Dies ist eine HTML Version eines Anhanges der Informationsfreiheitsanfrage 'Montenegro - children'.


Final Narrative Report  
 
Child Care System Reform 
(Montenegro) 
Part of the overall “Social Welfare and Child 
Care System Reform: Enhancing Social 
Inclusion” Project (IPA 2010) ID No. 
2010/255-602 
 
 
 
For the Delegation of the     
European Union   
 
 

 
 
December 2014 
 
 
UNICEF MONTENEGRO COUNTRY OFFICE 
U N   E C O   H O U S E  
S T A N K A   D R A G O J E V I C A   B B ,   8 1 0 0 0   P O D G O R I C A  
M O N T E N E G R O  
T E L E P H O N E :   + 3 8 2   2 0   4 4 7   4 0 0  
W e b s i t e :   w w w . u n i c e f . o r g / m o n t e n e g r o  
 
For every child 
Health, Education, Equality, Protection 
ADVANCE HUMANITY 
 

 
PROJECT PROFILE 
 

Assisted Country:  
Montenegro 
 
Project: 
Child Care System Reform ID No. 2010/255-602 
 
Donor: 

European Union  
 
Implemented by: 
UNICEF Montenegro 
 
 
Total Eligible Costs:  
1,374,560.00 € 
 
Total Allocation/Pre-financing for Years 1+2:  1,124,640.00€ 
 
Total Expenditure in Years 1+2+3:  
1,396,077.51€ 
 
Report Prepared:  
30 December 2014 
 
Period Covered: 
10 January 2011 – 10 July 2014 
 
 
   
 
 


link to page 3 link to page 4 link to page 5 link to page 6 link to page 9 link to page 9 link to page 9 link to page 10 link to page 11 link to page 11 link to page 11 link to page 12 link to page 12 link to page 13 link to page 13 link to page 14 link to page 14 link to page 14 link to page 15 link to page 16 link to page 16 link to page 16 link to page 16 link to page 18 link to page 19 link to page 19 link to page 20 link to page 21 link to page 21 link to page 23 link to page 24 link to page 24 link to page 24 link to page 33 link to page 36 link to page 43 link to page 44  
TABLE OF CONTENTS 
 
TABLE OF CONTENTS .............................................................................................................................................. 2 
MAP OF MONTENEGRO ............................................................................................................................................ 3 
LIST OF ACRONYMS ................................................................................................................................................. 4 
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ............................................................................................................................................. 5 
1. 
PROJECT ACHIEVEMENTS (10 JANUARY 2011 – 10 JULY 2014) ..................................................................... 8 
3.1  POLICY, LEGISLATIVE AND INSTITUTIONAL FRAMEWORK ......................................................... 8 
3.1.1 DEVELOPMENT OF THE NEW LAW ON SOCIAL AND CHILD PROTECTION ................................. 8 
3.1.2 DEVELOPMENT OF SECONDARY LEGISLATION ......................................................................... 9 
3.1.3 ORGANIZATION OF ROUNDTABLES FOR PRESENTATION OF THE REVISED LAW ON SOCIAL 
AND CHILD PROTECTION .................................................................................................................. 10 

3.1.4 ESTABLISHMENT OF THE INSTITUTE FOR SOCIAL WELFARE AND CAPACITY BUILDING ....... 10 
3.1.5 DEVELOPMENT OF CHILD PROTECTION STANDARDS AND A MONITORING SYSTEM ............ 11 
3.1.6 DEVELOPMENT OF NATIONAL AND LOCAL DATABASES ON CHILD PROTECTION .................. 11 
3.1.7 SUPPORT TO LOCAL PLANS OF ACTION IN AT LEAST 5 MUNICIPALITIES OF MONTENEGRO, 
AND MAPPING OF CHILD PROTECTION SERVICES IN ALL MUNICIPALITIES IN MONTENEGRO ......... 12 

3.2  CAPACITY BUILDING AND PREVENTION OF INSTITUTIONALIZATION OF CHILDREN ............... 13 
3.2.1 DEVELOPMENT OF THE PROTOCOL ON INCREASED INTERSECTORAL COLLABORATION FOR 
THE PREVENTION OF INSTITUTIONALIZATION AND PROVISION OF ALTERNATIVE SERVICES .......... 13 

3.2.2 TRAINING OF SOCIAL WELFARE PROFESSIONALS ON ASSESSMENT AND CARE PLANNING 14 
3.2.3 TRAINING OF PROFESSIONALS FROM THE HEALTH SECTOR ON SUPPORT TO VULNERABLE 
MOTHERS .......................................................................................................................................... 15 

3.2.4 TRAINING OF MEMBERS OF THE LOCAL COMMISSIONS FOR ORIENTATION OF CHILDREN 
WITH SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS .............................................................................................. 15 
3.3 FAMILY AND COMMUNITY BASED SERVICES…………………………………………………17 
3.3.1. 
DEINSTITUTIONALIZATION OF CHILDREN RESIDING IN THE INSTITUTE ‘KOMANSKI MOST’17 
3.3.2. 
TRANSFORMATION OF ‘MLADOST’ BIJELA INSTITUTION FOR CHILDREN WITHOUT 
PARENTAL CARE ............................................................................................................................... 18 
3.3.3. SUPPORT TO THE ESTABLISHMENT OF SMALL GROUP HOMES FOR CHILDREN ................... 19 
3.3.4. 
SUPPORT TO THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A NETWORK OF DAY CARE CENTRES FOR 
CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES ........................................................................................................... 20 
3.3.5. 
PROMOTION AND IMPLEMENTATION OF FOSTERING ........................................................ 22 
3.3.6. 
SUPPORT TO THE ESTABLISHMENT OF CHILD PROTECTION SERVICES........................... 23 
3.3.7. 
PROMOTION AND AWARENESS RAISING ACTIVITIES ON THE OVERALL REFORM 
PROCESS AND ON SOCIAL INCLUSION AND FAMILY AND COMMUNITY-BASED SERVICES ............... 23 
     VISIBILITY ACTIVITIES……………………………………………………………………………27 
     MID TERM AND FINAL POJECT EVALUATIONS…………………………………………………..29 
2. 
PROJECT METHODOLOGY ........................................................................................................................... 32 
3. 
CHALLENGES AND LESSONS LEARNED ...................................................................................................... 35 
4. 
FINANCIAL UTILIZATION ............................................................................................................................... 42 
LIST OF ANNEXES .................................................................................................................................................. 43 
BIBLIOGRAPHY…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………44 
 
 
 
 
 
 



 
 
MAP OF MONTENEGRO 
 
 
 
 


 
LIST OF ACRONYMS 
 
CEE/CIS 
Central and Eastern Europe and Commonwealth of Independent States 
CSW 
Centre for Social Work 
CRC 
UN Convention on the Rights of the Child 
DCC 
Day Care Centre for Children with Disability 
EUD 
Delegation of the European Union 
EUCOM 
European Command of the US Military 
KAP 
Knowledge Attitudes and Practices survey 
LPA 
Local Plans of Action for Children 
MoE 
Ministry of Education  
MoF 
Ministry of Finance 
MoH 
Ministry of Health 
MoLSW 
Ministry of Labour and Social Welfare 
MONSTAT 
Statistical Office of Montenegro 
MoU 
Memorandum of Understanding 
NGO 
Nongovernmental Organization 
SGH 
Small Group Home 
OPT 
Operational Plan of Transformation 
OVI 
Objectively Verifiable Indicator  
SIF / SIP 
Social Innovation Fund / Programme 
UNICEF 
United Nations Children’s Fund 
UNDP 
United Nations Development Fund 
 
 
 
 
 
 


 
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 
 
 
The Government of Montenegro has defined the rule of law agenda, observance of human 
rights  and  social  inclusion  of the most  vulnerable  as  a major  enlargement  policy  within  the 
EU  accession  process.  One  of  the  key  bottlenecks  identified  prior  the  start  of  the  “Social 
Welfare and Child Care System Reform: Enhancing Social Inclusion” Project in 2010, laid in 
the  weak  capacity  of  the  system  which  provided  quick  solutions  to  complex  problems  for 
children  and  families  in  need.  The  sector  was  weakened  by  the  insufficient  number  of 
qualified  professional  staff  and  over-emphasis  on  administrative  tasks.  High  number  of 
children in institutional care represented the evidence of inadequate support to families, non-
favorable  social  norms  supporting  institutionalization  and  lack  of  family  and  community 
based  services  at  community  level.    It  has  been  estimated  that  there  are  18,000  children1 
with  development  disabilities.  Physical  access  barriers,  social  rejection,  insufficient  social 
care  and  public  prejudices  proved  to  be  among  the  most  significant  challenges  for  their 
social inclusion.2  
 
From 10 January 2011 to 10 July 2014 UNICEF Montenegro has supported the Government 
of  Montenegro  (Ministry  of  Labour  and  Social  Welfare)  in  a  comprehensive  and  multi-
disciplinary reform of the child care system with the financial assistance of the Delegation of 
European  Union  to  Montenegro  (EUD).  The  Project  “Child  Care  System  Reform”  was  the 
third  component  of  the  “Social  Welfare  and  Child  Care  System  Reform:  Enhancing  Social 
Inclusion” Project (henceforth “Social Inclusion Project”) funded by the European Union (IPA 
2010),  a  multi-sectoral  intervention  undertaken  by  the  MoLSW,  the  Ministry  of  Education 
(MoE)3, UNDP and UNICEF.  
 
The  “Child  Care  System  Reform”  addressed  the  entire  child  protection  system,  and  was 
focused on policy and legislative change, changes of attitudes and social norms, institutional 
and  capacity  building  and  the  development  of  family  and  community  based  services  for 
vulnerable children and families.  
 
It needs to be noted that the EU accession process has been “a key facilitating factor”4 in the 
implementation of the reform and Social and Child Care System Reform has been integrated 
as  one  of  priority  actions  in  the  development  and  implementation  of  the  Chapter  23 
(Fundamental rights)  
 
The  reform  process  resulted  in  high  level  of  alignment  of  policy  and  legal  framework  with 
respective UN and EU international instruments (the new Law on Social and Child Protection 
(2013),  the  new  Strategy  for  the  Development  of  the  Social  and  Child  Protection  System 
(2013-2017)  and  the  Strategy  on  Development  of  Fostering  (2012-2016)).  The 
comprehensive  reform  which  is  still  underway,  significantly  improved  the  capacity  of  the 
overall  sector  and  capacities  of  the  Centres  for  Social  Work  to  deliver  better  services  in  a 
more coherent manner, based on improved cooperation with other services, families in need 
and NGOs, and with the support of a better data monitoring system. The system  of quality 
assurance in the social and child protection system is in development phase.5 The essential 
foundation for data collection and analysis, and evidence-based planning in the area of child 
                                            
1 Government of Montenegro (2008), “Strategy for Integration of Persons with Disability in Montenegro for the 
period 2008-2016”, p.27  
2 External Evaluation of Child Care System Reform Project, 2014, Promeso Consulting Ltd.  
3 MoE was in charge of First Component of the Social Inclusion Project, which was completed in March 2013. 
4 External Evaluation of Child Care System Reform Project, 2014, Promeso Consulting Ltd.  
5  External Evaluation of Child Care System Reform Project, 2014, Promeso Consulting Ltd. 
 


 
protection  has  been  established  through  the  introduction  of  the  electronic  child  protection 
database, installed in all CSWs at the local and MoLSW at the central level, and in use since 
the beginning of 2013. The Institute for Social and Child Protection has been established as 
per the new Law and will become functional in 2015. 
 
The  overall  objective  of  the  reform  process  is  to  enhance  access  to  comprehensive, 
inclusive  and  sustainable  family  and  community-based  services  as  an  alternative  to 
institutionalization of vulnerable children.  
 
As a result of the multidimensional  work and efforts  which influenced  important changes in  
policy  and  legal  framework,    improved  institutional  and  human  capacities,  and  positive 
changes  of  attitudes  and  social  norms  upon  the  implementation  of  massive  awareness 
raising  campaign  “Every  Child  Needs  a  Family”,  the  number  of  children  in  non-kin  foster 
families increased by 289 % until July 2014 (from 9 children in non-kin foster care in 2010 to 
35 children in July 2014) and the number of children in child care institutions decreased by 
31% (from 370 children in 2010 to 254 children in the end of 2013). 
 
The most importantly, and in line with the newly introduced provisions in the  Law on Social 
and  Child  Protection  which  prohibits  placement  of  children  under  three  in  institutions,  the 
number  of  children  aged  0-3  in  the  only  Institution  for  children  without  parental  care  in 
Montenegro, “Mladost”, Bijela has decreased by 86% since 2010.  
      
The Government also undertook important measures to increase the number of children with 
disabilities  in  mainstream  schools  and  to  provide  children  with  the  most  severe  disabilities 
with highly assertive daily care, which was all supported by the behaviour change campaign 
“It’s about Ability” (2010-2013). Those efforts have resulted in an increase of the number of 
children in inclusive education by 110% (from 654 children in 2010 to 1371 children in July 
2014).  Also,  community based  alternative  services  targeting  vulnerable  children  are  on the 
rise.  At  the  end  of  2010  there  were  only  two  functioning  day  care  centres  in  Montenegro, 
whereas  at  present  children  in  ten  municipalities  (almost  half  of  all  municipalities  in 
Montenegro)  have  access  to  this  service.  The  first  small  group  home  for  children  without 
parental care has been constructed in Bijelo Polje and equipped, and is expected to become 
functional in 2015.  
 
Finally,  Children’s  Pavilion  in  Public  Institution  “Komanski  Most”  has  closed  in  2014  and 
Komanski Most is now an institution for adults with severe intellectual disabilities.  
 
Other  UNICEF  programme  interventions  have  also  contributed  to  an  important  extent  to 
efficient  implementation  of  the  reform  process,  most  notably  in  the  area  of  inclusive 
education,  support  to  effective  system  response  in  the  cases  of  child  abuse  and  neglect, 
provision  of  the  support  to  the  Office  of  Human  Rights  Protector  of  Montenegro  to  install 
complaint  boxes  for  children  residing  in  child  care  institutions  and  many  other  activities 
focused  on  research  and  analysis  and  knowledge  gathering  such  as  Multiple  Indicator 
Cluster Survey on the State of Children and Women in Montenegro,  the Analysis of Media 
Exposure of Children in State Care and The Analysis of CSWs performance and work with 
children  without  parental  care  placed  in  child  care  institutions  conducted  by  the  Office  of 
Human Rights Protector of Montenegro.  
 
