Dies ist eine HTML Version eines Anhanges der Informationsfreiheitsanfrage 'Securitisation Regulation'.

link to page 3 link to page 3 link to page 4 link to page 4 link to page 4 link to page 4 link to page 4 link to page 5 link to page 5 link to page 6 link to page 6 link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 9 link to page 9 link to page 9 link to page 9 link to page 11 link to page 11 link to page 11 link to page 12 link to page 12 link to page 12

Ref. Ares(2017)3025174 - 16/06/2017
EuroABS Limited, 1 Royal Exchange Avenue, London EC3V 3LT +44-(0)800-772-3276 [Emailadresse] 
EuroABS Recommendations to the European Commission on Article 5 of STS 
Contents 

Background and Scope .................................................................................................................... 3 

Summary of Recommendations ...................................................................................................... 3 

What Does EuroABS Do, Our Experience, etc. ................................................................................ 4 
3.1 
European ABS Documentation and Reporting Database (EADReD) ....................................... 4 
3.2 
Portfolio Mark to Market Service (PMMS) ............................................................................. 4 
3.3 
Issuer and Investor Regulatory Compliance ........................................................................... 4 
3.4 
Further Information ................................................................................................................ 4 

Loan Level Data and Reporting ....................................................................................................... 5 
4.1 
Feedback from Investors ......................................................................................................... 5 
4.2 
Feedback from Issuers ............................................................................................................ 6 
4.2.1 
Differences Between European and US Residential Mortgage Law and Practice .......... 6 
4.2.2 
Effect of LLD and Reporting Requirements on Issuers’ Businesses as a Whole ............. 7 
4.3 
Justifying Loan Level Data as a Requirement .......................................................................... 7 
4.3.1 
Generating Accurate Indices – Comparison Between Transactions ............................... 7 
4.3.2 
Detecting and Correcting Errors in Reports – Calculation Differences Have Been 
Common 7 
4.3.3 
Accurate Calculation of Asset Pool Repayment Profile .................................................. 8 
4.4 
Tension Between Data Protection and Transparency ............................................................ 8 
4.5 
Differences between the ECB and BoE Templates ................................................................. 8 
4.5.1 
Some Observations That May Be Of Interest .................................................................. 8 
4.6 
Timeliness of Reporting .......................................................................................................... 9 
4.7 
EuroABS Recommendations on Reporting and Loan Level Data ............................................ 9 
4.7.1 
Loan Level Data ............................................................................................................... 9 
4.7.2 
Loan Level Data Reporting Technology and Format ....................................................... 9 
4.7.3 
Standardised Reporting ................................................................................................ 11 

Liabilities Waterfall Modelling ...................................................................................................... 11 
5.1 
What a LWM Is and Is Not – What It’s For and What It’s Not For ........................................ 11 
5.2 
Why Disclosure of LWMs is Important ................................................................................. 12 
5.2.1 
As a Mechanism to Both Discourage Complexity but Also Give Licence to Issuers 
Where Complexity is Necessary .................................................................................................... 12 


link to page 12 link to page 13 link to page 13 link to page 13 link to page 13 link to page 14 link to page 14 link to page 14 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 16 link to page 16 link to page 16 EuroABS Recommendations to the European Commission on Article 5 of STS
5.2.2 
Mistakes Have Occurred and Do Occur in the Liabilities Waterfall Documentation .... 12 
5.3 
Why Models Should Be Provided By Issuers ......................................................................... 13 
5.4 
BoE Liabilities Waterfall Models ........................................................................................... 13 
5.5 
EuroABS Recommendations on LWM Specification ............................................................. 13 

Disclosure of Documentation ....................................................................................................... 13 
6.1 
EuroABS Recommendations ................................................................................................. 14 

How the Data Should Be Made Available and To Whom ............................................................. 14 
7.1 
ECB Public Consultation ........................................................................................................ 14 
7.2 
US SEC – EDGAR .................................................................................................................... 15 
7.3 
BoE Example .......................................................................................................................... 15 
7.4 
EuroABS Recommendations ................................................................................................. 16 
7.4.1 
Some Thoughts on Acceptable Use Policy Criteria ....................................................... 16 
7.4.2 
The Role of ESMA .......................................................................................................... 16 


