keywords see appendix 2 below.  
The  Directors'  assistant  uses  the  information  available  in  the  database  to  update  internal 
management information about the complaints situation of each LO. 
1.5.6  Deadlines 
Good  administration  requires  that  decisions  be  taken  within  a  reasonable  time  and  without 
unnecessary delay. The Ombudsman must therefore be able to reach decisions on complaints 
within a reasonable time.  
To  make  this  possible,  the  Ombudsman  has  established  the  following  internal  management 
targets for his own office: 
(i) 
registration and acknowledgement of complaints within one week of reception;  
(ii) 
analysis of admissibility within one month;  
(iii) 
decision  closing  inquiries  within  one  year,  unless  there  are  exceptional  circumstances 
which justify a longer inquiry.  
In  inquiries  concerning  complaints  within  the  mandate,  if  the  Ombudsman  requires  further 
information  from  the  complainant  before  asking  the  institution  concerned  for  an  opinion,  he 
normally sets a one month deadline for the complainant to clarify or complement some aspects 
of his /her complaint.  
In accordance with the  Statute, the  Ombudsman normally gives the institution a three-month 
deadline for its opinion. This gives it the opportunity to make a full examination of the subject 
of the complaint and allows time for possible translation needs.  
If  the  Ombudsman  requires  further  information  from  the  institution  concerned,  he  normally 
sets a one month deadline. This period is reasonable since the institution has already had the 
opportunity to examine its position on the subject of the complaint. However, in the particular 
case of inquiries to the Commission, the deadline given should never be less than two months 
in order to respect the length of its internal procedures. 
Unless  there  are  exceptional  circumstances,  deadlines  are  set  to  fall  on  the  last  day  of  the 
month, since this makes for simplicity of monitoring (e.g. complaint sent to Commission on 14 
January 2006; deadline for opinion is 30 April 2006). 
Note:  The  Commission  has  agreed  to  the  EO's  proposal  that  the  normal  time  limit  for  an 
opinion  on  complaints  against  refusal  of  a  confirmatory  application  for  access  under 
Regulation 1049/2001 should be two months. See also section 3.3.1 below. 

If  there  is  a  good  reason  in  a  particular  case  why  the  institution  cannot  meet  a  deadline,  the 
Ombudsman  can accept the  request for extension of the deadline to a  specific date, provided 
 
16 

that  the  request  is  reasoned  and  is  made  before  the  expiry  of  the  original  deadline.    If  the 
institution does not request that extension before the deadline, the Ombudsman shall write to 
the institution reminding it of its obligations. If there is significant delay without a request for 
an extension, the responsible LO proposes action to the Ombudsman, normally a further letter 
to the institution. The complainant's are informed of the institution's request for extension of a 
deadline and of the reasons it has put forward for that request. 
The  Registry  and  the  Directors'  assistant  monitor  deadlines  using  the  computerised  database 
and  inform  the  Directors  and  the  responsible  LO  of  delays.  However,  each  LO  should  also 
monitor deadlines using his or her own records (see section 1.4 above). 
The complainant is normally invited to make observations within one month on the opinion of 
the institution and on its answers to any further inquiries. In practice, it should be remembered 
that deadlines are intended mainly for the benefit of complainants, and that the complainant is 
not  obliged  to  make  any  observations.  Therefore  the  Ombudsman  does  not  normally  write 
reminder letters to a complainant. 
The responsible LO dealing with an inquiry into an admissible case should normally submit a 
proposal  for  the  next  step  in  the  case  no  later  than  two  months  after  the  complainant’s 
observations  have  been  received,  or  the  deadline  for  observations  has  passed.  This  is  an 
extremely  important  obligation  of  all  LOs  and  their  particular  attention  and  care  is 
required in its respect

1.6 
OUTGOING COMPLAINTS CORRESPONDENCE 
All  outgoing  correspondence  in  relation  to  complaints  and  own-initiatives  is  signed  by  the 
Ombudsman  personally.  There  are  however  two  exceptions:  the  acknowledgement  of  receipt 
of  a  complaint,  which  is  signed  by  the  Head  of  the  Registry  and  the  letters/e-mails  to  the 
complainants  in  the  framework  of  telephone  procedures  which  are  signed  by  the  responsible 
LO (see........). 
The  above  rules  apply  to  e-mail  correspondence  as  well  as  to  letters  and  faxes.  All  e-mail 
correspondence  with  complainants  is  approved  by  the  Ombudsman  and  sent  from  the  "euro-
ombudsman" e-mail account in the name of the Ombudsman. 
Letters  should  be  drafted  with  the  relevant  provisions  of  the  Code  of  Good  Administrative 
Behaviour in mind (especially Articles 12-14). They should also be free from errors, including 
typographical and linguistic errors.  
1.6.1  Monitoring  and  prior  linguistic  checking  of  the  work  of  legal  officers  and 
trainees 
  During  2003,  a  system  was  introduced  for  monitoring  the  caseload  of  LOs  and  for 
linguistic  prior  checking  of  draft  documents  presented  for  the  Ombudsman’s  signature.  
Material  cannot  be  presented  to  the  Ombudsman  for  signature  until  corrected  by  lawyer 
linguists. 
The objectives of language checking 
The objectives of language checking are both external and internal. 
 
17 

  The  external  objective  is  to  help  the  Ombudsman  to  deliver  a  prompt  and  high-quality 
service to citizens. High-quality means that documents signed by the Ombudsman must be 
not only  substantively accurate but also correct from a presentational and linguistic point 
of view.  Internal summaries and notes, which are part of the  file on a complaint (and to 
which  the  complainant  therefore  has  the  right  of  access)  should  also  be  substantively 
accurate and clearly presented. 
The internal objective is to assist legal officers and trainees to maintain and, if possible, raise 
the quality of their work in the future.  
Responsibilities  of  the  person  presenting  work  to  be  checked  either  by  his/her 
HOU/Director or by the lawyer-linguists . 

Promptness 
Documents should be presented early enough to allow adequate time for checking, correction 
of  any  errors,  presentation  to  the  Ombudsman  for  signature,  and  copying  and  subsequent 
dispatch by the Registry. 
In  relation  to  the  one-month  deadline,  this  means  that  a  proposal  should  normally  be  made 
within two weeks from the date when the complaint is transmitted to the LO.  The responsible 
legal officer also has to inform his or her HLU of any case in which the one-month deadline 
has passed, giving the reason. 
As regards inquiries in admissible cases, the responsible legal officer should normally submit a 
proposal  for  the  next  step  in  the  case  no  later  than  two  months  after  the  complainant’s 
observations  have  been  received,  or  the  deadline  for  observations  has  passed.    If  the 
responsible legal officer is not in a position to submit a proposal, he or she has to inform his or 
her HLU, giving the reason. 
Quality 
The person who presents the document should do his or her best to ensure that it is ready for 
signature without corrections.  He or she should promptly make any corrections requested by 
the  person  responsible  for  the  language  checking  and/or  the  supervisor  and  also  try  to  learn 
from the corrections, thereby raising the quality of the work in future. 
Responsibilities of the persons checking (lawyer linguist and supervisor) 
The  lawyer  linguist  and  the  HLU/Director  should  identify  any  errors  of  substance  or 
presentation in documents for signature. 
Provided that the sense is clear, it is not essential to correct every linguistic or presentational 
error in internal summaries or notes, though such corrections may be useful in order to help the 
LO or trainee to avoid errors in future.   
During  the  annual  staff  reports  procedure,  the  Directors  consult  the  relevant  HLUs  who  are 
responsible for checking and monitoring the work of LOs.  Similar consultation takes place as 
regards the work of trainees in relation to a possible extension of traineeship.   
In case of serious or persistent problems as regards quality or respect for deadlines, the HLU 
informs the relevant Director immediately, so that a solution can be found. 
 
18 

The  HLU  should  also  ensure  that  the  relevant  Director  is  informed  of,  and  if  appropriate 
consulted about, complaints which raise important issues of principle, or which are likely to be 
of significant public interest.  
See also the checklist in appendix 6 below. 
1.6.2  Standard letters 
Standard  letters  for  many  purposes  exist  in  all  the  official  languages.  Access  to  the  standard 
letters is through the "resources" page of SISTEO/LOIS . 
For reasons of efficiency and consistency, LOs must always use the standard letters as a basis 
for correspondence in all appropriate cases.  
In  preparing  the  final  version  of  a  letter,  the  LO  uses  language  assistance  as  necessary  and 
performs  a  quality  check  for  linguistic,  typographical  and  other  errors  (e.g.;  erroneous 
deadlines such as 30 February or 31 September). It is also important to ensure that the standard 
letter  is  customised  for  the  correct  institution,  body,  office  or  agency,  by  checking  the  name 
and  address  of  the  institution,  the  name  of  the  President  and  the  name  of  the  responsible 
official to whom the correspondence is copied in the case of the European Parliament and the 
Council, for example.  
1.6.3  Signature, dispatching and filing   
Documents  for  the  signature  of  the  Ombudsman  should  be  prepared  in  the  appropriate 
templates respecting the visual identity of the Ombudsman. Don't use former letters you have 
drafted in the past, because perhaps they are no longer up-to-date.  
If the letter is to be copied to other recipients or if there are enclosures this is indicated at the 
bottom  of  the  last  page  after  the  Ombudsman’s  name.  In  order  to  avoid  possible  doubts  or 
mistakes  in  the  sending  of  documents,  it  is  good  practice  to  list  enclosures  sent  if  there  are 
more than one.  
Examples :  
If a complaint has one or more annexes  
Enclosures :   - complaint dated 7 March 2004 including 1 annex   
- complaint dated 7 March 2004 including x annexes  
If we are sending a complaint and further correspondence  
Enclosures :   - complaint dated 7 March 2004 [including x annex(es)]  
- further correspondence of 10 April 2004, 15 April 2004 and 5 May 2004 
NB: In the case of the  Commission, EPSO, the European Investment Bank, the European 
Economic  and  Social  Committee,  and  the  Parliament  where  enclosures  are  sent 
electronically only add "sent by e-mail". 

If the complaint is confidential, all related correspondence is marked CONFIDENTIAL. 
 
19 

The  paper  dossier  should  also  contain  documents  for  the  Ombudsman’s  information.  In  the 
case of a letter to the complainant saying that there is to be no inquiry:  
- a copy of the complaint  
- a summary of the complaint in English: see section 2.2 below  
- a note in English explaining the proposal  
- a completed statistical sheet 1  
If the case involves a new or interesting question concerning the Ombudsman's mandate, the 
conditions of admissibility of a complaint, or the requirement of grounds, the LO also includes 
a proposed text for the Annual Report. 
For letters to the complainant and the institution announcing the opening of an inquiry:  
- a copy of the complaint  
- a summary of the complaint in English: see section 3.2 below  
- a note in English explaining the proposal  
- a completed statistical sheet 2  
If appropriate, the Legal Officer should include in the dossier a proposal to use registered post 
for a particular letter. 
When the letter has been signed by the Ombudsman, the dossier is returned to the responsible 
LO.  After  removing  the  documents  included  for  the  Ombudsman’s  information,  the  LO 
promptly  transmits  the  dossier  to  the  secretaries  responsible  for  outgoing  correspondence, 
together with a transmission sheet. The secretary stamps the date and protocol number on the 
letter, makes copies for the file and the LO and dispatches the original letter. (IS THIS STILL 
ACCURATE, PETER?) 
No change of any kind may be made to a letter that has been signed by the Ombudsman. If a 
correction or amendment is necessary, the LO must present a new letter for signature.  
1.7 
SPECIAL RULES CONCERNING E-MAIL 
Official  e-mail  correspondence  should  normally  be  received  in  and  sent  from  the  "euro-
ombudsman" account. LOs should not inform complainants or other citizens of their individual 
e-mail addresses.  
An LO who receives  complaints-related e-mail in his or her own e-mail account prints it out 
and  transmits  it  to  the  Registry  for  registration  and  assignment  in  the  normal  way.  The  LO 
should  reply  to  the  e-mail  informing  the  complainant  that  the  correspondence  has  been 
received and registered and, if appropriate, that the Ombudsman will reply in due course. 
See section 1.5.2 above for guidance on how to deal with mass e-mail campaigns.  
 
20 


THE DECISION WHETHER TO OPEN AN INQUIRY  
2.1 
INTRODUCTION 
After  registration  in  the  Registry  and  assignment  of  complaints  within  the  mandate  by  the 
Diorectors, a digital copy is transmited electronically to the responsible LO. The LO examines 
the complaint promptly and, after having consulted with his/her HLU, informs the competent 
Director if it has been wrongly classified as a complaint, or if he or she is aware that similar 
complaints  have  been  assigned  to  another  LO.  The  Director  might  decide  to  re-assign  the 
complaint or to treat it as normal correspondence and shall inform the Head of the Registry. 
2.1.1  Is it a complaint or something else? (for example, a request for information) 
The fundamental principle is to give effect to the author's intentions.  A letter which seems to 
be  intended  as  a  complaint  is  registered  as  such,  even  if  the  issue  is  not  within  the 
Ombudsman’s mandate.  The vital thing is a description of a problem and a request or wish for 
intervention to solve it.  Naturally, if the author expressly states that it is not a complaint, then 
it is not.   
In case of doubt, the registry should normally register it as a complaint.  There are two reasons 
for this.  First, our business is dealing with complaints and most people who contact us know 
that.    Second,  registration  as  a  complaint  provides  a  clear  framework  for  dealing  with  the 
matter and ensures that our work is recorded as an output.   
Some people may be offended if we treat a letter as a complaint when it was not intended as 
such.    To  prevent  this,  the  person  drafting  the  answer  to  a  complaint  outside  the  mandate 
should  avoid  qualifying  the  citizen's  letter  as  a  complaint.    He/she  could  refer  instead  to  the 
subject, problem or grievance which the author raises.  The rest of the standard letter explains 
why  we  cannot  deal  with  the  matter  as  a  complaint  and,  if  possible,  gives  advice  about  a 
competent body.  This is normally the most helpful reply, even if the author did not intend the 
letter as a complaint. 
2.1.2  Should it be registered as a new complaint? 
There is nothing to prevent one person making several different complaints, either at the same 
time or over a period.  Each separate complaint should be registered with a separate number. 
Where a complaint has been closed, subsequent correspondence from the complainant should 
not automatically be registered under the old number.  If it is a new claim or allegation which 
requires an answer, it should be registered as a new complaint.  In case of doubt, the question 
should be submitted to the competent HLU. 
2.1.3  Other cases 
In all other cases, the LO promptly prepares in English a summary of the complaint, including 
an analysis of whether it meets the conditions necessary to open an inquiry. 
 
21 

In order to ensure accurate statistics, the summary and analysis should be performed even in 
cases where the complainant drops the complaint before the Ombudsman has made a decision 
on admissibility.  
The  summary  is  part  of  the  file  on  the  case  and  the  complainant  therefore  has  the  right  of 
access to it. It should be written in a correct and business-like way and should not contain any 
irrelevant material or remarks. 
Based on experience, the information needed to provide an adequate summary of a complaint 
outside the mandate should normally fit on one page.  Some cases may need a slightly longer 
summary, for example to give background information on previous complaints, or to explain 
why there are insufficient grounds for an inquiry, or why some of the  allegations and claims 
are inadmissible at this stage. 
 
Again based on experience, summaries of complaints that lead to an inquiry usually need to be 
two or three pages in length.   
 
Please treat the above as guidelines, not mechanical rules. 
 
In exceptional cases, it may be necessary for a summary to be significantly longer.  If the facts 
or the legal issues raised are particularly complex, the main part of the summary should give a 
brief overview and the more detailed material should be put in an annex.    
 
Please  note  that  if  the  essential  elements  of  a  complaint  cannot  be  briefly  and  easily 
summarised,  the  LO  should  consider  whether  the  object  of  the  complaint  is  sufficiently 
identified  (Art  2.3  of  the  Statute).    It  should  not  be  necessary  to  study  extensive  annexes in 
order  to  discover  the  essential  elements  of  the  case  and  the  complainant’s  allegations  and 
claims.  In case of doubt, consult your HLU at an early stage.  
 
The  Ombudsman  can  only  open  an  inquiry  into  a  complaint  if  the  complaint  is  within  the 
mandate, fulfils the conditions of admissibility and if there are grounds to do so. 
The  letter  informing  the  complainant  of  the  decision  to  open  an  inquiry  or  not  should  be 
dispatched within one month of the date of registration of the complaint.  
The  standard  letters  do  not  contain  any  advice  to  the  complainant  (except  SL-A-8)  and  this 
element should be added by the LO as appropriate.  
The different reasons for not opening an inquiry are analysed in section 2.3. 
If the LO proposes to open an inquiry, the summary is prepared in accordance with section 3.2 
below. The inquiry procedure is described in the rest of Part 3. 
2.1.4  Procedures for dealing with further correspondence from complainants  
The  responsible  LO  should  examine  further  correspondence  promptly  to  find  out  what  it 
contains and check whether it in fact relates to the complaint number under which it has been 
registered.  
 
22 

If it is a new complaint, the LO should have it registered as such. If it is not complaint-related, 
the LO should have it registered as ordinary correspondence.  
In the case of a complaint awaiting a decision on admissibility, the responsible LO takes the 
further correspondence into account in the summary of the case and the subsequent letter to the 
complainant. 
In a case where an inquiry is open, further correspondence, even if sent only for information, is 
normally forwarded to the institution concerned and the complainant is informed accordingly. 
In  other  cases,  if  it  is  absolutely  clear  that  the  further  correspondence  was  sent  only  for 
information, the LO records this fact in a brief note for the file and no further action is taken.  
(Trainees should submit the relevant note to their supervisor.)  If there could be any doubt, it is 
prudent to send  a brief  reply informing the complainant that the letter has been received and 
that  the  Ombudsman  assumes  that  it  was  meant  only  for  information.  This  gives  the 
complainant a chance to correct any misunderstanding. 
If a reply is required, the LO drafts the appropriate reply for the Ombudsman’s signature and 
submits it to his or her HLU and afterwards to the competent Director, together with a note for 
the Ombudsman. Naturally, the reply should be as professional and helpful as possible. 
Letters  complaining  about  our  decisions  or  procedures  should  be  dealt  with  as  a  priority  (an 
angry complainant who may  be satisfied if we  answer quickly and constructively is likely to 
become  even  more  annoyed  if  a  reply  is  delayed).  LOs  should  bare  in  mind  that  in  case  of 
further  correspondence  challenging  the  EO's  decision,  a  prompt  and  thorough  answer  to  all 
points raised of fact and law raised in the complainant's letter, is of utmost importance. 
Special procedures 
1 Very frequent correspondence for information  
In cases of very frequent correspondence that is only for information, notes may be prepared 
monthly  relating  to  all  the  correspondence  in  that  period.  Such  notes  will  normally  be  brief.  
Exceptionally  and  with  the  approval  of  the  head  of  the  legal  department,  frequent  e-mail 
correspondence may be recorded only electronically. 
2 Repetitive correspondences seeking a reply 
In  very  exceptional  cases  of  repetitive  correspondence,  it  may  be  necessary  to  inform  a 
complainant that further correspondence will not be answered unless there are new elements.  
The appropriate final letter should only be proposed for the Ombudsman’s signature with the 
approval  of  the  relevant  Director.  There  are  however  certain  pre-requisites  that  must  be  met 
before  correspondence  with  complainants  or  citizens  in  general  can  be  discontinued.  Please 
consult your hierarchy before proposing any such measures to the Ombudsman.  
2.2 
SUMMARY AND ANALYSIS IF THERE IS NO INQUIRY 
If no inquiry is to be opened, the summary and analysis of the complaint includes:  

The following information, as far as possible (please use the appropriate template): 
- who is complaining?  
 
23 

- against whom?  
- what is the complaint about?  
- what act or omission is the subject of the complaint?  
- when did it happen?  
- what is the precise allegation? (e.g. that a decision is unlawful)  
- what are the grounds for this allegation?  
-  what  is  the  complainant's  claim?  (e.g.  that  a  decision  be  revoked,  or  to  receive 
compensation).  

The reason or reasons for not opening an inquiry 

Possible advice to address another competent body or proposal for a transfer to such a 
body. 
If the complainant requests confidentiality, the summary states this.  
2.3 
THE REASONS FOR NOT OPENING AN INQUIRY 
The reasons for not conducting an inquiry are classified into three categories: (i) the complaint 
is outside the mandate; (ii) it is within the mandate, but inadmissible; or (iii) although within 
the  mandate  and  admissible,  in  very  specific  and  limited  number  of  cases,  the  Ombudsman 
considers that there are no grounds for an inquiry.  
Sometimes there will be more than one possible reason for not opening an inquiry. The reason 
given in the letter to the complainant is normally the highest applicable reason in the following 
hierarchy:  

Not against a Union institution, body, office or agency  

Against Court of Justice of the European Union in its judicial role  

Author/object not identified  

Being dealt with or settled by a court  

Time limit exceeded  

Lack of prior administrative approaches  

Non-exhaustion of remedies in staff cases  

Does not concern possible maladministration  

No grounds to justify an inquiry because another competent body is already dealing or 
has dealt with the matter  
10 
Not sufficient grounds to justify an inquiry.  
There is no point in giving multiple reasons why a complaint cannot be dealt with. Normally 
only the highest reason in the hierarchy is used, to ensure consistency of treatment.  However, 
two exceptions should be noted. 
 
24 

(i)  A  complaint  from  an  unauthorised  complainant.    Most  such  complaints  are  outside  the 
mandate  or  inadmissible  for  another  reason,  usually  because  they  are  not  against  a  Union 
institution, body, office or agency.  In such cases, Article 2 (1) is used and the complainant is 
also informed that only a citizen of the Union or a natural or legal person residing or having its 
registered  office  in  a  Member  State  of  the  Union)  is  entitled  to  complain.    In  the  case  of  a 
complaint from a candidate or accession state the following is used: 
Finally,  I  would  like  to  take  this  opportunity  to  inform  you  that,  when  a  State  joins  the 
European  Union,  its  nationals  become  citizens  of  the  Union  and  that  one  of  the  rights  of 
citizenship is to complain to the European Ombudsman. Please find enclosed a leaflet that 
outlines the work of the Ombudsman. 

(ii) If a complaint seeks to contest a decision  of a national court, the letter of inadmissibility 
refers both to Article 2.1 and to Article 1.3 of the Statute.   
The reference to Article 1.3 could be as follows: 
I  also  draw  your  attention  to  the  fact  that  Article  1.3  of  the  Statute  of  the  European 
Ombudsman provides that the Ombudsman  may not intervene in cases before courts or 
question the soundness of a court's ruling. 
Note  that  the  complainant  is  not  required  to  be  individually  affected  by  the  alleged 
maladministration  or  to  have  suffered  personally  from  it  in  any  way:  i.e.  actio  popularis 
complaints are admissible: see e.g. case 794/96/VK (1997 Annual Report). 
2.3.1  Unauthorised complainant  
Legal basis: Article 228 TFEU (ex Article 195 EC), Article 2.2 Statute 
A complaint may be made by "any citizen of the Union or any natural or legal person residing 
or having its registered office in a Member State of the Union." 
Standard letter: SL-A-1 
Resident is interpreted to mean a person who is physically present in the territory of a Member 
State, even if he or she may not be legally resident: case 972/96 (1996 Annual Report p. 15). 
NB  complaints  are  not  normally  rejected  only  on  the  ground  that  they  are  not  from  an 
authorised  complainant:  see  2.3  (i)  above.  Current  practice  is  that  if  a  complaint  from  an 
unauthorised person is otherwise within the mandate and admissible, consideration is given to 
the possibility of an own-initiative inquiry into the alleged case of maladministration.  
2.3.2  Not against a Union institution, body, office or agency  
Legal basis: Article 228 TFEU (ex Article 195 EC), Article 2.1 Statute 
Standard letter: SL-A-2 
The  Union  institutions  are  those  listed  in  Article  13  TEU:  the  European  Parliament,  the 
Commission,  the  Council,  the  Court  of  Auditors  and  the  Court  of  Justice  of  the  European 
Union.  
 