While  important  achievements  have  been  made  during  this  intervention,  the  remaining 
challenges  and  gaps  in  the  capacity  of  the  system  to  implement  the  reform  in  its 
comprehensiveness, drove the MoLSW, UN agencies and the EU Delegation to Montenegro 
to  conclusion  that  the  support  of  UN  and  EU  to  this  reform  must  continue  in  order  to 
consolidate  the  achieved  results  and  progress  and  ensure  their  sustainability.  To  this  end, 
the  Government  of  Montenegro  has  submitted  a  proposal  for  financing  the  continuation  of 
 


 
the reform under IPA II, while the bridging period between the two IPA modalities (I and II) 
has been supported from IPA 2014 reserves (so-called Bridging).  
 
The  key  challenges  that  will  be  addressed  and  worked  on  within  the  “Continuation  of  the 
Child  Care  System  Reform  in  Montenegro”  (Bridging  Initiative  2014-2016)  are  further 
capacity building of MoLSW in leading, programme and financial planning, implementing and 
monitoring  the  reform  process  with  the  aim  of  strengthening  leadership,  planning, 
implementation and monitoring of the reform. A set of activities concerning providing support 
to  MoLSW  in  finalizing  secondary  legislation  to  the  Law  on  Social  and  Child  Protection, 
strengthening  professional  capacity  of  the  Institute  for  Social  and  Child  Protection, 
strengthening  professional  capacities  of  centres  for  social  work,  providing  support  to  the 
social  and  child  protection,  health  and  education  sectors  in  the  prevention  of 
institutionalization of children and strengthening the provision of foster care and other family 
and  community  based  services  will  be  implemented  in  order  to  strengthen  the 
implementation  of  the  legislative  and  institutional  framework  and  coordination  for  the 
provision of quality social and child protection services.  
 


 
 
1. 
PROJECT ACHIEVEMENTS (10 JANUARY 2011 – 10 JULY 2014) 
 
 
Activities  of  the  project  fall  under  the  following  sub-components  and  aim  to  achieve  the 
following results in line with the Description of Action: 
 
1.  Policy, legislative and institutional framework 
Expected  result  1:  The  Child  Care  System  has  a  policy  and  legal  framework 
harmonized  with  international  standards  and  the  Institute  for  Social  Welfare6  is 
established to standardize and ensure quality child care services. 
 
2.  Capacity-building and prevention of institutionalization of children 
Expected result 2: Capacity of professionals in the child care sector is enhanced and 
vulnerable  children  and  families  have  improved  access  to  quality  preventive  and 
inclusive 
family 
and 
community-based 
services 
as 
an 
alternative 
to 
institutionalization. 
 
3.  Family and community-based alternative services 
Expected  result  3.1:  Capacity  of  professionals  in  the  child  care  sector  is  enhanced 
and vulnerable children and families have increased access to quality inclusive family 
and community-based services as an alternative to institutionalization;  
Expected result 3.2: The general public is increasingly aware and sensitized on the 
child care system reform, social inclusion and family and community-based care. 
 
These activities are described in detail below (numbering based on the revised Logframe7).   
 
3.1 
Policy, Legislative and Institutional Framework  
 

3.1.1 
Development of the new Law on Social and Child Protection  
 
The  new  Law  on  Social  and  Child  Protection  is  the  foundation  for  the  reform  of  the  social 
and child protection system in Montenegro. 
 
The  MoLSW  working  group  with  the  support  of  UNICEF  consultants  worked  on  the 
development of the text of Law in the period between 2011 and 2013. The Law was adopted 
by the Parliament of Montenegro on 28 May 2013. In addition, UNICEF provided support to 
the MoLSW in the execution of the financial impact analysis of the Law. Other reports and 
documents  that  were  prepared  during  this  period  provided  important  inputs  for  the 
development  of  the  Law  (e.g.  the  Foster  Care  Strategy  –  see  activity  3.3.5.  and  the 
assessment of CSWs – see activity 3.2.2.). 
 
The finalization of the Law was delayed compared to the original time schedule and resulted 
in delays in the implementation of several project activities. Some of the key reasons  were 
staffing  changes  at  senior  level  in  MoLSW  and  the  participatory  nature  of  the  drafting 
process.  Namely,  MoLSW  has  limited  human  resources,  and  whenever  new  priorities 
emerged they conflicted with the process of law drafting and revision. In addition, as this is a 
key law in social and child protection,  it  was critically important to ensure that the text  met 
                                            
6 In the Law on Social and Child Protection named “Institute for Social and Child Protection”. 
7  This  refers  to  the  Logframe  revised  in  the  Addendum  of  the  Project  (part  of  the  Project  Extension 
Documentation, Addendum no 1 dated 12 April 2013). 
 


 
the  highest  possible  standards.  Notably,  in  line  with  the  Convention  on  the  Rights  of  the 
Child (CRC) and the UN Guidelines on the Alternative Care of Children, UNICEF advocated 
for  restrictions  on  the  placement  of  children  in  large  residential  institutions,  particularly 
children aged 0-3; as well as for certain provisions on fostering that would facilitate access to 
this  family  based  service  as  an  alternative  to  institutionalization.  However,  the  process  of 
incorporating  international  standards  in  the  Law  was  fraught  with  challenges.  On  several 
occasions  the  drafts  prepared  by  UNICEF  consultants  and  the  official  working  group  were 
subsequently  altered  by  the  MoLSW  particularly  with  respect  to  provisions  such  as  the 
introduction of support services, regulation of fostering etc.; as a result of which UNICEF had 
to intervene several times and this further delayed the drafting process. Also, much time was 
spent  on advocating and negotiating with the MoLSW and the Ministry  of Finance (MoF) a 
provision in the Law that would enable establishing of an independent Institute for Social and 
Child  Protection  (rather  than  a  department  in  MoLSW  to  fulfil  its  functions).  After  strong 
advocacy of UN agencies UNDP and UNICEF, additional technical assistance provided, and 
with important assistance of  the EU Delegation to Montenegro (EUD), the final Draft of the 
Law incorporated the majority of provided inputs.  
 
The new  Law on Social and Child Protection, was adopted in May 2013,  and is  broadly in 
line  with  international  standards  and  written  in  the  spirit  of  the  reform.  For  instance, 
prevention  of  institutionalization  and  access  to  services  in  the  least  restrictive  environment 
are  listed  among  the  principles  of  social  and  child  protection;  the  Law  envisages  the 
transformation  of  residential  institutions;  it  defines  institutional  placement  as  a  measure  of 
last resort; and it prohibits institutional placement of children aged 0-3 unless all alternatives 
have  been  exhausted.  In  addition,  the  Law  envisages the  establishment  of  the Institute for 
Social and Child Protection (see Activity 3.1.4.) and quality assurance mechanisms.  
 
Annex: The Law on Social and Child Protection (in English language, unofficial translation). 
  
3.1.2 
Development of Secondary Legislation 
 
The development of secondary legislation is crucial from the perspective of operationalizing 
the  Law  on  Social  and Child  Protection  and  introducing  quality  standards  and  uniformity  in 
the social and child protection system and service provision across the country.  
 
UNICEF supported the official working groups in the development of the following bylaws: 
1.  The bylaw on the organization, standards and methods of work of CSWs (adopted in 
December 2013); 
2.  The  bylaw  on  the  terms  and  standards  for  performing  professional  activities  in  the 
social  and  child  protection  sector  (adopted  in  December  2013,  amended  in  March 
2014); 
3.  The bylaw on the terms for provision and use of foster care services (adopted in April 
2014); 
4.  The bylaw on the terms for provision and use and minimum standards of the service 
of  accommodation  in  shelters  and  emergency  reception  units  (adopted  in  June 
2014); 
5.  The bylaw on the terms for provision and use and minimum standards of residential 
care services for children and youth (adopted in October 2014); and  
6.  The bylaw on the terms for provision and use and minimum standards of community-
based services (under finalization). 
 
Due  to  the  delays  in  the  finalization  of  the  Law  on  Social  and  Child  Protection,  and  again, 
due  to  the  limited  human  resources  in  the  MoLSW,  the  process  of  development  of  bylaws 
took longer than expected. Three bylaws were not developed during the “Child Care System 
Reform”,  but  technical  assistance  will  be  provided  for  their  development  during  the 
continuation of the reform (IPA 2014), as follows: 
 


 
1.  The  bylaw  on  minimum  standards  of  socio-educational  and  counseling  and 
therapeutic services; 
2.  The bylaw on licensing of processionals; 
3.  The bylaw on accreditation of training programmes. 
 
The  texts  of  the  bylaws  were,  unfortunately,  significantly  shortened  and  the  norms  have 
been  left  very  strict  without  further  elaborations,  which  is  typical  for  so  called  “soft  law” 
characteristically applicable for the social sector domain. The issue occurred in the course of 
MoLSW legal department’s discussions with the Secretariat for Legislation.  As regards the 
bylaw on CSWs, which introduces case management, this shortcoming will be overcome in 
the course of the training where additional tools are being provided. As regards the bylaw on 
foster care, the Guidelines for CSWs on the implementation of the bylaw on foster care were 
developed and shared with the relevant professionals. For other bylaws, mitigation strategies 
will  be  identified  in  the  first  quarter  of  2015.  UNICEF  and  UNDP  already  held  several 
consultative meetings with MoLSW regarding this issue.   
 
In addition to the development of secondary legislation, MoLSW requested support by one of 
UNICEF’s key policy and legislation experts to the process of development of the Strategy 
for  the  Development  of  the  Social  and  Child  Protection  System
  2013-2017  by  the  official 
working group. The Strategy was adopted by the Government of Montenegro in June 2013. 
 
Annexes:  Secondary  legislation  on  professional  activities  in  the  social  and  child  protection 
sector (in English language, unofficial translation); secondary legislation on the organization 
of CSWs (in English language, unofficial translation); secondary legislation on foster care (in 
English  language,  unofficial  translation);  secondary  legislation  on  shelters  and  emergency 
reception  units  (in  Montenegrin  language);  The Strategy  for  the  Development  of the  Social 
and Child Protection System
 (in Montenegrin language). 
 
3.1.3 
Organization of Roundtables for Presentation of the revised Law on Social and 
Child Protection  

 
The  public  discussions  of  the  Law  on  Social  and  Child  Protection  were organized  to  make 
the process of development and finalization of the Law more transparent and participatory. 
 
During the “Child Care System Reform” implementation, four roundtables were held, the first 
one in Podgorica to announce the process of development of the new Law in May 2011, and 
three across Montenegro in February 2012 as part of the public discussion. In consultation 
with  the  MoLSW  it  was  agreed  that  a  final  conference  was  no  longer  necessary  as  key 
aspects  of  the  Law  had  already  been  covered  by  the  various  workshops  and  events  held. 
However,  key  provisions  of  the  new  Law  were  highlighted  at  all  events  held  following  the 
adoption  of  the  Law  by  the  Parliament,  including  at  the  national  conference  on 
deinstitutionalization held on 16 July 2013, shortly after the adoption of the Law. 
 
3.1.4 
Establishment of the Institute for Social Welfare and Capacity Building  
 
The new Law on Social and Child Protection envisages the establishment of the Institute for 
Social  and  Child  Protection  which  will  provide  effective  and  coordinated  monitoring, 
evaluation  and  supervision  of  the  quality  of  work  of  professionals  and  services, 
standardization,  licensing  of  professionals  and  accreditation  of  programmes  as  well  as 
analytical  and research activities.  
 
The Institute was established in 2014 (Official Gazette of Montenegro 17/2014), furnished by 
the  Government  of  Montenegro,  while  the  electronic  equipment  was  provided  through  the 
“Child Care  System  Reform”.  It  was expected  that  the  Institute will  become  operational  by 
 
10 

 
the  end  of  2014,  when  staff  will  be  recruited,  and  the  training  for  staff  provided  under  the 
continuation  of  the  reform  (IPA  2014).  However,  all  was  delayed  because  of  the  long 
administrative procedures for recruitment – the recruitment is expected to be done in the first 
two  months  of  2015.  This  training  was  originally  envisaged  within  the  “Child  Care  System 
Reform”, but could not take place due to the delays in staff recruitment (due to the elections 
in  spring  2014,  and  the  Institute  could  not  be  established  sooner  due  to  the  delays  in  the 
finalization of the Law on Social and Child Protection).  
 
The  “Child  Care  System  Reform”  also  contributed  to  the  establishment  of  the  Institute 
through  advocacy  for the  establishment  of  a  separate  Institute  rather than  a  department  of 
the  MoLSW  to  cover  these  functions  (see  activity  3.1.1.),  and  an  international  expert  was 
engaged to develop the proposal on the establishment of the Institute with job descriptions. 
 
In  addition,  a  study  visit  to  a  selected  EU  Member  State  with  extensive  experience  in 
managing similar knowledge/resource centres in the area of social and child protection was 
envisaged. Northern Ireland was selected as a good example of the reform of the child care 
system (and comparable in size to Montenegro) and it was decided that the purpose of the 
visit  should  be  broadened  to  include  visiting  various  child  protection  services,  particularly 
small group homes, in addition to visiting the Social Care Council of Northern Ireland (with 
functions comparable to the Montenegrin Institute). The visit took place in February 2014 for 
representatives of MoLSW (including the Minister) and UNICEF. 
 
Annexes:  Proposal  on  the  establishment  of  the  Institute  for  Social  Welfare  and  the 
PowerPoint  presentation  of  the  report  (in  Serbian  language);  Agenda  of  the  study  visit  to 
Northern Ireland.  
 
3.1.5 
Development of Child Protection Standards and a Monitoring System  
 
This activity aimed to ensure that all social and child protection services provided to children 
and families meet certain requirements according to international standards; and that these 
services are provided in a standardized manner.
 
 
The  following  standards  were  developed  by  multi-sectoral  working  groups  with  technical 
assistance of international consultants engaged by UNICEF in 2012: the draft standards on 
foster care (which have been integrated into the bylaw on foster care), the draft standards on 
shelters  and  emergency  units  (which  have  been  integrated  into  the  bylaw  on  shelters  and 
emergency units), and the draft standards on day care centres (which have been integrated 
into the draft bylaw on community based social and child protection services).  
 
Upon  request  of  the  MoLSW,  in  2013  UNICEF  provided  technical  assistance  for 
development  of  a  Concept  Note  on  Small  Group  Home  Service  in  Montenegro  including 
financial  projections  of  the  service  (see  also  Activity  3.3.3.).  This  document  served  as  a 
reference for the working group and the consultants engaged by UNICEF who worked on the 
development  of  minimum  standards  of  quality  of  residential  care  for  children  and  youth, 
which includes small group homes. This bylaw was in the final stage of development at the 
end of the “Child Care System Reform”. 
 
