Dies ist eine HTML Version eines Anhanges der Informationsfreiheitsanfrage 'Securitisation Regulation'.























Ref. Ares(2017)3025174 - 16/06/2017
Association For Financial Markets in Europe
Title
STS  of the meeting
Framework – a securitisation plan
Day Month 2011
for Europe?
Optional (location and dial in information)
26 October 2015
To be

held

at:


St Michael’s House
1 George Yard
London
AFME – Members’ Briefing Call
Phone: +44 (0) XXX XXX XXXX
Passcode: XXXXXXX#
1


Placed European ABS primary issuance
European Placed Issuance
450
400
350
300
250
illion 200
€b 150
100
50
0
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
YTD (3Q)
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
Values in EUR bn
YTD (3Q)
European placed
418.4
105.5
24.7
89.8
88.9
87.0
75.9
78.2
65.3
European retained
175.2
713.2
399.2
288.1
287.0
166.3
104.5
138.4
76.0
European retention (%)
30%
87%
94%
76%
76%
66%
58%
64%
54%
Total European
593.6
818.7
423.8
377.9
375.9
253.2
180.5
216.5
141.3
To
T tal US


2 080
,
5

934 9

1 385
,
3

1 203
,
7

1 056
,
6

1 579
,
2

1 515
,
1

1,131.5
1,240.0
Source: AFME Q3 2015 Securitisation Snapshot
2


Historical Default Rates for Securitisation:
Mid‐2007 to End Q2 2014

4,000
3,500
European CDOs
US RMBS
n)
European CLOs
3,000
b
European CMBS
(EUR
2,500
European Consumer ABS
ance
European Credit Cards
u
2,000
Iss
European RMBS
European SMEs
1,500
Original
US Autos
US RMBS
1,000
US Student loans
European RMBS
500
European CDOs

European CMBS
0
0%
5%
10%
15%
20%
25%
30%
Default Rate
Source: Standard and Poor’s
3


Historical Default Rates for Securitisation:
Mid‐2007 to End Q2

Q  2014
Original Issuance (EUR billion)
Default Rate (%)
Europe
Euro
Total PCS eligible asset classes

960.2
0.18
Credit Cards
33.2
0.00
RMBS
756.0
0.14
Other consumer ABS
68.0
0.18
SMEs
103.0
0.55
55
Only senior tranches to be PCS labelled, the default rate for which is zero, like Covered Bonds
Total Non‐PCS eligible asset classes
711.5
5.88
Leveraged loan CLOs
70.6
0.10
Other ABS
68.8
0.00
Corporate Securitisations
47.9
0.17
Synthetic Corporate CDOs
254.4
2.88
CMBS
163.3
10.66
Other CDOs
77.8
6.54
CDOs of ABS
28.9
41.08
Total European securitisation issuances
1,671.7
2.60
Covered Bonds
1,085.0
0.00
Total European issuances
2,756.7
1.58
Select US asset classes
Credit cards
295.4
0.14
Autos
198.2
0.04
Student loans
266.9
0.35
RMBS
3,254.9
22.97
Source: Standard and Poor’s
4


The three components of the new securitisation
framework


A new Securitisation Regulation (SR) which will:
• Set common core rules for all securitisations
• Provide specific provisions for STS securitisations
• Amend relevant sectoral laws: i.e. AIFMD, UCITS, CRA3, EMIR

A comprehensive amendment of the Capital Requirements Regulation
(CRR)
• Revises prudential treatment of securitisations (in line with EBA’s
advice)
• Implements the new Basel framework for general capital treatment of
securtisation exposures

Amendments to Solvency 2 and LCR will also be used to adjust existing
calibrations and make other necessary revisions

Next steps:
parallel negotiations in the Council and the
European
Parliament
5


The Securitisation Regulation

Defines the concept of Simple, Transparent and Standardised (STS)
short and long term
r securitisation

Aims to create consistency across a number of sectoral legislations
(AIFMD, CRR, Solv
Sol e
v ncy2)