EuroABS Recommendations to the European Commission on Article 5 of STS
1  Background and Scope 
Further to our meeting on the 17th November 2015 at the European Commission it was agreed that 
EuroABS would provide recommendations on the content and disclosure requirements for European 
Asset Backed Securities (‘ABS’) issuers under Article 5 of “laying down common rules on 
securitisation and creating a European framework for simple, transparent and standardised (‘STS’) 
securitisation” (the ‘Paper’) published by DG FISMA on the 30th September 2015. 
Whilst this document contains much in the way of general comment across ABS asset classes, it is 
written with a view to its application in the publicly registered Residential Mortgage Backed 
Securities market only. EuroABS is happy to discuss the further work and recommendations relating 
to all other asset classes and aspects of ABS. 
2  Summary of Recommendations 
 EuroABS consider that the inclusion of Loan level data (‘LLD’) requirements under STS Article
5 are important for accurate, high quality market oversight. Indeed we consider that the
Market would see a greater benefit if these data had been a requirement for longer and
covered examples of different periods of economic cycles.
 The markets appear to have accepted the LLD requirements of both the Bank of England
(‘BoE’) and the European Central Bank (‘ECB’). We suggest that, if possible, a way is found to
harmonise these requirements with those of STS as far as possible.
 EuroABS consider that European markets have accepted spreadsheets as the file format for
transferring ABS LLD. Whilst this situation is not perfect and there are advantages to be had
in the use of XML (or similar), we consider that the spreadsheet format has been shown to
work and is more accessible to a greater number of potential users.
 EuroABS consider that the specifications for investor reporting under the ECB template, BoE
market notices and Article 8b are broadly sound. A tight and consistent definition of ‘arrears’
along with the timescales of each instance of arrears to be reported (e.g. 1 month, 3
months, 6 months, etc.) should be agreed. Frequency and deadlines for report and data
publication should be consistent. See some further detailed points for consideration in
section 4.1
 EuroABS considers liabilities waterfall models (‘LWMs’) to be an important requirement for
issuers under STS. See details of our recommendations for a specification of LWMs in section
5.5. 
 All data and documentation should be made available free-of-charge to an accepted list of
professional parties on a secure password protected website that is controlled by the data
owner/issuer.
 Investor reports not containing loan level information should be considered for full
unrestricted publication.
 We consider that ESMA may be able to act as a directory/register of web addresses (URLs)
for issues looking to comply with STS. We also consider that ESMA may be best placed to act
as focal point of information on STS compliance and act as ultimate arbiter.


EuroABS Recommendations to the European Commission on Article 5 of STS
3  What Does EuroABS Do, Our Experience, etc. 
The EuroABS business began in the late 1990s and was original called ‘eWareOnLine’. The website 
first went live in July 2000. The business was renamed EuroABS in March 2003. 
EuroABS has three main business interests: 
3.1  European ABS Documentation and Reporting Database (EADReD) 
EADReD contains all publicly available data, documentation and reports for all public European 
securitisations issued since 1st January 1995. EADReD has been compiled at EuroABS’ own expense 
and effort, is not a core revenue generating business and is available free of charge to active ABS 
market participants and regulatory authorities. A modest charge is made for use of EADReD by non-
trading ABS market professionals (e.g. law firms and rating agencies). 
EADReD also produces and provides unrestricted access to new issuance overview reports for all 
new transactions and EuroABS has recently added unrestricted access to an indices page currently 
showing average arrears and LTVs across various classes of UK RMBS. Further indices for further 
asset classes are planned. 
3.2  Portfolio Mark to Market Service (PMMS) 
Live since early 2007, this service receives valuations from all the main European ABS investment 
bank trading desks – data stored in our database – then makes these data available to approved 
investor clients of those investment banks. Essentially, EuroABS acts as a hub for this information 
and facilitates essential data dissemination and receipt in standard, secure formats enabling high 
levels of automation and easy contribution and consumption. 
3.3  Issuer and Investor Regulatory Compliance 
EuroABS provides a series of products developed in response to regulatory changes made since the 
financial crisis 2007/2008. 
Commercial services aimed at investors include a CRR 406 key data field monitoring service to help 
investors with their ABS portfolio due diligence work. 
Commercial services aimed at issuers include a suite of products to help with central bank eligibility 
and current trends in regulatory compliance such as: 
 Liabilities waterfall model (‘LWM’) production
 Secure hosting
 Loan level data (‘LLD’) production, hosting and submission
 LLD vs contemporary investor report reconciliation
 LLD checking vs set of user defined rules
 LLD period dataset to period dataset continuity checking – sanity checking of dynamic fields
and tracking of static fields
3.4  Further Information 
 Please see our list of client testimonials: https://www.euroabs.com/Testimonials.aspx
 EuroABS Provenance of Key Staff Members (attached pdf)
 Market Indices: https://www.euroabs.com/MarketIndices.aspx