Annex: Concept Note on Small Group Home Service in Montenegro (in English language).  
 
3.1.6 

Development of National and Local Databases on Child Protection  
 
One of the highlights of the project and a cornerstone of the reform is the development of the 
Child  Protection  Database,  conceptualized  as  a  modern,  user-friendly  electronic  database 
facilitating  quality  and  efficiency  in  service  provision  and  enabling  statistical  analyses, 

 
11 

 
monitoring of reform progress and evidence based policy making and programme design.  
 
The  Child  Protection  Database,  linking  all  CSWs  at  the  local  level  and  the  MoLSW  at  the 
central level, was developed by two international experts through a consultative process with 
stakeholders,  and  the software  solution  by  a  local  IT  company,  in  the  period  2011-2012. It 
was  launched  at  a  press  conference  in  March  2013  but  it  has  been  in  use  since  January 
2013. As of 25 June 2014, it contained over 17,400 entries (active cases from all years, not 
only  new  entries  from  2013).  The  database  includes  several  components  including 
information  on  the  beneficiary,  information  on  measures  and  services  provided  to  the 
beneficiary,  statistics  page  and  indicators  page  (the  values  of  these  internationally 
recognized  indicators  are  calculated  automatically  by  the  software  and  will  be  used  to 
monitor progress in the reform).  
 
Training  was  provided  on  multiple  occasions  to  professionals  on  the  use  of  the  database, 
while the training on evidence-based policy making will be provided to MoLSW, the Institute 
for Social and Child Protection representatives and directors of CSWs under the next phase 
of the reform “Continuation of the Child Care System Reform”  (Bridging Initiative, IPA 2014 
reserves), considering that thus far in this sector data has been used to a very limited extent 
in policy and programme planning.  
 
Annex:  The  list  of  child  protection  database  indicators  (in  English  language,  unofficial 
translation).  
 
3.1.7 
Support to Local Plans of Action in at least 5 municipalities of Montenegro, and 
mapping of child protection services in all municipalities in Montenegro  

 
A Local Plan of Action for Children (LPA) is a strategic document outlining general municipal 
policy relating to children for a defined period, along with priority measures and activities that 
ought to be implemented so that all girls and boys grow up healthy, educated, protected and 
able to develop to their full potential, particularly those who are in need of special protection, 
in  line  with  the  UN  Convention  on  Rights  of  the  Child  and  the  National  Plan  of  Action  for 
Children.
 
 
Under the “Child Care System Reform”, a multi-sectoral local team, including representatives 
from the education, social  welfare and health sectors, civil society and children, developed 
the LPA of Cetinje in 2011, based on a thorough and participatory analysis of the situation, 
which  was  carried  out  through  17  focus  groups  with  local  stakeholders  including  children. 
The  Municipal  Assembly  of  Cetinje  adopted  the  LPA  in  2012.  One  of  the  objectives  of  the 
plan was the establishment of the Day Care Centre in Cetinje, operational since 2013. 
 
Five additional municipalities were supported in the process of publication and promotion of 
their LPAs, namely Rozaje, Bar, Bijelo Polje, Kotor and Ulcinj (for Ulcinj in both Montenegrin 
and Albanian languages). 
 
In order to support evidence based transformation of the system and targeted planning and 
development of family and community based services, an activity was added to the Project, 
namely the mapping of existing and needed child protection services at the local level. One 
international and one local consultant have were engaged for the execution of this task but 
long term Project consultants were also involved in field work due to the extensive scope of 
this activity. The report was finalized in 2013 and its findings were particularly useful for the 
finalization  of  the  Strategy  for  the  Development  of  the  Social  and  Child  Protection  System 
(2013-2017). 
 
Annexes: LPA Cetinje (in Montenegrin language); The report on mapping of child protection 
services in Montenegro (in Montenegrin language). 
 
12 

 
 
The  table  below  shows  the  status  in  the  achievement  of  the  expected  result  against 
objectively verifiable indicators (OVIs). 
 
Expected  result  1:  The  Child  Care  System  has  a  policy  and  legal  framework 
harmonized  with  international  standards  and  the  Institute  for  Social  Welfare  is 
established to standardize and ensure quality child care services.
 
OVI - Law on Social and Child Protection compliant with international standards by the end of 2013. 
Status - The Law on Social and Child Protection broadly aligned with international standards and adopted by 
the Parliament in May 2013. Target achieved. 
The Institute for Social Welfare officially established and functional by 2014. 
100% of Institute staff trained and operational by July 2014. 
The Institute for Social and Child Protection was established in early 2014 but did not become operational 
during the “Child Care System Reform” (due to delays in establishment of the Institute and then spring 2014 
elections), hence the training of staff could not take place. Target partially achieved. 
Secondary legislation for the Law on Social and Child Protection including Child Protection Standards created 
by July 2014. 
At least 50 Social Welfare professionals participated in the process of development of secondary legislation and 
Child Protection Standards and corresponding training by July 2014. 
At least 50 NGO representatives participated in the process of development of secondary legislation and Child 
Protection Standards and corresponding training by July 2014. 
Five bylaws were adopted within the “Child Care System Reform”, and one additional draft developed. Three 
bylaws were postponed for autumn 2014 (and will be developed during IPA 2014). There were 153 participants 
involved in the process of development of these documents, of which 13 NGO representatives. Target partially 
achieved. 
Local and national Child Protection databases created by end 2012 
The child protection database was developed in 2011/2012 and has been in use since January 2013. As of 25 
June 2014, it contained over 17,400 entries (active cases from all years, including new entries from 2013). 
Target achieved. 
At least 5 Local Plans of Action for children supported by July 2014. 
Since 2011, one LPA was adopted (in Cetinje) and five more supported in promotion (Bar, Bijelo Polje, Rozaje, 
Kotor and Ulcinj). Target achieved. 
 
 
3.2 
Capacity Building and Prevention of Institutionalization of Children   
 
3.2.1 
Development  of  the  Protocol  on  increased  intersectoral  collaboration  for  the 
prevention of institutionalization and provision of alternative services  
 
 

Prevention  of  institutionalization  requires  a  holistic  approach  and  efficient  and  effective 
cooperation between several sectors, in particular the social and child protection, education 
and health sectors. 
 
An intersectoral working group consisting of representatives of the social welfare, education 
and  health  sectors  (including  policy  makers  and  practitioners)  with  the  support  of  UNICEF 
international  expert  developed  the  document  entitled  The  Protocol  on  intersectoral 
cooperation for the prevention of child abandonment
 in 2013-2014. The Protocol was signed 
 
13 

 
in  April  2014  by  the  MoLSW,  the  MoH  and  the  MoE.  The  Protocol  was  subsequently 
presented to approximately 80 professionals from the three sectors.  
 
The  Protocol  outlines  the  responsibilities  of  each  sector  in  considerable  detail,  however, 
further support to the implementation of the Protocol will be provided under IPA 2014, with 
particular focus on the role of the health sector and linkages with the social protection and 
education sectors, which has in the previous period been rather weak.  
 
Annex: The Protocol on intersectoral collaboration for the prevention of child abandonment 
(in Montenegrin language). 
 
3.2.2 
Training of Social Welfare Professionals on Assessment and Care Planning  
 
Rights  in  social  welfare  and  child  protection  in  Montenegro  are  basic  cash  benefits  and 
social  and  child  protection  services  (Law  on  Social  and  Child  Protection  2013,  Article  11), 
which are provided by Centres for Social Work (CSWs) at the local level, making their reform 
instrumental to the reform of the entire social welfare and child protection system.
 
 
In  preparation  for  the  reform  of  CSWs,  UNICEF  engaged  an  international  expert  in  the 
second  half  of  2011  to  undertake  an  assessment  of  current  practices  and  organizational 
structures of CSWs. The expert produced a report which was critical for the finalization of the 
new  Law  on  Social  and  Child  Protection,  essential  for  the  development  of  secondary 
legislation  on  CSW  organization  and  standards  of  work  and  the  bylaw  on  professional 
activities, as well as for planning capacity building activities for CSWs.  
 
In  May  and  June/July  2014,  a  pilot  phase  of  the  training  on  case  management  was 
implemented. Initially it was planned to pilot the methodology in 2 to 3 CSWs, however, this 
strategy  proved  not  to  be feasible  considering that  the  process  of  development  of  the  new 
systematization  of  work  places  was  ongoing  in  all  CSWs.  Instead,  19  professionals  from 
CSWs  across  Montenegro,  who  were  identified  by  MoLSW  as  the  “champions  of  change”, 
were trained by two international experts. Scaling up of the case management methodology 
to cover all CSWs will be implemented under IPA 2014. 
 
Additionally, a study visit to a neighbouring country which has already accepted and applied 
case management methodology was envisaged. Slovenia was selected as a good example, 
comparable in size to Montenegro and with similar heritage in the social welfare system. The 
visit  took  place  in  July  2014  for  representatives  or  CSWs  (mostly  directors),  one 
representative  of  MoLSW  and  one  of  UNICEF,  and  it  focused  on  the  reform  of  CSWs  but 
also more broadly on the reform of the child protection system. 
 
In  addition,  a  comprehensive  family  counselling  training  was  provided  in  2011/2012  to 
selected CSW professionals with the aim to enhance the capacity of centres for social work 
in supporting families in their care giving role and preventing separation of children from their 
families. Four workshops were held with 19 professionals – including 17 from CSWs (which 
comprises 10% of total professional workforce in CSWs across the country), and facilitated 
by  international  experts  engaged  by  UNICEF.  The  training  programme  complies  with 
standards of the European Association Psychotherapy (EAP) and European Association for 
Family  Therapy  (EFTA).  Certificates  were  awarded  to  18  successful  participants,  in  a 
ceremony held in June 2013. 
 
Annexes: Assessment of CSWs organization and capacities (in English language, unofficial 
translation),  family  counselling  training  programme  (in  Montenegrin  language),  case 
management  training  programme  (in  Montenegrin  language);  Agenda  of  the  study  visit  to 
Slovenia. 
 
14 

 
 
3.2.3 
Training  of  Professionals  from  the  Health  Sector  on  Support  to  Vulnerable 
Mothers  

 
Health  workers  are  frequently  the  first  of  point  of  contact  of  the  system  with  a  vulnerable 
pregnant woman or parent hence the health workers’ role in supporting them and referring to 
other services needs to be promoted and strengthened
. 
 
Prior  to  the  implementation  of  this  capacity  building  activity,  the  MoH  requested  an 
assessment of the procedures and practice in maternity wards and relevant health services 
with a focus on the health professionals’ communication with/support to vulnerable mothers 
and cooperation with the social protection sector, so as to better identify the training needs 
of these professionals (this study was funded by UNICEF using other resources). Four high-
level  international  experts  were  engaged  by  UNICEF  and  the  assessment  was  finalized  in 
late 2011.  
 
Two of the above international experts and one local expert were subsequently engaged to 
prepare and deliver a part of the recommended training programme (general training on the 
prevalence of institutionalization and consequences for the child, preventative strategies and 
the  roles  of  each  relevant  sector,  ethics,  and  child  rights).  The  training  was  delivered  in 
March  2012  to  approximately  100  health  and  social  welfare  professionals  from  all 
Montenegrin  municipalities.  The  training  provided  inputs  for  the  Protocol  on  intersectoral 
cooperation for the prevention of child abandonment 
(see activity 3.2.1.).  
 
As  mentioned  above,  additional  training  will  be  organized  especially  targeting  the  health 
sector  as  part  of  additional  support  to  be  provided  to  the  implementation  of  the  Protocol 
under IPA 2014. 
 
Annex: Assessment of support services in maternity wards and relevant health services (in 
English language, unofficial translation). 
 
3.2.4 
Training of Members of the local Commissions for Orientation of Children with 
Special Educational Needs  

 
The  Commissions  for  Orientation  of  Children  with  Special  Educational  Needs  are  an  inter-
sectoral mechanism functioning at the local level, which on the basis of an assessment of a 
child  with  special  educational  needs  proposes  the  most  adequate  educational  programme 
and the necessary support for the child to access education.
 
 
UNICEF  engaged  international  technical  assistance  to  support  the  MoE  in  the  process  of 
finalizing  the  bylaw  on  the  work  of the  Commissions for  orientation  of  children  with  special 
educational needs, which was adopted in late 2011. The planned training of members of the 
18 commissions from across Montenegro were organized in March 2012, supported by the 
abovementioned  international  expert  and  two  local  consultants.  In  addition,  the  two  local 
consultants, supported by the long term Project consultant (defectologist by training), visited 
all  local  Commissions  twice  in  2012  with  the  aim  to  provide  additional  practical  support  to 
their  work.  Additional  training  was  provided  to  the  Commissions  as  a  result  of  the  findings 
and recommendations made on these occasions, and these were organized by UNICEF  in 
2013 using UNICEF’s other resources. 
 
The table below shows the current status in the achievement of the expected result against 
OVIs. 
 
Expected result 2: Capacity of professionals in the child care sector is enhanced and 
 
15 


 
vulnerable  children  and  families  have  improved  access  to  quality  preventive  and 
inclusive 

family 
and 
community-based 
services 
as 
an 
alternative 
to 
institutionalization. 
OVI - Protocol of inter-ministerial cooperation formalized by end of 2013. 
Status – The Protocol developed and signed in April 2014. Target achieved. 
Case management piloted in at least 2 centres for social work by the end of 2014. 
Bylaws developed, including concerning case management. Case management piloted in early 2014. Target 
achieved (although strategy changed, from piloting in CSWs to training champions of change). 
10% of professional workforce in centers for social work trained on family counselling and received certificates by 
the end of 2013. 
10% of professional workforce in centers for social work trained on family counselling and received certificates in 
June 2013. Target achieved.  
Number of children with special educational needs assessed by Commissions for Orientation of Children with 
Special Educational Needs increased by 100% by July 2014 (baseline: 654 at the end of 2010, i.e. before the 
project start). 
Between 2010 and July 2014, there was a 110% increase in the number of children with special educational 
needs referred by Commissions for assessment and orientation of children with special educational needs (SEN), 
as shown in graph below (source: MoES December 2013, updated September 2014). Target achieved
 
 
 
The average admissions of children into “Mladost”, Bijela institution reduced by 10% by the end 2013 (baseline: 
31.5 admissions per year on average by the end of 2010, i.e. before the project start). 
The average admission to “Mladost”, Bijela institution has decreased by 20% (average admission between 2008 
and 2013 is 25.17). Target achieved. 
 
