Dies ist eine HTML Version eines Anhanges der Informationsfreiheitsanfrage 'Generelle Anweisungen'.

QUICK GUIDE FOR HANDLING OUTSIDE MANDATE COMPLAINTS
The Registry Unit
02 April 2012 (last update 13 August 2012)

Jean DUPONT
Directeur
123 rue de la Liberté
75005 PARIS
FRANCE
[email address]
Confidential
Strasbourg,
Complaint 1234/1900/(ZZ)(YY)XX
Dear Mr/Mrs/Ms/Dr/Professor or, where known and appropriate, Title Surname,
I am writing in reply to your letter of [date] in which you complained
[of___ or that___].
Comment [MSOffice1]:
In this part of any of the standard
The Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union and the Statute of
letters, we can freely write up our
the European Ombudsman set certain conditions concerning the opening of an
succinct understanding of the
inquiry by the Ombudsman.
complainant's grievances and, if any,
questions.
One of these conditions is that the Ombudsman shall help to uncover
maladministration in the activities of the Union institutions, bodies, offices and
agencies. No action by any other authority or person may be the subject of a
complaint to the Ombudsman.
After a careful examination of your complaint, it appears that this
condition is not met, because your complaint is not related to an act of a Union
institution, body, office or agency. I regret to have to inform you, therefore, that
the European Ombudsman is not entitled to deal with your complaint.
Comment [MSOffice2]:
Standard text, do not change. If useful,
[ WHEN UNAUTHORISED COMPLAINANT CASE: I would also like to
we may add, to the penultimate
inform you that the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union provides
sentence, ", but concerns [title/type of
for the European Ombudsman to receive complaints from:
the object of the grievances]".
"any citizen of the Union or any natural or legal person residing or having its
registered office in a Member State."
From a careful examination of your complaint, it appears that you do
not fall into any of these categories. ]
1 avenue du Président Robert Schuman
T. + 33 (0)3 88 17 23 13
www.ombudsman.europa.eu
CS 30403
F. + 33 (0)3 88 17 90 62
[Europäische Bürgerbeauftragte request email]
F - 67001 Strasbourg Cedex


If you consider that your complaint does in fact concern an act of a
Union institution, body, office or agency, you are of course welcome to send us
relevant additional information or comments that may clarify the object of your
complaint. On the Union's website, you will find detailed information on EU
institutions, bodies, offices and agencies through the following page:
http://europa.eu/about-eu/institutions-bodies/index_en.htm
You are also free to make a reasoned request for review of my factual
finding that your complaint does not concern an EU institution, body, office or
agency. If you choose to do so, please indicate precisely which institution, body,
office or agency you consider to be involved. Such a reasoned request for
review will be examined by the Ombudsman.
Comment [MSOffice3]:
Standard text, do not change without
Having concluded that your complaint is outside the European
consulting the HoR.
Ombudsman's mandate [ message about advise, if applicable ].
Yours sincerely,
Peter Bonnor
Head of the Registry
Enclosure:
● Lorem Ipsum
Comment [MSOffice4]:
If we send the letter by e-mail, use web-
links and leave out "enclosures" unless
inappropriate to do so (for instance
because of doubt as to whether the
complainant has regular internet
access).
2


Complaint outside the mandate
To de-activate or to activate the grey scroll down lists and tick-boxes, just tick 'Form'
under 'Toolbars' under 'View', then untick or tick the yellowish lock on the menu bar
Complaint reference:
Comment [MSOffice5]:
-We always respect complainant's
Confidential?
yes
no
requests for confidentially.
-We consider statements like "please
deal with anonymously" or "please do
If EO decision to classify as confidential:
not show to anyone" to be requests for
- necessary to protect the interests of the complainant
confidentiality.
- necessary to protect the interests of a third party
-We classify complaints as confidential
if they contain sensitive personal data
(EO Implementing Provisions, Article 10(1))
(privacy), and if they contain
allegations and/or information that
could harm third parties.
Complaint dropped
-We do not classify complaints as
confidential only because their content
Reminder list - enclosures, transfer letters or similar:
could be politically controversial.
Transfer: letter to other competent body
Comment [MSOffice6]:
-We always respect complainants' wish
to drop a complaint, at any stage of the
EO Brochure:
procedure.
-We then write a letter in which we
EO complaint form:
simply inform the complainant that we
have taken note of his/her wish, and the
Info-letter to other person/body (e.g. EP, national ombudsman, SOLVIT)
EO has closed his handling of the case.
-We nevertheless record the usual
Other (please explain):
statistical information, using the
present form.
Proposal approved by the Head of the Registry or, in his absence, the director
in charge:
Date:
Comment [MSOffice7]:
This proposal has been saved under S:\Legal\Complaint summaries\INADMIS
If we send the reply letter to the
yes
complainant by e-mail (only or in
addition to a hard copy letter), we
simply include a link to the brochure
In HoR's absence:
and/or the complaint form.
In the HoR's absence, it is normally the Director who signs. Please check if the
HoR is absent, and if he is, then:
Comment [MSOffice8]:
We usually do not send such letters. We
a/ insert the following sentence in the first paragraph:
only do so if the complainant has
In the current absence of the European Ombudsman's Head of Registry,
expressly asked us, in writing, to do so.
I have approved and signed the present response to your complaint.
Comment [p9]: The proposal must be
saved there BEFORE it is sent to the
OMC mailbox.
b/ and insert the following to be used for signature (check that V2 is respected -
'signature' format):
João Sant'Anna
Director
3