25 

There  is  no  definition  or  authoritative  list  of  Union  bodies.  The  term  includes  bodies 
established by the Treaties, such as the European Investment Bank, the Economic and Social 
Committee, the Committee of the Regions, the European Central Bank, the European External 
Action Service (EEAS), as well as bodies set up by legislation under the Treaty. The so-called 
"decentralised agencies" are also Union bodies:  
  Community Plant Variety Office  
  European Medicines Agency  
  European Agency for Safety and Health at Work  
  European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training (Cedefop)  
  European Environment Agency  
  European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions  
  European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction  
  The European Monitoring Centre on Racism and Xenophobia  
  European Training Foundation  
  Office for Harmonisation in the Internal Market  
  Translation Centre for Bodies of the European Union  
  European Agency for Reconstruction 
  European Aviation Safety Agency 
  European Maritime Safety Agency 
  European Food Safety Authority 
  Eurojust 
A list of the agencies can be found in the Europa website:  http://europa.eu/index_en.htm 
The Ombudsman has considered that the following are not  Union institutions, bodies, offices 
or agencies: 
The  Centre  for  the  Development  of  Industry  and  the  Technical  Centre  for  Agricultural  and 
Rural Co-operation, both established under the Lomé Convention and governed by the ACP - 
EC Committee of Ambassadors: cases 41/97/(VK)OV and 218/98/OV (1998 Annual Report). 
The European Molecular Biology Laboratory, case 374/96/PD (1996 Annual Report). 
Eurocontrol, cases 911/99/ME and 1113/99/PR. 
The European University Institute, case 2225/2003/(ADB)PB summarised in chapter 3 of the 
2004 Annual Report. 
The  European  Schools:  cases  199/23.10.95/EP/B/KT  (1996  Annual  Report)  and  989/97/OV 
(1997  Annual  Report).  However,  the  Ombudsman  has  dealt  with  complaints  concerning  the 
European  Schools  and  with  complaints  concerning  the  Centre  for  Development  of  Industry 
 
26 

(CDI),  insofar  as  the  complaints  were  directed  against  the  Commission  and  Council.  In 
relation  to  the  European  Schools,  the  Ombudsman  considered  that  the  Commission  has  a 
general  responsibility,  arising  from  its  representation  on  the  Governing  Boards  and  the 
provision of funding by the Communities but that this responsibility does not extend to matters 
of internal management. 
As  regards  comitology  committees,  the  case-law  of  the  CFI  suggests  that  they  should  be 
regarded  as  coming  under  the  Commission  and  not  as  separate  Union  bodies  (see  Case  T-
188/97, Rothmans International BV v Commission, judgement of 19 July 1999 paras 58-60). 
Complaints against individual MEPs 
Complaints  against  individual  MEPs  are  outside  the  Ombudsman's  mandate  because  they  do 
not concern an act of a Union institution, body, office or agency. They are therefore closed on 
the  basis  of  Article  2.1.  Normal  practice  is  to  send  a  copy  of  the  complaint  and  of  the 
Ombudsman's reply to the MEP for information. 
Complaints contesting a decision of a national court 
If the complainant seeks to contest a decision of a national court, the letter of inadmissibility 
refers both to Article 2.1 and to Article 1.3 of the Statute.   
2.3.3  CJEU in its judicial role  
Legal basis: Article 228 TFEU (ex Article 195 EC) 
Standard letter: SL-A-3 
The Presidents of the Court of Justice and the Court of First Instance (now the General Court) 
have  stated  that  the  Courts  are  acting  in  their  judicial  role  when  dealing  with  requests  for 
access to case-files held in the Courts’ registries: see case 126/97/VK. 
2.3.4  Author/object not identified 
Legal basis: Article 2.3 Statute 
Standard letter: SL-A-4 
Author:  In  order  to  send  a  reply/decision/correspondence  to  a  complainant,  we  need  to  have 
his/her  name  and  address,  or  at  least  his/her  e-mail  address.  If  we  have  an  address  but  no 
name, the letter is sent to the address. If we have no address, the LO prepares the appropriate 
letter to close the case, which remains on the file after signature by the Ombudsman. The same 
applies  when  we  have  no  name  and  no  address.  The  reason  for  closing  the  case  should  be 
appropriate  for  the  circumstances  (for  instance  Article  2.1,  2.2  or  2.4  of  the  Statute)  and  not 
always  Article  2.3,  which  should  only  be  used  if  the  object  of  the  complaint  is  unclear  (see 
below). 
Object: If it is not possible to make a summary of the complaint because it is too unclear, or if 
the complainant can reasonably be expected to state his or her own complaint  more precisely 
(e.g., a company or a lawyer), then the complaint should be treated as inadmissible because its 
 
27 

object  cannot  be  identified.  A  brochure  including  the  standard  complaint  form  should  be 
enclosed with the letter to the complainant. 
2.3.5  Court proceedings 
Legal bases: Article 228 TFEU excludes an inquiry by the Ombudsman if "the alleged facts 
are or have been the subject of legal proceedings". 

Article 1.3 Statute "The Ombudsman may not intervene in cases before courts or question 
the soundness of a court’s ruling". 

Standard letters: 
SL-A-5 if the complainant wants the Ombudsman to investigate a case which is being, or has 
been, dealt with by a court anywhere in the world. 
SL-A-6  if  the  complainant  requests  the  Ombudsman's  intervention  in  proceedings  before  a 
court anywhere in the world, or if the complaint questions the soundness of a court’s ruling. 
For a case where both provisions applied, see 223/98/IJH (1998 Annual Report p. 24). 
The Article 228 TFEU exclusion applies where the parties are the same, i.e. the complainant 
and the institution, body, office or agency complained against are, or were, also parties in the 
legal proceedings.  
If the same issue is currently before a court, but the parties are not the same, the Ombudsman 
may  decide  to  suspend  any  inquiry  until  the  court  gives  judgement:  see  e.g.  joined  cases 
463/96/PD,  770/96/PD  and  1017/96/JMA  (Annual  Report  1997)  and  the  decision  on  case 
463/96/PD. 
If  the  complaint  does  not  refer  to  a  court  case,  we  normally  do  not  make  inquiries  about  the 
question  at  the  stage  of  deciding  admissibility.  If  the  complainant,  or  the  institution,  body, 
office  or  agency  concerned,  subsequently  inform  about  legal  proceedings,  the  Ombudsman 
then  decides  whether  to  suspend  his  inquiries,  or  terminate  them  under  Article  2.7  of  the 
Statute. 
NB  (i)  Where  a  complainant  seeks  to  contest  a  decision  of  a  national  court,  the  letter  of 
inadmissibility  should  refer  both  to  Article  2.1  and  to  Article  1.3  of  the  Statute.  (see  2.3.2 
above).    (ii)  for  complaints  against  the  Court  of  Justice  of  the  European  Union,  see  section 
2.3.3 above. 
2.3.6  Time limit 
Legal basis: Article 2.4 Statute  
"A complaint shall be made within two years of the date on which the facts on which it is 
based came to the attention of the person lodging the complaint" 

Standard letter: SL-A-7 
The  time-limit  also  applies  if  the  complaint  is  about  an  alleged  failure  to  answer  by  the 
institution, body, office or agency concerned. If the complainant has waited for more than two 
 
28 

years  for  an  answer  before  complaining,  he  should  be  invited  to  repeat  its  question  to  the 
institution before turning to the EO. 
2.3.7  Lack of prior administrative approaches 
Legal basis: Article 2.4 Statute 
"A  complaint  …  must  be  preceded  by  the  appropriate  administrative  approaches  to  the 
institutions and bodies concerned." 

Standard letter: SL-A-8 
It  is  for  the  Ombudsman  to  decide  what  prior  administrative  approaches,  if  any,  are 
appropriate.  The  idea  is  for  the  institution,  body,  office  or  agency  concerned  to  have  the 
possibility to correct its behaviour, or at least explain itself, before a complaint is made to the 
Ombudsman. The prior approach could be made in writing or by telephone. 
Prior administrative approaches are not considered appropriate for actio popularis complaints 
in  which  the  institution  is  obviously  aware  of  the  issue  concerned  and  has  already  had  an 
opportunity to define its position. see e.g. case 794/96/VK (1997 Annual Report); joined cases 
971/96/PD,  1039/96/PD,  1111/96/  PD  and  48/97/PD  (the  MEPs  allowances  cases:  1997 
Annual Report). 
In cases where the complainant writes to the Ombudsman at the same time as, or very shortly 
after addressing the institution concerned, the complaint is inadmissible under Article 2.4. The 
letter  to  the  complainant  should  suggest  waiting  a  reasonable  time  for  a  response  from  the 
institution before  possibly renewing the  complaint. As a rough rule  of thumb, two  months is 
long enough to wait before making a complaint to the Ombudsman. 
As  regards  Article  258  TFEU  (infringement)  complaints,  the  starting  point  is  that  the 
Commission  is  aware  of  the  file  and  has  had  the  opportunity  to  explain  its  position  to  the 
complainant.  Normally, therefore, it is not appropriate to require the complainant to carry out 
additional administrative approaches before complaining to the Ombudsman.  
If the complainant is clearly putting forward new evidence to support the complaint against the 
Member  State,  it  may  be  appropriate  in  some  cases  for  the  complainant  first  to  bring  such 
evidence to the attention of the Commission.   
Experience suggests, however, that it is rare for a complainant to come up with new evidence 
as opposed to a repetition, or different interpretation, of evidence that the Commission already 
has in its possession. 
Furthermore, additional administrative approaches may not always be appropriate even when 
the  complainant  does  present  new  evidence:  for  example,  if  the  complainant  argues  that  the 
Commission should have discovered the new evidence for itself, or if there are also allegations 
of deficiencies or irregularities in the procedure leading to the closure of the case. 
In  those  few  cases  where  it  is  appropriate  to  ask  the  complainant  to  make  additional 
administrative  approaches,  it  would  be  helpful  to  depart  from  the  standard  wording  and  to 
explain the reason why the Ombudsman considers that additional approaches are appropriate. 
 
29 

2.3.8  Failure to exhaust internal remedies (work relationships with the institutions) 
Legal basis: Article 2.8 of the Statute  
"No complaint may be made to the Ombudsman that concerns work relationships between 
the  Community  institutions  and  bodies  (now  Union  institutions,  bodies,  offices  and 
agencies)  and  their  officials  and  other  servants  unless  all  possibilities  for  submission  of 
internal administrative requests and complaints, in particular the procedures referred to in 
Article  90  (1)  and  (2)  of  the  Staff  Regulations,  have  been  exhausted  by  the  person 
concerned (...)" 

Standard letter: SL-A-9 
Article 2.8 of the Statute refers only to Article  90 (1) and (2) of the Staff Regulations.  Once 
these  internal  procedures  have  been  exhausted,  the  complainant  may  choose  either  to  pursue 
his complaint in accordance with Article 91 of the Staff Regulations, by appeal to the Court of 
Justice of the European Union, or to complain to the Ombudsman. 
The mere fact that the complainant disagrees with an answer given under Article 90 (2) of the 
Staff  Regulations  is  not  an  allegation  of  maladministration.  Nor  is  it  evidence  to  support  an 
allegation of maladministration. 
A  complaint  to  the  Ombudsman  by  an  official  or  other  servant  who  had  the  possibility  to 
submit a complaint under Article 90 (2) and who failed to do  so before the deadline expired 
does  not  comply  with  the  condition  laid  down  by  Art.  2  (8)  (see  cases  545/2000/IP; 
546/2000/IP; 547/2000/IP). 
Advice in cases where Article 2.8 applies 
The complainant should be  advised of the possibilities  under Article  90 (1) and/or (2) of the 
Staff Regulations as appropriate. If the AIPN is the Commission, the complainant should also 
be informed of the possibility to address the Commission's Staff mediator using the following 
standard wording. 
As  well  as  the  formal  procedures  of  the  Staff  Regulations,  you  have  the  possibility  to 
contact  the  Commission's  internal  staff  mediator,  Mr  Peter  GALEZOWSKI  (acting 
mediator). His telephone number is 296 47 02. You should note that contact with the staff 
mediator does not suspend time-limits under the Staff Regulations. 

Cases in which Article 2.8 does not apply 
A  complaint  does  not  concern  work  relationships  merely  because  it  is  made  by  someone 
working  in  a  Union  institution,  body,  office  or  agency.  Therefore  Article  2.8  does  not,  for 
example, apply to someone working in an institution who alleges that the institution has failed 
to follow tendering procedures for the award of a supply contract. In such cases, the possible 
application of Article 2.4 of the Statute should be examined (see section 2.3.7 above). 
Although  external  candidates  in  recruitment  competitions  may  lodge  an  appeal  under  Article 
90 (2) of the Staff Regulations, Article 2.8 does not apply to such persons because they are not 
members of the Union staff. 
 
30 

As  regards  existing  Union  staff  who  complain  about  their  treatment  in  a  recruitment 
competition  in  which  they  have  participated,  the  Ombudsman  takes  account  of  the  fact  that, 
where a decision of a competition selection board is at issue, the case law of the Court allows 
an action to be brought before the General Court, within the period of three months laid down 
by  the  Staff  Regulations,  without  a  prior  Article  90(2)  appeal.    The  Ombudsman  does  not 
apply Article 2.8 in a more restrictive way. 
However,  experience  has  shown  that  before  opening  an  inquiry  into  a  complaint  about 
recruitment, it is necessary to identify an allegation of possible maladministration (2.3.9) and 
sufficient grounds in support of the allegation to justify an inquiry (2.3.11). The mere fact that 
the  complainant  disagrees  with  the  decision  of  a  Selection  Board  is  not  an  allegation  of 
maladministration. Nor is it evidence to support an allegation of maladministration. 
2.3.9  Does not concern possible maladministration 
Legal basis: Article 228 TFEU (ex Article 195 EC) 
Article 2.2 Statute 
Standard letter: SL-A-10 
At the stage of deciding whether or not to open an inquiry the Ombudsman is not seeking to 
determine  whether  there  is  maladministration,  but  whether  the  complaint  concerns  possible 
maladministration.  
The identification of maladministration during an inquiry is dealt with in Part 4 below.  
At  the  stage  of  deciding  whether  or  not  the  Ombudsman  should  open  an  inquiry  into  a 
complaint, the responsible LO should ask him or herself the following question:  
"assuming  every  allegation  made  by  the  complainant  is  true,  would  there  be  an  instance  of 
maladministration?"  
If the answer is no, then no inquiry should be opened.  
The generally-accepted  definition of  maladministration, included in the 1997 Annual Report, 
is that 
Maladministration  occurs  when  a  public  body  fails  to  act  in  accordance  with  a  rule  or 
principle which is binding upon it.  

The  complaint  should  therefore  contain,  even  if  only  implicitly,  an  allegation  that  the 
institution, body, office or agency concerned has failed to act in accordance with a binding rule 
or  principle.  It  can  also  be  useful  to  apply  the  non-exhaustive  list  of  examples  of 
maladministration given in the 1995 Annual Report:  
  administrative irregularities or omissions  
  abuse of power  
  negligence  
  unlawful procedures  
 
31 

  unfairness  
  malfunction or incompetence  
  discrimination  
  avoidable delay  
  lack or refusal of information  
In  the  case  of  discretionary  administrative  decisions,  the  complaint  does  not  concern 
maladministration  unless  there  is  an  allegation  that  the  institution,  body,  office  or  agency 
concerned  has  acted  outside  the  limits  of  its  legal  authority.  It  is  not  enough  that  the 
complainant merely hoped for a different decision. This is particularly important in staff cases: 
the  Ombudsman  should  not  open  an  inquiry  unless  the  complainant  makes  an  allegation 
which, if true, would be an instance of maladministration.  
A complaint which concerns only the merits of a Regulation or Directive, or the wisdom of a 
decision  taken  in  the  exercise  of  political  authority  does  not  raise  an  issue  of 
maladministration. Therefore the Ombudsman does not deal with complaints against decisions 
of  the  European  Parliament  or  its  Committees,  including  the  Committee  on  Petitions  (see 
section 2.4.1 below). 
2.3.10 Insufficient/No grounds 
Legal  basis:  Article  228  TFEU  and  Article  3  of  the  Stautute,  which  provide  that  the 
Ombudsman  "shall  conduct  inquiries  for  which  he  finds  grounds"  or  "that  he  connsiders 
justified"
.  Even  if  all  conditions  for  the  admissibility  of  a  case  are  fulfilled,  the  Ombudsman 
still has the discretion to decide not to open an inquiry. The reason for such a decision has to 
be  given  to  the  complainant  e.g.:  the  case  is  dealt  with  or  is  being  considered  by  another 
competent body (for example if a petition has been addressed to the European Parliament); the 
claims are too general in nature; there is not enough supporting evidence supplied;. Any other 
reasoning for not opening an inquiry into complaint within the mandate should be avoided. 
Please  see hereunder how to proceed in  those  situations  where or the  institution's position or 
behaviour seem, prima facie, adequate or reasonable.  
If  the  complaint  is  unclear,  apply  Article  2(3)  of  the  EO  Statute:  object  of  the  complaint  not 
identified. 
The  templates  for  Insufficient/No  grounds  decisions  are  available  on  SISTEO/Legal-
Lois/Drafting  templates/No  grounds  decision  (+'Letter  to  the  institution'; 'Text'  and 'Letter  to 
the complainant'). They have to be used in all cases except for cases closed under Article 228 
TFEU because: 
- the allegations/claims are too general in nature; 
- not enough supporting evidence is supplied; or 
- a petition has been addressed to the European Parliament. 
In such cases, the template 'No grounds - Simple letter' must be used. 
 
 
32 

The  decision  is  only  sent  to  the  institution  when  this  is  considered  appropriate.  Only  the 
anonymised  English  version  of  the  decision  is  sent  to  the  institution.  The  letter  to  the 
complainant is not sent to the institution. 
 
The decision is drafted in English. Once approved by the Head of Legal Unit, and then by the 
competent Director, it is sent to the Lawyer-Linguist for checking. It is then submitted to the 
Ombudsman.  If  necessary,  the  decision  is  translated  into  the  language  of  the  complainant  by 
the  Legal  Officer  in  charge  of  the  case,  or  sent  to  the  translation  service  of  the  European 
Parliament if the language is not covered by the office or  if the HLU considers it appropriate 
(please refer to section 1.3 'Languages' of the handbook). 
The letter sent to the complainant is drafted by the LO in the language of the complainant. 
In some cases where another competent body is not already dealing with the matter, it may be 
appropriate to transfer the complaint or advise the complainant accordingly.  
Although it is important to clearly inform the complainant of the reasons why the Ombudsman 
is  not  opening  an  inquiry,  we  should  never  give  the  impression  of  arguing  on  behalf  of  the 
institution, body, office or agency against which the complaint is made. If an issue needs to be 
explored the ombudsman should open the inquiry and let the institution, body, office or agency 
speak for itself in its opinion.  
On the other hand if any issue needs to be clarified by the complainant, if supporting evidence 
is  missing  from  the  complaint,  the  Ombudsman  should  open  an  inquiry  and  ask  the 
complainant  to  complete  the  information  he/she  has  submitted,  instead  of  rejecting  the 
complaint  as  unclear  or  not  supported  by  sufficient  evidence.  Even  in  those  cases  where  the 
institutions'  answer  and  behaviour  appears  to  be  correct,  the  Ombudsman  should  not 
immediately issue a decision of no-grounds to open an inquiry. The Ombudsman should rather 
open the inquiry into the complaint and ask the complainant to indicate precisely the reasons 
why  he/she  does  not  accept  the  specific  points  or  arguments  that  the  institution  has  put 
forward.  Only  after  having  received  the  complainant's  further  clarifications,  and  if  the 
Ombudsman  is  not  satisfied,  should  he  issue  a  decision  closing  his  inquiry  with  a  finding 
either  of  "no  further  inquiries  justified"  or  even  of  "no  mal  administration  found".  If  the 
Ombudsman is satisfied with the complainant's clarifications he should then proceed to ask an 
opinion from the institution concerned. 
The  circumstances  of  each  individual  case  determine  how  precise  the  complainant’s 
allegations  need  to  be  and  how  much  supporting  evidence  is  needed  to  justify  an  inquiry. 
Normally,  for  the  reasons  explained  in  section  2.3.8  above,  a  higher  threshold  is  applied  in 
staff cases. 
Admissible  cases  should  always  be  assigned  to  LOs.  This  also  applies  to  Insufficient/No 
grounds  complaints,  even  if  the  reason  is  that  there  is  not  enough  supporting  evidence 
supplied.  If  a  trainee  notices  that  such  a  case  has  been  assigned  to  him/her,  he/she  should 
inform  his  or  her  HLU,  who  will  then  ask  the HLD  to  transfer  the  case  to  an  LO. The  HLU 
may ask the transfer to be made to himself/herself, with a view to asking the trainee concerned 
to be involved in the handling of the case.  
 
33 

2.4 
COMPLAINTS INVOLVING THE COMMITTEE ON PETITIONS 
Article 24 TFEU and Article 227 TFEU establish the right to petition the European Parliament. 
According to Annex VI of the Parliament’s Rules of Procedure, the Committee responsible for 
the examination of petitions is the Committee on Petitions.  
The  Committee  on  Petitions  is  also  responsible  for  Parliament’s  relations  with  the 
Ombudsman.  In  this  capacity,  it  examines  and  reports  on  the  Ombudsman’s  Annual  Report 
and  may  also  report  on  any  special  reports  made  by  the  Ombudsman  (European  Parliament 
Rules of Procedure, Rule 179). 
2.4.1  Complaints against the Committee on Petitions 
Complaints  against  decisions  of  the  Committee  on  Petitions  are  considered  outside  the 
Ombudsman's  mandate  (Article  2(2)  EO  Statute).  They  do  not  concern  possible 
maladministration  because  they  are  against  a  decision  of  a  political  body.  Use  the  standard 
letter available on SISTEO/Legal-Lois/Drafting templates.   
A complaint about the administrative procedures of the Committee on Petitions should be dealt 
with  in  the  same  way.  The  Ombudsman  considers  that  these  proceedings  fall  within  the 
political responsibility of the European Parliament to organise its services so as to carry out its 
institutional functions. Such a complaint would therefore raise political issues and not possible 
maladministration (see complaint 420/96 1996 Annual Report p. 15). 
However,  where  a  complainant  alleges  that  he/she  sent  a  petition  to  Parliament  and  did  not 
receive an answer, contact can be established with the Registrar of Parliament ('le Greffe'), in 
order  to  ascertain  whether  a  petition  has  indeed  been  received.  As  a  rule,  the  Registrar  of 
Parliament  sends  an  acknowledgement  of  receipt  for  each  individual  petition.  The  possible 
follow-up  given  by  Parliament  to  each  petition  is,  however,  a  matter  that  falls  within  the 
institution's  political  work  and  is,  therefore,  outside  the  Ombudsman's  mandate.  We  can  and 
should  control  whether  an  acknowledgement  of  receipt  has  been  sent  by  Parliament's 
administration  (Greffe),  given  that  it  has  confirmed  it  would  do  so  in  all  cases.  If  no 
acknowledgement of receipt has been sent to the petitioner, the LO may refer to section 3.3.5 
of  the  handbook  concerning  'telephone  procedures'.  The  Ombudsman  should  not  investigate 
whatever follow-up the Committee on Petitions has given to the petition.  
A  copy  of  any  complaint  against  the  Committee  on  Petitions  is  normally  forwarded  to  the 
Committee  for  information,  except  if  it  is  confidential,  together  with  a  copy  of  the 
Ombudsman’s  reply  to  the  complainant,  explaining  that  the  complaint  is  outside  of  his 
mandate. 
2.4.2  Complainants who also submit a petition  
Cases  may  arise  in  which  a  person  who  has  addressed  a  petition  to  the  European  Parliament 
also complains to the Ombudsman about the same matter.  
If  the  complaint  is  outside  the  mandate  or  inadmissible,  the  Ombudsman  informs  the 
complainant accordingly and also notes that the matter is being, or already has been, dealt with 
by the European Parliament as a petition. 
 