 
16 


 
 
 
 
 
3.3 
          Family and Community Based Services 
 
3.3.1.  Deinstitutionalization of children residing in the Institute ‘Komanski Most’ 
 
De-institutionalization has been at the heart of  the  child care system reform in the country, 
with a special sense of urgency in relation to the children residing in the institution Komanski 
Most, until recently an institution accommodating both children and adults with learning and 
combined disabilities.
 
 
Under the “Child Care System Reform”, staff in the children’s pavilion of Komanski Most and 
CSW  representatives  were  supported  in  the  process  of  revising  children’s  individual  care 
plans  with  a  view  to  deinstitutionalization.  One  international  expert  from the  UK’s  Intensive 
Interaction Institute was engaged in late 2011 to support staff who previously did not receive 
training  in  communication  and  work  with  children  with  profound  disabilities  and  to  assess 
children’s  progress  since  this  work  method  was  introduced  with  the  support  of  UNICEF  in 
2009.  Another  international  expert  was  engaged  towards  the  end  of  2011  to  support  the 
revision  of  the  children’s  care  plans,  which  incorporated  the  assessments  of  the  Intensive 
Interaction expert, information received after the social  workers’ visits to children’s families 
and  conclusions  reached  during  the  consultative  process  of  revision.  The  care  plans  thus 
made  were  broadly  in  line  with  case  management,  even  though  case  management  was 
officially  introduced  only  in  2013  (see  activity  3.1.2.).  UNICEF  experts  subsequently 
supported  relevant  professionals  in  the  process  of  revision  of  the  children’s  individual  care 
plans once in six months.  
 
As a result of the care planning, significant progress has been made in strengthening contact 
with  the  children’s  parents.  Two  children  (siblings)  made  the  first  contact  since  placement 
with  their  family  in  cooperation  with  their  CSW  and  visited  their  family  accompanied  by 
Komanski Most care staff. Another child also made the first contact since placement with the 
child’s  mother,  who  is  now  visiting  her  child  regularly.  In  the  case  of  two  more  children, 
contact with the parent/sibling intensified.   
 
A  draft  operational  plan  of  transformation  of  the  children’s  pavilion  was  developed  and 
shared  with  MoLSW,  and  in  parallel  UNDP  and  UNICEF  supported  MoLSW  in  developing 
the draft plan of transformation of the adult pavilions through a Delivering as One initiative (in 
2011/12 by UNDP with the support of UNICEF, which was adopted in late 2013).  
 
 
17 

 
In  accordance  with  MoLSW  plans,  Komanski  Most  is  now  an  institution  for  adults  with 
learning  disabilities,  and  the  children’s  pavilion  closed  in  2014.  Unfortunately,  due  to  the 
delays in the establishment of alternative services for children in Komanski Most, the closure 
of the pavilion cannot be ascribed to a deinstitutionalization process in line with international 
standards. Namely,  there were ten children in the Children’s pavilion  when the “Child Care 
System Reform” was launched, of which five children aged out over time and moved to the 
adult  pavilions  in  late  2013/early  2014.  MoLSW  and  the  institution  made  the  decision  to 
transfer  young  adults  from  the  Children’s  pavilion  to  the  adult  pavilions,  in  order  to  ensure 
safety  of  the  children  still  resident  in  the  Children’s  pavilion  and  this  was  monitored  by 
UNICEF. One child passed away during the 2012 influenza outbreak. Two children who will 
turn  18  in  2014  and  2015  respectively  (the  latter  has  a  sibling  who  is  already  in  the  adult 
pavilion) also moved to the adult pavilion but they now spend full day at the Resource Centre 
“1st  June”  instead  of  attending  morning  classes  only.  Two  youngest  children  moved  to the 
Resource Centre “Podgorica”, and their progress was assessed very positively by a team of 
international experts who were engaged to provide training on the preparation of children for 
changing placement (see activity 3.3.3.). It is possible that they will be residents of the first 
small group home to become functional in the first half of 2015 (see activity 3.3.3.). 
 
3.3.2.  Transformation  of  ‘Mladost’  Bijela  Institution  for  Children  without  Parental 
Care  
 
The Children’s Home “Mladost” in Bijela for children without parental care is the largest child 
care institution in Montenegro hence its transformation is inextricably linked to the reform of 
the entire system.  
 
The  beginning  of  the  “Child  Care  System  Reform”  initiative  coincided  with  the  process  of 
drafting  the  Master  Plan  of  Transformation  of  Child  Protection  Services  led  by  the  NGO 
Lumos  in  partnership  with  UNICEF  and  the  Government  of  Montenegro.  The  draft  Master 
Plan  was  developed  in  an  intersectoral  workshop  held  in  March  2011  based  on  an 
assessment of the system conducted in 2010, and was presented to an intersectoral group 
of stakeholders in September 2011 with mixed success. This was followed by study visits to 
the United Kingdom organized for representatives of the education sector (in late 2011) and 
social  welfare  sector  (in  May  2012),  funded  by  Lumos.  Unfortunately  the  Plan  was  not 
adopted for several reasons, mostly due to the fact that the Plan was overly ambitious while 
the capacities of the system were too weak at the time, which resulted in weak ownership of 
the  process  especially  on  the  part  of  the  MoLSW.  The  draft  Master  Plan  did  however 
intensify  the  debate  on  deinstitutionalization  and  influenced  the  course  of  the  reform,  and 
was used, along with the assessment of the system conducted in 2010, as a valuable source 
of information for consultants engaged in the process of the reform.  
 
UNICEF subsequently focused efforts on advocating for and supporting the development of 
the Operational Plan of Transformation (OPT) of the Children’s Home “Mladost”. A draft OPT 
of  the  children’s  home was developed  by  a  working group consisting  of representatives of 
the  MoLSW,  the  Institution  and  CSW  and  with  the  support  of  UNICEF  international 
consultant in the period July 2013 – March 2014. The OPT is based on the initial draft plan 
developed  by  the  Institution  representatives  and  an  advisor  from  the  MoLSW  in  2012, 
demonstrating  commitment  and  ownership  by  the  Institution  of  the  transformation  process. 
MoLSW committed to finalizing the plan in autumn 2014.  
 
Even though the OPT has not yet been adopted and hence implemented, there has been a 
significant reduction in the number of children in Bijela. There were 154 children in 2010, 116 
children  at  the  end  of  2013,  and  96  in  July  2014.  The  number  of  children  aged  0-3  was 
steady  between  2008  and  2011  averaging  at  25  children  resident  in  a  year,  subsequently, 
the  number  began  decreasing  dramatically,  with  only  4  children  aged  0-3  placed  in  July 
 
18 

 
2014.  This  reduction  is  due  to  the  reduced  admissions  (by  20%),  increased  level  of 
discharge,  intense  capacity  building  of  CSWs (see  activities  3.2.2,  3.2.3.,  3.3.5  and  3.3.7.) 
and  key  staff  from  Bijela  (involved  in  a  number  of  activities  including  in  relation  to  the 
development and promotion of foster care and prevention of institutionalization)  and above 
all growing awareness, understanding and commitment to deinstitutionalization at all levels. 
The  interministerial  conference  held  in  November  2012  in  Sofia,  organized  by  UNICEF 
regional Office and OHCHR, and the national conference on deinstitutionalization organized 
as  part  of  the  “Child  Care  System  Reform”  in  July  2013  provided  opportunities  for  the 
Government of Montenegro to publicly reaffirm commitment to deinstitutionalization.  
 
The  “Child  Care  System  Reform”  envisaged  upgrading  the  process  of  supporting  older 
children graduating from the institution “Mladost”, and more broadly from formal care, based 
on the recognition that leaving care is a particularly sensitive and challenging for youth, and 
that youth in Montenegro leave care insufficiently prepared for independent life (according to 
MoLSW and child rights NGOs). Unfortunately this activity was not implemented due to the 
difficulties in recruiting adequate technical support and tight deadlines for the deliverables as 
the  project  was  nearing  its  end.  This  activity  has  been  postponed  for  autumn  2014,  to  be 
carried out under IPA 2014. 
 
Annex: Draft Operational Plan of Transformation of ‘Mladost’ Bijela. 
 
3.3.3.  Support to the Establishment of Small Group Homes for Children  
 
A small group home (SGH) is an alternative to large  scale institutions for children requiring 
residential  care,  with  the  purpose  to  provide  adequate  care  in  a  family-like  setting,  in  an 
open community, and with more focused attention of the carers in a smaller group, resulting 
in  greater  chances  that  children  will  be  prepared  to  the  highest  possible  extent  for 
independent life and be able to develop to their full potential. 
 
The first SGH in Montenegro was constructed in April 2014 in Bijelo Polje, with the financial 
assistance of the EUCOM through the American Embassy in Montenegro. UNICEF provided 
support to MoLSW in finalizing the proposal for the construction of the SGH and in gathering 
the necessary legal documentation for the construction to begin. Also, under the “Child Care 
System Reform” the SGH was equipped. The SGH unfortunately did not become operational 
by the end of the initiative, officially due to the local elections in 2014 and the inability to hire 
staff. However, the commitment to the establishment of SGHs  should certainly be stronger 
(please refer to the “Chal enges” section). The Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) on the 
financing of the SGH was not signed between the local authorities and MoLSW by the end of 
the  project,  but  only  in  December  2014.  Under  the  continuation  of  the  reform  (IPA  2014) 
UNICEF will monitor the situation to ensure that the SGH becomes operational as  early as 
possible. In addition, UNICEF has agreed with MoLSW and UNDP to allocate a part of the 
funding that MoLSW transferred to UNDP for the continuation of the reform, for the training 
of SGH staff, or any additional needs such as the development of internal procedures or the 
preparation  of  children  for  the  move.  UNICEF  held  a  preliminary  meeting  with  the  CSW 
Bijelo  Polje  concerning  the  possible  residents  of  the  SGH  in  Bijelo  Polje  based  on  the 
children’s  individual  care  plans.  UNICEF  will  also  invest  efforts  in  advocacy  for  the 
identification of the locations where additional SGHs can be constructed (unfortunately only 
one  SGH,  rather  than  two  as  initially  planned,  was  secured  under  the  “Child  Care  System 
Reform”).  
 
It is worth noting that in 2012 and 2013, UNICEF supported with own resources CSWs’ visit 
to Montenegrin children residing in Serbian institutions, with the support of an international 
expert  (for  the  first  visit)  as  well  as  the  local  long-term  project  consultant  (for  the  first  and 
second visit) and accompanied by a representative of the MoLSW. Children’s individual care 
 
19 

 
plans were revised, and it is expected that some of these children will be placed in the first 
SGH.  As  in  the  case  of  Komanski  Most  children  (Activity  3.3.1.)  significant  progress  has 
been made in terms of re-establishing contact between children and their families and one 
child  eventually  returned  to  her  family  in  April  2014.  However,  the  commitment  to 
deinstitutionalizing children from Serbia is not uniformly shared within the MoLSW. 
 
In  June  2014,  a  team  of  international  experts  were  engaged  to  provide  support  to  CSWs 
staff  in  the  preparation  of  children  changing  placement  in  the  light  of  the  changes  in 
placement of some children until then and MoLSW’s future plans on deinstitutionalization (in 
the form of a three day training and hands-on support provided to the carers of children who 
recently  changed  placement).  A  one  day  workshop  was  also  held  for  the  members  of  the 
local Commission for Orientation of Children with Special Educational Needs.  
 
Annex: Photos of the SGH.    
 
3.3.4.  Support to the Establishment of a Network of Day Care Centres for Children 
with Disabilities 
 
Day  care  centres  (DCCs)  are  local  services  where  children  with  severe  disabilities  can 
benefit  from  a  professional  therapeutic  environment  during  working  hours,  while  living  with 
their families, where they belong. 
 
 
Significant  support  was  provided  to  the  network  of  DCCs  across  Montenegro.  In  terms  of 
training, the basic training on DCC functioning was organized for: Pljevlja (in partnership with 
the local association of parents of children with disability “Ray of Hope”) Igalo in Herceg Novi 
municipality (in partnership  with the DCC), Plav, Ulcinj, Berane and Cetinje (between 2011 
and  2014),  and  advanced  training  on  DCC  functioning  was  provided  to  selected 
representatives of all functional DCCs in June 2014. Selected staff from “Mladost” institution 
took part in some of these training sessions upon request of MoLSW. It is worth noting that 
additional training outside of this project was provided to several DCCs on autism (those that 
were functional at the time). 
 
As regards the provision of equipment, it was procured for the following DCCs: Pljevlja and 
Niksic (sensory rooms), Plav, Mojkovac, Cetinje and Podgorica (virtually fully equipped). The 
following  diagram  maps  the  functional  DCCs,  all  of  which  were  supported  in  one  way  or 
another  during  the  “Child  Care  System  Reform”.  Joint  training  sessions  also  provided 
opportunities for the networking between DCCs.  
 
 
20 


 
 
 
Unfortunately the DCC in Mojkovac did not become operational during the initiative,  due to 
the local elections in 2014 and the inability to hire staff, according to the local authorities and 
MoLSW. Under the continuation of the reform (IPA 2014) UNICEF will monitor the situation 
to ensure that the DCC becomes operational as early as possible. In addition, UNICEF has 
agreed with MoLSW and UNDP to allocate a part of the funding that MoLSW transferred to 
UNDP  for  the  continuation  of  the  reform,  for  the  training  of  staff  of  DCCs  which  are  to  be 
established in the forthcoming period (please see above map). 
 
Finally, as per the decision of the Project Steering Committee, a significant portion of funds 
originally intended for supporting child protection services within the Social Innovation Fund 
(see activity 3.3.6.) was allocated to the renovation of the premises to serve as the DCC in 
Podgorica.  A  MoU  between  MoLSW,  the  Capital  City,  UNDP  and  UNICEF  was  signed  in 
early  2014,  spelling  out  the  contributions  and  responsibilities  of  each  party  (UNICEF  using 
EU  funding,  MoLSW  also  contributed  with  funding  to  be  administered  by  UNDP,  UNDP 
made a financial contribution, and the Capital City made non-monetary contributions). During 
the process of renovation, additional expenses emerged, most of which have been covered 
(please refer to the minutes of  5th, 6th, 7th, 8th and 9th Project Steering Committee meetings 
enclosed  with  this  report).  Under  the  continuation  of  the  reform  (IPA  2014)  UNICEF  will 
monitor  the  situation  to  ensure  that  the  DCC  becomes  operational  as  early  as  possible 
(expected  in  January  2015  as  the  construction  and  equipping  was  finalised  in  December 
2014).  
 