Data:
Date of registration of complaint:
Date of summary/revised summary to Head of Registry/Director:
Complainant's surname(s):
Complainant's first name(s):
Comment [MSOffice10]:
'represented by' (if relevant):
-If there is any doubt, we do not record
that the complainant is represented by
someone. To record that someone is
represented by someone is to record
data about someone. We must therefore
be reasonably certain.
Language of complaint:
-The notion of 'represented by' applies,
for instance, as follows:
The complaint is submitted by an
organisation
Country of address:
(NGO/company/university/public
body. .): Here the organisation is
'represented by' the person who sent us
the complaint in the name of the
Nationality:
organisation.
The complaint is submitted by a
lawyer/law firm: Here the individual
person in question is 'represented by'
the lawyer/law firm.
If natural person:
man
Comment [MSOffice11]:
woman
The complaint letter / form decides the
language, even if we realise that the
and when relevant:
complainant did not write in his/her
mother tongue, and even if all annexes
EU staff:
are in a different language. In
MEP
appropriate cases, we may of course offer
to the complainant that subsequent
If organisation:
correspondence could be conducted in
company/firm
his/her mother tongue.
association / non-profit organisation
other (specify):
Method of transmission:
direct
transferred by MEP
transferred by Committee on Petitions
other (specify):
4


Summary and proposal
Comment [MSOffice12]:
Try to identity one main object of the
complaint, even if it is broad ('the
Complaint against:
legislator of country xyz').
Carefully check if the complainant has
written to one of the EU institutions
Unknown:
(etc.) about his/her problem, even if
his/her main problem is outside the
EU's competence. If s/he has written to
one of the EU institutions, and not
received a reply, or a satisfactory reply,
If the complaint is against national public body/institution:
the complaint may have to be
understood to be against the EU
Country:
institution in question, and is hence
Type:
scroll down
admissible.
If the complaint is against international public body/institution:
Comment [MSOffice13]:
Be succinct but precise. The reader of
Title:
scroll-down
the summary normally already knows
Other (specify):
and understands, from the above
information, that the complaint is
outside the EO's mandate. The
If the complaint concerns a private entity:
description of the complainant's
Country if known:
grievances serves primarily to precisely
lay down, in one or two paragraphs,
the EO's understanding of the
complaint, and, second, to identify and
If the complaint is against an MEP:
record the information relevant to the
provision of advice or to the transfer of
If the complaint is against none of the above, i.e. other:
the complaint.
Comment [MSOffice14]:
2.1 - not EU institution (etc). The
Facts / issues according to the complainant:
assessment is usually straight forward.
! de-activate 'Forms' to write here !
Special cases are for instance:
a. European schools. These are not EU
institutions, but it may be appropriate
to inform the complainant that s/he
could consider complaining to the
European Commission if s/he thinks the
Commission fails to fulfil its obligations
Reason why the complaint is outside the EO's
as a member of the board of the
mandate:
Schools. In that case, s/he should first
write (complain) to the Commission
(prior administrative approaches, Art.
scroll down
2.4 EO Statute).
b. MEPs. Members of the European
NB1: Only one reason is recorded, therefore please choose the main one.
Parliament are private persons, and
therefore outside the EO's mandate.
NB2: In cases where the complainant is 'unauthorised' - i.e. not an EU citizen,
and not located in the EU - one of the other reasons must apply too. It is that
2.2 - not maladministration. The EO's
other reason that you should tick, and which will be used for statistical
mandate extends to all non-political
activities of the EU institutions (etc).
purposes. The letter templates nevertheless foresee that we inform the
The mandate is therefore broad, and
complainant that s/he is 'unauthorised'.
includes, for instance, the content of
implementing regulations (e.g. in the
Additional text if needed:
field of CAP), rules adopted by the
institutions (etc) regarding their
internal organisation, and specific
decisions in areas where the institution
concerned enjoys wide discretionary
powers. Issues that fall outside the EO's
mandate are 'political' issues, such as
... [1]
5