34 

For  complaints  which  are  within  the  mandate  and  admissible,  the  Ombudsman  normally 
considers that there are no grounds for an inquiry if the complainant has already submitted a 
petition on the same subject and the Committee on Petitions is currently dealing with it (e.g. 
case 646/97/IJH, 1997 Annual Report p 29). 
Similarly, if the Committee on Petitions has closed the case, there are usually no grounds for 
an  inquiry,  unless  there  is  new  evidence.  Use  the  standard  letter  'No  grounds  -  Simple  letter' 
available on SISTEO. 
2.5 
COMPLAINTS INVOLVING DATA PROTECTION ISSUES 
In  dealing  with  cases  that  involve  data  protection  issues,  LOs'  proposals  should  take  into 
account the provisions of the Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) signed by the EO and the 
EDPS on 30 November 2006 (available in s:legal\:main topics\data protection). In particular, 
LOs should have regard to the provisions of the MoU concerning: 
  the provision of information to complainants about the EDPS and possible transfers with 
the consent of the complainant;  
 
the provision of information to the EDPS in certain circumstances  
 
avoidance of duplication of procedures;  
 
the  need  for  the  EO  and  the  EDPS to  adopt  a  consistent  approach  to  legal  and 
administrative aspects of data protection. 
Complaints concerning matters being dealt with or having been dealt with by the EDPS should 
lead to decisions of no-grounds to open an inquiry by the Ombudsman (see above section ....). 
2.6 
TRANSFERS AND ADVICE TO CONTACT OTHER BODIES 
2.6.1 General Principles 
Transfer of complaints  and the giving of advice to complainants are an important  part of the 
EO's activities to help citizens. Careful judgement is required in each case. 
The  European  Ombudsman  (EO)  transfers  a  complaint  when  he  sends  it  directly  to  a 
competent  body  to  be  dealt  with.    Advice  is  a  suggestion  to  the  complainant  to  address  a 
competent body. 
If a complaint is outside the mandate of the EO, or inadmissible, it should be transferred if all 
the following conditions are met:  
1.  another body exists that is competent to deal with the complaint; 
2.  that body can accept transfers from the EO; 
3.  the complainant consents to the transfer; 
4.  the  object  of  the  complaint  is  clear  and  the  complaint  contains  sufficient 
information for the other body to be able to deal with it.  (How much information is 
sufficient  and  whether,  for  example,  supporting  documents  are  needed,  may  vary 

 
35 

between the different bodies to which we transfer:  see below as regards the French 
and Belgian ombudsmen
). 
 
If a transfer is not possible or appropriate, the EO seeks to advise the complainant of another 
body that could help, especially if the case involves issues of EU law.  
The European Network of Ombudsmen facilitates transfers and advice.  It comprises: 
  national  ombudsmen  of  the  Member  States  (including  the  committee  on 
petitions of the German Bundestag); 
  national ombudsmen of recognised EU Candidate States;  
  regional ombudsmen  of  the  Member  States  (including  petitions  committees  of 
the German Länder); 
  the ombudsmen of Iceland and Norway; 
  the Committee on Petitions of the European Parliament. 
When considering a complaint against the authorities of a State covered by the Network, 
the  responsible  LO  should  always  consider  whether  it  is  appropriate  to  transfer  the 
complaint to a national or regional ombudsman.  

Transfer  to  the  European  Parliament,  or  advice  to  petition  the  European  Parliament,  is 
appropriate  where  a  complaint  raises  political  issues  such  as  the  desirability  of  changing  EU 
law or competences.  
The  EO  may  also  transfer  cases  to  the  Commission,  especially  if  it  is  known  that  the 
Commission is already dealing with the subject in the Article 258 TFEU procedure.  
If  the  complainant  is  looking  for  a  solution  to  a  specific  problem  rather  than  seeking 
compensation  or  a  decision  of  principle,  a  transfer  to,  or  advice  to  contact,  the  appropriate 
SOLVIT  centre  may  be  appropriate.    Note,  however,  that  SOLVIT  is  not  an  independent 
mechanism to investigate and report on complaints: each SOLVIT centre is part of the relevant 
national administration. 
SOLVIT  tries  to  solve  cross-border  problems  between  a  business  or  a  citizen  on  the  one 
hand  and  a  national  public  authority  on  the  other,  in  cases  where  there  is  possible 
misapplication  of  EU  law.    According  to  SOLVIT,  the  policy  areas  it  has  dealt  with 
include: 
 
  Recognition of professional qualifications and diplomas  
  Access to education  
  Residence permits  
  Voting rights  
  Social security  
  Employment rights  
  Driving licences  
  Motor vehicle registration  
  Border controls  
  Market access for products  
 
36 

  Market access for services  
  Establishment as self-employed  
  Public procurement  
  Taxation  
  Free movement of capital or payments. 
 
SOLVIT says it is ready to consider other possible areas within the above-mentioned remit 
(for example, "cross-border problems between a business or a citizen on the one hand and a 
national public authority on the other, where there is possible misapplication of EU law"). 
A complainant should not be advised to turn to the Commission or to SOLVIT if it is clear that 
no infringement of Union law has occurred. 
If a complaint involves data protection issues, the complaint may be transferred to the EDPS 
(see 2.5 above).  
Before proposing a transfer or advice, the LO should make sure (i) that the complaint is within 
the competence of the other body and (ii) that the latter can handle a complaint in the language 
used by the complainant.  Every national office in the European Network of Ombudsmen has a 
liaison officer who can be contacted for this purpose (names and contact details are available 
through  SISTEO/Legal-Lois  –  Liaison  network).    A  transfer  to  SOLVIT  also  requires  the 
agreement of the centre in question (see 2.6.2.1 below).  
The  national  or  regional  ombudsman  whish  to  be  informed  when  a  complainant,  who  has 
submitted  a  complaint  which  is  outside  the  mandate  of  the  EO,  was  given  the  advice  that 
he/she could potentially complain to them. The Registry will provide such information to the 
members of the network on a quarterly basis.   
2.6.2 Transfers 
Transfer  of  a  complaint  is  possible  with  the  consent  both  of  the  competent  body  and  of  the 
complainant.  
Subject  to  the  exceptions  mentioned  in  section  2.6.6  below,  all  members  of  the  European 
Network of Ombudsmen accept transfers of complaints from the EO. 
The  standard  complaint  form  invites  the  complainant  to  accept,  or  reject,  the  possibility  of  a 
transfer.    If  the  complainant  has  not  used  the  form,  a  standard  letter  is  available  on 
SISTEO/Legal-Lois to seek consent to a transfer in an appropriate case.  Other standard letters 
in relation to transfers are also available on SISTEO/Legal-Lois.  
It should be noted that in cases where a transfer is possible but where the complainant has not 
yet  given  his  or  her  consent  for  the  transfer,  the  procedure  is  to  close  the  case  and  offer  to 
transfer the case to the competent body if the complainant sends his consent within a month. 
The closure therefore intervenes immediately and is independent from the transfer of the case, 
which may or may not take place depending on the complainant's reaction. 
In  some  cases,  more  than  one  different  body  could  be  competent.    For  example,  where  a 
complaint alleges infringement of Union law at the national level, a national ombudsman, the 
Commission, or the Committee on Petitions of the EP could all be competent.  Transfer of a 
 
37 

complaint  to  more  than  one  body  is  not  possible.  When  a  complainant  has  consented  to  a 
transfer  on  the  complaint  form,  the  Ombudsman  normally  transfers  to  the  most  appropriate 
body.  This requires judgement in each case.  In some cases of this kind, it may be preferable 
to give advice. 
Where a single complaint contains different aspects for which different bodies are competent, 
it is normally best to give appropriate advice (see 2.6.5 below).  
When a complaint is transferred, the original complaint is enclosed with the EO’s letter to the 
competent body.  A copy of the complaint is kept in the EO’s file on the case.  In the case of a 
complaint with extensive annexes, the annexes may be omitted from the copy kept in the EO’s 
file. The omission and the reason are mentioned in a note in the file.  
 
2.6.3  Transfer  of  a  complaint  to  be  dealt  with  as  a  petition  by  the  European 
Parliament 
There is an agreement between the Committee on Petitions of the European Parliament and the 
Ombudsman concerning the mutual transfer of complaints and petitions in appropriate cases.  
For transfers from the Committee on Petitions to the Ombudsman, see below section 2.6.7. 
Petitions should formally be presented to the European Parliament and not to the Committee 
on Petitions of the European Parliament. 
The following guidelines are given so that we adopt  a consistent approach in our  summaries 
and letters to complainants. 
When a complaint is transferred to the European Parliament to be dealt with as a petition, the 
summary and the letter to the complainant should state that the petition has been transferred to 
the European Parliament. The letter of transfer is addressed, in English, to the President of the 
European Parliament (SL-B-4) and copied to the chairman of the Committee on Petitions. The 
Ombudsman also informs the complainant by letter of the action taken (SL-B-2). 
 
The  original  complaint  is  enclosed  with  the  Ombudsman’s  letter  to  the  President  of  the 
European Parliament.  A copy of the complaint is kept in the Ombudsman’s file on the case.  
If a complaint has an extensive number of annexes, they may be omitted from the copy kept in 
the Ombudsman’s file. The omission of the annexes and the reason for doing so is mentioned 
in a note placed in the Ombudsman’s file on the case. 
To ensure a smooth flow of information, the responsible LO informs his or her HLU and the 
competent  Director  of  any  transfer  of  a  complaint  to  be  dealt  with  as  a  petition  by  the 
European Parliament.  The Director then informs the Head of the Secretariat of the Committee 
on Petitions, normally by e-mail.  
When  a  complainant,  whose  complaint  has  been  transferred  to  the  EP,  asks  for  information 
regarding the handling  of his/her petition, he/she should be invited to  contact the  Committee 
on Petitions of the European Parliament. 
 
38 

2.6.4  Transfers to SOLVIT 
Before transferring a case to SOLVIT, the relevant SOLVIT centre should be contacted to 
make sure that it will accept the case. 
 
SOLVIT  centres  are  not  normally  willing  to  accept  a  transfer  unless  the  complainant,  or 
the EO, can identify a cross border problem involving a possible misapplication of EU law.  
The transfer letter should normally mention the specific legal provision that may have been 
misapplied. 
2.6.5  Advice 
It is not the EO’s role to give legal advice to complainants.  Furthermore, to do so can be risky, 
because the facts as presented by the complainant are often unclear and not always reliable.   
Advice to address another body should be given in cautious terms, informing the complainant 
of the possibility that the other body could deal with the matter. It is important not to give the 
complainant the impression that the complaint is being transferred.  
In  all  cases  where  advice  is  given  to  contact  another  body,  the  address,  whenever  possible, 
including a name and other available contact details should be provided.  
References  to  websites  and  (public)  e-mail  addresses  should  be  given  to  a  person  who  has 
contacted  the  EO  electronically,  or  who  has  specifically  requested  such  details.  The  EO’s 
website  contains  links  to  the  websites  of  national  ombudsmen  and  similar  bodies  in  the 
European Union. 
If there appears to be a legal problem and no competent body exists to which the complainant 
can be advised to turn, the LO should consider whether to include the following: “If you have 
not already done so, you may think it advisable to consult a lawyer concerning your case
”.  If 
it is clear that the complainant has already consulted a lawyer, it is normally appropriate to put 
I note that you have already consulted a lawyer concerning your case”. 
When  more  than  one  body  could  be  competent  to  deal  with  a  case,  the  complainant  may  be 
advised  of  the  options  available,  though  long  lists  of  possibilities  should  be  avoided.  
Whenever it is clear that a national or regional ombudsman could deal with the matter, this is 
the preferred advice.  
Where a single complaint contains different aspects for which different bodies are competent 
(e.g.,  a  complaint  against  both  national  authorities  and  the  EU  legislator),  the  complainant 
should  be  advised  as  to  which  body  is  competent  for  each  of  the  different  aspects.    If  a 
standard letter is sent to a national or regional ombudsman in such a case, it should make clear 
that  we  have  advised  the  complainant  to  turn  to  that  ombudsman  only  to  the  extent  that  the 
complaint concerns a national or regional body within the ombudsman’s competence.  
The  European  Ombudsman  cannot  be  expected  to  have  a  comprehensive  knowledge  of 
problem-solving  and  complaints-handling  procedures  in  every  Member  State,  especially  as 
regards  matters  outside  the  scope  of  Union  law.    As  a  service  to  the  citizen,  however,  the 
responsible LO or trainee should use his or her knowledge of the Member State concerned to 
offer appropriate advice, if possible. 
 
39 

2.6.5.1 Advice to contact a member of the European Network of Ombudsman 
Some  national  or  regional  ombudsmen  require  complainants  to  have  used  available  internal 
complaints procedures before they will accept a case. When appropriate, complainants should 
be  advised  of  the  relevant  internal  complaints  procedure  and  of  the  possibility  to  turn  to  the 
ombudsman subsequently.  The ombudsman does not need to be informed of this advice.  
If the institution to which the complainant is advised to turn consists of a  single ombudsman, 
the  address  given  to  the  complainant  should  normally  include  the  name  of  the  ombudsman, 
e.g.:  
Mr Hans Gammeltoft-Hansen 
Folketingets Ombudsmand 
Gammel Torv 22 
DK - 1457 Copenhagen K 
Denmark 
See, however, section 2.6.6 below as regards the UK Parliamentary Ombudsman.  
If the relevant ombudsman office contains more than one ombudsman (e.g., Austria, Belgium, 
Hungary,  Lithuania,  Sweden)  and  for  committees  on  petitions,  no  name  is  given  to  the 
complainant, e.g.:  
Riksdagens ombudsmän 
Box 16327 
103 26 Stockholm 
Sweden 
 
The EO however addresses his  correspondence to the Chief or Head ombudsman, the 
chairman of the Committee on petitions or the Head of office, as appropriate. 
Up-to-date  contact  details  for  national  and  regional  ombudsmen  in  the  European 
Network of ombudsmen are available on LOIS – Liaison network - List of Ombudsmen 
&  Similar  Bodies  and  Liaison  Officers.  
Names  and  addresses  of  national  or  regional 
ombudsmen  should  be  checked  against  this  document  (and  not  be  derived  from  earlier 
EO correspondence or other websites).  

2.6.5.2 Advice if appropriate administrative approaches have not been made 
If  a  complaint  is  inadmissible  because  appropriate  administrative  approaches  have  not  been 
made  (Art.  2.4  of  the  Statute),  the  complainant  is  usually  advised  to  address  the  Union 
institution, body, office or agency concerned. If it is clear that the complainant has identified 
the wrong institution, body, office or agency, this should be explained.  The EO's letter always 
gives  the  contact  details  of  the  institution,  body,  office  or  agency  to  which  appropriate 
administrative approaches should be made.   
 
40 

Normally, the letter indicates the possibility for the complainant to make a new complaint to 
the  European  Ombudsman  if  the  administrative  approaches  do  not  lead  to  a  satisfactory 
response within a reasonable time. 
Care should be taken to avoid giving the impression that the European Ombudsman is advising 
the complainant to complain to an institution, body, office or agency against itself. 
2.6.5.3 Advice to petition the European Parliament 
When a complainant is advised that he could consider petitioning the European Parliament, the 
letter to the complainant should invite him/her to send his/her petition to the  President of the 
European Parliament or to submit a petition via the EP's website: 
 
https://www.secure.europarl.europa.eu/parliament/public/petition/secured/submit.do?langu
age=EN 

 
2.6.5.4 Advice to contact SOLVIT 
The  EO’s  letter  advising  a  complainant  to  contact  SOLVIT  should  normally  include  the 
following  standard  wording,  which  may  be  adapted  if  the  circumstances  of  the  case  so 
require:  
 
Although I  am unable  to begin an  inquiry  into your complaint, you  may wish to consider 
contacting  SOLVIT  regarding  the  matter.    SOLVIT  is  a  problem-solving  network, 
coordinated  by  the  European  Commission,  with  centres  in  each  EU  Member  State.  
SOLVIT deals with cross-border problems between a business or a citizen on the one hand 
and  a  national  public  authority  on  the  other,  in  cases  where  there  is  possible 
misapplication of EU law. SOLVIT aims to resolve problems within ten weeks.
 
 
Below you will find the relevant contact details for the 
[as appropriate] SOLVIT centre, to 
which  you  could  submit  your  complaint.  If  they  are  able  to  handle  your  complaint,  they 
will then liaise with the 
[as appropriate] SOLVIT centre(s), in order to find a solution. 
 
Unless the complaint mentions the specific legal provision that may have been misapplied, 
it  would  be  helpful  for  the  EO's  letter  to  the  complainant  to  do  so,  wherever  possible,  so 
that the complainant can include this information in the approach to SOLVIT. 
2.6.6 Exceptions and special arrangements  
2.6.6.1 Transfers 
The  United  Kingdom  Parliamentary  Commissioner  cannot  accept  transfers  from  the  EO 
because complaints must be submitted through a member of the national Parliament. 
The  French  Ombudsman  has  requested  the  EO  systematically  to  transfer  cases  rather  than  to 
give advice to contact him or his "délégués".  The Federal Ombudsmen of Belgium have made 
a similar request.   
 
41 

2.6.6.2 Advice 
The  European  Parliament  is  not  informed  of  advice  that  a  petition  could  be  submitted  to  it. 
(Our understanding is that the Committee on Petitions is satisfied to be informed in the Annual 
Report of the total number of cases in which such advice has been given).  
The  EO  does  not  advise  complainants  to  contact  the  French  Médiateur  (or  délégués)  or  the 
Federal  Ombudsmen  of  Belgium  but  normally  transfers  the  complaint  (see  4.1  above).  
Exceptionally,  it  may  be  appropriate  to  inform  the  complainant  in  general  terms  that  the 
relevant ombudsman  is  competent to deal with  complaints against national authorities, rather 
than  to  transfer  (for  example,  if  the  complaint  expresses  a  generalised  sense  of  grievance 
against the national authorities, with no specific focus).  
Advice  to  contact  the  UK  Parliamentary  Ombudsman  should  either  make  clear  that  a 
complaint must be submitted through a Member of Parliament, or take the form of suggesting 
that the complainant contact the Parliamentary Ombudsman’s services for advice on possible 
means of redress. 
In some cases, for example if a complaint against national authorities is framed in very general 
terms,  it  may  be  best  only  to  inform  the  complainant  that  the  relevant  ombudsman  is 
competent  to  deal  with  complaints  against  such  authorities  without  advice  to  contact  that 
ombudsman and without therefore informing the ombudsman in writing. 
2.6.7  Petitions  transferred  from  the  Committee  on  Petitions  of  the  European 
Parliament to the European Ombudsman 
As  noted  in  the  Ombudsman's  1995  Annual  Report  and  in  the  corresponding  Report  of  the 
Committee  on  Petitions,  there  is  an  agreement  between  the  Committee  and  the  Ombudsman 
concerning  the  mutual  transfer  of  complaints  and  petitions  in  appropriate  cases  and  with  the 
consent  of  the  complainant  or  petitioner  (see  above  section  2.6.3  on  transfers  by  the 
Ombudsman to the Committee on Petitions). 
The above-mentioned agreement provides for the Committee on Petitions, with the consent of 
the complainant, to transfer a petition to the Ombudsman to be dealt with as a complaint if the 
petition concerns allegations of maladministration in the activities of a Union institution, body, 
office or agency. 
Before  a  transferred  petition  is  registered  as  a  complaint,  it  should  be  transmitted  to  a  legal 
officer who will check  that the file contains evidence that the petitioner has consented to the 
transfer.  A contact with the secretariat of the Petition's Committee is necessary if there is no 
evidence  that  the  petitioner  has  consented  to  the  transfer.  Once  it  has  been  checked  that  the 
petitioner  has  given  his  agreement,  the  transferred  petition  is  registered  as  a  complaint.  The 
Registry  sends  a  special  version  of  the  standard  letter  of  acknowledgement  to  the 
petitioner/complainant. The admissibility of the complaint is then examined. 
The Ombudsman sends a copy of the letter of admissibility/inadmissibility to the chairman of 
the  Committee  on  Petitions  for  information.  If  an  inquiry  takes  place,  the  Ombudsman  also 
sends  a  copy  of  the  final  decision  letter  to  the  chairman  of  the  Committee  on  Petitions  for 
information. 
 
42 

A transfer is only possible if the Committee on Petitions has not already begun to deal with the 
matter itself by addressing an inquiry to the Commission about the petition. 
2.6.8  Transmission to the Ombudsman of the file on a petition.  
In  some  cases,  after  receiving  the  institution's  opinion  on  a  petition,  the  Committee  on 
Petitions has considered that there could be an instance of  maladministration in the activities 
of the institution. It has then closed its examination of the petition and transmitted the file to 
the European Ombudsman.  
The European Ombudsman does not deal with such cases as transfers.  
In an appropriate case, the file transmitted by the Committee on Petitions may form the basis 
of a decision by the European Ombudsman to open an own-initiative inquiry. The decision to 
open an own-initiative inquiry is a discretionary decision of the Ombudsman. 
In such cases, the European Ombudsman informs the chairman of the Committee on Petitions 
and  the  petitioner  of  whether  or  not  he  will  open  an  own-initiative  inquiry.  If  an  inquiry  is 
opened, the chairman of the Committee on Petitions and the petitioner are kept informed of its 
progress.  
 