It is worth noting that the number of children  and youth  with disabilities in DCCs increased 
more than four times between 2009 – 2012 (from 30 in 2009 to 126 in July 2014). 
 
Annex: MoU between MoLSW, the Capital City, UNDP and UNICEF on the rehabilitation of 
the premises to serve as the DCC in Podgorica. 
 
21 

 
 
3.3.5.  Promotion and Implementation of fostering  
 
While  kinship  care  has  been  relatively  widespread  in  Montenegro,  non-kin  foster  care  was 
extremely rare until the “Child Care System Reform”, hence significant efforts needed to be 
invested in promoting this type of family based care. 
 
In 2011, an international expert was engaged by UNICEF to support the working group in the 
development of the Strategy on the Development of Foster Care in Montenegro 2012-2016. 
Following  two  intense  workshops  held  in  November  2011  and  February  2012  the  text  was 
finalized and the Strategy adopted in March 2012, and presented to over 50 stakeholders in 
June  2012.  The  expert  also  provided  valuable  inputs  to  the  new  Law  on  Social  and  Child 
Protection which was being drafted at the time, in order to enhance the legal framework for 
the  development  of  foster  care  (introducing  various  types  of  foster  care  services, 
standardization  of  foster  care,  licensing  of  foster  carers  and  improved  benefits  for  foster 
carers), in line with the specific objectives of the Strategy. 
 
As  part  of  the  implementation  of  the  Strategy,  a  team  of  five  international  experts  were 
engaged  to  deliver  basic  training  on  fostering  consisting  of  5  modules  (promotion  of  foster 
care, contemporary approaches to foster care, foster care standards, assessing prospective 
foster  families  and  assessing  children’s  needs).  The  first  two  modules  were  delivered  to a 
wider  profile  and  greater  number  of  professionals  (approximately  70,  including 
representatives  of  relevant  ministries,  municipal  authorities,  all  CSWs,  and  civil  society) 
while  the  latter  ones  targeted  social  welfare  professionals.  The  whole  training  programme 
was  delivered  between  July  and  November  2012.  Subsequently,  in  February  2013,  an 
advanced  training  for  selected  CSW  professionals  was  delivered  in  three  sessions.  As  a 
result,  23  CSW  and  2  MoLSW  professionals  became  trainers  of  foster  families,  and  were 
awarded certificates in June 2013. In June 2014, the certified CSWs professionals took part 
in  two-day  interactive  workshops  on  training  foster  families  including  practical  workshops 
with  current  and  prospective  kinship  and  non-kin  foster  carers.  During  those  sessions  the 
preparation  of  children  for  foster  care  was  identified  as  an  issue,  hence  a  training  on  this 
topic will be organized for CSW and “Mladost” representatives during the continuation of the 
reform (IPA 2014). 
 
Also, during the continuation of the reform (IPA 2014), specialized training will be provided to 
CSWs  professionals  on  the  different  types  of  foster  care  introduced  by  the  Law  on  Social 
and  Child  Protection  2013,  namely:  foster  care  with  intensive  support  (frequently  called 
specialized foster care), emergency foster care, and respite foster care.  
 
In addition to the training of professionals, it is worth noting that the bylaw on foster care was 
adopted in 2014 (see 3.1.2.), that the Guide for foster carers was developed and published 
in July 2014 (to be used in training foster carers), and that guidelines for CSW professionals 
for  the  implementation  of  the  foster  care  bylaw  were  developed  in  July  2014  and  finalized 
and shared with the CSWs in autumn 2014.  
 
Details  on  the  implementation  of  campaign  “Every  child  needs  a  family”  are  described  in 
activity 3.3.7. below. 
 
Annex:  Strategy  on  the  Development  of  Foster  Care  in  Montenegro  2012-2016  (in 
Montenegrin language); draft guidelines for CSW professionals for the implementation of the 
foster  care  bylaw  (in  Montenegrin  language);  The  Guide  for  foster  carers  (in  Montenegrin 
language) can be downloaded from http://www.unicef.org/montenegro/media_9983.html. 
 
22 

 
 
 
3.3.6.  Support to the establishment of child protection services  
 
The  shift  from  institutional  to  community-based  care  requires  the  development  of  a 
continuum of sustainable and inclusive child protection services at the local level. 
 
In July 2011, two UNDP and two UNICEF project team members undertook a study visit to 
Serbia  to  learn  about  their  experience  in  piloting  the  Social  Innovation  Fund,  a  grant 
mechanism  supporting  innovative  service  provision  at  the  local  level.  Following  the  visit, 
UNICEF  project  team  members  participated  in  the  short  listing  of grant proposals for  adult 
services in the three rounds administered by UNDP in 2011, 2012 and 2013. 
 
Echoing  UNICEF’s  concerns  about  the  sustainability  of  the  supported  services,  it  was 
recommended  by  the  Mid-term  Evaluation  of  the  project  (see  relevant  section  below),  and 
subsequently agreed by the Project Steering Committee in March 2013 (5th meeting) to use 
the  funding  originally  envisaged  for  SIF  grants  (120,000  EUR)  for  the  development  of 
sustainable  child  protection  services  identified  as  priority  by  the  MoLSW.  At  the  Project 
Steering Committee held in November 2013, it was decided that 70,000 EUR of the amount 
envisaged for this budget line would be used for the rehabilitation of facilities which will serve 
as the Day Care Centre for children with disabilities in Podgorica, while MoLSW would cover 
the  rest  of  the  expenses  (see  3.3.4.).  In  the  end,  due  to  additional  unforeseen  expenses, 
UNICEF  contributed  with  approximately  110,000  EUR  (based  on  the  Project  Steering 
Committee approval, see minutes of the 8th and 9th meeting).  
 
3.3.7.  Promotion  and  awareness  raising  activities  on  the  overall  reform  process 
and on social inclusion and family and community-based services     
 
Special attention was paid to promoting and raising awareness of  the  general  public about 
the overall reform process and family based care in particular in order to promote the social 
inclusion of some of most vulnerable children in Montenegrin society
.  
Events  organized  within  this  initiative  were  covered  by  the  media  (print,  electronic, 
television), and/or published on the UNICEF Montenegro website and Facebook and Twitter 
pages.  However,  most  resources  and  efforts  were  invested  in  the  mass  campaign  “Every 
Child Needs a Family”.  
 
The campaign was planned to take place in the fall 2012, however, it had to be postponed 
for 2013 due to the parliamentary elections which were held in October 2012 (also meaning 
that  the  new  Government  was  established  in  only  December  2012),  and  the  delay  in  the 
finalization  of  the  Law  on  Social  and  Child  Protection  which  was  seen  as  key  and  a 
prerequisite for the success of the campaign (see Activity 3.3.5.). The campaign was hence 
implemented  between  September  2013  and  January  2014.  It  was  launched  by  the  Prime 
Minister  of  Montenegro,  Head  of  the  EU  Delegation  and  UNICEF  Montenegro 
Representative on 19th September 2013. 
 
CSWs were instrumental in the implementation of the campaign, having organized in total 48 
open days in all municipalities  across Montenegro.  Some open days had special guests or 
contributors,  such  as  the  famous  British  actor  Mr.  Nicholas  Lyndhurst  (visit  funded  by 
UNICEF  using  other  funds),  the  internationally  renowned  professor  of  forensic  and  child 
psychology Prof dr Kevin Browne, the famous Montenegrin singers Mr. Sergej Cetkovic and 
Ms. Nina Zizic, UNICEF Montenegro Goodwill Ambassador Rambo Amadeus, and UNICEF 
high level officials (UNICEF Regional Director for CEE/CIS Ms. Poirier and UNICEF Deputy 
Executive Director Ms. Gupta, whilst UNICEF Montenegro representative visited at least one 
open  day  in  each  municipality).  As  for  child  participation,  during  the  campaign  20  children 
 
23 

 
participated in the making of so called One-Minute Juniors on the right of the child to a family 
environment. The most successful of these short films have been shown at  various events 
during  the  campaign,  including  open  days.  In  addition,  28  kinship  carers  or  non-kin  foster 
carers and 16 young people who used to be fostered participated in the open days in order 
to share their compelling personal stories. 
 
The results of the campaign, which was assessed as very successful, were presented in a 
special event hosted by the Prime Minister of Montenegro at Vila Gorica on 31st March 2013. 
The  so-called  Knowledge,  Attitudes  and  Practices  (KAP)  surveys  implemented  on  a 
nationally  representative  sample  before  and  after  the  campaign  (in  December  2012  and 
January 2014) demonstrated positive changes in attitudes of inhabitants toward foster care 
as opposed to placement in an institution: four out of five people in Montenegro now believe 
that it is better for a child without parental care to be placed in a foster family rather than in 
an institution. The number of children in foster care has been increasing with 321 children in 
kinship care and 35 children in non-kin foster care in July 2014 (compared to only 9 children 
in  non-kin  foster  care  in  2010).  This  number  continued  growing,  thus  in  December  2014 
there were 329 in kinship care and 42 children in non-kin foster care. 
 
Further  efforts  will  be  invested  in  the  future  in  the  recruitment  of  foster  families  in  order  to 
reach the target  set out in the  Strategy on the Development of  Foster  Care in Montenegro 
(July  2014:  27  non-kin  foster  families,  December  2014:  31,  target  by  the  end  of  2016:  55 
families).  
 
 
 
 
24 

 
I  am  a  foster  carer.  I  would  like  to  tell  you  something  about  myself  and  what 
motivated me to become a foster carer.  
I am a teacher. I have worked with children for many years and gave them my 
love  and  respect  unselfishly  because  “love  gives  strength  to  children”  and  children 
have to be our priority above anything else. In front of the Centre for Social Work which 
is in my neighbourhood, I would often see unhappy children, torn between their moms 
and dads and their pain was hard for me, but this feeling culminated one day when I 
was watching a TV show on children without parental care. 
Namely,  the  journalist  asked  the  children  “What  would  you  like  to  get  from 
Santa  Claus?”  One  child  responded  “Mom  and  dad!”  Deeply  moved  by  this  child’s 
wish,  with  tears  in  my  eyes,  I  watched  the  children  eating  cake,  smeared  on  their 
faces, yet they had a sad look in their eyes and no joy. I immediately thought of taking 
one  child  into  care.  However,  my  son  convinced  me  to  take  two  children  by  saying 
“Wel , mom, you of all people should know how difficult it is to grow up alone.” (I was 
the only child to my parents, my son is an only child as well). I accepted his suggestion 
and for quite some time I’ve been waking up happy knowing that I have made two lives 
happier, that I have provided kindness and love, which is given back to me in return as 
wel . After all, is there anything nicer than being told “you are our love, joy, happiness 
and thank you for taking us from the [children’s] home”. I have enriched my life and the 
life of my family and made friends with children whom I hadn’t known before. Seeing 
them  grow  up  happy  in  a  loving  family  environment  is  what  makes  me  fulfilled  and 
happy. I will now tell you a short story:  
After a sunny day, a strong wind made the waves cast out thousands of fish on 
the hot sand. The fish helplessly try to get back into the sea. Two man are passing by 
and one of them says: “What a pity, so many fish wil  die”. The other one, approaching 
him,  bends  down  and  throws  something  into  the  sea.  When  they  meet  the  first  one 
says: “Excuse me, I see you are throwing the fish back into the sea, but you cannot 
save them  all”.  The  other  man  replies,  while  throwing  the fish back  into  the  sea  and 
walking: “I cannot save them all, but these I can.”  
Nada, foster carer,  
excerpt from her speech at the launch of “Every child needs a family” 
September 2013 
 
Media 
releases 
concerning 
the 
fostering 
campaign 
can 
be 
accessed 
at 
http://www.unicef.org/montenegro/15868_24752.html.  
 
The table below shows the current status in the achievement of the expected results against 
OVIs. 
 
Expected  result  3.1:  Capacity  of  professionals  in  the  child  care  sector  is  enhanced 
and vulnerable children and families have increased access to quality inclusive family 
and community-based services;  
Expected  result  3.2:  The  general  public  is  increasingly  aware  and  sensitized  on  the 
child care system reform, social inclusion and family and community-based care.
 
OVI - 100 % of children in Komanski Most de-institutionalized by July 2014  
Status – The Children’s pavilion closed, however, the children did not move to alternative services in line with the 
principles of deinstitutionalization. Target partially achieved.  
30 % of children from ‘Mladost’ Bijela aged 0-3 de-institutionalised by July 2014 (baseline: 28 children in 2010, 
i.e. before the project start) 
20 % of children from ‘Mladost’ Bijela aged over 3 de-institutionalised by July 2014 (baseline: 126 children in 
2010, i.e. before the project start). 
The number of children aged 0-3 has decreased by 86% since 2010, whilst the number of children aged 3 and 
 
25 


 
above has decreased by 27% compared to the baseline. Target achieved.  
 
 
  
100% increase in the number of children attending Day care centres by July 2014 (baseline: 53 children in 2010, 
i.e. before the project start). 
The number of children and youth attending day care centres has increased by 140% since 2010 (from 53 
children in 2010 to 126 in July 2014). There are eight operational DCCs across Montenegro: Bijelo Polje, Niksic, 
Herceg Novi, Pljevlja, Plav, Ulcinj, Cetinje and Berane (Mojkovac DCC will be operational soon). Target achieved. 
At least 2 Small Group homes established and operational by July 2014. 
The first small group home was constructed and furnished but has not yet become operational. Target partially 
achieved. 
At least 300% increase in the number of non-kin foster families identified and trained by July 2014 (baseline: 5 
foster families in 2010). 
The number of non-kin foster families has increased by 22 families or by 440% compared to the baseline (there 
were 27 non-kin foster families in July 2014). Target achieved. 
 
 
26 


 
 
 
Improved health and development of children participating in the de-institutionalization process by July 2014 
(documented in individual care plans). 
Improved health and development of children has been observed and documented through the regular revision of 
individual care plans, as a result of training of staff, introduction of new work methods, provision of specialized 
equipment, renewed contact with children’s families etc. Target achieved.  
More than 60% of people think that children should be placed in a foster family rather than in an institution after 
the fostering campaign. 
At least 60% citizens noticed the campaign “Every child needs a family”, by January 2014. 
Campaign implemented. 83% people think that children should be placed in a foster family rather than in an 
institution after the fostering campaign. 87% citizens noticed the campaign “Every child needs a family”, by 
January 2014. 
 