EuroABS Recommendations to the European Commission on Article 5 of STS
 Other information at https://www.euroabs.com
4  Loan Level Data and Reporting 
ECB templates are here: 
https://www.ecb.europa.eu/paym/coll/loanlevel/transmission/html/index.en.html 
BoE templates here: 
http://www.bankofengland.co.uk/markets/Pages/money/eligiblecollateral.aspx 
There are also templates that have been released by the US Securities and Exchange Commission and 
Reserve Bank of Australia. Whilst we have viewed these, we have not had time to give them any 
serious consideration. 
Perhaps in an ideal world, all information relating to a securitisation issue would be made freely and 
publicly available to all. However, the more information that is made available to all, the more 
concerned the asset originators become in breaching their customer privacy and data protection 
responsibilities. Clearly this situation has to be carefully managed. 
We consider the LLD requirements set out in the RTS under Article 8b (link below) to be sound and 
similar to the more detailed specification provided by the ECB and BoE. 
http://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/PDF/?uri=CELEX:32015R0003&from=EN 
4.1  Feedback from Investors 
“Simplicity is better” 
For secured lending underlying assets to suffer loss: 
1. the borrower stops paying and
2. the underlying asset foreclosure value is less than outstanding loan plus expenses.
On this basis investors are as interested in trends in house prices and unemployment rates as 
individual transaction pool figures. 
Also of interest are current forbearance arrangements/regulations applying to the pool. 
Loan to value (‘LTV’) information on the assets in the underlying pool is essential. 
 Original
 Current (original valuation versus outstanding loan)
 Indexed (house price index linked valuation versus outstanding loan)
Repayment profile of asset pool – also essential, enabling investors to take a view on the credibility 
of the issuer’s stated intended bond repayment terms. 
Consistency of definition, interpretation and reporting of payment arrears and delinquencies 


EuroABS Recommendations to the European Commission on Article 5 of STS
Repayment/prepayments – for each investor report issuers must be required to provide either the 
explicit figures for or the means to accurately calculate the following: 
 Expected scheduled repayment
 Actually received scheduled repayment
 Unscheduled prepayment
All the LLD now available is recent and representative of a low interest rate environment. With the 
benefit of hindsight, it is regrettable that these datasets were not available before providing more 
historical data and evidence of loan pool performance during different economic cycles and 
conditions. 
4.2  Feedback from Issuers 
For reasons that are covered elsewhere in this paper and not hard to understand, issuers are 
generally keen to reduce transparency and disclosure to a minimum. If the positives of issuing stack 
up against the negatives of transparency they’ll go ahead with their transactions, if not they won’t. 
However, our perception is that current low European ABS issuance levels are mainly down to: 
 better alternative sources of funding (various forms of cheaper central bank funding,
covered bonds, etc.)
 general levels of economic activity are lower that pre 2007/2008 crisis (fewer assets to
securitise)
 Adverse/uncertainty surrounding regulatory capital requirements (e.g. Solvency II)
and NOT particularly transparency and disclosure requirements, although this is likely to be a factor 
cited by issuers because there is a cost and a probably not insignificant effort factor in meeting 
them. 
One thing that does come through loud and clear from issuers is a request for international 
regulators and central banks to coordinate their efforts, learn from each other and try to agree on a 
single set of standards. This will help to prevent: 
 Issuers having to do the same or similar work on each transaction multiple times (over-
burdensome) and
 Regulatory arbitrage opportunity
both of which are, of course, important to keep to a minimum. 
4.2.1  Differences Between European and US Residential Mortgage Law and Practice 
There are three major differences between European and US residential mortgage markets: 
1. A large percentage of US mortgages are provided by agencies which are government
guaranteed (Ginnie Mae, Freddy Mac, etc.). European mortgage lenders, in the main, do not
have an explicit government guarantee.
2. In the US the mortgage contract essentially ends when the obligor moves out of the
property the loan is secured on and hands back the keys. In Europe, it is normally the case