43 


CARRYING OUT INQUIRIES 
3.1 
THE BASICS 
3.1.1  The procedures in outline  
1. Identify precisely the complainant’s allegations and claims in a summary  
2. Ask the complainant for clarifications or further information or evidence. 
3. Send the complaint to the institution, body, office or agency for an opinion  
4. Check the opinion  
5. Send the opinion to the complainant for possible observations  
6. Check any observations received  
7. Examine the file to consider the next step  
8. If necessary, carry out further inquiries / inspect documents / hear witnesses  
9. If there appears to be maladministration, seek a friendly solution, if possible  
10. If the friendly solution is not accepted, consider issuing a draft recommendation. 
11. If the DR is not accepted, consider making a special report to Parliament or any alternative 
ways of drawing attention to the case. 
12. Draft a decision closing the complaint.  
It is the responsibility of each LO to put these procedures into effect for the cases with which 
he or she is dealing.  
NB: 
(i) Steps 8 and 9 are not necessary in every case. 
(ii)  Some  cases  may  lead  to  draft  recommendations  and/or  a  special  report.  How  to  prepare 
draft  recommendations  and  special  reports  is  explained  in  Part  5  of  the  Handbook  below 
(sections 5.2.6 and 5.2.7 respectively). 
(iii)  A  special  procedure  exists  for  complaints  about  unanswered  letters  (telephone 
procedures). 
3.1.2  Fair procedure  
It is a basic principle of fair procedure that the Ombudsman's decision on a complaint cannot 
take into account information contained in documents provided by one party, unless the other 
party has had the possibility to respond.  
The  institution’s  opinion  on  the  complaint,  its  answers  to  any  further  inquiries  and  its 
responses  to  any  proposal  for  a  friendly  solution  or  draft  recommendations  are  therefore 
normally forwarded to the complainant, who has the possibility to submit observations.  
 
44 

Similarly the institution must have had the opportunity to comment on any material submitted 
by the complainant which is taken into account in the Ombudsman’s decision. 
3.1.3  Three essential rules 
  The scope of the closing decision is limited to the issues dealt with in the inquiry.  
  The scope of the inquiry into a complaint is limited to the allegations and claims made by 
the complainant. In general, the LO should not raise new issues.  
  The  scope  of  the  inquiry  is  normally  defined  by  the  original  complaint.  The  closing 
decision  can  only  deal  with  extra  allegations,  claims  or  grounds  submitted  by  the 
complainant  during  the  course  of  the  inquiry  if  the  institution  concerned  has  had  the 
opportunity to answer them.  
3.1.4  Further correspondence from complainants  
  The responsible LO should examine further correspondence  promptly and deal with it in 
accordance with point 2.1.4 above. 
3.2 
SUMMARY AND ANALYSIS FOR AN INQUIRY 
3.2.1  Drafting the summary 
The summary is part of the file on the case. It should be written in a correct and business-like 
way and should not contain any irrelevant material or remarks.  
If  an  inquiry  is  to  be  opened,  the  summary  and  analysis  of  the  complaint  must  be  prepared 
using the appropriate template available on SISTEO. The summary must include: 
1 The following information 
- who is complaining?  
- if the complainant has requested confidentiality, the summary should indicate this.  
- against whom?  
- what is the complaint about?  
- what act or omission is the subject of the complaint?  
- when did it happen?  
-  what  is  the  precise  allegation  or  claim?  (e.g.  that  a  decision  is  unlawful,  or  that  damages 
should be paid)  
- what are the grounds for this allegation or claim?  
- what does the complainant want? (e.g. revocation of a decision, or compensation).  
2 A judgement that the complaint is within the mandate, meets all the criteria of admissibility 
and concludes that there are grounds for opening an inquiry, either by asking the complainant 
for clarifications or by asking the institution for an opinion. These matters are all dealt with in 
 
45 

section 2.3 above on reasons for not opening an inquiry. The following should be specifically 
stated: 
- the relevant date or dates for the two year limit  
- the complainant’s prior administrative approaches (unless actio popularis)  
- in a case concerning work relationships, that the Article 90 procedures have been used  
- that the complainant has not also addressed a petition to the European Parliament about the 
case  
- whether there is any information about a possible court case  
- the possible instance(s) of maladministration, assuming that the complainant’s allegations are 
true 
- the rule or principle that would be breached if what the complainant says is true. 
- the eventual relevance of the European Charter of Fundamental Rights 
Our  main  duty  is  to  try  to  help  citizens  to  achieve  their  rights.  Especially  when  the 
complainant is an ordinary citizen, we must make an effort to understand the complaint and its 
grounds, if they have not been very well expressed. 
Please note however that if the essential elements of a complaint cannot be briefly and easily 
summarised,  the  LO  should  consider  whether  the  object  of  the  complaint  is  sufficiently 
identified  (Art  2.3  of  the  Statute).    It  should  not  be  necessary  to  study  extensive  annexes in 
order  to  discover  the  essential  elements  of  the  case  and  the  complainant’s  allegations  and 
claims.  In case of doubt, consult your supervisor at an early stage.  
If  the  complaint  contains  two  or  more  allegations  or  claims,  the  summary  should  state  them 
separately and number them. Obviously, the allegations and claims should be identical in the 
summary of the complaint, the opening letters to the institution and to the complainant, and in 
the closing decision.  
The information contained in the  fields 'Concerning', 'Allegations' and 'Claims' are published 
on the website when an inquiry is conducted towards the institution. Therefore, these sections 
must be drafted with the utmost care: 
  The  information  given  in  the  'Concerning'  section  will  become  the  title  of  the  case 
published on the website. It must be as short as possible and self-explanatory. It should 
be drafted in the style of a title and not as an entire sentence.  
  The  elements  given  in  the  'Concerning',  'Allegations',  and  'Claims'  sections  must 
systematically  be  anonymised  for  all  cases,  irrespective  of  whether  the  case  is 
confidential. The text approved by the SG in the 'Summary Admissible' document will 
be automatically posted on the website.  
  From  the  moment  that  the  'Summary  Admissible'  document  is  approved  by  the 
Ombudsman/SG,  the  LO  should  ensure  that  the  information  contained  in  the  opening 
letter  is  fully  consistent  with  the  'Concerning', 'Allegations',  and 'Claims'  contained  in 
the  'Summary  Admissible'  document,  given  that  the  information  contained  in  the 
document will be published on the website. 
 
46 

3.2.2  Terminology 
In  order  to  avoid  confusion  and  to  make  our  work  consistent,  the  following  uniform 
vocabulary has been adopted: 
Allegation:  an  accusation  that  the  institution,  body,  office  or  agency  has  failed  to  act  in 
accordance with a rule or principle which is binding on it.  As noted above, we should always 
identify which rule or principle the allegation concerns. 
For  example,  a  complainant  might  allege  that  an  institution,  body,  office  or  agency  has:  
violated the rules governing a tender procedure; refused access to a document for reasons that 
are legally wrong; failed to provide adequate reasons for its decision; applied the wrong article 
of a Regulation in dealing with the case; failed to deal properly with a certain issue, etc.  
Claim: what the complainant wants: for example, that a tender procedure should be cancelled; 
access to a document should be given, or that he should receive compensation. 
NB: when used as a verb, “claim” can sometimes be followed by a noun: e.g. “the complainant 
claims compensation”; “the complainant claims damages”.  Normally, however, claim should 
be  followed  by  a  verb.    Special  care  should  be  taken  to  use  correct  syntax.    Here  are  some 
examples of correct usage: 
The complainant claims that the Commission should carry out an inquiry. 
The complainants claim that the Commission should apologise for the late payment.  
The  complainant  claims  that  the  Commission  should  take  disciplinary  action  against  the 
responsible officials. 

In all of the above examples, it is important to follow “claim” by a verb, rather than a noun.  
One should not therefore write:   
The complainants claim an inquiry by the Commission. 
The complainants claim an apology by the Commission for the late payment.   
The  complainant  claims  disciplinary  action  by  the  Commission  against  the  responsible 
officials

Argument: the grounds, evidence and reasoning that the complainant puts forward to support 
his  allegation(s)  and  claim(s).    In  ordinary  English,  the  word  “claim”  is  often  used  to  mean 
argument  in  this  sense.    We  should  use  the  word  argument  in  order  to  avoid  confusion.  
Arguments  may  comprise  a  statement  of  facts,  inferences  drawn  from  facts  and  sometimes 
legal reasoning.  
The arguments  must  be set out in the  summary.  This is useful for two reasons.  First, to 
check that there are sufficient grounds for an inquiry. Second, the arguments are usually part 
of  the  'COMPLAINT'  section  of  the  closing  decision.  The  supporting  arguments  are  not 
published on the website.  
 
47 

3.3 
OPENING  AN  INQUIRY  INTO  A  COMPLAINT  WITHIN  THE  MANDATE  AND 
ADMISSIBLE 

3.3.1 Letter to the complainant requesting clarifications 
If the complaint is within the mandate and admissible but, (1) it is not supported by enough 
material  evidence,  (2)  if  the  allegations  and  claims  are  not  sufficiently  clear  or  (3)  if  the 
position expressed by the institution appears to be, prima facie, reasonable and correct, the 
Ombudsman  should  open  an  inquiry  and  ask  the  complainant  to  clarify  or  complement 
his/her  complaint.  The  opening  letter  to  the  complainant  can  already  briefly  indicate  the 
Ombudsman preliminary view on the complaint and should ask precise questions that will 
help  the  Ombudsman  further  to  assess  the  case.  The  letter  indicates  the  deadline  for  the 
opinion. Unless there are exceptional circumstances, the deadline is one month. A template 
of these letters is available on SISTEO/Legal-Lois/Drafting templates. 
On  the  basis  of  the  supplementary  evidence/arguments  provided  by  the  complainant,  the 
Ombudsman shall consider whether he should ask for the institution's opinion, or decide to 
close  the  case  with  a  decision  of  "no  further  inquiries  justified"  or  of  "no 
maladministration found'.
 
3.3.2 Letter to the institution asking for its opinion 
Substance and presentation 
The LO prepares a letter, for the Ombudsman’s signature, to the Head of the institution, body, 
office or agency concerned requesting an opinion on the complaint.  
The  letter  is  based  on  the  standard  letter  available  under  SISTEO/Legal-Lois/Drafting 
templates  and  should  include  a  clear  and  well-organised  list  of  the  complainant’s  allegations 
and claims, as explained in section 3.2.2. If there are more than one allegation and claim, the 
opening letter should number these for the sake of clarity.  
If  the  complaint  contains  allegations  and  claims  which  the  EO  rejects,  these  should  be  dealt 
with separately after the above-mentioned list of allegations/claims taken up for inquiry.   
Deadlines 
The  letter  indicates  the  deadline  for  the  opinion.  Unless  there  are  exceptional  circumstances, 
the  deadline  is  three  months  from  the  end  of  the  current  month  (e.g.  if  the  Ombudsman 
forwards  the  complaint  on  14  January  2006;  the  deadline  for  the  opinion  should  be  30  April 
2006).  
NB:  The  Commission  has  agreed  that  the  normal  time  limit  for  opinions  on  complaints 
concerning  the  refusal  of  a  confirmatory  application  for  access  under  Regulation  (EC)  No 
1049/2001  should  be  two  months.  The  opening  letter  to  the  Commission  should  conclude  as 
follows: 
 
48 

The present complaint concerns the refusal of a confirmatory application for access under 
Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001.  By  letter  dated  18  June  2004,  the  President  of  the 
Commission  agreed  that  the  deadline  for  opinions  on  such  complaints  should  be  two 
months. I would, therefore, be grateful if the Commission could send its opinion by (date). 

The  normal  three-month  deadline  should  still  be  applied  for  all  other  institutions,  bodies, 
offices and agencies.  
Confidentiality 
If the complaint is confidential, the Ombudsman’s letter is marked CONFIDENTIAL.  
Translations of opinions 
The  Commission,  Council  and  Parliament  normally  provide  a  translation  of  the  opinion  into 
the  language  of  the  complainant.  Letters  addressed  to  other  institutions,  bodies,  offices  and 
agencies should request such a translation.  
Enclosures 
A  copy  of  the  complaint,  including  all  the  supporting  documents  sent  by  the  complainant,  is 
enclosed with the Ombudsman’s letter.  
Electronic transfer of documents relating to complaints  
A simplified procedure for the transmission of complaint-related documents has been adopted 
with  the  Commission,  EPSO,  the  European  Investment  Bank,  the  European  Economic  and 
Social Committee and Parliament. 
When  writing  to  these  institutions,  the  cover  letter  is  sent  by  e-mail  at  the  same  time  as  the 
hard copy is dispatched. If the letter contains enclosures, these are only sent electronically and 
this fact is mentioned in the letter. 
LOs  should  take  care  to  mention  this  in  the  way  suggested  by  the  templates  available  on 
SISTEO: [Enclosure(s): XXXXXXXX (sent by e-mail) ] 
3.3.2  Letter to the complainant 
The  LO  also  prepares  a  standard  letter  to  the  complainant  (available  under  SISTEO/Legal-
Lois/Drafting templates), in the language of the complaint, informing him or her of the inquiry 
conducted  towards  the  institution.  See  also  section  1.6.  above  on  rules  and  procedures  for 
outgoing complaints correspondence.  
3.3.3.  Information letter to national/regional ombudsmen in infringement cases  
As from September 2010, the relevant national/regional ombudsman is informed when (i) the 
EO  opens  an  inquiry  into  a  complaint  against  the  Commission's  handling  of  an  infringement 
complaint,  or  (ii) the  EO  requests  the  Commission  to  consider  dealing  with  a  complaint  as  a 
potential infringement complaint.  
 
49 

The letter mentions the first paragraph of the opening letter (with the allegations and claims). 
No copy of the opening letter is sent. The identity of the complainant is not communicated to 
the ombudsman.  In case the relevant ombudsman wishes to have the name of the complainant, 
the latter will be asked for his/her consent.  
Common  sense  is  required  concerning  which  ombudsman  to  inform  in  countries  which  have 
ombudsmen at both the national and regional levels. 
The  templates  are  available  under  SISTEO/Legal-Lois/Drafting  template/Standard 
letters/Opening letters/Information letter to the relevant ombudsman in infringement cases. 
3.3.4  Multiple complaints 
Multiple  complaints  about  the  same  subject  are  normally  treated  jointly.  Unless  there  are 
identical allegations and claims in every complaint, the summary and the Ombudsman’s letter 
to the institution, body, office or agency concerned should identify which complaints contain 
particular allegations and claims.  
Multiple complaints which arrive at the same time are all sent to the institution, body, office or 
agency  concerned.  If  they  arrive  over  a  period  of  time,  later  complaints  in  the  series  do  not 
have to be forwarded if they contain no new and relevant material.  
3.3.5  'Telephone procedures'  
Work in progress on this section don't know how to delete his.... 
 
If a complainant alleges that a Union institution, body, office or agency has failed to reply or 
has not completely and fully replied to written correspondence, a telephone procedure may be 
used to try and ensure that the complainant receives a prompt reply.  
This procedure is as follows: 
  The responsible LO sends an e-mail to his/her HLU proposing for the special procedure to 
be  used.  The  HLU's  e-mail  authorising  the  use  of  the  telephone  or  extended  telephone 
procedure forms part of the file on the case and is copied to the  Registry. The date of the 
HLU's  approval  is  considered  as  the  date  of  the  decision  on  admissibility  that  will  be 
registered in the database of complaints. 
  The LO telephones the institution, body, office or agency concerned and sends the relevant 
PDF  version  of  the  complaint  to  the  appropriate  contact  person  within  it.  The  LO  makes 
clear  to  the  institution  that  the  purpose  of  this  procedure  is  to  try  to  obtain  rapidly  an 
answer  to  the  complainant's  request.  The  institution  must  therefore  provide  an  answer 
rapidly  (normally  within  no  more  than  15  days).  If  not  the  EO  will  be  forced  to  open  a 
fully-fledged  written  inquiry  and  ask  the  institution  for  an  opinion.  The  LO  also  asks  the 
institution to send to the EO a copy of the answer provided to the complainant. 
  If the procedure is successful, meaning that the institution answered the complainant, The 
LO in charge of the case asks the complainant whether he/she is satisfied with the answer 
received  (a  copy  of  the  answer  can  be  again  sent  to  the  complainant).  This  request  is  in 
 
50 

form of a letter signed by the LO, but should be send by e-mail if available (a template is 
available on SISTEO).   
  If  the  complainant  is  satisfied  the  case  is  closed  as  "settled  by  the  institution".  If  the 
complainant is not happy with the answer he/she received, the Ombudsman must make his 
own assessment. If he considers that the answer provided by the institution was  complete 
and accurate, he will close the case with a decision of "no further inquiries justified" .  If 
he considers that the answer is insufficient of inaccurate, he should either conduct a further 
telephone  procedure  with  the  institution  or  open  a  written  inquiry  towards  the  institution 
asking the pertinent questions.  
  All  standard  letters  are  available  under  SISTEO/LEGAL-LOIS/Drafting  templates.  The 
draft  letters  are  submitted  for  signature  by  the  Ombudsman,  once  approved  by  the  HLU 
and  the  competent  Director  and  checked  previously  by  the  Lawyer-Linguists.  Once 
checked,  the  draft  letters  are  sent  for  final  approval  using  the  e-mail  templates  available 
under Sisteo/Legal/Lois/Submission of drafts.  
All  the  correspondence  to  and/or  from  the  institution,  body,  office  or  agency  should  be 
transmitted to the Registry for registration. 
A  proposal  to  use  one  of  these  special  procedures  must  be  made  rapidly  so  that  the 
complainant can be informed, within the one-month deadline, either that the case has been 
settled, or that the Ombudsman has begun a normal inquiry. Furthermore, a reply from the 
institution,  body,  office  or  agency  cannot  normally  be  considered  as  “prompt”  unless  it 
arrives  quickly  enough  for  the  Ombudsman  to  be  able  to  close  the  complaint  as  settled 
within one month of the date of registration. The LO has no formal authority to establish a 
deadline  for  a  reply  from  the  institution,  body,  office  or  agency.    Informally,  he  or  she 
should indicate, in a friendly way, that if a copy of the reply to the complainant can be sent 
to  the  Ombudsman  within  a  week  or  two,  it  will  be  unnecessary  for  the  Ombudsman  to 
open a normal written inquiry.  
The telephone procedure is not used if there is reason to suspect that the failure to reply may 
be deliberate rather than an oversight.  In such cases, a normal inquiry is opened. 
A trainee who thinks that a case may be suitable for a telephone procedure informs his or her 
HLU,  who  will  then  ask  the  relevant  Director  to  transfer  the  case  to  an  LO  (complaints  that 
give rise to inquiries, be it under the normal or the telephone procedures, may not be assigned 
to  trainees).  The  HLU  may  ask  the  transfer  to  be  made  to  himself/herself,  with  a  view  to 
asking the trainee concerned to be involved in the procedure. 
3.4 
CHECKING THE OPINION 
When the opinion arrives, the LO must immediately check to see if it 
(a)  responds  fully  and  properly  to  all  the  allegations  and  claims  listed  in  the  Ombudsman’s 
request for an opinion;  
(b) questions the admissibility of the complaint, or the Ombudsman’s competence to deal with 
it;  
 
51 

(c) contains documents that the institution considers to be confidential/non-public. 
If the opinion fails to respond fully and properly to all the allegations and claims, the LO must 
inform his or her Head of Legal Team promptly, so that the question of sending a new letter 
can  be  considered.  This  is  of  vital  importance:  the  worst  case  scenario  is  to  identify  some 
months later that the opinion is inadequate.  
3.4.1 Issues concerning admissibility or the Ombudsman’s competence 
In all cases, the complainant should be given the opportunity to comment on the institution's 
view,  normally  by  sending  the  opinion  for  observations.   If  appropriate,  the  letter  to  the 
complainant  inviting  observations  refers  specifically  to  the  institution's  view  and  requests 
additional information from the complainant. 
When the observations are received, or the deadline has passed, the LO must promptly make 
a proposal as to how to proceed. This proposal should be made within two months after the 
deadline for observations from the complainant.
   
If the institution's  view that the complaint is outside the  mandate or inadmissible  is justified, 
the  case  should  normally  be  closed.    In  exceptional  cases,  where  an  objection  relates  to 
admissibility rather than to the mandate, it may be appropriate for the Ombudsman to continue 
dealing with the  matter on his own initiative.   The Ombudsman should immediately  write  to 
the  institution  concerned,  acknowledging  the  point  that  it  has  made  and  explaining  why  he 
intends to continue the inquiry on his own initiative. 
If  the  institution's  position  is  not  justified  and  the  case  is  ready  to  be  closed,  it  may  be 
sufficient to deal with the matter in the closing decision.  However, if the institution's position 
is  strongly  stated  (for  example,  as  an  objection  to  the  Ombudsman’s  dealing  with  the 
complaint) or if it raises an issue of principle, then it may be prudent to answer in a separate 
letter before the closing decision. (The closing decision should also deal with the question). 
If there are to be steps in the inquiry before the closing decision (e.g. further inquiries, friendly 
solution  proposal)  the  question  should  be  dealt  with  as  a  preliminary  matter  in  the  relevant 
letter to the institution, to avoid giving the impression that the Ombudsman has ignored it. 
The time limit 
In making the initial decision on admissibility, the Ombudsman normally gives the citizen the 
benefit of the doubt if there is uncertainty about the application of the two-year time limit. If 
the institution’s opinion clearly shows that the time limit has been exceeded, the case should 
be closed, unless there are exceptional circumstances which justify an own-initiative inquiry.  
Legal proceedings  
No matter how convincing the evidence of a court case between the institution concerned and 
the  complainant  about  the  same  subject  matter,  fair  procedure  requires  that  the  complainant 
must still be given the opportunity to state his or her view before Article 2.7 of the Statute is 
applied.  
Appropriate administrative approaches 
 
52 

If  the  institution  succeeds  in  showing  that  administrative  approaches  described  by  the 
complainant did not in fact take place, it will normally be appropriate to close the case.  
In  other  circumstances,  even  if  the  Ombudsman  considers  that  the  institution’s  view  of  the 
initial  admissibility  of  the  complaint  could  be  correct,  it  may  be  efficient  both  for  the 
institution and the complainant for the Ombudsman to continue the inquiry rather than to close 
the  case  so  that  administrative  approaches  can  take  place.  The  Ombudsman  should 
immediately write to the institution concerned, acknowledging the point that it has made and 
explaining why he intends to continue the inquiry.  
3.4.2  Possible maladministration outside the scope of the complaint 
When examining the institution’s opinion to decide whether to look for more information, the 
LO should remember the second essential rule in section 3.1.2 above. 
The scope of the inquiry into a complaint is limited to the allegations and claims made by the 
complainant. In general, the LO should not raise new issues. 
If the Ombudsman's inquiry into a complaint reveals a possible instance of maladministration 
which is not relevant to the complainant's case, it should not be pursued in the inquiry or dealt 
with  in  the  closing  decision.  If  appropriate,  the  Ombudsman  could  open  an  own-initiative 
inquiry into the matter. 
3.4.3 Documents that the institution considers to be confidential/non-public 
If the opinion contains documents that, according to the institution, cannot be released to the 
complainant,  the  opinion  and  the  documents  in  question  shall  be  returned  to  the  institution 
concerned.  The  Ombudsman  does  not  accept  opinions  containing  documents  that  cannot  be 
communicated to the complainant. The LO draws the attention of the institution to Articles 5.1 
and  5.2  and  13  of  the  Ombudsman  Implementing  Provisions  concerning  access  to  the 
complaint file. 
If the opinion contains documents that, according to the institution, can only be released to the 
complainant, but which in its view cannot be communicated to other persons, the opinion and 
its annexes are registered in full and measures are taken to ensure that special care is taken to 
examine  those  documents  in  the  case  of  a  request  for  access  to  documents  (cf.  case 
1331/2007/JMA and 2449/2007/VIK).  
3.5 
THE COMPLAINANT'S OBSERVATIONS 
The  institution’s  opinion  is  forwarded  to  the  complainant  with  an  invitation  to  make 
observations  on  it  within  one  month  (e.g.  Ombudsman  writes  on  15  June  2006,  deadline  for 
observations is 31 July 2006). Use standard letter SL-C-4. 
In  practice,  deadlines  are  intended  mainly  for  the  benefit  of  the  complainant,  who  is  not 
obliged  to  make  any  observations.  Therefore  the  Ombudsman  does  not  normally  write 
reminder  letters  to  a  complainant.  Furthermore,  provided  that  they  arrive  in  time  to  be  taken 
into  account,  observations  are  accepted  outside  the  deadline,  subject  to  what  is  said  below 
about new allegations, claims or grounds. 
 