Visibility Activities 
 
The “Child Care System Reform” project paid special attention to ensuring EU and UNICEF 
visibility.  
 
High  level  representatives  of  the  EU  Delegation  participated  in  a  number  of  special  events 
and  press  conferences organized  within  the  project,  most  notably  the  launch  of  the  project 
(held on 22nd February 2011), roundtables on the Law on Social and Child Protection (held 
in May 2011 and February 2012), presentation of the Strategy for the Development of Foster 
Care  in  Montenegro  (June  2012),  mid-term  review  roundtable  (November  2012),  launch  of 
the  Child  Protection  Database  (March  2013),  launch  of  the  campaign  “Every  child  needs  a 
family” (September 2013) and presentation of the campaign results (March 2014) hosted by 
the Prime Minister of Montenegro. 
 
In the opening remarks at all events (public events or closed such as training sessions and 
meetings), implementing partners  and basic information  about the Project were mentioned, 
and  partners’  logos  (including  EU  flag)  as  well  as  the  title  of  the  project  were  used  on 
banners  at  events  as  well  as  on  invitation  letters  and  accompanying  agendas.  Brief 
information  about  the  implementing  partners  and  the  Project  were  outlined  in  vacancies 
advertised in daily press and on UNICEF Montenegro website.  
 
27 

 
 
Folders and notepads with all implementing partners’ logos as well as the title of the project 
were  designed,  printed  and  disseminated  at  all  events,  while  stickers  with  EU  logo  were 
printed for the equipment procured through the Project (Project office, the Institute for Social 
and  Child  Protection,  a  number  of  day  care  centres  and  the  Small  Group  Home  in  Bijelo 
Polje).  The  project  office  plaque  was  designed  and  posted  on  several  locations  in  the 
building  where  the  Project  Office  was  located  (between  April  2011  and  May  2014).  EU 
templates  for  communication  products  have  been  followed  and  shared  with  the  EU 
Delegation and the beneficiary (primarily the MoLSW) for approval prior to being used. 
 
Particular  attention  was  paid  to  EU  visibility  during  the  mass  media  campaign  “Every  child 
needs  a family”,  implemented  between September  2013  and January  2014,  with a special 
event showcasing the results of the campaign held in March 2014. Visibility activities, aside 
from the two high level press conferences included press releases, broadcasting of a video 
spot  on  all  TV  stations  in  Montenegro  (free  of  charge),  printing  of  leaflets  explaining  what 
foster  care  is,  publishing  of  the  Guide  for  foster  carers,  organization  of  48  open  days  by 
centres for social work across Montenegro, where EU visibility guidelines were respected. 
 
In total 2,116 media reports were published about the “Child Care System Reform” between 
10 January 2011 and 10 July 20148, as shown in the graph below: 
 
Number of media reports per year 2011-2014 Jul
958
444
454
260
Year 2011
Year 2012
Year 2013
01.01.-10.07.2014
 
Not surprisingly, most media reports were published during 2013 and 2014 as a result of the 
campaign “Every child needs a family”. During the reporting period, most media reports were 
published in print media, followed by television, and then online media, as shown in the chart 
below: 
 
                                            
8 Charting report developed by Arhimed in September 2014, which included the following media: televisions 
(TVCG, TV Vijesti, Atlas, Pink M, Prva, Montena, MBC), print media (Vijesti, Dan, Pobjeda, Dnevne novine, 
Blic Crna Gora, Vecernje novosti, Monitor), and online media (Café del Montenegro, Analitika, Bankar.me). 
Each media report is counted on its own right (even if several media agencies report about the same news/topic).  
 
28 


 
 
During the implementation of “Child Care System Reform”, 22 stories about the reform (both 
in  Montenegrin  and  English)  were  published  on  the  UNICEF  Montenegro  website.  When 
Facebook  posts  are  added  to  this  figure,  the  total  number  of  web  stories  and  Facebook 
posts was 90. 
 
 
Finally,  the joint  work of  the  Government and the UN system  in  Montenegro in the area of 
social welfare and child care system reform, was effectively presented and communicated to 
the EU counterparts through the joint presentation of UNICEF and UNDP Representatives, 
together with the Montenegrin Chief Negotiator in February 2014 in Brussels.   
Annexes: Media Coverage Report, visibility material, photos, links, etc.  
 
 
 
Mid-term and final evaluations of the project  
 
During  the  implementation  of  the  “Child  Care  System  Reform”,  a  mid-term  evaluation 
(November/December 2012) and final evaluation (May 2014) were conducted.  
 
 
The mid-term evaluation covered components 2 and 3 of the Social Inclusion Project (“Social 
Welfare  Reform”  and  “Child  Care  System  Reform”)  and  was  conducted  by  a  high  level 
international  expert  during  November/December  2012  with  the  aim  to  provide 
recommendations for  the  most  effective  continuation  of the  project  and the  reform  process 
based  on  an  assessment  of  the  implementation  of  the  two  components  to  date.  More 
specifically, the mid-term evaluation: 
1)  Assessed the relevance of the intervention, the progress against planned results and 
objectives,  and the  expected  sustainability  of  project  benefits  beyond  the  lifetime of 
the project; 
2)  Provided reflections on the system’s capacity to manage, implement and monitor the 
reform process; 
3)  Identified good practices, lessons learned and gaps in the approaches to the reform; 
4)  Provided  recommendations  for  potential  improvements  in  the  project  until  its 
finalization,  as  well  as  recommendations  concerning  the  continuation  of  the  reform 
processes beyond this project. 
 
 
29 

 
In  addition  to  conducting  interviews  with  stakeholders,  a  mid-term  review  roundtable  was 
held  on  27  November  2012,  in  which  more  than  70  project  stakeholders  participated  and 
unanimously agreed that the project is highly relevant for Montenegro and that the reform of 
the  social  and  child  protection  system  must  continue  in  the  coming  years.  Based  on  the 
findings  of  the  report9  finalized  in  early  2013,  UNDP  and  UNICEF  requested  no-cost 
extension of their components by 12 months, which was granted by EUD in April 2013. 
 
The final  evaluation  covered  only  component  3 of the  Social  Inclusion  Project  (“Child  Care 
System Reform”) and was conducted by an international agency specializing in evaluations 
in the spring 2014, with the  purpose to evaluate its final results. More specifically, the final 
evaluation: 
1)  Provided  feedback  to  UNICEF  Montenegro  and  counterparts  on  the  relevance, 
effectiveness,  efficiency,  impact  and  sustainability  of  the  Project  approach  in 
strengthening the capacities of the Child Care System in implementing the reform for 
the benefit of the most vulnerable and excluded children and families; 
2)  Extracted  general  lessons  learnt  and  recommendations  aimed  at  further 
enhancement of the “Child Care System Reform”; 
3)  Provided  the  EUD  with  information  on  the  impact  of  their  specific  support  to  the 
reform of the system. 
 
Data was collected from project documentation, relevant literature and reference documents, 
interviews  with  key  stakeholders  at  the  national  and  local  levels,  focus  groups,  discussion 
groups and site visits to a representative sample of municipalities. The report10 was finalized 
following  the  final  Project  Steering  Committee  meeting  where  it  was  presented  on  4th  July 
2014.  Like  the  mid-term  evaluation,  the  final  evaluation  found  the  “Child  Care  System 
Reform” extremely relevant for the realities in Montenegro and supported the continuation of 
the reform11.  
 
The Project officially ended on 10 July 2014, but it had been agreed by MoLSW, EUD and 
UN agencies that the reform needed to continue in line with Montenegro’s roadmap for EU 
accession. To this end, a request was submitted by MLSW for further financing of the reform 
by the EU through IPA II modality. In the meantime a funds for bridging period were granted 
by  EUD  in  August  2014  as  “Support  to  Montenegrin  Social  Reform”  (IPA  2014),  with  two 
complementary components: 
1.  Component  1,  implemented  by  MoLSW  and  UNDP,  entitled  “Continuation  of  the 
Social Welfare Reform in Montenegro” (50,000 EUR EU contribution12), 
2.  Component  2,  implemented  by  MoLSW  and  UNICEF,  entitled  “Continuation  of  the 
Child Care  System  Reform  in Montenegro”  (in total  300,000 EUR  with 200,000 EU 
contribution and 100,000 EUR UNICEF contribution).   
 
Annexes:  Final  report  of  the  mid-term  evaluation  of  components  2  and  3  of  the  Social 
Inclusion Project (“Social Welfare Reform” and “Child Care System Reform”) and final report 
                                            
9 Arkadi Toritsyn PhD. 2013. Mid Term Evaluation of the „Social Welfare and Child Care System Reform: 
Enhancing Social Inclusion” Project: Social Welfare and Child Care System Reform Components. Unpublished 
report. 
10 Promeso Consulting Ltd. 2014. Final Evaluation Report (07 July 2014): Final Evaluation of the “Child Care 
System Reform” IPA 2010. Unpublished report. 
11 According to the final evaluation, “external support is crucial for the continuation of reforms especially at 
local level until rights-based foundations of practices and procedures are built and capacities are in place to 
ensure that laws and systems run effectively” (Promeso Consulting Ltd. Ibid. P. 74). 
12 In addition MoLSW will transfer in total 350,000 EUR by 2015 to UNDP for the continuation of the reform 
until December 2015 (see MoLSW press release http://www.minradiss.gov.me/vijesti/138957/SAOPsTENJE-
Nastavak-reforme-sistema-socijalne-i-djecije-zastite.html,
 accessed 4 July 2014). 
 
30 

 
of  the  final  evaluation  of  component  3  of  the  Social  Inclusion  Project  (“Child  Care  System 
Reform”).  
 
 
31 

 
 
2. 

PROJECT METHODOLOGY 
 
 
This action is built upon a decade of efforts of MoLSW to reform the child care system, but 
rather than using a piecemeal approach, this intervention adopted a  systematic approach 
to  the  reform  of  the  system
,  at  the  level  of  policy  and  legislation,  at  the  level  of 
strengthening of the institutional framework including through capacity building, at the level 
of service provision in line with international standards and the level of awareness raising.  
 
A  number  of  activities  were  undertaken  to this  end  with  a  significant  investment  of  human 
and  financial  resources
  (including  UNICEF  non-project  staff  and  resources).  It  is  also 
worth noting that activities that UNICEF has been implementing outside of the framework of 
this project complemented and contributed to the reform of the child care system, including 
the reform of the justice system for children, education system, activities advancing quality in 
the  health  care  system,  support  to  the  development  of  national  policies,  monitoring 
mechanisms, data collection and research etc. 
 
As  anticipated,  a  significant  number  of  project  activities  required  the  provision  of  external 
technical expertise. It has in fact proven necessary to provide more technical expertise than 
initially  anticipated,  with  the  intention  to  contribute  to  building  an  effective  social  protection 
system for children by enabling local professionals to acquire new knowledge and practices 
of work. For instance, selected CSW professionals received certification in family counseling 
and as trainers of foster carers, having attended comprehensive training programmes led by 
two teams of international experts. The case management training  has been delivered to a 
first  group  of  professionals,  in  line  with  the  adopted  bylaws  and  will  also  be  certified  and 
scaled up to cover professionals in all CSWs.  
 
The  provision  of  external  technical  expertise  was  particularly  valuable  for  the  drafting  of 
legislation  and  policy  documents  in  line  with  international  standards,  the  reform  of  the 
institutional  framework  (CSWs  and  the  Institute  for  Social  and  Child  Protection),  capacity 
building  of  professionals,  transformation  of  child  care  institutions,  the  development  of  the 
foster  care  services  and  the  evaluation  of  the  project  progress  and  impact.  Aside from  the 
provision of external technical expertise for specific activities, two consultants (one at senior 
level)  were  engaged  to  assist  the  Ministry  in  the  implementation  of  the  project,  and  an 
additional one as a consultant for activities relating to deinstitutionalization and the provision 
of community based services.  
 
This project has included the provision of essential equipment for the functioning of new 
services,  including  for  the  establishment  of  community  based  services  for  children  without 
parental  care  and  children  with  disabilities  –  day  care  centres  and  the  small  group  home 
service, and the Institute for Social and Child Protection.  
 
Project activities were complemented by a strong communication component. The mass 
media  campaign  promoting  foster  care  “Every  child  needs  a  family”  combined  visits  by 
celebrities, expert presentations on the harm of institutionalization, and practical information 
about  the  national  procedures  for  becoming  foster  carers,  through  print  and  electronic 
media, television and radio, and ceremonial and public events such as open days organized 
by CSWs. 
 
UNICEF key strategy has been to cultivate sustainable partnerships with a wide range of 
stakeholders including policymakers, child care and social work professionals, NGOs and to 
 
32 

 
ensure participation of children (for instance,  the production of One Minute Juniors, activity 
3.3.7.).  UNDP  was  also  a  major  partner  in  this  project  as  the  implementer  of  the  second 
component of the Social Inclusion Project and in the light of some complimentary activities 
(the development of bylaws for instance). The main project partners included: 
  MoLSW, 
  Ministry of Education,  
  Ministry of Health,  
  Centres for Social Work,  
  Children’s Home “Mladost” and other relevant child protection/care institutions, 
  Municipalities, and the Union of Municipalities, 
  The Prime Minister’s cabinet, 
  Ombudsman’s Office of Montenegro, 
  Parliament of Montenegro (relevant Parliamentary Committees), 
  NGOs  (associations  of  parents  of  children  with  disabilities,  Child  Rights  Centre, 
Forum MNE, etc.), 
  UNDP and other UN agencies,  
  Other international organizations, diplomatic representations etc. 
 
To support additional project sustainability, UNICEF has paid particular attention to securing 
and  confirming  clear  ownership  of  the  project  by  its  stakeholders  
–  notably  the 
MoLSW.  This  was  ensured  through  participatory  and  transparent  development,  planning, 
implementation  and  monitoring  of  activities,  the  development  of  consultants’  Terms  of 
Reference and training materials, preparation of lists of participants  in events,  execution of 
concrete  activities  and  sharing  of  consultants’  deliverables  and  reports  and  providing  and 
obtaining feedback. 
 
Furthermore, the MoLSW has had a coordinating role in all activities and has been central to 
providing  overall  policy  directions  for  the  reform  process.  However,  challenges  have  been 
identified in the limited capacity of MoLSW to implement the reform at the pace envisaged by 
the Project (elaborated in Section 3 below).  
 