EuroABS Recommendations to the European Commission on Article 5 of STS
that the contract can remain in force allowing the lender to pursue the borrower for any 
outstanding amount after foreclosure. 
3. In the US, non-payment of a mortgage on the agreed terms can mean property repossession
within a matter of a few months. In Europe, forbearance rules and laws can vary
considerably and it can prove very difficult, expensive and time-consuming for lenders to
repossess property.
Why does this matter? 
Clearly the above can affect the performance of a securitisation and its ultimate credit quality, 
therefore markets and regulators of each may well view European and US RMBS markets differently, 
making it more difficult to harmonise regulatory requirements and avoid the effects of regulatory 
arbitrage as would otherwise appear to be highly desirable. 
4.2.2  Effect of LLD and Reporting Requirements on Issuers’ Businesses as a Whole 
Also perhaps worth noting is that, particularly with respect to the disclosure of loan level data to an 
externally specified template, the businesses of asset originators are likely to be affected across 
multiple departments, rather than just those concerned with funding and securitisation. Specific 
demands for data items from securitisation regulators and central banks may require changes all the 
way through an organisation to sales and underwriting where datasets are originally input into 
systems. Whilst this may cause upheaval and practice change that is unwelcome, resented and 
resisted, we consider that such a process is generally healthy and, whilst it can be painful, in the 
longer-term, it benefits all. 
4.3  Justifying Loan Level Data as a Requirement 
Our understanding is that loan level data was being provided to Credit Rating Agencies (CRAs) for 
many years. Such privileged access to information we consider to be unhealthy and not a sustainable 
model for long-term market stability. EuroABS generally consider that all information disclosed to 
CRAs should be publicly, or at least more widely, disclosed (more on this in section 7 below). 
4.3.1  Generating Accurate Indices – Comparison Between Transactions 
Access to finely granular data allows third parties to calculate statistics which are reliably 
comparable between issues. It also allows the creation of indices by pooling data from multiple 
issues to calculate statistics across market sectors. These important calculations cannot be done 
accurately or reliably with sets of previously aggregated data. 
4.3.2  Detecting and Correcting Errors in Reports – Calculation Differences Have Been 
Common 
Access to the underlying loan level data allows independent verification of many of the statistics 
included in investor reports. This not only allows the user of the data to confirm that the reports are 
correct, but also allows a more nuanced understanding of the statistics – for example, of the extent 
to which multiple borrower accounts have been aggregated prior to calculation. 
Since the availability of LLD over the last few years, our field experiences have shown that 
inconsistencies and errors in reports versus contemporary LLD are not particularly uncommon and 
much work still remains to be done across the industry to put this right. 


EuroABS Recommendations to the European Commission on Article 5 of STS
4.3.3  Accurate Calculation of Asset Pool Repayment Profile 
For users wishing to model the behaviour of the asset pool cash flows, loan level data facilitates the 
calculation of the contracted amortisation profile and may also provide inputs to models attempting 
to estimate prepayment behaviour and losses. 
4.4  Tension Between Data Protection and Transparency 
Over several years we have seen heated debate between asset originators and regulators all over the 
world relating to the exact detail of individual underlying asset loan level data disclosure 
requirements. Our understanding is that the primary concern of asset originators is that, as a 
regulatory requirement of securitisation, they may be forced to disclose loan level information that 
would allow, perhaps in combination with other available datasets, identification of individual 
borrowers (or “obligors”). Allowing such data to fall into the wrong hands could be dangerous. 
As an example of concerns discussed in the UK, it was demonstrated that if sufficient detail is provided 
for property post code, it is possible to cross-check publicly available Land Registry data to identify an 
individual address and specific property (sometimes termed ‘re-identification’). It was argued that if 
sensitive details of the current state of a mortgage relating to specific property were to fall into the 
hands of organised criminals, it might leave obligors vulnerable to fraud. 
Clearly there is a balance to be struck here and this appears to have been acknowledged by the Bank 
of England and the ECB in their detailed loan level data template requirements. 