53 

When the complainant’s observations arrive the LO should immediately check if there are new 
allegations,  claims  or  grounds  which  are  clearly  linked  to  the  original  complaint  and  which 
could be appropriately dealt with at the same time. If so, the observations should be forwarded 
to the institution concerned so it has the possibility to give an opinion on them.  
If  the  new  allegations  or  claims  do  not  fit  in  very  well  with  the  original  complaint,  the 
complainant should be told that they cannot be dealt with in this procedure but that there is the 
possibility to make a new separate complaint on the issue. 
3.6 
THE NEXT STEP  
When the institution’s opinion and the complainant’s observations have been received, or the 
deadline for possible observations has expired, the LO examines the file and makes a proposal 
to  his  HLU,  within  a  maximum  of  two  months,  either  to  close  the  case  with  a  reasoned 
decision or to continue the inquiry. 
Except for the situations identified in section 3.4.1 above (objections to admissibility, Article 
2.7 of the Statute), the possible reasons for closing a case at this stage are: 
(i) Dropped by the complainant  
(ii) Settled by the institution 
(iii) No maladministration  
(iv) With a critical remark when, exceptionally, a friendly solution or a draft recommendation 
are not appropriate.  
The  requirements  for  each  possibility  are  set  out  in  Part  5  below.  Note  that  it  is  unusual  to 
close a case with a critical remark at this stage. Normally there should be either  an attempt to 
achieve  a  friendly  solution,  or  a  request  for  further  information.  See  the  section  on  critical 
remarks below.  
Unless  the  requirements  for  one  of  the  possible  reasons  for  closing  the  case  are  met,  the  LO 
makes a proposal for how to continue the inquiry. 
If  more  information  is  needed  to  determine  whether  or  not  there  is  maladministration,  the 
normal way to proceed is to make further inquiries by letter to the institution.  
The Ombudsman’s powers of inquiry also include inspection of documents and the taking of 
oral evidence. 
If  there  is  a  prima  facie  case  of  maladministration  the  LO  should  propose  to  seek  a  friendly 
solution. 
3.7 
FURTHER INQUIRIES BY LETTER 
Addressing a letter of further inquiries to the institutions can be justified when key aspects of 
the inquiry, necessary for taking a decision, are not clear after the opinion of the institution and 
the observations of the complainant have been examined.  This can be the case when the facts 
are controversial or unclear, or when the institution did not address one or more aspects of the 
complaint. If the information requested is however purely factual or limits itself to requesting 
 
54 

missing  documents  or  applicable  internal  regulations,  it  should  be  considered  whether  an 
exchange of e-mails with the institution and/or telephone call would not suffice.  
 
The  questions  to  the  institution,  body,  office  or  agency  should  be  as  precise  as  possible  and 
relate to the inquiry into the complaint. There is no point in asking a question if the possible 
answers will not help the Ombudsman to decide if there is maladministration or not.  
 
If the complainant has sent observations, the Ombudsman’s letter to the institution mentions 
this fact and encloses a copy. If the Ombudsman wants the institution to answer to points made 
in  the  observations,  the  letter  should  clearly  identify  the  points  concerned  and  specifically 
request  an  answer.  Legal  Officers  should  avoid  asking  the  institution  to  merely  comment,  in 
general,  on  the  observations  of  the  complainant.  However,  unless  the  complainant  has 
formulated  his  or  her  points  in  a  clear  and  precise  manner,  the  LO  should  summarise  the 
complainant’s points in the Ombudsman’s letter to the institution.  
 
If the observations include new allegations, claims or grounds, which are clearly linked to the 
original  complaint  and  which  could  be  appropriately  dealt  with  at  the  same  time,  the 
Ombudsman’s letter should mention this fact and request an opinion on them.  
 
The  normal  deadline  for  the  institution’s  reply  is  the  end  of  the  following  month  (e.g. 
Ombudsman  writes  on  5  or  25  September  2006,  the  deadline  for  observations  is  31  October 
2006). In the case of the Commission, which has particularly lengthy internal procedures  for 
adopting its answers, the Ombudsman has agreed that the deadline should be no less than two 
months.   
 
The complainant should be informed that further inquiries were made. The letter informing the 
complainant of this fact should also inform him/her that he/she will be given the opportunity to 
submit observations on the institution's further opinion. The letter of further inquiries does not 
have  to  be  forwarded  to  the  complainant.  However,  if  asked,  the  complainant  can  be  sent  a 
copy of the letter of further inquiries in English. 
 
If  the  institution  concerned  is  the  Commission,  and  the  responsible  LO  considers  that  the 
further  inquiry  is  important  enough  to  merit  drawing  it  to  the  responsible  Commissioner's 
attention, he/she should check whether the direct document transmission system applies to the 
Commissioner  concerned  (see  the  list  of  applicable  Commissioners,  available  under 
SISTEO/LEGAL-LOIS:  "Contacts-Com.Cab.").  If  appropriate,  the  LO  should  apply  the 
procedure as explained in Appendix 8. 
 
3.8 
INSPECTION OF DOCUMENTS  
Legal basis: Statute, Article 3.2:  
"The  Community  institutions  and  bodies  (now  Union  institutions,  bodies,  offices  and 
agencies)  shall  be  obliged  to  supply  the  Ombudsman  with  any  information  he  has 
requested of them and give him access to the files concerned. They may refuse only on duly 
substantiated grounds of secrecy." 

 
55 

The institution, body, office or agency  must obtain the  prior agreement of the  Member State 
before  giving  the  Ombudsman  access  to  documents  "originating  in  a  Member  State  and 
classed as secret by law or regulation". They shall give access to other documents originating 
in a Member State after having informed the Member State concerned." 
The Ombudsman’s inspection of documents must be clearly distinguished from public access 
to documents. Inspection by the Ombudsman does not result in either the public at large or the 
complainant  obtaining  access  to  confidential  documents,  since  the  Ombudsman  and  his  staff 
have  the  same  duty  of  confidentiality  in  relation  to  such  documents  as  the  responsible 
Commission  services:  Statute  Article  4  (see  also  Article  3  and  13  of  the  Ombudsman 
Implementing Provisions). 
3.8.1  Procedure for inspection of documents 
The  Ombudsman  writes  to  the  institution,  body,  office  or  agency  concerned  to  announce  the 
inspection. Details of time and place are confirmed in writing. 
The  inspection  is  normally  carried  out  by  the  LO  responsible  for  the  case,  accompanied  by 
another member of the Ombudsman’s staff. Before beginning the inspection, the LO normally 
meets representatives of the institution concerned and explains  the inspection procedure. The 
LO  requests  the  services  of  the  institution  concerned  to  identify  any  documents  that  they 
regard as confidential, or as containing confidential information. The report of the inspection 
should note that this was done and ensure that any documents identified as confidential by the 
services of the institution concerned are so marked in the list of documents inspected and that 
any confidential information included in the report on the inspection is marked as such.  
The services of the institution concerned may remain present to observe the inspection.  
The right to inspect includes the possibility to read the documents, to make notes, and to take 
photocopies.  If  the  services  of  the  institution  concerned  seek  to  prevent  or  impose 
unreasonable conditions on the inspection of any documents, the LO informs them that this is 
considered as a refusal. 
If  inspection  of  any  document  is  refused,  the  LO  asks  the  services  of  the  institution,  body, 
office  or  agency  concerned  to  state  the  duly  substantiated  ground  of  secrecy  on  which  the 
refusal is based.  
The  LO  may  seek  instruction  from  the  HLU/Director  if  any  problems  arise  during  an 
inspection.  
The  LO  should  prepare  a  complete  list  of  the  documents  which  are  inspected  or  copied.  If 
necessary,  the  LO  may  request  the  assistance  of  the  services  of  the  institution  concerned  in 
preparing the list. 
LOs must not sign any form of undertaking or any acknowledgement other than a simple list 
of the documents inspected or copied. If the services of the institution concerned make such a 
proposal, the LO transmits a copy of it to the Ombudsman.  
Following the inspection, the LO prepares an inspection report. If the documents inspected are 
confidential,  the  report  is  drafted  with  due  consideration  to  this  fact,  and  the  confidential 
documents  are  handled  in  accordance  with  the  Ombudsman's  relevant  security  rules.  The 
 
56 

Registry has put in place the necessary measures to ensure confidentiality of such documents 
in the paper and digital files.  
 
Experience shows that it can be useful to send a draft of the report, on an informal basis, to the 
officials of the institution who were present at the inspection and invite them to inform the LO 
in  case  they  consider  that  there  are  serious  inaccuracies  or  omissions.  It  should  however  be 
borne  in  mind  that  any  comments  made  by  these  officials  are  mere  suggestions  and  that  the 
decision  on  the  contents  of  the  report  remains  exclusively  with  the  Ombudsman's 
Office. The report is submitted to the HLU for approval. It is added to the file once approved 
by  the  Ombudsman.  A  copy  of  the  report  is  sent  to  the  institution  and  the  complainant,  the 
latter being invited to submit observations (usual deadline). The LO checks and ensures that no 
confidential information or documents are sent to the complainant. 
3.9 
THE TAKING OF ORAL EVIDENCE  
Legal basis: Statute, Article 3.2, 5th indent: 
"Officials and other servants of the Community institutions and bodies must testify at the 
request  of  the  Ombudsman;  they  shall  speak  on  behalf  of  and  in  accordance  with 
instructions  from  their  administrations  and  shall  continue  to  be  bound  by  their  duty  of 
professional secrecy". 

So far the need to use this provision has arisen only in cases involving the Commission. On the 
basis  of  experience  in  the  first  case  (1140/97/IJH)  the  Ombudsman  wrote  to  the  Secretary 
General of the Commission on 7 July 1999 setting out a general procedure to apply in future 
cases:  
1  The  date,  time  and  place  for  the  taking  of  oral  evidence  are  agreed  between  the 
Ombudsman’s  services  and  the  Secretariat  General  of  the  Commission,  which  informs  the 
witness(es). Oral evidence is taken on the Ombudsman’s premises, normally in Brussels.  
2 Each witness is heard separately and is not accompanied.  
3 The language or languages of the proceedings is agreed between the Ombudsman’s services 
and  the  Secretariat  General  of  the  Commission.  If  a  witness  so  requests  in  advance,  the 
proceedings are conducted in the native language of the witness.  
4 The questions and answers are recorded and transcribed by the Ombudsman’s services.  
5  The  transcript  is  sent  to  the  witness  for  signature.  The  witness  may  propose  linguistic 
corrections to the answers. If the witness wishes to correct or complete an answer, the revised 
answer  and  the  reasons  for  it  are  set  out  in  a  separate  document,  which  is  annexed  to  the 
transcript.  
6 The signed transcript, including any annex, forms part of the Ombudsman’s file on the case.  
The  letter  to  the  Commission  announcing  that  oral  evidence  will  be  taken  should  recall  the 
above  procedure,  which  should  also  be  applied,  by  analogy  in  cases  concerning  other  Union 
institutions, bodies, offices or agencies. 
The  complainant  is  informed  that  oral  testimony  has  been  taken.  A  copy  of  the  signed 
transcript,  including  any  annex  is  forwarded  to  the  complainant  on  request.  A  one-month 
deadline for possible observations is set if the transcript is forwarded. 
 
57 

LOs  should  note  that  Articles  5.3  and  13  of  the  Ombudsman's  Implementing  Provisions 
foresee  that  if  the  Ombudsman  decides  that  the  official  giving  evidence  will  do  so  in 
confidence, the complainant shall not have access to that information.  
3.10  SEARCHING FOR FRIENDLY SOLUTIONS 
Legal basis: Statute Article 3.5 
"As  far  as  possible,  the  Ombudsman  shall  seek  a  solution  with  the  institution  or  body 
concerned to eliminate the instance of maladministration and satisfy the complaint." 

The  procedure  of  seeking  a  friendly  solution  applies  only  if  the  Ombudsman  considers  that 
there is maladministration.  
Any  proposal  by  an  LO  to  seek  a  friendly  solution  must  therefore  identify  the  instance  of 
maladministration  (see  Part  4  below)  in  the  case  and  indicate  how  the  proposed  friendly 
solution would eliminate it. 
However, in order to avoid an aggressive tone in the friendly solution letter, the Ombudsman 
normally  presents  his  finding  along  the  following  lines:  "in  light  of  the  foregoing,  the 
Ombudsman's  provisional  conclusion  is  that  (an  aspect  of  the  Institution's  behaviour)  could 
constitute  an  instance  of  maladministration".  Recently,  the  Ombudsman  has  used  other 
formulations  which  avoid  stating,  even  if  provisionally,  that  there  could  be  an  instance  of 
maladministration.  The  Ombudsman  has  rather  identified  some  problems  or  shortcomings  in 
the institution's behaviour that could probably be solved to the complainant's satisfaction if the 
institution could adopt a certain measure which he proposes in his friendly solution. 
After  the  Head  of  Legal  Unit  and  the  competent  Director  have  approved  the  proposal  for  a 
friendly solution, the LO checks, normally by telephone, that the complainant would accept it. 
This telephone contact is a sensitive step. The LO should prepare the phone call together with 
his/her HLU or another experienced LO. A note of the telephone conversation is prepared and 
included in the file. 
If the complainant's response is positive, the LO prepares a letter to the institution concerned. 
It  is  essential  that  the  letter  to  the  institution  identify  clearly  the  problems  or  deficiencies 
detected  (the  instance  of  maladministration)  and  the  proposed  friendly  solution,  since  if  the 
latter is rejected the Ombudsman will, normally, proceed to make a draft recommendation.  
It should be noted that a friendly solution proposal should concentrate only on the aspect(s) for 
which  the  Ombudsman  made  a  provisional  finding  of  maladministration  or  detected  some 
problems or shortcomings in the institution's behaviour, and indicate the proposed solution to 
that/those problem(s). The friendly solution must not provide a full examination of all points 
and  allegations;  this  makes  the  proposal  more  focussed  and  easier  to  communicate.  The 
remaining  aspects  will  be  dealt  with  in  the  final  decision,  or  not  at  all,  depending  on  the 
complainant's reaction. 
The  complainant  should  receive  a  copy  of  the  friendly  solution  proposal.  If  the  complainant 
reads  English,  the  English  version  can  be  sent  to  him/her.  The  LO  can  check  with  the 
complainant first. A translation is sent to the complainant if s/he asks for one.  
 
58 

If  the  institution  involved  is  the  Commission,  and  the  direct  document  transmission  system 
applies  to  the  Commissioner  concerned  (see  the  list  of  applicable  Commissioners,  available 
under  SISTEO/LEGAL-LOIS:  "Contacts-Com.Cab."),  the  LO  should  apply  the  procedure  as 
explained in Appendix 8. 
 
 
59 


WHAT IS MALADMINISTRATION? 
Neither the Treaty nor the Statute defines the term maladministration.  
The 1995 Annual Report explained that  
"…  there  is  maladministration  if  a  Community  institution  or  body  fails  to  act  in 
accordance with the Treaties and with the Community acts that are binding upon it, or if it 
fails  to  observe  the  rules  and  principles  of  law  established  by  the  Court  of  Justice  and 
Court of First Instance."  

The Report also contained a non-exhaustive list of some possible forms of maladministration:  
  administrative irregularities or omissions  
  abuse of power  
  negligence  
  unlawful procedures  
  unfairness  
  malfunction or incompetence  
  discrimination  
  avoidable delay  
  lack or refusal of information  
The 1997 Annual Report provided a definition of the term maladministration:  
"Maladministration  occurs  when  a  public  body  fails  to  act  in  accordance  with  a  rule  or 
principle which is binding upon it."  

Therefore  when  the  Ombudsman  finds  maladministration  he  should  identify  the  binding  rule 
or principle which the institution, body, office or agency concerned has failed to respect.  
The possible sources of a binding rule or principle are:  
  Treaties and binding Community/Union acts  
  Case-law of the Court of Justice of the European Union  
  The European  Convention  on  Human  Rights  and  the  case-law of  the  European  Court  of 
Human Rights  
  The Code of Good Administrative Behaviour  
  The Charter of Fundamental Rights of the EU 
  Case-law of the European Ombudsman  
  Authoritative  commentaries  (for  example,  the  Council  of  Europe  Handbook  The 
Administration and You, 1996).  
 
60 

4.1 
DISCRETIONARY POWERS 
A  Union  institution,  body,  office  or  agency  has  a  discretionary  power  when  it  has  legal 
authority  to  choose  between  two  or  more  possible  courses  of  action.  Although  very  broad 
discretionary  powers  may  exist,  they  are  always  subject  to  the  fundamental  principles  of 
administrative law, including the giving of reasons  for decisions. The fundamental principles 
of administrative law form part of the Code of Good Administrative Behaviour (see especially 
Articles 4-11). 
An institution, body, office or agency must therefore act within the limits of its legal authority 
and commit no manifest error of appreciation when making a discretionary decision. Provided 
that  it  has  done  so,  the  Ombudsman,  just  likes  the  EU  courts,  does  not  seek  to  question  its 
decision.  
4.2 
TENDERS AND CONTRACTS 
Contracts  to  which  a  Union  institution,  body,  office  or  agency  is  a  party  are  governed  by 
national law. 
In  dealing  with  complaints  concerning  an  existing  contractual  relationship  with  a  Union 
institution, body, office or agency the Ombudsman does not seek to determine whether there 
has been a breach of contract by either party. This question could be dealt with effectively only 
by a court of competent jurisdiction, which would have the possibility to hear the arguments of 
the  parties  concerning  the  relevant  national  law  and  to  evaluate  conflicting  evidence  on  any 
disputed issues of fact.  
The  Ombudsman  therefore  limits  his  inquiry  to  examining  whether  the  Union  institution, 
body, office or agency has provided him with a coherent and reasonable account of the legal 
basis for its actions and why it believes that its view of the contractual position is justified. If 
that  is  the  case,  the  Ombudsman  concludes  that  his  inquiry  has  not  revealed  an  instance  of 
maladministration.  This  conclusion  does  not  affect  the  right  of  the  parties  to  have  their 
contractual dispute examined and authoritatively settled by a court of competent jurisdiction. 
The following standard wording is used in cases involving a disputed allegation of a breach of 
contract: 
According to Article 228 TFEU (ex Article 195 EC), the European Ombudsman is empowered 
to receive complaints "concerning instances of maladministration in the activities of the Union 
institutions,  bodies,  offices  or  agencies  ".  The  Ombudsman  considers  that  maladministration 
occurs when a public body fails to act in accordance with a rule or principle binding upon it. 
Maladministration  may  thus  also  be  found  when  the  fulfilment  of  obligations  arising  from 
contracts concluded by the Union institutions, bodies, offices or agencies is concerned.  
However, the Ombudsman considers that the scope of the review that he can carry out in such 
cases  is  necessarily  limited.  In  particular,  the  Ombudsman  is  of  the  view  that  he  should  not 
seek to determine whether there has been a breach of contract by either party, if the matter is in 
dispute. This question could be dealt with effectively only by a court of competent jurisdiction, 
which would have the possibility to hear the arguments of the parties concerning the relevant 
national law and to evaluate conflicting evidence on any disputed issues of fact.  
 
61 

The  Ombudsman  therefore  takes  the  view  that  in  cases  concerning  contractual  disputes  it  is 
justified to limit his inquiry to examining whether the Union institution, body, office or agency 
has provided him with a coherent and reasonable account of the legal basis for its actions and 
why  it  believes  that  its  view  of  the  contractual  position  is  justified.  If  that  is  the  case,  the 
Ombudsman will conclude that his inquiry has not revealed an instance of maladministration. 
This  conclusion  will  not  affect  the  right  of  the  parties  to  have  their  contractual  dispute 
examined and authoritatively settled by a court of competent jurisdiction.  
The tendering procedures used by the Union institution, body, office or agency for the award 
of contracts are governed by Union law and are therefore dealt with normally. 
 
62 


DECISIONS CLOSING INQUIRIES 
This  section  requires  extensive  revision.  Please  note  that  the  new  drafting  templates  are 
available in: 
http://www.sisteo.ep.parl.union.eu/LOIS/Drafting%20templates/Home.aspx 
5.1 
BASIC PRINCIPLES 
A  case  which  has  been  declared  admissible  in  letters  to  the  complainant  and  the  institution 
concerned must eventually be closed by a decision of the Ombudsman. 
Draft  recommendations  and  special  reports  do  not  themselves  close  a  case.  If  draft 
recommendations are accepted or partially accepted by the institution, body, office or agency 
concerned,  this  is  the  reason  for  closure  (see  section  5.2.6  below).  If  the  draft 
recommendations  are  not  accepted,  there  will  normally  be  a  special  report  to  the  European 
Parliament,  after  which  the  case  is  closed  (see  section  5.2.7  below).  The  techniques  for 
preparing  draft  recommendations  and  special  reports  are  similar  to  those  for  preparing 
decisions.  Therefore  they  are  dealt  with  in  this  section  of  the  Handbook,  under  the 
corresponding reason for closure. 
The  Ombudsman's  decisions  closing  a  complaint  are  drawn  up  according  to  the  template 
available  under  'Sisteo/Legal-Lois/Drafting  templates/Decisions  /Decision-Text'  .  The 
document containing the decision is sent with a covering letter to the complainant. A copy of 
the decision is sent to the institution, body, office or agency concerned. 
A  decision  should  be  a  self-contained  document  so  that  anyone  reading  it  can  understand  it 
without requesting more information. It should be as concise, clear and logical as possible.  
For the possible sources of rules and principles see Part 4 above. 
Decisions should not include the names of officials, since the Ombudsman’s inquiries concern 
the institution. 
Before  presenting  a  draft  decision,  please  read  it  thoroughly  and  ensure  not  only  the 
substantive  quality  and  accuracy  of  the  legal  reasoning  but  also  check  for  typographical  and 
other errors.   The spell  check in  Word is a useful aid, but it is not infallible. Remember that 
your performance will be evaluated by your hierarchy, also according with the quality of the 
drafts you submitt for approval. It is therefore appropriate to thoroughly check the substantive 
and formal quality of your drafts before you submitt them. Appendix 3 below contains detailed 
instructions  on  the  style  and  format  of  decisions.  Appendix  4  explains  how  to  prepare  a 
summary for the Annual Report. 
5.2 
THE POSSIBLE REASONS FOR CLOSING A CASE 
5.2.1  Dropped by the complainant 
NB: A case may be closed for more than one reason, if there are multiple allegations or claims 
which are dealt with separately in the decision.  