Advice to contact someone else:
Comment [MSOffice15]:
! de-activate 'Forms' to write here !
-As a rule, we give advice. When we do
not, we therefore state why. Typical
reasons are that the complainant has
already contacted the relevant redress
body, or that the overall nature of the
NB: If no advice, state why
complaint is such that advice would not
be useful.
-Individuals who submit outside
mandate complaints already have an
If advice to contact someone else - statistical information:
information-deficit in terms of how to
obtain help. Several pieces of advice
First advice:
scroll down
may therefore add confusion. We
other (specify):
therefore usually give the complainant
when applicable, country:
only one piece of advice.
-The advice is always limited to advice
Second advice, if necessary: scroll down
about another body or person that
other (specify):
might be able to help the complainant.
when applicable, country:
The other body or person may provide
concrete help (e.g. redress) or useful
expert advice.
Transfer to other competent body - analysis:
-The advice we give is not legal or
otherwise substantive advice as such.
-Call the other body if any doubt. But
do not mention the complainant's name
(data protection).
If transfer - statistical information:
-An exception: We normally do not
advise complainant's to turn to the
scroll down
French Ombudsman or to the Belgian
other (specify):
Federal Ombudsman, but we transfer
to these bodies when a transfer is
when applicable, specify country:
possible and appropriate.
... [2]
Comment [MSOffice16]:
Any useful information to complainant:
-To transfer a complaint means that we
send the original complaint to another
public body that may be able to help
the complainant. We only do so if we
have the complainant's express written
consent for a transfer. S/he may already
have given his/her consent in the
complaint. If not, we may call him/her,
inviting him/her to send us the consent.
We accept consent sent by e-mail.
-We mainly transfer to national
ombudsmen, to the Commission, to
SOLVIT and to Parliament.
-We do not transfer to the UK's
Parliamentary Ombudsman, which
only accepts complaints through
Members of the UK Parliament. We
only advise complainants to turn to this
body.
... [3]
Comment [MSOffice17]:
- 'Useful information' can cover
anything, including information about
the EO's work. 'Useful information'
does not replace 'advice'.
- Be it advice or any other information,
if we send the letter to the complainant
only be e-mail, we usually just provide
the relevant web link in the body of the
letter (= no need to "attach" documents).
6


Eurovoc classification:
Object not identified - only use for
Leave
inadmissible/outside mandate (not in
Libel and slander
the official EUROVOC list)
Member of Parliament
Administrative competition
Migrations
[Institution/Agency/Body]
National implementing measure
Administrative transparency
National/Regional Ombudsmen and
Adoption law
similar bodies (not in the official
Aid to agriculture
EUROVOC list)
Air transport
OLAF
Banking system
Organisation of elections
Border control
Pay
Child protection
Payment
Climate
Pensions
Competition law
Petitions
Construction policy
Police
Consumer protection
Political parties
Cooperation policies
Pollution
Corruption
Press
Courts and tribunals
Prices
Data protection
Prisons
Disabled person
Promotion
Disciplinary proceedings
Protection of animals
Divorce
Psychological harassment
Driving licence
Public services
Duties and rights of civil servants
Racism and xenophobia
Employment
Rail transport
Environmental policy
Real property
Equal treatment
Recognition of diplomas
EU charter of fundamental rights
Refugee
European citizenship
Research
European Court of Human Rights
Road transport
European School
Sea transport
European symbol
Sexual harassment
Europol
Social policy
Extradition
Social security
Foreign policy
Structural funds
Fraud
Subsidy
Free movement of capital
Supervision of medicinal products
Free movement of goods
Taxation
Free movement of persons
Telecommunications
Freedom to provide services
Terrorism
Grant
Trans-European networks
Health care
Unemployment
Health policy
Use of languages
Humanitarian aid
Visa policy
Immigration
Waste
Insurance
Working time
Intellectual property
7