Risk Retention

Regulatory Due Diligence

Transparency

Applies to all securitisations and to all EU institutional investors
investing in securitisation, to originators, original lenders, sponsors
and SPVs

Separate criteria for STS ABCP Securitisation

Sy
S nthetic securitisations ‐ out of scope at the moment
6


The new rules for risk retention

Introduction of the a “direct” approach: EU originators, sponsor
and
l
origina l d
en ers u d
n er obligation to retain
i
m i
n mum of 5 %
of net economic interests; investors still obliged to check if the
retention requirements are met

Article 4 SR ‐ Exclusion of certain originators from being risk
ret
re e
t n
e ti
t o
i n holders i e
. . if it “has been established or operat
oper es
at
for
fo
the sole purpose of securitising exposures”

New RTS will specify retention requirements including the
modalities of retaining risk, measurement of the level of retention,
prohibition
pr
of hedging/selling the ret
re ai
a n
i e
n d
e inte
int r
e e
r st
e , ret
re e
t n
e ti
t on
o on
consolidated basis and exemption for indexes
7


Regulatory due diligence broadly mirrors the
exi

ex sti
t ng
n CC
 R
CC rules



Article 5 SR requires that institutional investors “verify [if certain
conditions have been met] before becoming exposed to a
securitisation”, including that:

The originator
originat
or original lender grants
gr
all its credits
cr
on the
basis of sound and well‐defined criteria

Originator, sponsor or original lender retains a material net
i
econom c interest and discloses it to insti
i
tut
l
ona investors

Originator, sponsor and SSPE make available the information
requir
q
ed by and in accordance with transpar
p ency requirement
provisions

Differ t
en procedures for ongoing monit i
or ng are appr
i
opr ate
depending on whether the securitisation is held in the trading
book or non‐trading book
8


The new transparency rules intend to replace Art.
8b CRA



The obligation to make information available to "holders of a
securitisation position and to the competent
compet
authorities“
authorities :

Information on the exposures underlying the securitisation on a
quarte
quart rly
rl basis, or in case of ABCP, info
inf rmation
o
on the underl
under ying
l
receivables on credit claims on a monthly basis.

Detailed description of the priority of payments of the securitisation
ie. final offe
off ring
e
document or prospectus
pr
with the closing transaction
tr
documents, asset sale agreement, assignment, derivatives and
guarantees agreement.

Summary
Summa
or ove
ov r
e vi
v e
i w of the
th main fea
fe t
a ure
r s
e of the securitisation
(where prospectus is not available), including details regarding the
structure of the deal, exposure characteristics, cash flow, voting rights
of the holders of the securitisation position.

ESMA to develop RTS on information and presentation of
standard
d
ise
l
temp ate one year f
a ter entry into force f
o
h
t e
Securitisation Regulation
9


General requirements for STS Securitisation
Sale or assignment
Homogeneity
assignment
No r
 e
re ‐securitisation
Simple
Reps and warranties
Ordinary course of
One payment
(Art.8)
origination and
No active management
underwriting standards  No proceeds of sale
Transparent  Historical
Hist
data
Cash flow model


Draft
Dr  documents
documents
(Art. 10)
External verification
Loan –level data
Risk retention
No reverse waterfalls
Clear duties
Standard
Standar 
Hedging
Earl
Ear y
l amortisation
Default consequences
(Art.9)
Standard rates
Triggers to end the
Conflict resolution
revolving period
10


Two tier approach for STS ABCP
Transaction
The remaining WAL of the assets may The underlying exposures may not include
Level
not exceed 2 years, and no underlying residential or commercial mortgages.
asset may have a residual maturity of
more than 3 years.
Programme
The sponsor of the ABCP programme None of the securities issued under the ABCP
Level
must
be:
a
credit
institution programme
(which
are
required
to
supervised under the CRD, a liquidit
q
y predominantly consist of commercial paper
facility provider and must support all with a final maturity of less than one year)
transactions in the ABCP programme. may include call options, extension clauses or
The sponsor must support all liquidity other clauses affecting the final maturity of
and credit risks and any material the instrument.
dilution risks of the securitised
exposures as well as any other
transaction costs and programme‐
wide costs.
• Problems
remain in practical application:
application
disclosures, private
transactions, all underlying transactions must be securitisations
11