 
63 

If the complainant decides to drop the complaint after an inquiry has begun the file is closed 
for this reason.  
This  reason  is  used  only  if  the  complainant  abandons  the  case.  Usually,  complainants  who 
inform  us  that  they  wish  to  drop  their  complaint  do  so  because  the  Union  institution,  body, 
office  or  agency  concerned  has  changed  its  position  after  the  complainant’s  approach  to  the 
Ombudsman. Such cases are closed as settled by the institution. 
5.2.2  Settled by the institution 
In some cases, the Union institution, body, office or agency changes its position after learning 
that the complainant has approached the Ombudsman. If the complainant no longer wishes to 
pursue the case because he or she is satisfied with the institution’s action, the case is closed as 
"settled by the institution."  
In cases of doubt, the LO should propose to contact the complainant to check that he or she is 
satisfied, either in writing or by telephone.  
5.2.3  No maladministration  
Statistically, no  maladministration is the  most frequently used reason for closing a case. It is 
not  necessarily  negative  for  the  complainant,  provided  that  the  complaint  has  been  taken 
seriously and properly investigated.  
The Ombudsman’s inquiry is confined to the allegations and claims made by the complainant 
and the complainant must provide some supporting evidence. No inquiry should begin unless 
the  complainant  has  provided  sufficient  evidence  to  justify  an  inquiry  (see  section  2.3.11 
above).  
If the complainant has provided such evidence then we must carry out a proper inquiry before 
concluding that there is no maladministration.  
It  should  also  be  recalled  that  the  complainant  is  not  obliged  to  supply  observations  on  the 
opinion  of  the  institution,  body,  office  or  agency  concerned.  We  cannot  close  a  case  merely 
because there are no observations. We must first check that the institution’s opinion properly 
answers all the allegations and claims made in the complaint. 
5.2.4  Friendly solution 
Legal basis: Article 3.5 Statute 
The  criteria  for  launching  a  search  for  a  friendly  solution  and  the  procedures  used  are  dealt 
with in section 3.10 above.  
A case is closed as a "friendly solution achieved" if: 
(i) the Ombudsman has launched the procedure to look for a friendly solution and  
(ii) the complainant is satisfied as regards the allegation or claim concerned. If the complainant 
is  not  satisfied  with  the  result  to  which  he/she  had  previously  agreed,  the  EO  should  rather 
 
64 

close the case as "no further inquiries justified". No criticism should be made of the institution 
that accepted the Friendly solution proposed by the Ombudsman. 
5.2.5  Critical remark 
Legal basis: Article 7 Implementing provisions. 
A critical remark means that at least one of the complainant’s allegations of maladministration 
is justified, but that it is not possible for the institution to put the matter right. A critical remark 
has two purposes: (i) to give the complainant the satisfaction of a finding of maladministration, 
even  though  nothing  can  be  done  to  put  it  right  and  (ii)  to  indicate  clearly  to  the  institution, 
body, office or agency concerned what it has done wrong and how it should have behaved, so 
as to help avoid similar maladministration in the future.  
When is a critical remark appropriate? 
A  critical  remark  is  an  appropriate  way  to  close  a  case  in  which  the  Ombudsman  finds 
maladministration only if three conditions are met:  
1 no friendly solution is possible, or the  search for a  friendly  solution has been unsuccessful 
and there are good reasons for not making a draft recommendation. 
2  it  is  not  possible  for  the  institution,  body,  office  or  agency  concerned  to  eliminate  the 
instance of maladministration 
3 the instance of maladministration has no general implications.  
If  either  the  second  or  third  condition  is  not  met,  the  Ombudsman  makes  a  draft 
recommendation rather than a critical remark. 
A critical remark is also made if the Ombudsman considers that it is not appropriate to submit 
a special report in a case where the institution, body, office or agency concerned fails to accept 
a draft recommendation. 
A critical remark does not, however, constitute redress for the complainant. Where redress 
should be provided, it is best if the institution concerned takes the initiative, when it receives 
the complaint, to acknowledge the maladministration and offer suitable redress. In some cases, 
this could consist of a simple apology. 
By taking such action, the institution demonstrates its commitment to improving relations with 
citizens.  It  also  shows  that  it  is  aware  of  what  it  did  wrong  and  can  thus  avoid  similar 
maladministration in the future. In such circumstances, it is unnecessary for the Ombudsman 
to  make  a  critical  remark.  If  there  is  a  suspicion  that  the  individual  case  may  result  from  an 
underlying systemic problem, however, the Ombudsman may decide to open an own-initiative 
inquiry, even though the specific case has been resolved to the complainant's satisfaction. 
The structure of a critical remark  
A critical remark should be structured as follows:  
1 A statement of the relevant facts  
 
65 

2 A statement of the rule or principle which the institution, body, office or agency concerned 
has breached  
3  unless  obvious,  what  the  institution,  body,  office  or  agency  should  have  done  in  the 
circumstances to avoid maladministration.  
Points  2  and  3  are  useful  to  maximise  the  educative  potential  of  the  critical  remark.  Thus 
constructed,  a  critical  remark  also  explains  and  justifies  the  Ombudsman's  finding  of 
maladministration and thereby seeks to strengthen the confidence of citizens and institutions in 
the fairness and thoroughness of the Ombudsman's work. 
Examples: 
The complainant’s request for information from the Commission received neither a substantive 
reply nor a holding reply for over six months.  According to the Commission’s Code of Good 
Administrative Behaviour, if a reply to a letter cannot be sent within fifteen working days, the 
member  of  staff  responsible  should  send  a  holding  reply,  indicating  a  date  by  which  the 
addressee may expect to be sent a reply.  The Commission’s failure to follow its own Code in 
this case was an instance of maladministration. 

The European Parliament decided to take away a former MEP’s privileges.  Every citizen has 
the right to know the reasons for an administrative decision which adversely affects his or her 
interests  and  to  be  heard  before  such  a  decision  is  made.    Before  taking  away  the  former 
MEP’s  privileges,  Parliament  should  therefore  have  told  him  what  he  had  done  wrong  and 
given  him  the  opportunity  to  put  his  side  of  the  case.    It  should  also  have  communicated  its 
reasoned decision to him promptly.  Its failure to do so was an instance of maladministration. 

The critical remark is stated in the section "Conclusions" of the decision as well as in the 
covering letter which is sent to the President of the institution, body, office or agency 
concerned. For an example of a decision containing a critical remark, see decision 
1202/2009/GG . 
 
 
The register of critical remarks 
A register of critical remarks from the beginning of 2002 has been established.  It is available 
on SISTEO/Legal-Lois/Complaints Data.  This should help facilitate the follow-up of critical 
remarks by the Ombudsman.   
Critical remarks are numbered in the register (as e.g. CR 1/2002).  If a decision contains more 
than one critical remark, each should be numbered separately.  The register should also include 
the  reference  number  of  the  case  in  which  the  critical  remark  was  made  and  the  date  of  the 
decision. 
It seems unnecessary, and difficult in practice, to include the number in the decision letter to 
the  complainant,  or  in  the  covering  letter  to  the  institution.    The  Webmaster  will  allocate 
numbers to critical remarks when the relevant decision is put on the Website and maintain the 
register that is available through SISTEO/Legal-Lois/Complaints Data, with links to the text of 
the critical remarks in the decisions on the Website.  
When the database will be further developed, it should be possible to generate the register of 
critical  remarks  dynamically  from  the  database,  together  with  similar  registers  of  draft 
 
66 

recommendations  and  further  remarks.    At  this  stage,  consideration  could  be  given  to 
publishing the registers on the Website. 
5.2.6  Draft recommendation(s) accepted or partially accepted by the institution 
Legal basis: Article 3.6 Statute, together with Article 8 of the implementing provisions.  
Article 3.6 of the Statute provides for the Ombudsman to send a report to the institution, body, 
office or agency concerned, where appropriate making draft recommendations. The institution, 
body, office or agency must send a detailed opinion within three months. The Ombudsman’s 
letter  to  the  institution  specifically  refers  to  the  requirement  of  a  detailed  opinion  and  points 
out  that  the  detailed  opinion  could  accept  the  Ombudsman's  decision  and  describe  the 
measures taken to implement it.  
Draft  recommendations  are  addressed  to  the  institution,  body,  office  or  agency  concerned. 
They  are  drawn  up  according  to  the  template  available  under  'Sisteo/Legal-Lois/Drafting 
templates/Draft recommendations/Draft recommendation - Text' 
Draft  recommendations,  which  can  be  used  as  a  model,  are  available  on  the  Ombudsman's 
website. 
The  document  containing  the  draft  recommendation(s)  is  sent  with  a  covering  letter  to  the 
institution, body, office or agency concerned.
 
Draft recommendations made in the context of a complaint are forwarded to the complainant, 
for  information,  in  his/her  language.  When  the  detailed  opinion  from  the  institution,  body, 
office or agency is received, it is forwarded to the complainant for possible observations.  
If the Ombudsman considers that the detailed opinion is a satisfactory response, he closes the 
case  with  a  decision  accordingly.  When  appropriate,  the  case  is  considered  as  closed  with 
partial acceptance of the draft recommendation (option 'DR partly agreed by the institution' in 
the Statistical information sheet 2). This conclusion must be clearly stated in the closing letters 
and  in  the  Decision.  It  has  to  be  noted  that  'partly  agreed'  should  not  become  a  source  of 
'negotiation', and that this conclusion should only be used when the institution has genuinely 
responded  to  central  points  in  the  Draft  recommendation  in  a  constructive  and  cooperative 
manner. In the context of a complaint, the decision is addressed, as normal, to the complainant 
with a copy to the institution, body, office or agency concerned. 
If  the  detailed  opinion  of  the  institution,  body,  office  or  agency  is  not  satisfactory,  the 
Ombudsman might consider making a special report to the European Parliament.  
In  his  Annual  Report  for  1998,  the  Ombudsman  pointed  out  that  the  possibility  for  him  to 
present a special report to the European Parliament was of inestimable value to his work. He 
added that special reports should therefore not be presented too frequently, but only in relation 
to  important  matters  where  the  Parliament  was  able  to  take  action  in  order  to  assist  the 
Ombudsman1.  The  Annual  Report  for  1998  was  approved  by  the  European  Parliament.  The 
LO in charge of a case, which touches upon an important issue of principle and has particular 
circumstances  that  would  make  it  appropriate  and/or  necessary  to  submit  a  special  report  to 
Parliament, should discuss the matter with the HLU and the HLD.  
                                              
1 Annual Report for 1998, pages 27-28.  
 
67 

 
If the Ombudsman decides not to  make  a special report, he will close  a case with  a decision 
making appropriate critical remarks. In some cases where the Ombudsman did not consider it 
appropriate  to  make  a  special  report  to  Parliament,  he  has  made  his  conclusions  public  by 
issuing a relevant press release. He  has also in some cases informed particular institutions of 
his  decisions  like  the  Court  of  Auditors  or  particular  interinstitutional  bodies  of  the  EU  civil 
service  like  the  College  of  Heads  of  Administration,  which  might  have  an  interest  in  the 
subject  matter  of  the  inquiry.  In  another  case  he  has  informed  a  specific  committee  of  the 
European Parliament competent on the subject matter (social affairs committee). 
If  the  Ombudsman  decides  to  make  the  special  report,  he  sends  it  to  the  institution,  body, 
office or agency concerned. In the context of a complaint, he informs the complainant of this 
action. The special report may contain one or more recommendations. These should be based 
on the draft recommendations made to the institution, body, office or agency concerned. Any 
changes should be explained and justified. 
If  the  institution  involved  is  the  Commission,  and  the  direct  document  transmission  system 
applies  to  the  Commissioner  concerned  (see  the  list  of  applicable  Commissioners,  available 
under  SISTEO/LEGAL-LOIS:  "Contacts-Com.Cab.")
,  the  LO  should  apply  the  procedure  as 
explained in Appendix 8. 
After having submitted a special report to the European Parliament, in accordance with Article 
3(7)  of  his  Statute,  the  Ombudsman  closes  the  case  with  a  very  short  decision.  In  fact,  the 
Ombudsman's  Statute  provides  that  the  submission  of  a  report  to  the  European  Parliament  is 
the final step in an inquiry by the Ombudsman. For a model letter, please see previous cases 
(e.g. case 3453/2005/GG). 
 
 
5.2.7  Following a special report 
Legal Basis: Statute, Article 3.7 
A  special  report  to  the  European  Parliament  is  made  if  the  Ombudsman  considers  that  the 
detailed  opinion  forwarded  to  him  by  an  institution,  body,  office  or  agency  to  which  he  has 
made draft recommendations is unsatisfactory.  
A copy of the special report is also  sent to the institution, body, office or agency concerned, 
and to the complainant in the context of a complaint.  
A  special  report  normally  includes  recommendations.  Any  difference  between  the 
recommendations and the earlier draft recommendations should be explained and justified.  
In accordance with Rule 179 of the Parliament’s Rules of Procedure, the special report is dealt 
with  by  the  committee  responsible  (i.e.  the  Committee  on  Petitions),  which  may  draw  up  a 
report.  
A special report is translated into all languages and published on the Website. 
 
68 

The  decision  closing  a  case  following  a  special  report  is  normally  short,  formal  and 
unpublished;  since  the  results  of  the  Ombudsman's  inquiry  are  dealt  with  fully  in  the  special 
report itself.  
 
5.2.8  Other  
Other possible reasons for closing a case are:  

Article  2.7  Statute,  termination  because  of  legal  proceedings.  The  result  of  any 
inquiries carried out is "filed without  further action", so the decision is short and formal: see 
e.g. case 458/27.2.96/HS/B/KT, 1997 Annual Report, p. 170.  

If  the  Ombudsman  discovers  during  the  course  of  his  inquiry  that  the  complaint  is 
outside the mandate or inadmissible  

If  the  Ombudsman  discovers  during  the  course  of  his  inquiry  that  another  competent 
body is dealing with the matter, he may consider that there are no grounds for him to continue 
his inquiry (cf. section 2.3.10 above).  
5.3 
FURTHER REMARKS 
A  further  remark  may  be  made  when  the  Ombudsman  has  not  found  maladministration,  but 
where he considers that the institution, body, office or agency has an opportunity  to improve 
the quality of its administration in the future. A further remark should therefore be constructive 
in  tone  and  should  not  contain  criticism  of  the  institution  concerned.  However,  as  with  a 
critical remark, a further remark is quoted in the covering letter to the institution, body, office 
or agency concerned. 
5.4 
PROCEDURE FOR PREPARATION OF DECISIONS 
Language checking 

When opening inquiries, LOs may submit their allegations and claims to the lawyer-
linguist for prior checking if they are unsure about the accuracy of the language used.   

 Friendly  solution  proposals,  draft  recommendations  and  closing  decisions, 
including  their  accompanying  letters  to  the  complainants  and  the  institutions  concerned, 
should  only  be  submitted  to  the  lawyer-linguist  for  checking  after  approval  by  the 
appropriate  HLU  and  the  relevant  Director.  Special  reports,  own-initiative  inquiries, 
queries from national Ombudsmen and summaries of decisions should be submitted to the 
lawyer-linguist in the same way. HLUs may, however, authorise special arrangements for 
language checking after consulting the Directors.  
3  
The  lawyer-linguist  indicates  corrections  and  queries  using  the  TRAK  change 
function  on  an  electronic  version  of  the  draft.  He/she  then  sends  the  document  with 
revisions by e-mail to the LO who submitted it and to the LO’s HLU in copy.  
4  
The LO who has prepared the draft should carefully check all the proposed revisions 
and deal with any queries. In the case of substantive queries, the LO should re-submit the 
text to his/her HLU for approval.  The LO is responsible for the text presented to the EO 
 
69 

after  the  language  check  and  should  seek  to  learn  from  the  corrections  made  in  order  to 
improve the quality of future work. 
5  
If  substantive  revisions  are  required  after  drafts  are  re-submitted  to  HLUs,  the 
responsible HLU may instruct the LO concerned to submit the text for a further language 
check.  In such cases, the LO should inform  the lawyer-linguist that the draft has already 
been checked and clearly indicate the area of substantive revision. 
 
Presentation  to  the  EO    (THIS  PART  SHOULD  BE  CHECKED  TO  SEE  IF  IT  NEEDS 
ADAPTATION) 


Once  counter-signed  by  the  principal  supervisor,  decisions  are  submitted  to  the 
Ombudsman for signature on headed paper, if the language of the complaint is English, or on 
ordinary  paper,  if  the  language  of  the  complaint  is  not  English.  In  the  latter  case  the  words: 
"Final  English  version  of  decision  in  case  xxxxx"  are  used  instead  of  the  closing  formula 
"yours sincerely".  

When the Ombudsman has signed the decision, the LO proceeds directly to step 3 if the 
language of the complaint is English.  
If necessary, the decision is translated into the language of the complaint, either by the LO or 
by  the  translation  service.  In  the  latter  case,  the  LO  checks  the  translation,  or  submits  it  for 
checking  by  a  person  in  the  office  who  is  competent  in  the  language  concerned.  When  the 
translation is complete, the LO submits the decision for the Ombudsman’s signature on headed 
paper in the language of the complaint.  
Clarification of the procedure for decisions requiring translation 
When the Ombudsman approves the English version of a decision, he is merely authorising the 
document  to  be  sent  for  translation.  The  decision  on  the  case  is  only  made  when  the 
Ombudsman signs it in the authentic language, on headed paper. 
If  the  Ombudsman  approves  an  English  version  on  which  he  has  made  hand-written 
corrections, he is indicating that he does not need to check that the corrections have been made 
before the document is sent for translation. The idea is to avoid unnecessary delay in sending 
the  document  for  translation.  The  LO  should  of  course  make  the  corrections  required  by  the 
Ombudsman before sending the corrected text for translation. 
In  a  case  where  no  hand-written  corrections  have  been  made,  the  LO  should  present  in  the 
final signataire: 
(1)  The  original  plain  paper  English  version  of  the  document,  bearing  the  Ombudsman’s 
signature; 
(2) The document in the authentic language, on headed paper, for the Ombudsman’s signature. 
It should be accompanied by an English version of the document, without the Ombudsman’s 
signature, for transmission to the institution. 
In  this  case,  the  original  of  (1)  and  a  copy  of  (2)  are  to  be  added  to  the  file  on  the  case  and 
should therefore be scanned for the digital archive. 
 
70 

In a case where hand-written corrections have  been  made, the LO  should also  present in the 
final signataire: 
(3) the corrected English version of the document on plain paper. The Ombudsman can then 
check  that  his  corrections  have  indeed  been  implemented  and  sign  the  corrected  and  final 
English version, which replaces the version with the hand-written corrections (1). 
In this case, the original of (3) and a copy of (2) are added to the file and should be scanned. 
(1)  in  this  case  is  merely  a  working  document  and  should  neither  be  added  to  the  file,  nor 
scanned. 
It  is  important  that  the  LO  should  present  the  signataire  in  a  way  that  makes  clear  what  is 
being  presented.  The  LO  should  normally  add  an  explanatory  note  at  the  beginning  for  this 
purpose.    The  note  should  explain,  when  appropriate,  that  the  EO  approved  the  EN  version 
with hand-written corrections and that a clean  copy of the EN version with these corrections 
implemented  is  enclosed  for  the  EO’s  signature,  in  addition  to  the  decision  in  the 
complainant's language. 

The  LO  copies  the  decision  in  English  and  in  the  language  of  the  complainant  if 
different to the correct year and name sub-directory of s:\legal\decisions. The document should 
be  given  a  name  of  the  following  pattern:  619-06en.doc,  619-06de.doc  (the  latter  being  the 
decision in the language German of the complainant.  

Make  a summary of the decision in English  for the Annual  Report if  appropriate (see 
Appendix 4 below).  
NB:  See section 1.4.2 in case of confidential complaints 
5.5 
FOLLOW UP BY INSTITUTIONS ON CRITICAL REMARKS OR FURTHER REMARKS 
Each  year  the  Ombudsman  makes  a  study  of  the  follow-up  given  by  the  institutions  to  the 
critical remarks and further remarks made by the Ombudsman in the previous year. The study 
is sent to all the institutions and bodies and published on the website.  
The study looks at follow-up in terms of systemic improvements that raise the quality of 
administration, thus making maladministration less likely to occur in the future. In dealing 
with critical remarks, the study does not focus on the specific instance of maladministration 
that led to the remark, but on the lessons that the institution concerned has learnt for the future. 
For the purpose of the study, whenever an institution sends a follow-up on a critical remark or 
a further remark, the responsible LO should draft a note on that  follow-up within one month 
and submit it to his/her Head of Legal Unit.  
The  template  as  well  as  guidelines  for  drafting  notes  on  the  follow-up  to  critical  and  further 
remarks are available under SISTEO/Legal-Lois/Resources/ Notes on the follow-up to critical 
and further remarks. Once approved by the competent Director, the note is sent to his assistant, 
who  saves  it  in  the  appropriate  folder,  and  to  the  colleagues  mentioned  in  he  template  (the 
Director's  assistant  and  to  the  colleagues  which  have  the  responsibility  for  preparing  this 
study).  The  note  is  also  sent  to  the  Registry  to  be  registered  as  an  incoming  document 
('Entrée') in the file.  
 
71 

In case an institution responds to both critical and further remarks in the same case, the note is 
saved in both folders.  
 
5.6 
PROCEDURES IF THE COMPLAINANT WISHES TO CONTEST A DECISION OF THE 
OMBUDSMAN, OR COMPLAIN AGAINST THE RESPONSIBLE LO 

Unfortunately  we  are  not  always  able  to  satisfy  complainants.  This  section  deals  with  two 
different ways in which complainants may express dissatisfaction. 
5.6.1  Requests for information about how to contest a decision of the Ombudsman 
The responsible LO proposes a reply for the Ombudsman’s signature.  This must be done as a 
matter of priority. 
It  is  important  that  we  provide  consistent,  accurate  and  helpful  information  to  complainants 
who write to request information about how to contest a decision of the Ombudsman.  
A request for the Ombudsman to review or revise his own decision on a complaint should be 
dealt  with  on  its  merits.  The  following  guidance  is  only  relevant  in  such  cases  if  the 
complainant also requests information about possibilities for external remedies. 
 
The guidance does not take the form of a standard letter, because it is important to respond to 
the individual request.  In doing so, however, it may be appropriate to include one or more of 
the following elements: 
 
  The European Ombudsman must submit an annual report to the European Parliament 
on the outcome of his inquiries. (If appropriate in answering the specific request, 
reference should also be made to Article 8 of the Statute
.)  
 
  A decision by the Ombudsman that there is maladministration does not create 
enforceable rights for a complainant.  Nor does a finding of no maladministration 
deprive the complainant of the possibility to seek a judicial remedy against the Union 
institution, body, office or agency concerned.  
 
  Neither Article 228 TFEU nor the Statute of the Ombudsman1 provide for any appeal or 
other remedy against the Ombudsman’s decisions. 
 
  The General Court has taken the view that the Ombudsman’s submission to the 
European Parliament of a report finding a case of maladministration is not a measure 
capable of being challenged in annulment proceedings.2  
 
                                              
1  
European Parliament decision 94/262 of 9 March 1994 on the regulations and general conditions governing the 
performance of the Ombudsman’s duties, OJ 1994, L 113/15. 
2  
Order of the Court of First Instance of 22 May 2000 in Case T-103/99, Associazione delle Cantine Sociali Venete 
v European Ombudsman and European Parliament
 2000 ECR II-4165 
 
72 

  The General Court has declared inadmissible proceedings brought against the 
Ombudsman under Article 265 of the TFEU for failure to act.1  
 
  The Court of Justice of the European Union has held that it is possible to bring an 
action for damages against the European Ombudsman based on the latter’s alleged 
mishandling of a complaint. According to the Court, in very exceptional circumstances 
a citizen may be able to demonstrate that the Ombudsman has committed a sufficiently 
serious breach of Union law in the performance of his duties likely to cause damage to 
the citizen concerned.2  
 
  If you require detailed advice about any possible legal remedies that may be available 
to you, you could consult a lawyer. 
 