Further correspondence ('FC')
'FC' here refers to letters that the complainant sends us after s/he
has received the EO's response to his/her complaint.
FC may typically contain one or more of the following:
 a request for information / explanations
 repetition of the grievances already stated in the complaint
 praise
 criticism of the EO's handling of the complaint
 doubts as to the accuracy of the EO's initial response
 a reasoned request for review of the EO's initial response
A basic rule is to consult the management (usually the HoR, or
the Director in the HoR's absence) if there is any doubt as to how
the FC should be understood, and what response it should

receive.
Beyond that, the following guidelines should be noted:
A person who submits an outside mandate complaint to the EO
already has an important knowledge deficit regarding how best to
solve the problems in question. If this deficit remains after the EO's
initial response, the complainant is not very likely to benefit from
yet another formal written letter.
In case of FC that contains a request for information /
explanations, and/or repetition of the grievances 
already stated in
the complaint, the most relevant and helpful action is, therefore, to
call the complainant and explain the EO's mandate and the initial
response that we sent him/her. This, therefore, is what we should
do as a rule. We only do so if the complainant has already chosen
8


to communicate his/her telephone number to the EO. We do not
search for complainants' telephone numbers on the internet.
We should use common sense and empathy when making such
calls, but there are a few elementary procedural rules that must be
followed:
o Inform the complainant who you are and why call him/her.
o Ask the complainant if s/he has time to talk about the FC (if
not, ask when you could call back).
o Following your provision of information, or of your
explanations, you ask if the complainant finds that his/her
FC has been replied to, and if s/he has any more questions.
o Finally, you must ask if the complainant wishes to receive a
written confirmation of the information/explanations that
you provided.
Following the call, you make a telephone note. This can be done by
simply editing a summary of the call in the functional e-mail
available on sisteo's submission-of-drafts table (remember to
include the registration number of the FC), and forwarding it to
the HoR for approval.
FC that contains 'praise', including expressions of gratitude, does
not normally require a reply. It may, however, be friendly to
inform the HoR or other colleagues about it.
FC that contains criticism of the EO's handling of the complaint
OR doubts as to the accuracy of the EO's initial response OR a
reasoned for review of the EO's initial response, must receive a
written reply.
How to distinguish these three categories of FC? And how to deal
with them?
What may be understood to be 'criticism' is usually an expression
of frustration over the fact that the EO cannot help the
complainant. It is rare that the complainant criticises the way in
which the outside mandate complaint was dealt with, for instance
regarding delay, wording of the letter, or similar. When it happens,
you should first talk to the HoR, who may remember how similar
FC was dealt with in the past.
9


Possible expressions of doubt as to the accuracy of the EO's initial
response is basically the type of FC referred to in the standard
letter template as follows: "If you consider that your complaint
does in fact concern an act of a Union institution, body, office or
agency, you are of course welcome to send us relevant additional
information or comments that may clarify the object of your
complaint." The kind of FC here concerned usually has its roots in
the complainant's idea that the EO ought to be able to deal with EU
matters at all levels. If the FC can, on a reasonable interpretation,
be understood to fall within FC containing a request for
information / explanations, it is better to treat it as such.
It goes without saying that a formal request for review of the EO's
initial response must not be confused with a mere expression of
doubt as to the accuracy.
The key to identifying "reasoned requests for review" is the word
"reasoned". This word means (a) that the FC must normally point
out which EU institution is supposedly responsible for the subject
matter in question, and (b) it must contain concrete arguments in
support of the complainant's view.
If FC is thought to contain a "reasoned request for review", the
complaint handler immediately informs the HoR, who in turn
immediately informs the relevant Director. The latter issues the
relevant instructions.
Article 14(3) cases - the Article refers to the European
Ombudsman's Code of Good Administrative Behaviour
If the FC calls for a reply, but is part of what we may refer to as
repetitive correspondence, and we think that we have already
adequately informed the complainant why the EO is not competent
to deal with the complainant's grievances, we send a letter, signed
by HoR, which merely states that ”we have received your letter of
(date), which we understand was sent for information only”.
Following this, FC will not need to be replied to unless the
complainant specifically contests the fact that his/her
correspondence was for information only.
10