This project aimed to strengthen inter-sectoral collaboration and coordination between 
the MoLSW, MoES and MoH for the prevention of institutionalization of children deprived of 
parental care and/or children with disabilities and the development of alternative family and 
community-based  services.  This  can  be  exemplified  by  activities  such  as  the  development 
and  signing  of  the  Protocol  on  intersectoral  cooperation  for  the  prevention  of  child 
abandonment
, organization of joint training sessions and the intersectoral workshops for the 
development of the draft Master Plan of Transformation of Child Protection Services.  
 
The  Project  Steering  Committee  meetings  provided  an  important  opportunity  for 
information  exchange  across  sectors  aiming  to  improve  the  quality  of  the  Social  Inclusion 
Project  and  enhance  the  process  of  implementation  of  the  reform  through  monitoring, 
supervision and decision-making. The Committee was composed of representatives of: 
  MoLSW,  
  MoE,  
  MoH,  
  MoF,  
  the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and European Integrations,  
  the Union of Municipalities,  
  EUD,  
  UNICEF and UNDP.  
 
 
33 

 
In total nine Steering Committee meetings were held during project implementation. For the 
purposes  of  monitoring  progress,  MoLSW  and  UNICEF  prepared  briefs  and  documents 
outlining  the  status  of  activities,  the  progress  in  the  achievement  of  results  using  the 
Logframe  indicators  and  a  budget  overview,  prior  to  each  Steering  Committee  meeting.  At 
the  final  Steering  Committee  meeting  it  was  decided  that  the  Steering  Committee  will 
continue to convene in the framework of the continuation of the project under IPA 2014.  
As  outlined  in  the  previous  section,  due  credit  and  visibility  was  given  to  the  EU  for 
contributing  to  this  intervention.  UNICEF  systematically  informed  all  partners  that  funding 
was  provided  by  the  EU.  UNICEF  did  its  utmost  to  promote  the  EU’s  name  and  image  in 
association  with  the  intervention,  in  the  local  press  and/or  on  its  website  and  social  media 
channels. 
Annexes: Minutes of the Project Steering Committee meetings (9 meetings) 
 
 
 
 
 
34 

 
 
3. 

CHALLENGES AND LESSONS LEARNED 
 
Components  213  and  3  of  the  Social  Inclusion  Project  were  due  for  completion  by  10  July 
2013; however a no-cost project extension was granted until 10 July 2014 (Addendum no 1, 
dated 12 April 2013). In addition, in August 2014, a continuation of both components of the 
reform  was  ensured  through  so-called  bridging  -  reserve  funds  of  IPA  2014  for  the  period 
from August 2014 to January 2016. 
 
UNICEF’s commitment to ensuring the government’s full involvement at every stage of the 
process, and to conducting policy making processes in an open and transparent manner has 
meant  that  the  original  timelines  envisaged  for  some  activities  were  over  ambitious,  and  it 
has been necessary to adjust the project’s pace to better reflect the capacity constraints and 
needs of the main stakeholders, i.e. the MoLSW. . In particular, the processes of revision of 
policies  and  legislation  necessitated  the  central  involvement  of  the  MoLSW,  and  limited 
resources  within  that  Ministry  resulted  in  a  relatively  small  number  of  individuals  being 
burdened  with  participation  in  multiple  working  groups  and  drafting  processes,  inevitably 
slowing down the overall workflow of activities and in turn resulting in delays in implementing 
subsequent  activities.  This  refers  in  particular  to  the  Law  on  Social  and  Child  Protection 
which  was  adopted  only  in  May  2013,  finally  creating  the  preconditions  for  the 
implementation  of  other  activities,  such  as  the  development  of  secondary  legislation, 
preparations  for  the  establishment  of  the  Institute  for  Social  and  Child  Protection,  capacity 
building  of  professionals  to  implement  the  new  legal  framework  and  implementation  of  the 
mass media campaign “Every child needs a family”. 
 
Additional delays occurred at the beginning of the project as the inception period coincided 
with  the  Government’s  writing  of  the  Action  Plan  to  meet  the  seven  priorities  for  the 
opening  of  negotiations  for  accession  to  the  European  Union;  during  the  first  two  years  of 
project implementation due to several personnel changes at higher political levels (at the 
MoLSW  and  the  MoH)  and  a  reluctance  by  respective  ministries  to  fully  commit  to  the 
implementation of project activities until replacements were officially installed; in mid-October 
2012  due  to  the  Parliamentary  elections  and  May  2014  due  to  the  local  elections  in  12 
municipalities, when public events could not be organized to avoid the risk of lack of media 
space  or  misuse  of  events for  the  purposes  of election  campaigns  or  when  services  could 
not be established due to the ban on the employment of public servants. 
 
The  numerous  changes  in  the  social  and  child  protection  system  brought  by  the  reform 
proved to be challenging for the rather limited professional capacities in the system. For 
instance,  MoLSW  negotiations  with  the  Secretariat  for  Legislation  significantly  delayed  the 
process of development of bylaws, which were also considerably shortened. In the case of 
the  foster  care  bylaw  a  mitigation  strategy  was  adopted,  namely  to  develop  detailed 
Guidelines  for  CSW  professionals  (a  Guide  for  foster  carers  has  also  been  published). 
UNICEF,  UNDP  and  MoLSW  will  continue  dialogue  on  identifying  the  most  appropriate 
forms of support that can be provided to professionals in the implementation of other bylaws 
and  these  discussions  will  be  joined  by  the  Institute  for  Social  and  Child  Protection  once 
operational.  
 
The  limited  capacity  in  the  social  welfare  sector  in  general  in  the  country  also  became 
apparent  in  the  process  of  recruitment  of  project  team  members,  where  the  senior-level 
consultant  seconded to  MoLSW  was  engaged  only  in  September  2011, following  repeated 
selection  procedures.  However,  the  reform  itself  has  brought  important  contribution  to  the 
                                            
13 Component 2: Social Welfare Reform, implemented by MoLSW and UNDP. 
 
35 

 
capacity  development  in  the  MoLSW  and  across  the  administration  in  a  number  of  critical 
areas from social welfare reform to child care systems reforms and international norms and 
standards in this area. 
 
 
MoLSW  has  over  time  shown  growing  commitment  to  the  overall  reform,  and  this  was 
confirmed  by  the  final  project  evaluation14.  Growing  commitment  to  the  process  of 
deinstitutionalization  in  particular  has  also  been  observed  among  child  protection 
professionals, and also noted by the final project evaluation15. However, the commitment to 
deinstitutionalization
 at the operational levels of MoLSW still appears to be ambivalent. As 
the  final  evaluators  noted,  “in  general,  MoLSW  stronger  push  is  needed  towards  the 
deinstitutionalisation process
”16. This particularly refers to the delays in the finalization of the 
Plan  of  Transformation  of  “Mladost”,  Bijela  and  delays  in  the  development  of  alternative 
community based services such as small group homes (as a result of which the closure of 
the Children’s Pavilion in Komanski Most has not been done in a  fully satisfactory manner, 
and  there  is  still  a  high  proportion  of  children  with  disabilities  in  large  scale  institutions  in 
Montenegro and neighboring countries – Serbia and Bosnia and Herzegovina).  
 
Practical  implementation  of  the  project  has  also  been  hampered  by  the  financial  crisis 
which  has  negatively  impacted  the  development  of  new  services.  New  services  commonly 
require  costly  investments  in  infrastructure  and  the  recruitment  of  new  workforce. This  can 
be  exemplified  by  the  delays  in  the  establishment  of  the  DCCs  despite  strong  MoLSW 
commitment, as well as the small group home (in addition, only one rather than two as was 
envisaged by the project was constructed). Although the government has been able to raise 
funds for the construction works in several cases (e.g. DCCs Cetinje, Berane, Mojkovac and 
partly  for  DCC  Podgorica)  and  the  construction  of  the  SGH  was  funded  by  the  USA 
Embassy,  while  the  project  provided  funds  for  furnishing/equipping  and  a  large  part  of  the 
rehabilitation works on the DCC in Podgorica, reaching agreement with the local authorities 
on the financing of running costs has proven challenging particularly in relation to the SGH in 
Bijelo Polje. Local recruitment procedures and the lack of funding frequently resulted in time 
gaps  between  the  ceremonial  opening  of  a  DCC  and  the  day  it  actually  began  functioning 
(i.e. welcoming children).   
 
The fate  of the Institute  for  Social  and  Child  Protection  was  also  uncertain  for  a  long time, 
due to the reluctance of the MoF to agree to the establishment of this new institution in times 
of  crisis  and  reform  of  public  administration.  In  early  2013  however,  MoLSW  was  able  to 
reach an agreement with MoF on establishing an independent institution rather than a new 
department at the MoLSW.  
 
Related to the financial crisis and the involvement of MoF in the reform process, it has been 
noted  that  MoF  should  have  a  stronger  role  in  the  reform  of  the  social  and  child 
protection system
, by being more accommodating to the transitional costs of the reform of 
                                            
14 “Political commitment for the reform supported by the Project boosted with the appointment of the new 
MoLSW leadership early 2013.
 The new Minister and his team managed to include the setting up of the most-
needed Institute for Social and Child Welfare in the new law adopted in 2013 (which raised long discussions 
and negotiations with the MoF and did not figure in the first draft submitted to the Parliament) and to fundraise 
for the continuation of reform with the Government and the EU, with the full support of NIPAC, UNICEF and 
UNDP”. Source: Promeso Consulting Ltd. Ibid. P. 71 (emphasis in original). 
15 “Most importantly, the capacity building actions, on the background of new legal provisions, rulebooks and 
standards, had a major contribution to the change of mindsets and consequently of attitudes and work practices: 
in the past, the CSWs staff believed that institutionalisation is the best option for children left without parental 
care, a belief which has been reversed with the contribution of the Project”
. Source: Promeso Consulting Ltd. 
Ibid. P. 50 (emphasis in original). 
16 Promeso Consulting Ltd. Ibid. P. 53 (emphasis in original).  
 
36 

 
services and an increase in financial benefits. The new leadership of the MoLSW seems to 
be  more  successful  compared  to  their  predecessor  in  negotiations  with  the  Ministry  of 
Finance (as evidenced  by the establishment of the Institute for  Social and Child Protection 
and  the  budget  line  for  the  development  of  services,  as  wel   as  MoLSW’s  intentions  to 
increase financial benefits once savings are generated through the Social Card)17. 
 
The  health  sector  played  a  more  active  role  in  the  project  particularly  in  inter-sectoral 
activities:  the  development  of  the  Protocol  and  the  training  of  health  and  social  protection 
personnel  on  baby  abandonment.  The  professionals  interviewed  by  the  final  evaluators 
stated that “the Project introduced new ways of thinking in the health sector. Health workers 
are  more  aware  of  their  ‘social’  role,  more  able  to  recognise  the  social  risk  and  better 
networked  with  colleagues  from  other  sectors”18.  Notwithstanding  this  achievement,  more 
work needs to be done to enhance cooperation between the health and the social and child 
protection sectors and to enhance understanding across the health sector of their important 
contribution to the reform of the social and child protection system19. 
 
As  regards  the  involvement  of  another  key  stakeholder,  i.e.  civil  society  organizations, 
they  have  not  participated  in  the  policy  making  process  to  a  satisfactory  extent,  despite 
UNICEF’s calls for stronger representation of civil society in working groups established by 
the  MoLSW.  Non-governmental  organizations  are  important  service  providers  and  their 
stronger involvement in the reform process would be beneficial for the reform, as noted by 
the final evaluation20. 
 
The reform of the social and child protection system has coincided with the introduction 
of the so-called Social Card
 (Social Welfare Information System  - SWIS). This presented 
an  additional  burden  on  the  system  in  particular  on  the  CSWs,  which  have  rather  weak 
capacities,  which  are  undergoing  reorganization  and  which  are  instrumental  to  the 
implementation  of  the  new  legal  framework  (see  Activity  3.2.2.).  UNICEF  is  now  investing 
efforts  in  ensuring  that  the  Child  Protection  database  is  integrated  into  the  Social  Card 
database (the amount of data stored in the Social Card will be larger but key elements of the 
Child Protection database such as indicators and statistics “filters” wil  need to be introduced 
in the Social Card to enable data analysis and monitoring). 
 
It  needs  to  be  noted  that  the  EU  accession  process  has  been  “a  key  facilitating 
factor”21  in  the  implementation  of  the  reform,  and  that  the  involvement  of  the  EU 
Delegation  in  the  project  through  Steering  Committee  Meetings,  at  public  events,  in 
discussions  about  the continuation  of  EU  support  to  the  reform,  and  in  discussions 
with  the  MoLSW,  MoF,  UNDP  and  UNICEF  about  the  Law  on  Social  and  Child 
Protection greatly enhanced the results and impact of the project.  
 
The key lessons learned are as follows: 
 
                                            
17 The so-called “over-rigid formula for budgetary allocations” is not unique to the Montenegrin MoF. The 
multi-country evaluation of the child care system reform in CEE-CIS countries revealed an underdeveloped 
relationship between the Ministry of Finance and the line ministries responsible for child welfare services, 
“which was sub-optimal in a reform environment” (Pluriconsult Ltd. “Child’s Right to a Family Environment: 
Multi country evaluation of results achieved through child care system reform 2005-2012”. Unpublished draft 
evaluation report to UNICEF Regional Office for CEE/CIS, 23 September 2014. P. 52). 
18 Promeso Consulting Ltd. Ibid. P. 48. 
19 In fact, across the CEE-CIS region, coordination with the health sector has been assessed as “not well 
developed” and as “one of the most significant factors hindering more effective and complete reform within the 
child care system” (Pluriconsult Ltd. Ibid. P. 64). 
20 Promeso Consulting Ltd. Ibid. P. 71, also see p. 59. 
21 Promeso Consulting Ltd. Ibid. P. 45-46. 
 
37 

 
1.  Demonstrating flexibility in the design and implementation of the project22 
The  implementation  of  the  mid-term  evaluation  of  the  components  “Social  Welfare 
Reform”  and  “Child  Care  System  Reform”  was  an  important  activity  in  the  project, 
which  provided  a  strategic  moment  of  reflection  on  the  direction  of  the  reform23.  It 
showed  a  clear  need  for  the  continuation  of  the  reform  and  its  recommendations 
were integrated in the request for no-cost extension of the project and the addendum 
of  the  Description  of  the  Action.  For  example,  instead  of  implementing  the  Social 
Innovation  Programme,  UNICEF  redirected  the  envisaged  funds  to  the  support  to 
sustainable  child  protection  services  with  clear  by-in  by  the  Government  and  local 
authorities – most of these funds were redirected to the establishment of the DCC in 
Podgorica.  
 