The calibration of CRR introduces the
preferential treatment for STS Securitisation


Implementation of the modular approach– the EC sets additional criteria
d
un er the CRR for STS
i
secur tisation by setting a cap on risk
i
we h
g ts f
o
underlying exposures (Art. 243)
• 40% on weighted basis for Residential mortgages (weighted basis) +
cannot contain loans with l
l
oan‐to‐va ue (
)
LTV ratio > 100%
• 50% commercial mortgage (individual basis)
• 75% retail exposure (individual basis)
• 100% any other exposure

The risk weight calculation under all risk weighting methodologies (SEC‐
IRBA, SEC‐ERBA, SEC‐SA) for positions in STS securitisation, with a risk floor
l
d
owere from 15%
15 to 10%
10 (for
i
sen or
iti
secur
t
sa i
ti
)
ons (A t
r . 259 to A t
r . 264)
264

Certain synthetic SME securitisations that are undertaken alongside public
authorities can get STS treatment under certain conditions. (Article 270)
12


CRR ‐ general framework for securitisation
positions


New hierarchy of approaches that are used to calculate securitisation risk
weights (Art. 254):

I t
n
l
erna R t
a i
tings B
d
ase Approach (SEC‐ IRBA)

External Ratings Based Approach (SEC‐ERBA)

Standardised approach (SEC‐SA) (a fallback option)

The look‐through approach expanded to other senior securitisation positions
(Art 267) – a maximum risk weight can be calculated on the basis of the
capital charges associated with the underlying exposures

The use of maximum capital requirements
q
expanded to other methods than
SEC‐IRBA (Art 268)

Stricter requirements for positions in resecuritisation
i
(Art 269)
269 – not only
can resecuritisation not qualify for STS treatment, the proposal suggests
further punitive requirements
13


Our constructive engagement has been
welcomed by


all
  our interlocutors

AFME’s public position papers have been shared with the Commission and
key nati
l
ona auth i
or ties.

The most important issues include:
• Sensible calibration of capital for bank and insurer investors: there are
mixed views about whether the EC proposals are good enough to enable
the market to revive
• A revision of the LCR, and the relative treatment of ABS and covered
bonds within that ‐ the LCR is currently out of scope of the Commission
proposals, this is seen by members as a dangerous
g
omission
• ABCP ‐ the framework should work for the bulk of the ABCP market, not
exclude nearly all of it (which it does right now)
14


The EC proposals deliver strong start to the
legislativ

legislati e
v pr
 oc
pr ess
oc


We welcome the recognition of the strong credit performance of European securitisation
before, during and after the crisis

The proposed adjustment to the Basel hierarchy enabling banks to use the Standard
Approach where the External Ratings Based Approach produces a result “not commensurate
to the credit
cr
risk”
risk , and other impro
impr v
o ements
v
to reg
re ul
u a
l t
a o
t ry
r capital treatment
tr

Harmonisation of the current fragmented due diligence and risk retention regime across
differ
diff ent
er
inv
in e
v st
e or
st types.

Enabling investors to place “appropriate reliance” on the STS notification undertaken by
originat
a o
t rs,
s, sponso
sors an
a d SSPE
SS s.

Technical adjustments to some of the detailed STS criteria which broaden scope and
incorporate existing prudent market practices

However, further adjusment are needed and the time is of the essence
15


Q & A
16












Offices
The Association for Financial Markets in Europe advocates
stable, competitive and sustainable European financial markets
that support economic growth and benefit society.
London
Brussels
St Michael’s House
Rue de la Loi 82
1 George Yard
1040 Brussels
London EC3V 9DH
Belgium
United Kingdom
T l
e
44
: +  (0) 20
20 7743 9300
T l
e
32
: +  (0)2 788 3971
www.afme.eu
17