 
A draft model letter is included in appendix 5 below. 
5.6.2 Complaints against the LO responsible 
In fairness to both the complainant and the LO concerned, the reply to a complaint against an 
LO  should  normally  be  proposed  to  the  Ombudsman  by  the  Secretary-General  after  prior 
approval by the competent Director. 
If  a  letter  of  complaint  is  received,  the  LO  should  promptly  prepare  a  note  informing  the 
Ombudsman  of  this  fact  and  giving  his  or  her  response  to  the  complainant’s  allegations.    A 
copy of the note is included in the file on the case. 
The Ombudsman then decides on the appropriate action, which could be to transfer the case to 
another LO or HOU.   
If a complainant requests information about how to contest a decision of the Ombudsman and 
at  the  same  time  complains  or  expresses  dissatisfaction  with  the  responsible  LO,  both 
procedure under 5.6.1 and 5.6.2 apply. 
 
 
                                              
1  
Order of the Court of First Instance of 22 May 2000 in Case T-103/99, Associazione delle Cantine Sociali Venete 
v European Ombudsman and European Parliament
 2000 ECR II-4165 
2  
Case C-234/02 P, European Ombudsman v Frank Lamberts, Judgment of the Court  of 23 March 2004. 
 
73 


OWN-INITIATIVE INQUIRIES 
Legal basis: Article 228 TFEU (ex Article 195 EC): 
"… the Ombudsman shall conduct inquiries… either on his own initiative or on the basis of 
complaints submitted to him… " 

In practice the own-initiative power has been used in six kinds of cases: 
(i) if there have been a number of complaints on the same subject, so that an initiative could be 
useful in finding out whether there is a more general problem and, if there is, finding a solution  
(ii) if the Ombudsman considers that an allegation of maladministration made in a complaint 
should be investigated  despite the  fact that the complaint  does not  meet all the conditions of 
admissibility, or is submitted by a non-citizen or non-resident (see note below) 
(iii)  to  enable  the  Ombudsman  to  investigate  an  allegation  of  maladministration  without 
revealing the identity of the complainant to the institution concerned  
(iv) where appropriate, following the transmission to the Ombudsman of the file on a petition 
which the Committee on Petitions has examined (see section 2.6.6 above)  
(v) where appropriate, following the reply of a  Union institution, body, office or agency to a 
query from a national ombudsman. 
(vi) where the Ombudsman decides to conduct a visit to an agency of EU (see examples in the 
relevant section of the EO's website).  
The  procedure  for  dealing  with  complaints  applies  by  analogy  to  an  own-initiative  inquiry. 
However, the opening letter to the institution  must always  explain the Ombudsman's reasons 
for  opening  an  own-initiative  inquiry.  In  cases  (ii)  -  (v)  the  replies  of  the  institution,  body, 
office  or  agency  concerned  are  normally  forwarded  to  the  interested  party,  for  possible 
observations. The interested party is also informed of the closing decision, which is addressed 
to the Union institution, body, office or agency concerned. 
The list of own-initiative inquiries can be obtained from the Registry. 
Note 
Where an own-initiative inquiry is opened on the basis of a complaint which is submitted by a 
non-citizen or non-resident of the EU, the normal procedure for own  initiatives should apply 
and the final decision on the case should be addressed to the institution in question with a copy 
to the complainant (and not vice versa). 
 
74 


QUERIES FROM NATIONAL OMBUDSMEN 
Article 5 of the Statute provides for the European Ombudsman to cooperate with authorities of 
the  same  type  in  certain  Member  States,  insofar  as  it  may  help  to  make  his  enquiries  more 
efficient and better safeguard the rights and interests of complainants.  
At  a  seminar  for  national  Ombudsmen  and  similar  bodies  held  in  Strasbourg  in  September 
1996 it was agreed that:  
"The  European  Ombudsman  will  receive  queries  from  national  Ombudsmen  about 
Community law and either provide replies directly, or channel the query to an appropriate 
Union institution or body for response."  

Queries are numbered separately from complaints: e.g. Q2/2006/IP. The list of queries can be 
obtained from the Registry.  
Most  queries  are  dealt  with  through  a  procedure  analogous  to  that  used  for  inquiries.  The 
Ombudsman forwards the query to the appropriate institution, body, office or agency, usually 
the Commission, with a three month deadline for an opinion (see SL-D-1). When the reply is 
received,  it  is  forwarded  to  the  national  ombudsman.  A  request  for  clarification,  or  a 
supplementary query, is dealt with through the same procedure  
If the national ombudsman does not reply, or replies that he is satisfied with the institution’s 
opinion,  the  Ombudsman  closes  the  case.  The  EU  institution  to  which  the  query  was 
forwarded is also informed of the closure of the case. 
In  a  case  where  the  national  ombudsman  considers  that  the  institution’s  reply  is  wrong,  the 
European  Ombudsman  may  open  an  own-initiative  inquiry  into  a  possible  instance  of 
maladministration,  if  there  are  grounds  to  do  so  (see  e.g.  Q5/98).  If  there  are  not  sufficient 
grounds,  the  European  Ombudsman  informs  the  national  ombudsman  accordingly  (see  e.g. 
Q2/97).  
If  the  national  ombudsman  expressly  requests  the  European  Ombudsman  not  to  transmit  the 
query to the institution concerned, the latter limits himself to undertaking research to provide 
the national Ombudsman with all necessary elements for the case he was examining (Q1/99). 
 
75 


PUBLIC ACCESS TO DOCUMENTS 
Trainees  should  immediately  consult  their  tutor  about  any  request  by  the  complainant  for 
access to his or her file or any request for public access.  THIS SHOULD BE UPDATED BY 
THE REGISTRY 
8.1 
GENERAL PRINCIPLES 
Public access to documents held by the Ombudsman’s office is governed by Article 14 of the 
implementing provisions.  
LOs  can  provide  copies  of  documents  in  accordance  with  Article  14  under  the  conditions 
defined below.  
A refusal to give access to a document is a formal reasoned decision of the Ombudsman, made 
in writing on the proposal of the Head of the Legal Department. LOs should not therefore state 
that a particular document will not be released. If the document in question does not appear to 
be  a  public  document  as  defined  by  Article  14  of  the  implementing  provisions,  the  person 
requesting the document may be so informed, but should also be invited to address the request 
in writing to the Ombudsman.  
If it is not clear what document is being requested, the person making the request should be so 
informed  and  invited  to  address  to  the  Ombudsman,  in  writing,  a  request  that  sufficiently 
identifies the document.  
8.2 
REQUESTS FOR ACCESS TO COMPLAINTS-RELATED DOCUMENTS  
8.2.1  Written requests  
(i.e. requests made by letter, fax or e-mail) 
We need to maintain centralised control of how we handle requests in order to ensure prompt 
and  consistent  replies,  in  accordance  with  the  implementing  provisions,  as  well  as  a  central 
record of requests for statistical purposes.  
As  a  provisional  solution,  pending  approval  of  a  new  handbook,  requests  for  public  access 
should be dealt with by the assistant to the HLD in consultation with the responsible LO and 
HLD.  
The same procedure should be used to deal with a request by a complainant for access to his or 
her own file. 
8.2.2  Oral requests  
(i.e. requests made in person, or by telephone) 
Where an oral request is addressed to a member of staff other than the LO responsible for the 
relevant complaint file, the request should normally be referred to the responsible LO. 
 
76 

Where  an  oral  request  is  made  to  the  responsible  LO,  he  or  she  may  provide  a  copy  of  the 
document if it is clear that the document is a public document as defined by Article 14 of the 
implementing provisions. The responsible LO consults with the Head of the Legal Department 
in cases of doubt.  
8.3 
REQUESTS FOR ACCESS TO NON COMPLAINTS-RELATED DOCUMENTS  
8.3.1  Written requests 
(i.e. requests made by letter, fax or e-mail)  
Written  requests  are  dealt  with  through  the  usual  procedure  for  correspondence.  They  will 
normally be assigned to the press officer, who consults with the Head of the Legal Department 
on any matters of doubt. 
8.3.2 Oral requests  
(i.e. requests made in person, or by telephone) 
Up to 10 copies of documents which have been produced for distribution to the public and a 
single copy of an Annual Report are supplied on request, if available.  
In  the  case  of  oral  requests  for  larger  numbers  of  copies  of  the  above  documents,  or  for 
documents which have not been produced for distribution to the public, the person concerned 
is invited to address a written request to the Ombudsman.  
8.4 
REQUESTS INVOLVING LARGE NUMBERS OF DOCUMENTS 
If a request involves copying more than 50 pages the matter should be referred to the Head of 
the  Legal  Department  to  consider  whether  a  charge  should  be  made  or  on-the-spot  access 
offered as an alternative.  
Requests  for  a  whole  class  of  documents  (e.g.  all  complaints  from  Germany,  all  complaints 
against the European Parliament) should be referred to the Head of the Legal Department for a 
recommendation  to  the  Ombudsman  as  to  whether  the  request  sufficiently  identifies  the 
documents concerned. 
8.5 
ON-THE-SPOT ACCESS 
Oral  requests  for  on-the-spot  access  to  documents  are  dealt  with  by  inviting  the  person 
concerned to address a written request to the Ombudsman, or to contact the Head of the Legal 
Department for clarification.  
This  procedure  applies  also  in  the  case  of  requests  for  access  to  documents  for  purposes  of 
academic research. 
 
77 

APPENDIX 1: TREATY ARTICLES 
Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union. 
Article 24 TFEU (ex Article 21 EC) 
The European Parliament and the Council, acting by means of regulations in accordance 
with the ordinary legislative procedure, shall adopt the provisions for the procedures and 
conditions required for a citizens' initiative within the meaning of Article 11 of the Treaty 
on  European  Union,  including  the  minimum  number  of  Member  States  from  which  such 
citizens must come. 

Every  citizen  of  the  Union  shall  have  the  right  to  petition  the  European  Parliament  in 
accordance with Article 227. 

Every  citizen  of  the  Union  may  apply  to  the  Ombudsman  established  in  accordance  with 
Article 228. 

Every citizen of the Union may write to any of the institutions, bodies, offices or agencies 
referred to in this Article or in Article 13 of  the Treaty on European Union in one  of the 
languages  mentioned  in  Article  55(1)  of  the  Treaty  on  European  Union  and  have  an 
answer in the same language.  

Article 226 (ex Article 193 EC) 
In the course of its duties, the European Parliament may, at the request of a quarter of its 
component  Members,  set  up  a  temporary  Committee  of  Inquiry  to  investigate,  without 
prejudice  to  the  powers  conferred  by  the  Treaties  on  other  institutions  or  bodies,  alleged 
contraventions or maladministration in the implementation of Union law, except where the 
alleged facts are being examined before a court and while the case is still subject to legal 
proceedings. 

The temporary Committee of Inquiry shall cease to exist on the submission of its report. 
The detailed provisions governing the exercise of the right of inquiry shall be determined 
by  the  European  Parliament,  acting  by  means  of  regulations  on  its  own  initiative  in 
accordance with a special legislative procedure, after obtaining the consent of the Council 
and the Commission.  

Article 227 TFEU (ex Article 194 EC) 
Any citizen of the Union, and any natural or legal person residing or having its registered 
office  in  a  Member  State,  shall  have  the  right  to  address,  individually  or  in  association 
with  other  citizens  or  persons,  a  petition  to  the  European  Parliament  on  a  matter  which 
comes within the Union's fields of activity and which affects him, her or it directly. 

Article 228 TFEU (ex Article 195 EC)  
1.  A  European  Ombudsman,  elected  by  the  European  Parliament,  shall  be  empowered  to 
receive complaints from any citizen of the Union or any natural or legal person residing or 
having its registered  office in  a Member State concerning instances of maladministration 

 
78 

in the activities of the Union institutions, bodies, offices or agencies, with the exception of 
the  Court  of  Justice  of  the  European  Union  acting  in  its  judicial  role.  He  or  she  shall 
examine such complaints and report on them. 

In accordance with his duties, the Ombudsman shall conduct inquiries for which he finds 
grounds, either on his own initiative or on the basis of complaints submitted to him direct 
or  through  a  Member  of  the  European  Parliament,  except  where  the  alleged  facts  are  or 
have been the subject of legal proceedings. Where the Ombudsman establishes an instance 
of  maladministration,  he  shall  refer  matter  to  the  institution,  body,  office  or  agency 
concerned, which shall have a period of three months in which to inform him of its views. 
The  Ombudsman  shall  then  forward  a  report  to  the  European  Parliament  and  the 
institution,  body,  office  or  agency  concerned.  The  person  lodging  the  complaint  shall  be 
informed of the outcome of such inquiries. 

The  Ombudsman  shall  submit  an  annual  report  to  the  European  Parliament  on  the 
outcome of his inquiries. 

2. The Ombudsman shall be elected after each election of the European Parliament for the 
duration of its term of office. The Ombudsman shall be eligible for reappointment. 

The Ombudsman may be dismissed by the Court of Justice at the request of the European 
Parliament if he no longer fulfils the conditions required for the performance of his duties 
or if he is guilty of serious misconduct. 

3.  The  Ombudsman  shall  be  completely  independent  in  the  performance  of  his  duties.  In 
the  performance  of  those  duties  he  shall  neither  seek  nor  take  instructions  from  any 
Government, institution, body, office or entity. The Ombudsman may not, during his term 
of office, engage in any other occupation, whether gainful or not. 

4.  The  European  Parliament  acting  by  means  of  regulations  on  its  own  initiative  in 
accordance  with  a  special  legislative  procedure  shall,  after  seeking  an  opinion  from  the 
Commission  and  with  the  approval  of  the  Council,  lay  down  the  regulations  and  general 
conditions governing the performance of the Ombudsman's duties. 

Article 339 TFEU (ex Article 287 EC)  
The members of the institutions of the Union, the members of committees, and the officials 
and other servants of the Union shall be required, even after their duties have ceased, not 
to  disclose  information  of  the  kind  covered  by  the  obligation  of  professional  secrecy,  in 
particular  information  about  undertakings,  their  business  relations  or  their  cost 
components. 

 
79 

APPENDIX 2: KEYWORDS 
Statistical sheet 1 has to be completed when you propose your decision on in-/admissibility. It 
contains four fields of key words: 
1 Eurovoc  
2 Field of law  
3 Type of maladministration alleged  
4 Subject matter of the case  
Key word lists are set out further below.  
Key  word  fields  two,  three  and  four  are  only  used  when  an  inquiry  is  opened,  or  for 
complaints  that  are  rejected  on  'no  grounds'.  For  complaints  that  are  outside the  mandate  or 
inadmissible, only field one is used. 
Key  word  field  one  (Eurovoc)  must  always  be  completed.  The  list  of  Eurovoc  descriptors  is 
not  exhaustive.  If  you  wish  to  propose  the  addition  of  a  new  Eurovoc  descriptor,  it  must 
already exist in the Eurovoc list, available under: http://europa.eu/eurovoc/. You should make 
your  proposal  directly  to  the  HLD,  explaining  why  none  of  the  existing  terms  would  be 
adequate.  
 
Do  not  delay  sending  a  case  because  you  are  waiting  for  a  reply  concerning  the  appropriate 
key word to use.  Just leave your statistical sheet empty, adding a post-it note for the Registry 
stating that you will inform them as soon as possible which keyword to insert.  
 
The list of key words for the second third and fourth fields are exhaustive. 
The  list  of  key  words  2  ('Field  of  law')  is  based  on  the  EUR-Lex  directory  of  Community 
legislation.  The  list  of  key  words  3  ('Type  of  maladministration  alleged')  mainly  follows  the 
structure and the content of the European Code of Good Administrative Behaviour, with slight 
modifications.   
Each of these fields may contain more than one word.  
If  deemed  useful,  the  legal  act  concerned  should  be  mentioned,  by  way  of  information,  on 
statistical information sheet 1 (in the separate field next to key words 2 'Field of law'). There is 
no need to give a full OJ reference or the name of the issuing institution and the kind of act. 
The number and date of the legal act are sufficient (e.g. Council Directive 85/337, 27.6.85).  
Specific  key  words  should  be  preferred  to  more  general  ones.  For  example,  the 
complainant argues that the Commission has not given him the possibility to express his views 
in  an  Article  81  procedure.  As  this  allegation  concerns  the  rights  of  defence,  the  key-word 
'Right to be heard and to make statements [Article 16 ECGAB]' should be used rather than the 
more  general  key  word  '  Lawfulness  (incorrect  application  of  substantive  and/or  procedural 
rules) [Article 4 ECGAB]'.  
 
 
80 

If a complaint contains more than one allegation, it is better not to indicate one key word per 
allegation,  but  rather  to  select  an  appropriate  keyword  relating  to  the  most  significant  issue. 
For  example,  a  person  complains  in  a  staff  case  that  he/she  was  a  victim  of  discrimination 
because all the  members of the Selection Board were of the other  sex and the Board did not 
give sufficient reasons for its decision to exclude him/her from the competition. Here, '[Breach 
of, or of duties relating to]
 Absence of discrimination [Article 5 ECGAB]' and ' [Breach of, or 
of  duties  relating  to]  
Duty  to  state  the  grounds  of  decisions  and  the  possibilities  of  appeal 
[Articles 18 and 19 ECGAB]' should both be used. 
 
IMPORTANT: the keyword 3 "Requests for public access to documents [Article 23 ECGAB]" 
is obligatory for complaints concerning the application of Regulation 1049/2001.  
 
Key Words Eurovoc  
The  list  is  available  under  SISTEO/LEGAL-LOIS/Resources/Keywords.  As  this  list  is 
regularly updated, it is advised to consult it each time a keyword is needed. 
Key  Words  for:  Fields  of  Law;  Type  of  Maladministration  Alleged;  and  'Subject 
matter of the case/Union activity concerned'  

The lists of these key words are available under: 
SISTEO/LEGAL-LOIS/Resources/Keywords.  
 
 
81 

APPENDIX 3: THE FORMAT OF A DECISION LETTER 
This  section  requires  extensive  revision.  Please  note  that  the  new  drafting  templates  are 
available in: 
http://www.sisteo.ep.parl.union.eu/LOIS/Drafting%20templates/Home.aspx 
 
 
The standard form and some standard wordings for decision letters are set out on the next three 
pages. The model assumes the complaint is against the Commission.  
Note the following points of style: 

Italics are used only for direct quotes.  

Paragraph numbers should be used in the part headed THE DECISION and only in this 
part.  If  the  complaint  raises  three  points,  it  is  very  likely  that  you  will  have  three  paragraph 
numbers and a fourth for the conclusion.  

Indents  should  not  be  used  generally  for  the  summarising  of  the  complaint,  the 
institution's opinion, or the complainant's observations. They are used when the complaint, the 
observations or the opinion are presented in the form of separate points with roman numbering 
((i) (ii) (iii) etc.)  

Quotes  are  indented,  unless  they  are  an  integral  part  of  the  text.  Quotation  marks  are 
double " , and single ' for a quote within a quote.  

The text should be in Times New Roman, 13 point, with any footnotes in 10 point.  

Before presenting a draft decision, please read it through to check for typographical and 
other errors. The spell check in Word is a useful aid, but be aware that it is not infallible.  (For 
example, it sometimes tries to turn co-operation into Cupertino, a town in California).  
 
(Complainants name and address) 
Strasbourg, 
Decision on complaint (reference number) against the [Institution] 
Dear (complainant's name), 
On (date) you made a complaint to the European Ombudsman concerning (xxx)  
On (date), I forwarded the complaint to the President of the European Commission. The 
Commission  sent  its  opinion  on  (date)  and  I  forwarded  it  to  you  with  an  invitation  to  make 
observations, if  you  so  wished.  No observations appear to have been received  from  you. OR 
The  Commission  sent  its  opinion  on  (date).  I  forwarded  it  to  you  with  an  invitation  to  make 
observations, which you sent on (date). 
I am writing now to let you know the results of the inquiries that have been made. 
 
82 

If Article 258 TFEU (ex Article 226 EC): 
To  avoid  misunderstanding,  it  is  important  to  recall  that  the  EC  Treaty  empowers  the 
European  Ombudsman  to  inquire  into  possible  instances  of  maladministration  only  in  the 
activities  of  Union  institution,  body,  office  or  agency.  The  Statute  of  the  European 
Ombudsman specifically provides that no action by any other authority or person may be the 
subject of a complaint to the Ombudsman.  
The Ombudsman's inquiries into your complaint have therefore been  directed towards 
examining  whether  there  has  been  maladministration  in  the  activities  of  the  European 
Commission.  
THE COMPLAINT 
xxx 
THE INQUIRY 
The [Institution's] opinion 
xxx 
The complainant's observations 
xxx 
Further inquiries 
After  careful  consideration  of  the  [institution's]  opinion  and  the  complainant's 
observations, it appeared that further inquiries were necessary. 
xxx 
THE OMBUDSMAN'S EFFORTS TO ACHIEVE A FRIENDLY SOLUTION 
xxx 
THE DECISION 
1 Heading 
1.1 xxx 
2 Heading 
2.1 xxx 
3 Conclusion 
 
(Dropped by the complainant) 
It  appears  from  the  information  supplied  to  the  Ombudsman  by  the  complainant  that 
s/he wishes to drop the complaint. The Ombudsman therefore closes the case. 
(Settled by the institution) 
It  appears  from  the  Commission’s  comments  and  the  complainant's  observations  that 
the [Institution] has taken steps to settle the matter and has thereby satisfied the complainant. 
The Ombudsman therefore closes the case. 
 
83 

(No maladministration) 
On  the  basis  of  the  Ombudsman's  inquiries  into  this  complaint,  there  appears  to  have 
been no maladministration by the [Institution]. The Ombudsman therefore closes the case. 
(Critical remark) 
On the basis of the Ombudsman's inquiries into this complaint, it is necessary to make 
the following critical remark: 
xxx 
Given that this aspect of the case concerns procedures relating to specific events in the 
past,  it  is  not  appropriate  to  pursue  a  friendly  settlement  of  the  matter.  The  Ombudsman 
therefore closes the case. 
(Friendly solution) 
Following  the  Ombudsman's  initiative,  it  appears  that  a  friendly  solution  to  the 
complaint  has  been  agreed  between  the  [Institution]  and  the  complainant.  The  Ombudsman 
therefore closes the case. 
The President of the [institution] will also be informed of this decision.  
FURTHER REMARKS 
xxx 
Yours sincerely, 
P. Nikiforos DIAMANDOUROS 
 
 
84 

APPENDIX 4: HOW TO PREPARE A DECISION SUMMARY 
Introduction 
A summary  must be produced  in English  for every decision closing an inquiry,  except when 
the  inquiry  was  closed  after  a  'telephone  procedure',  an  'extended  telephone  procedure',  or 
when  the  complaint  was  dropped  by  the  complainant  without  the  European  Ombudsman 
having  conducted  any  inquiry.  All  such  summaries  are  a  vital  communication  tool  in  clearly 
and  simply  explaining  the  Ombudsman's  work  to  citizens  and  highlighting  the  results  he 
obtains. 
The Head of the Legal Department and the Secretary-General select individual summaries to 
be  translated  into  all  the  official  languages  of  the  Union.  These  selected  summaries  are 
published  on  the  website  in  all  official  languages  and  constitute  the  main  news  items  on  the 
Ombudsman's website. 
Summaries  of  the  Ombudsman's  decisions  are  indispensable,  both  internally  and 
externally, in helping  to raise awareness about the Ombudsman's work  - be it by keeping 
colleagues  up-to-date  with  the  Ombudsman's  findings,  alerting  journalists  to  particular 
cases,  issuing  press  releases  or  reaching  out  to  more  specialised,  target  audiences.  The 
guidance provided below includes suggestions on how to draft a good summary. 
Drafting the summary 
Please  use  the  template  available  under  SISTEO/Legal-Lois/Drafting  templates  V2/Other 
templates/Decision summary.  
Summaries should be drafted along the following lines: 
1.  
Insert a heading (This is needed for the website): 
Name  of  institution  -  Finding  -  Keyword  2  (Field  of  law)  -  Keyword  3  (Type  of 
maladministration) and  Keyword 4 (Subject matter) 
For  example:  Commission  -  No  maladministration  found  -  15  Environment,  consumers  and 
health  protection  
-  Lawfulness  (incorrect  application  of  substantive  and/or  procedural  rules) 
[Article 4 ECGAB] - The Commission as Guardian of the treaty: (Article 258 of the TFEU) 
The keywords are necessary to facilitate the preparation of the thematic indices. They should 
be the same as those contained in the database entry on the case. If necessary, the LO should 
inform the Registry of modifications to the keywords so that the database entry can be changed 
accordingly. 
2. 
Insert a subheading 
On  the  first  line,  add  a  title  which  can  be  used  on  the  website  and  which  refers  to  the  main 
issue of the complaint, not to the result of the inquiry. The second line should read:  
Summary  of  decision  on  complaint  [complaint  reference  -  add  confidential  if  appropriate] 
against [name of institution]. 
 