2.  Adapting to the changes in time schedule 
The delay in the adoption of the Law on Social and Child Protection caused delays in 
the  implementation  of certain  activities,  however,  some  activities  were  implemented 
in parallel to the process of drafting the Law and this in fact proved to be beneficial. 
For instance, the parallel development of the Strategy for the Development of Foster 
Care  in  Montenegro,  the  Strategy  for  the  Development  of  the  Social  and  Child 
Protection System, the draft standards of a number of child protection services and 
the  initial  working  group  sessions  on  the  bylaw  on  CSW  reorganization  and  work 
standards,  provided  important  inputs  to  the  text of  the  Law  and  enabled  coherence 
between  the  legal  and  policy  documents.  This  also  meant  that  during  the 
development of the Law on Social and Child Protection experts in various fields were 
on contract and were able to contribute to the development of the text of the Law. 
 
3.  Recognition  that  the  reform  is  very  demanding  on  the  system  and  requires 
more time 
The  final  evaluation  of  the  project  found  the  project  “commendable for  pushing  the 
reform forward and tackling the system in its complexity”24, however it also expressed 
concern that the project was overly ambitious for the given time frame and the ability 
of  the  system  to  absorb  changes.  It  may  also  be  noted  that  building  ownership  of 
MoLSW  of  the  reform  took  a  long  time  and  the  building  full  commitment  to 
deinstitutionalization  at  all  levels  will  require  additional  work.  In  view  of  the 
aforementioned,  the  no-cost  extension  of  the  project  by  12  months  proved  to  be 
necessary, as well as the continuation of the reform through IPA 2014 to consolidate 
the  achieved  results  and  to  implement  activities  that  were  not  implemented  during 
IPA 2010.  
 
 
 
                                            
22 Also see Promeso Consulting Ltd. Ibid. P. 43 and 90. 
23 Arkadi Toritsyn. Ibid. Also see Promeso Consulting Ltd. Ibid. P. 57. 
24 Promeso Consulting Ltd. Ibid. P. 42. Also see p. 90. 
 
38 

 
FOLLOW UP ACTIONS 
 
The  continuation  of  the  “Social  Welfare  and  Child  Care  System  Reform-Enhancing  Social 
Inclusion”,  reform  proved  to  be  of  outmost  importance  for  consolidation  of  the  reform 
progress and results and has been set as a high priority in the country`s accession process 
to  the  EU.  It  has,  therefore,  been  carefully  planned  and  agreed  among  the  main  project 
partners in a short and long run as follows: 
 
1.  Through  the  Bridging  intervention  (August  2014-January  2016),  which  has  been 
provided from IPA 2014 reserves, and consists of the two components, component 1 
implemented  by  MoLSW  and  UNDP  “Continuation  of  the  Social  Welfare  Reform  in 
Montenegro” and Component 2 implemented by MoLSW and UNICEF “Continuation 
of the Child Care System Reform in Montenegro”.  
 
“Continuation  of  the  Social  Welfare  Reform  in  Montenegro”  is  expected  to  achieve  the 
following  results:  Result  1  –  Leadership,  planning,  implementation  and  monitoring  of 
the reform process strengthened 

By  strengthening  leadership,  programme  and  financial  planning,  implementation  and 
monitoring  of  the  reform  process  by  MoLSW,  MoLSW  will  have  stronger  capacities  for 
managing  the  reform  of  the  system,  increasing  impact  and  sustainability  of  the  initiated 
reform  process.  As  will  be  described  in  the  activities  section  below,  capacity  building  of 
MoLSW is a complex and lengthy process but essential foundations will be laid in the course 
of this intervention. Investing in capacity building of MoLSW was recommended by both the 
mid-term and final evaluation of IPA 2010. 
The achievement of this result will be monitored using the following indicator: 
Indicator 1: At least 80% professionals in the Directorate for Social and Child Protection with 
strengthened  capacity  in  evidence-based  leading,  planning,  implementing  and  monitoring 
the reform process by the end of 2015. 
Data  collected  for  the  purposes  of  monitoring  the  above  indicator  will  be  gender 
disaggregated,  taking  into  account  the  gender  structure  in  MoLSW’s  Directorate  for  Social 
and Child Protection. 
 
Result  2  –  Legislative  and  institutional  framework  strengthened  and  coordination 
enhanced  for  the  provision  of  quality  social  and  child  protection  services  and  to 
prevent institutionalization
 
During IPA 2010, the reform of the legislative and institutional framework have been initiated 
but a significant amount of work remains to be done. The Law on Social and Child Protection 
needs  to  be  fully  operationalized  through  secondary  legislation  to  be  fully  implementable. 
Capacity building of the CSWs who are presently undergoing significant restructuring and of 
the Institute for Social and Child Protection which is yet to become operational are essential 
in order to ensure effective social work interventions and efficient provision of quality social 
and  child  protection  services.  During  IPA  2010,  coordination  between  the  social  welfare, 
education  and  health  sector  has  been  formalized  through  the  protocol  on  intersectoral 
cooperation for the prevention of institutionalization, but further efforts need to be invested to 
ensure its adequate implementation. Notable achievements have been made with regard to 
promoting  non-kin  foster  care,  but  further  efforts  need  to  be  made  to  reach  the  targeted 
number of non-kin foster families and to improve the quality of care in foster care in general. 
 
39 

 
The achievement of this result will be monitored using the following indicators: 
Indicator 1: Three bylaws developed by July 2015. 
Indicator  2:  At  least  80%  professionals  in  the  Institute  for  Social  and  Child  Protection  with 
strengthened  capacity  to  perform  functions  prescribed  by  Law  (in  line  with  training  needs 
assessment) by the end of 2015. 
Indicator 3: At least 100 relevant professionals in centres for social work with strengthened 
capacity in case management25 by the end of 2015. 
Indicator  4:  At  least  100  health  professionals  with  strengthened  capacity  in  communication 
with vulnerable pregnant women/parents by the end of 2015. 
Indicator 5: At least 20 professionals in centres for social work with strengthened capacity in 
the provision of specialised, emergency and respite fostering as per the Law on Social and 
Child Protection by the end of  2015. 
All  data  collected  for  the  purposes  of  monitoring  the  above  indicators  will  be  gender 
disaggregated  (for  Indicators  2,  3,  4  and  5,  however,  it  is  important  to  note  that  the  social 
and child protection sector is female dominated and that a higher ratio of trained females to 
males is to be expected). 
 
Result 3  Increased availability of and access to quality child protection services 
The  child  care  system  reform  implies  significant  changes  in  the  system  response  to  child 
vulnerability, a shift from institutional to community-based care. The prevention of separation 
of children from their families, the prevention of admissions to child care institutions and the 
process  of transformation  of  child  care  institutions  (including finding  alternative  placements 
for  children  currently  resident)  requires  a  continuum  of  child  protection  services  in  order  to 
adequately respond to the diverse needs of children.  
The achievement of this result will be monitored using the following indicators: 
Indicator  1:  At  least  one  service  (socio-educational,  counselling,  therapeutic,  or  crisis 
intervention as an alternative to institutional care) established in “Mladost”, Bijela institution 
by the end of 2015. 
Indicator  2:  One  small  group  home  and  at  least  2  new  day  care  centres  opened  and 
operational by the end of 2015. 
 
As described above, the Government of Montenegro has submitted a proposal for financing 
the  continuation  of  the  social  and  child  care  system  reform  under  IPA  II,  while  this 
intervention  is  seen  as  bridging  the  gap  between  IPA  2010  and  IPA  II,  using  IPA  2012 
reserves.  The  future  reform  of  the  social  and  child  care  system  will  therefore  be  a 
continuation  of  this  intervention.  MoLSW  is  leading  the  reform  process  and  is  the  main 
partner and beneficiary of IPA 2010, Bridging intervention and IPA II if approved, therefore 
securing continuity of the reform. 
 
2.  In  order  to  ensure  continuation  of  the  reform  process  in  the  long  run  and  foster  its 
sustainability  the  Government  of  Montenegro  has  submitted  the  application  for 
continued  EU  assistance  through  IPA  II  funding  (2014-2020)  for  so  called  “Social 
Welfare  and  Child  Care  System  Reform”  
which  has  defined  the  following  results 
that are expected to be achieved by 2020: 
                                            
25 Individual planning, effective implementation and regular monitoring and revision of plans with enhanced 
gatekeeping and referral mechanisms. 
 
40 

 
 
 
Result  1-  Strengthened  capacities  of  social  and  child  protection  system  institutions  for  the 
development  of  social  and  child  protection  services  in  line  with  minimum  standards  as  per 
the new legal framework 
 
Indicator  1:  Professionals  in  charge  of  planning  and  implementing  activities  pertaining  to 
social  policy,  development,  monitoring,  supervision,  evaluation  and  control  of  services  in  3 
institutions  (MLSW  –  Directorate  for  Social  Welfare  and  Child  Protection,  including  the 
Division  for  the  Development  of  Social  Services  in  Municipalities,  Institute  for  Social  and 
Child Protection, Social Inspection) strengthened by end of 2017; 
Indicator 2: Minimum 15 training programmes developed and submitted for accreditation and 
adoption by end of 2017; 
Indicator  3:  Licenses  issued  to  at  least  70%  needed  professionals  in  the  social  and  child 
protection sector by end of 2017; 
Indicator 4: Minimum 30 licenses issued to service providers by end of 2017. 
 
 
 
Result -2
: Priority social and child protection services established and accessible to socially 
vulnerable persons in line with national strategies and local plans for social inclusion  
 
Indicator 1: Coverage of municipalities by social and child protection services increased by 
50% (services supported through the Action); 
Indicator  2:  The  rate  of  children  admitted  to  the  Institution  for  children  without  parental 
care “Mladost”, Bijela decreased by 40% by the end of 2017 (baseline: 25 admissions on 
average  between  2010  and  2013,  target  15  admissions  on  average  between  2014  and 
2017); 
Indicator 3
: By end 2017 Bijela has no children under three years of age and the number 
of children aged three years and above decreased by 45% (baseline 91 at the beginning 
of May 2014, target 50 at the end of 2017); 
Indicator  4:  By  end  2016  additional  family    and  community  based  services  established 
resulting in: 40% increase in the number of children in.non-kin care (baseline 30 children 
in  May  2014,  target  50  children  by  the  end  of  2017),  60%  increase  in  the  number  of 
children in Day Care Centres for children with disabilities (target 69 children aged up to 18 
at  the  end  of  May  2014,  target  109  at  the  end  of  2017);  at  least  15  children  placed  in 
SGHs by end 2017 (baseline 0 in May 2014). 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
41 

 
4. 
FINANCIAL UTILIZATION  
 
 
The final financial report against the contractual budget is attached. 
 
42 

 
LIST OF ANNEXES 
 
 
3.1.1. The Law on Social and Child Protection (in English language, unofficial translation). 
3.1.2. Secondary legislation on professional activities in the social and child protection sector 
(in English language, unofficial translation); secondary legislation on the organization of 
CSWs (in English language, unofficial translation); secondary legislation on foster care (in 
English language, unofficial translation); secondary legislation on shelters and emergency 
reception units (in Montenegrin language); secondary legislation on residential placement of 
children and youth, including SGHs (in Montenegrin language) ; The Strategy for the 
Development of the Social and Child Protection System (in Montenegrin language). 
3.1.4. Proposal on the establishment of the Institute for Social Welfare and the PowerPoint 
presentation of the report (in Serbian language); Agenda of the study visit to Northern 
Ireland (in English language). 
3.1.5. Concept Note on Small Group Home Service in Montenegro (in English language). 
3.1.6. The list of child protection database indicators (in English language, unofficial 
translation). 
3.1.7. LPA Cetinje (in Montenegrin language); The report on mapping of child protection 
services in Montenegro (in Montenegrin language). 
3.2.1. The Protocol on intersectoral collaboration for the prevention of child abandonment (in 
Montenegrin language) 
3.2.2. Assessment of CSWs organization and capacities (in English language, unofficial 
translation), family counseling training programme (in Montenegrin language), case 
management training programme (in Montenegrin language); Agenda of the study visit to 
Slovenia (in English language). 
3.3.3.  Assessment  of  support  services  in  maternity  wards  and  relevant  health  services  (in 
English language, unofficial translation). 
3.3.2. Draft Operational Plan of Transformation of ‘Mladost’ Bijela. 
3.3.3. Photos of the SGH.    
3.3.4.  MoU  between  MoLSW,  the  Capital  City,  UNDP  and  UNICEF  on  the  rehabilitation  of 
the premises to service as the DCC in Podgorica. 
3.3.5.  Strategy  on  the  Development  of  Foster  Care  in  Montenegro  2012-2016  (in  English 
language,  unofficial  translation);  draft  guidelines  for  CSW  professionals  for  the 
implementation of the foster care bylaw (in Montenegrin language);  
Final report of the mid-term evaluation of components 2 and 3 of the Social Inclusion Project 
(“Social Welfare Reform” and “Child Care System Reform”)  
Final report of the final evaluation of component 3 of the Social Inclusion Project (“Child Care 
System Reform”). 
Minutes of the Project Steering Committee meetings (9 meetings) 
 
 
43 

 
BIBLIOGRAPHY  
 
 
Ministarstvo  rada  i  socijalnog  staranja  Crne  Gore  “Nastavak  reforme  sistema  socijalne  i 
dječje  zaštite  (http://www.minradiss.gov.me/vijesti/138957/SAOPsTENJE-Nastavak-
reforme-sistema-socijalne-i-djecije-zastite.html,
 accessed 4 July 2014).  
 
Pluriconsult Ltd. “Child’s Right to a Family Environment: Multi  country evaluation of results 
achieved through child care system reform 2005-2012”. Unpublished draft evaluation 
report to UNICEF Regional Office for CEE/CIS (23 September 2014 draft). 
 
Promeso Consulting Ltd. 2014. “Final Evaluation Report: Final Evaluation of the “Child Care 
System  Reform”  IPA  2010”.  Unpublished  report  for  UNICEF  Montenegro  (07  July 
2014).  
 
Toritsyn,  Arkadi  PhD.  2013.  “Mid  Term  Evaluation  of  the  „Social  Welfare  and  Child  Care 
System Reform: Enhancing Social Inclusion” Project: Social Welfare and Child Care 
System Reform Components”. Unpublished report for UNICEF Montenegro. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
44