If after further correspondence has been answered, a complainant
continues to argue that his/her matter should be dealt with by the
EO, then a letter should be written to explain the reasons once
more and the following sentence added: ”I hope you will agree
that further correspondence on this matter which is
manifestly outside the European Ombudsman's mandate would
not be useful.”
Only if we receive FC after this message, should we consider
informing the complainant that we will no longer write to
him/her. Such letters should be presented to the SG after approval
by the relevant Director. The SG will pass them on to the
Ombudsman himself for signature.
In relation to the present issue (i.e. Article 14(3)), if the FC at any
point contained a "reasoned request for review", and was dealt
with accordingly through approval of, and signature by, the
Ombudsman himself, the case will be dealt with on its specific
facts. The relevant director and/or the SG will issue the necessary
instructions.
PB 100412
11

Page 5: [1] Comment [MSOffice14]
13/08/2012 11:35:00
2.1 - not EU institution (etc). The assessment is usually straight forward. Special cases are for instance:
a. European schools. These are not EU institutions, but it may be appropriate to inform the complainant that s/he
could consider complaining to the European Commission if s/he thinks the Commission fails to fulfil its obligations as
a member of the board of the Schools. In that case, s/he should first write (complain) to the Commission (prior
administrative approaches, Art. 2.4 EO Statute).
b. MEPs. Members of the European Parliament are private persons, and therefore outside the EO's mandate.
2.2 - not maladministration. The EO's mandate extends to all non-political activities of the EU institutions (etc). The
mandate is therefore broad, and includes, for instance, the content of implementing regulations (e.g. in the field of
CAP), rules adopted by the institutions (etc) regarding their internal organisation, and specific decisions in areas
where the institution concerned enjoys wide discretionary powers. Issues that fall outside the EO's mandate are
'political' issues, such as legislation and deliberations and acts of Parliament's committees. All issues, substantive and
procedural, relating to the work of the Committee on Petitions, are outside the EO's mandate as 'not concerning
possible maladministration'.
2.2 - ECJ acting in its judicial role. All substantive and all procedural matters that require decision-making by judges,
are excluded from the EO's mandate. Issues that are not excluded would for instance be staff issues or failures to reply
to letters.
Page 6: [2] Comment [MSOffice15]
13/08/2012 11:35:00
-
As a rule, we give advice. When we do not, we therefore state why. Typical reasons are that
the complainant has already contacted the relevant redress body, or that the overall nature of
the complaint is such that advice would not be useful.
-
Individuals who submit outside mandate complaints already have an information-deficit in
terms of how to obtain help. Several pieces of advice may therefore add confusion. We therefore
usually give the complainant only one piece of advice.
-
The advice is always limited to advice about another body or person that might be able to
help the complainant. The other body or person may provide concrete help (e.g. redress) or
useful expert advice.
-
The advice we give is not legal or otherwise substantive advice as such.
-
Call the other body if any doubt. But do not mention the complainant's name (data
protection).
-
An exception: We normally do not advise complainant's to turn to the French Ombudsman or
to the Belgian Federal Ombudsman, but we transfer to these bodies when a transfer is possible
and appropriate.
- Be it advice or any other information, if we send the letter to the complainant only be e-mail, we usually just provide
the relevant web link in the body of the letter (= no need to "attach" documents).
Page 6: [3] Comment [MSOffice16]
13/08/2012 11:35:00
-
To transfer a complaint means that we send the original complaint to another public body
that may be able to help the complainant. We only do so if we have the complainant's express
written consent for a transfer. S/he may already have given his/her consent in the complaint. If
not, we may call him/her, inviting him/her to send us the consent. We accept consent sent by e-
mail.
-
We mainly transfer to national ombudsmen, to the Commission, to SOLVIT and to
Parliament.
-
We do not transfer to the UK's Parliamentary Ombudsman, which only accepts complaints
through Members of the UK Parliament. We only advise complainants to turn to this body.

-
The choice of body depends on the case. For instance, a complainant who needs very quick
action may be better served by SOLVIT's service than by submitting a formal infringement
complaint to the Commission.
-
It is the EO Office that decides whether a transfer should be made. For reasons of efficiency
and courtesy, we nevertheless call the relevant body or institution to check if a transfer would
be relevant (it is obligatory for SOLVIT, and the relevant SOLVIT centre is that of the
complainant's home country). When doing so, we describe the facts of the case, but we do not
mention the complainant's name (data protection). The summary must contain a reference to the
telephone conversation, including the name of the person who was contacted.