85 

Example  of  a  title,  'Refusal  to  grant  access  to  an  internal  advisory  document'  and  not 
'Commission  criticised  for  refusing  access  to  a  document'.  The  title  should  be  written  in 
sentence case (as if you were writing a normal sentence). If possible, please avoid legal terms 
which might be difficult for non-lawyers to understand. 

Main body 
1.  The  context:  provide  details  of  the  complainant  and  the  situation  he/she  found 
himself/herself  in.  Where  possible,  please  give  personal  data  about  the  complainant  (e.g., 
nationality,  profession)  so  as  to  facilitate  efforts  to  raise  awareness  in  the  relevant 
country/sector (e.g., 'a Danish businessman'; 'an English farmer', rather than 'the complainant'). 
Please  also  be  as  specific  as  possible  about  the  activities  of  the  complainant  (e.g.,  an 
environmental  NGO  and  the  EU  programmes  or  projects  they  participate  in  (e.g.,  'the 
European student exchange programme Erasmus', rather than 'the Erasmus Programme'). 
2. The relevant allegations and/or claims taken up for inquiry. 
3. The position of the institution. 
4. The Ombudsman's relevant findings. 
5. Outcome: whether the institution accepted the Ombudsman's recommendations; whether the 
complainant was satisfied, and any other important additional information. 
If  there  are  several  allegations  or  findings,  please  concentrate  on  the  most  important  points. 
Please avoid references to regulations, articles etc., unless they are explained (e.g. Regulation 
1049/2001 on public access to documents). 
Be specific about the kind of documents the complainant wanted access to (e.g., in the field of 
research,  finance,  health,  etc.).  Please  note:  the  interest  of  the  reader  is  often  related  to  the 
policy field. 
6. Time frame: please give one key indication about the beginning of the case (e.g., when was 
the complaint lodged). 
Please do not use footnotes in the summary. 
In general, summaries should be concise, clear and short, avoiding legal terms where possible. 
The majority of readers are not lawyers. 
Given  the  very  high  cost  of  translations,  summaries  of  decisions  should  be  limited  where 
possible  to  2000  characters  and  should  not  be  above  the  absolute  maximum  of  2200 
characters  
in  length.  They  should  be  written  in  plain  English,  in  the  past  tense.  Summaries 
must focus on the main point or points of the case. Please see for example: 
Summary of decision on complaint 3172/2005/WP on page 69 of the Annual Report 2006. 
For confidential complaints, the summary should be anonymised and marked as confidential. 
Concerning the submission of summaries for approval, please refer to Chapter '1.4.2. Material 
for the Website and the Annual Report' 
 
86 

APPENDIX 5: DRAFT STANDARD LETTER TO BE USED WHERE A 
COMPLAINANT  ASKS  HOW  TO  CONTEST  A  DECISION  OF  THE 
OMBUDSMAN  ON  A  COMPLAINT  (PLEASE  ALSO  SEE  SECTION 
5.6.1  OF  THE  HANDBOOK  FOR  FURTHER  ELEMENTS  THAT  MAY 
BE INCLUDED IN THE LETTER)
 
 
 
Thank  you  for  your  letter  concerning  my  decision  on  your  complaint,  which,  I 
understand, has dissatisfied you. You have therefore asked my advice about any possible legal 
remedies that may be available to you to challenge my decision,  
In reply, it should first be pointed out that the European Ombudsman is a non-judicial 
remedy  and  that  neither  Article  228  TFEU  (ex  Article  195  EC)  nor  the  Statute  of  the 
Ombudsman1 provides for any appeal or other remedy against his decisions.  The work of the 
Ombudsman is supervised by the European Parliament, to whom the Ombudsman must submit 
an annual report on the outcome of his inquiries. You could therefore consider submitting your 
viewpoint to the European Parliament. 
As  regards  the  possibility  of  judicial  proceedings,  a  decision  by  the  Ombudsman  that 
there  is  maladministration  does  not  create  enforceable  rights  for  a  complainant.    Nor,  on  the 
other hand, does a finding of no maladministration deprive the complainant of the possibility 
to  seek  a  judicial  remedy  against  the  institution,  body,  office  or  agency  concerned. 
Complainants who wish to pursue judicial remedies therefore have the opportunity to institute 
legal proceedings against the institution, body, office or agency concerned directly, rather than 
complaining to the Ombudsman and then challenging the latter’s findings.  It should be noted 
in this context that the General Court has taken the view that the Ombudsman’s submission to 
the  European  Parliament  of  a  report  finding  a  case  of  maladministration  is  not  a  measure 
capable of being challenged in annulment proceedings under Article 173 (now Article 230) of 
the EC Treaty.2  
If  you  require  further  detailed  advice  about  any  possible  legal  remedies  that  may  be 
available to you, you could consult a lawyer. 
I hope that the above information is useful to you. 
Yours sincerely, 
 
P. Nikiforos Diamandouros 
                                              
1  
European Parliament decision 94/262 of 9 March 1994 on the regulations and general conditions governing 
the performance of the Ombudsman’s duties, OJ 1994, L 113/15. 
2  
Order  of  the  Court  of  First  Instance  of  22  May  2000  in  Case  T-103/99,  Associazione  delle  Cantine  Sociali 
Venete v European Ombudsman and European Parliament
 2000 ECR II-4165 
 
87 

APPENDIX  6:  CHECK  LIST  FOR  COMPLAINTS  LETTERS 
PRESENTED FOR THE EO’S SIGNATURE. 
Careful attention to all the points in the check-list will minimise the need for signataires to be 
returned  to  LOs  for  correction  before  signature  and  also  facilitate  the  dispatch  of  signed 
correspondence. 
 
It is the responsibility of the LO/trainee who drafts a letter for the Ombudsman’s signature to 
check the following points: 
 
1   All letters 
  Run  the  spell  check  (for  English  use  the  UK,  not  the  US  variety).    Think  before 
accepting any proposed changes; 
  The headed paper and envelope correspond to the language of the letter; 
  Text is correctly aligned on the page; 
  At least two lines of text on the signature page above the closing formula; 
  Complaint reference number is correct (including year); 
  Date of the complaint (check especially the year) is correct; 
  Letter is marked CONFIDENTIAL if the case is confidential; 
  Enclosures  are  listed,  included  in  the  signataire  and  clearly  identifiable  (When 
enclosures  are  to  be  sent  by  e-mail,  the  reference  number  of  the  document  in  the 
digital  archive  should  be  given  -  see  also  5th  bullet  under  3  below  concerning  the 
special procedure that applies for the Commission, EPSO, the European Investment 
Bank, the European Economic and Social Committee, and the Parliament.) 
  The envelope is appropriate for the number and size of enclosures. 
 
2   Letters to complainants 
   
In addition to the items in 1 above: 
  Name and address of the complainant are correct and complete. 
Closing decisions 
  The  allegations  and  claims  are  identical  in  THE  COMPLAINT  and  THE 
DECISION and are the same as in the original opening letter.  
  Where the decision sent to the complainant is in a language other than English, the 
signataire should also contain (1) the final English version of the decision with the 
EO's  approval  (without  hand-written  corrections)  and  (2)  a  print  out  of  the  final 
English  version  marked  as  "Final  English  version  of  decision...."  without  the  EO's 
signature and without being marked as "for translation into...". The latter is sent to 
the institution together with the decision in the language of the complaint. 
3   Letters to institutions, bodies, offices or agencies 
In addition to items in 1 above, check that the following all correspond: 
  Name of the institution (e.g. European Parliament) 
 
88 

  The address (e.g. - Rue Wiertz, 1047 Brussels, BELGIQUE) 
  The addressee (e.g. Mr Solana) 
  The person to whom the letter is copied, if applicable (e.g. Mr Piris) 
Electronic transfer of enclosures in inquiries 
Signataires  handed  to  the  Registry  should  normally  contain  all  enclosures  in  their  full 
length.  However,  the  following  institutions  accept  PDF-copies  of  the  enclosures  relating 
to  full  inquiries
:  the  Commission,  EPSO,  the  European  Investment  Bank,  the  European 
Economic and Social Committee, and Parliament. In this respect, the following rules apply:  
  The  cover  letter  (which  is  always  sent  by  navette)  mentions  the  enclosures  as: 
"Enclosure(s):  [list]  (sent  by  e-mail)".  The  templates  on  SISTEO  contain  relevant 
indications of this. 
  The  LO  must  include  in  the  signataire  a  printout  of  the  first  PDF  page  of  each 
enclosure,  bearing  the  complaint  number  and  registration  number  so  that  the 
secretaries can identify them in the digital archive.  
  NB: If an enclosure is a document signed by the Ombudsman – such as a friendly 
solution  or  a  draft  recommendation  –  that  document  is  also  sent  by  navette.  The 
templates on SISTEO contain relevant indications of this. 
 
4   Internal documents 
  All  the  sections  of  the  statistical  sheets  are  filled  in  completely,  clearly  and 
accurately, i.e. the information is consistent with the final version of the decision. 
This  information  is  registered  in  the  database  at  the  time  of  dispatch  and  its 
completeness and accuracy are essential for the production of reliable statistics. 
  In the case of complaints involving the Commission, the statistical sheet identifies 
the DG or other service concerned. 
  Transmission sheets are filled in. 
 
5 How to address recipients of complaints-related letters written in English 
Hereafter  are  the  instructions  given  by  the  Ombudsman  on  how  to  address  recipients  of 
complaints-related letters written in English. 
The President or Secretary General of an institution should be addressed as follows : 
Mr President, or Madam President, 
Mr Secretary General, 
In other cases, when the gender of the recipient is known, he/she should be addressed as: 
Dear Mr [Surname], 
Dear Mrs [Surname], 
If  the  recipient  has  specified  herself  as  Miss  or  Ms,  then  that  title  should  be  used  instead  of 
Mrs. 
 
89 

When the gender is not known but the recipient provided first name and surname, then he/she 
should be addressed as: 
Dear [first name] [Surname], 
When the gender is not known and the recipient provided only one or more initials instead of a 
full first name he/she should be addressed as: 
Dear [Initial(s)] [Surname], 
6 Standardised format for addresses 
To avoid possible errors and confusion, it seems useful to adopt a degree of standardisation for 
addresses to be used in all letters submitted for the Ombudsman’s signature. 
Different  countries  have  different,  rules,  standards  and  conventions.  The  Universal  Postal 
Union provides information on these at: 
http://www.upu.int/post_code/en/addressing_formats_guide.shtml 
The address of the recipient.  
Since all our correspondence is dispatched from France, it is logical to follow the rules of the 
French  Post  Office  as  regards  the  country  field  of  the  address:  i.e.  the  name  of  the  country 
should  be  put  in  French  and  in  capital  letters  (for  the  EU-25,  see  the  attached  list).    It  is 
unnecessary to specify France as a destination country.  
As regards the rest of the address, we should normally use the address that the Ombudsman’s 
correspondent  has  given.    The  address  may  be  modified  or  supplemented  according  to  the 
postal rules of the country of destination, if this seems necessary to ensure correct delivery.  
Contact addresses given in the Ombudsman's letters (see also 2.6.3) 
If  the  European  Ombudsman  cannot  deal  with  a  matter,  we  often  give  advice  as  to  another 
institution, body, office or agency which could be competent.   
The contact addresses given in the Ombudsman’s letters should normally be the one specified 
by the institution, body, office or agency itself.  Where the institution, body, office or agency 
is located in a different country from the recipient of the Ombudsman’s letter, the name of the 
country should be included as the last line of the address.  It should be put in capitals, in the 
language in which the letter is written.   
 
 
 

List of names in French of EU-25 countries 
 
ALLEMAGNE 
AUTRICHE 
BELGIQUE 
CHYPRE 
DANEMARK 

 
90 

ESPAGNE 
ESTONIE 
FINLANDE 
FRANCE 
GRECE 
HONGRIE 
IRLANDE 
ITALIE 
LETTONIE 
LITUANIE 
LUXEMBOURG 
MALTE 
PAYS BAS 
POLOGNE 
PORTUGAL 
REPUBLIQUE TCHEQUE 
ROYAUME UNI 
SLOVAQUIE 
SLOVENIE 
SUEDE 

 
7 Standard practice for the use of numerical figures 
Numerical figures are written as follows (this practice is adopted in all languages):  
EUR 10 million 
EUR 328 000.75 
EUR 47 300 000  
Making  use  of  the  "non  breaking  space"  (Ctrl/shift/spacebar)  instead  of  the  normal  space 
between the numerals will ensure that the figure appears on one line. 
 
91 

APPENDIX 7: PRESENTATION OF DOCUMENTS IN SIGNATAIRES 
Section  1.6.3  (Signature,  dispatching  and  filing  of  outgoing  complaints  correspondence)  and 
Appendix 6 (Check list for complaints letters presented for the Ombudsman’s signature) of the 
Handbook  provide  detailed  information  on  how  to  present  letters  to  the  Ombudsman  for 
signature.   
The purpose of the present note is to specify practical details in relation to the preparation of 
signataires, in order to enable them to be dealt with efficiently.  Most of the instructions are a 
matter of common sense: put yourself in the position of the Ombudsman receiving a signataire 
and think how the signataire should be presented and organised to enable the Ombudsman to 
identify, read and, if appropriate, sign the various documents. 
Please pay particular attention to the following points: 
URGENT MATERIALS 
Genuinely urgent matters should be submitted to the EO in a red signataire upon authorisation 
of the relevant supervisor. The accompanying note, approved by the supervisor and included in 
the signataire, should contain a brief explanation of why the matter is urgent.   
Please note that the Ombudsman should not be expected to deal with matters urgently because 
the responsible LO or trainee is late in dealing with a case, or has presented the case at the last 
moment before a given deadline. 
Urgent  materials  should  be  presented  separately,  i.e.  a  red  signataire  should  not  also  contain 
non-urgent materials.  
PREPARING SIGNATAIRES 
The first document relating to each case should be on a right hand page of the signataire. 
Each  document  prepared  by  the  responsible  LO  or  trainee  either  for  the  Ombudsman's 
information (notes, summaries, etc...) or for signature should be presented one page per page 
of signataire, so that it is readily available for reading. 
Letters should be protected from the mark of paper clips by small pieces of paper. The entire 
text should however be legible and not hidden by the protective paper. The appropriate size of 
paper  clip  should  be  used  to  avoid  documents  falling  out  when  the  pages  of  a  signataire  are 
turned.  
Signataires  should  contain  an  e-mail  or  note  which  clearly  shows  that  the  material  has  been 
approved by the appropriate supervisor as well as a copy of the correspondence to which the 
draft reply refers. 
To  facilitate  signing,  pages  requiring  the  EO's  signature  should  be  on  a  right  hand  page  of  a 
signataire and the space reserved for the EO's signature should not be placed on a hole. 
Enclosures should be included in the signataire and clearly listed and specified in the letter. (In 
the  case  of  the  Commission,  EPSO,  the  European  Investment  Bank,  the  European  Economic 
and  Social  Committee,  and  the  Parliament,  only  the  first  page  of  each  enclosure  is  included 
since  they  are  sent  electronically  only).  When  submitting  a  letter  inviting  the  complainant's 
 
92 

observations on an opinion or other reply from the institution concerned, the enclosure may be 
omitted from the signataire if it is voluminous.  
Drafts for admissible and inadmissible cases should be presented in different signataires. 
The pages of drafts should be numbered.  
Where applicable, the second page of a letter should contain  at least two lines of text before 
the closing formula and signature. 
 
93 

APPENDIX 8: DIRECT TRANSMISSION OF CERTAIN DOCUMENTS 
TO CONTACT PERSONS IN COMMISSIONERS' CABINETS
1 Background 
The Commission’s revised internal procedure for handling the Ombudsman’s inquiries 
(see  Communication  from  the  President  in  agreement  with  Vice-President  Ms  Wallström: 
Empowerment  to  adopt  and  transmit  communications  to  the  European  Ombudsman  and 
authorise  civil  servants  to  appear  before  the  European  Ombudsman  (SEC(2005)  1227/4),  4 
October 2005
) came into operation on 1 November 2005. 
According  to  the  Communication,  “(t)o  nurture  a  culture  of  greater  willingness, 
commitment  and  cooperation  with  regard  to  the  Ombudsman  (and,  ultimately,  citizens),  the 
individual Commissioners need to take greater ownership of the Commission’s handling of the 
Ombudsman’s enquiries
.”   
The  new  procedure  therefore  empowers  the  Commissioner  in  charge  of  the  matter 
under  inquiry  to  answer  on  behalf  of  the  Commission.  In  practice,  the  responsible 
Commissioner  signs  the  covering  letter  accompanying  the  opinion  on  the  complaint  and  any 
subsequent replies to the Ombudsman.  
2 Direct transmission  
At a meeting with the Commission co-ordinators on 6 June 2006, the Ombudsman 
announced that he would be ready to transmit directly to a contact person in the cabinet of 
the responsible Commissioner:  
(i) friendly solution proposals; 
(ii) draft recommendations; and  
(iii) certain letters containing further inquiries.  
 
By  receiving  such  documents  at  an  early  stage,  before  the  relevant  services  have 
formulated a position, the Commissioner should be in a better position to have an input as 
regards matters for which he or she will be asked to take responsibility.  
Direct  transmission  to  the  responsible  Commissioner’s  cabinet  is  in  addition  to 
normal transmission via the Secretariat General of the Commission. 
The  Ombudsman  intends  to  implement  the  direct  transmission  procedure 
progressively,  following  bilateral  meetings  with  individual  Commissioners  to  explain  its 
purpose and to identify a contact person in his/her cabinet. 
The  list  of  contact  persons  in  their  cabinets  (s:\\legal\contact_persons\Contact 
persons in Commissioners' Cabinets) is available through LOIS (in "Contacts-Com.Cab."). 
 
 
3 Practical arrangements  
 
94 

The practical arrangements to put the direct transmission system into operation for 
the Commissioners mentioned above are as follows.   
(a) Information for the Ombudsman  
Drafts  of  friendly  solutions  and  draft  recommendations  to  the  Commission  should 
be  accompanied  by  a  brief  note  to  the  Ombudsman  identifying  the  relevant  DG  and  the 
responsible Commissioner.  Until full implementation in relation to all Commissioners, the 
note  should  also  state  whether  the  direct  transmission  system  applies  to  the  responsible 
Commissioner. 
 
In the case of drafts of further inquiries to the Commission, the accompanying note 
to  the  Ombudsman  explaining  and  justifying  the  further  inquiries  should  contain  the 
information  mentioned above.  If the direct transmission system applies to the  responsible 
Commissioner,  the  note  should  also  state  whether  the  further  inquiries  are  important 
enough to merit drawing them to the Commissioner’s attention.   
 (b) Information to and action by the Registry  
The transmission sheet which serves as a check list for the Registry has to be filled 
in by the LO at the level of the tick box:  “Direct transmission to Commissioner's cabinet”. 
The responsible LO should also mention the name of the contact person. 
 
The Registry will send an e-mail containing a brief standard wording to the contact 
person identified on the transmission sheet, with the document as a pdf attachment. The e-
mail  will  be  copied  to  the  responsible  LO  and  the  contact  person  in  Mrs  Wallström’s 
cabinet. It will be registered as part of the file on the complaint. 
 
The Commission Secretariat-General will be informed of the direct transmission to 
the  responsible  Commissioner's  cabinet.  This  will  be  done  by  introducing  a  standard 
sentence  in  the  "transmission  e-mail",  used  by  the  Registry  for  sending  all  complaints-
related documents to the Commission.  
 
The above arrangements apply to documents drafted on or after 1 August 2006.   
 
 
LO note 3/2006 - IJH  26 July 2006 
Updated by JSA on 22 February 2008 
 
 
95 

APPENDIX  9:  ON-THE-DESK  GUIDELINES  FOR  DIFFICULT 
PHONE CALLS. 
 
On-the-desk guidelines for difficult phone calls. 
 
1.  Identify your correspondent, present yourself. 
 
2.  Identify  the  subject  matter  -  a  complaint?  an  information  request?  does  it  concern 
previous contacts with the correspondent, and if so, who in our office dealt with it at 
the time? 
 
3.  Take  notes  from  the  beginning  for  a  telephone  note  (the  person  might  hang  up 
during the call). 
 
4.  Remain calm.  
 
5.  Be service-minded, state that you wish to understand the person's problem. 
 
6.  Give  basic  information  only:  (a)  Clarify  the  EO's  standard  procedures  for 
complaint  handling/information  requests;  (b)  do  not  tell  the  person  what  the  EO 
will/would  do  in  the  matter;  (c)  do  not  give  information  on  the  content  of  drafts 
circulating internally.    
 
7.  Terminate or transfer the call if the person becomes unreasonably aggressive, or if 
s/he asks questions you cannot answer. Examples of how to do this are:  
 
"I'm  sorry,  but  if  you  can't  speak  more  calmly/politely,  I  will  have  to 
terminate the call
". 
 
"I'm  sorry,  but  I  don't  think  I  can  help  you  in  this  matter.  I  will  have  to 
transfer your call to one of my colleagues/superiors
".  Your HLU/supervisor 
may not speak the language, so you might have to transfer to another lawyer.  
 
"I  am  sorry  but,  as  I  have  already  explained  to  you,  the  European 
Ombudsman  is  not  authorised  to  deal  with  complaints  against  Member 
State's  authorities/  private  organisations.  You  have  to  understand  that  he 
cannot exceed his powers. Please do not insist and accept the advice he has 
given you with an eye to trying to help you solve your problem."
  
 
8.  Remember  to  do  a  telephone  note  also  in  cases  where  either  you  or  the 
correspondent has hung up. Get the telephone note checked by your supervisor, and 
inform our switchboard about the call.  
 
PB - 17/04/2009 
 
96