Property location

Event (such as purchase) date data and

Exact transaction amount
are the primary concerns considered vulnerable for cross-checking, as these are likely to exist in 
multiple data sources. 
4.5  Differences between the ECB and BoE Templates 
See reports BoEvsECB.xlsx and ECBOnlyData.xlsx 
4.5.1  Some Observations That May Be Of Interest 
ECB requires issue level and tranche level data to be included in the same dataset as LLD. 
BoE only requires data at the underlying asset level, but requires similar issue and bond level data in 
its standardised reporting requirements. 
Both templates appear to look to address some ‘re-identification’ concerns: 
Property location - For BoE the post code of the property is optional and both templates specify only 
the first few characters. BoE looks to put more emphasis on less precise location ‘regional NUTS 
codes’ by making these mandatory. ECB requires a different set of NUTS codes, but their inclusion is 
optional according to the template. 
Date formatting – there are quite a few differences here. The ECB in many cases require just month 
and year for the date, omitting the day of the month, we assume to reduce re-identification risk. 


EuroABS Recommendations to the European Commission on Article 5 of STS
Purchase price – ECB require rounding of the purchase price. Again, our assumption is to reduce re-
identification risk, although this clearly comes at the cost of reduced data accuracy. 
4.6  Timeliness of Reporting 
Over the years EuroABS has noticed that adherence to reporting deadlines has not been consistent 
across all issuers. We would estimate 50% of issuers are reporting on time and 50% not. 3-4 months 
late is not unusual. In some cases this appears to go unnoticed by investors and it falls to us at 
EuroABS to remind issuers to produce the reports. Whilst we acknowledge that the production of 
comprehensive reports is not a simple process and can be hit with problems and delays, particularly 
for the first few instances or report production for a new issue, issuers should be under more 
pressure than they currently appear to be to deliver on time. 
4.7  EuroABS Recommendations on Reporting and Loan Level Data 
4.7.1  Loan Level Data 
Whilst we were not party to detailed discussions on the content of the loan level data templates, we 
can only assume that a lot of work and consultation has gone into their development. We would 
suggest that the best policy here is to build on existing work rather than taking a fresh approach. 
STS standards, like those of central bank eligibility, are optional. The central bank templates and 
disclosure requirements appear to have been accepted by all. We aren’t aware of any legal disputes 
or problems caused by these. 
Building on the work done by the central banks looks to be the way to go. We would suggest a 
review of these standards and, perhaps, recommend changes/updates, but would not advise 
wholesale changes unless deemed absolutely necessary. 
Perhaps look to negotiate a formal review process for these requirements with the central banks 
and agree to adopt their standards for STS, ie if a bond is ECB or BoE eligible, its loan level data is 
automatically accepted as STS compliant. There would need to be a formal focal point and action 
process for appeals against exclusion and to report non-compliance of accepted issues. Could this 
logically be a role for ESMA (see 7.4.2 below)? 
4.7.2  Loan Level Data Reporting Technology and Format 
In standardising the delivery of loan level data, there are two primary considerations; what, and 
how. The two issues are not entirely independent of each other, in that different delivery formats 
support different technologies for formatting and validating content. The two primary technologies 
being used for LLD transfer are spreadsheets and XML. XML is the modern de facto standard for 
electronic data exchange. Spreadsheets are the de facto standard for finance professionals. 
Spreadsheets have the advantage of being easily created, read and understood by people who are 
not Information Technology professionals. The applications which produce them (Microsoft Excel, 
for example) provide rich features to acquire, manipulate and display data.  
Spreadsheets have the disadvantage that they can be rather inexact; the underlying data storage is 
abstracted away from the user interface, and what is actually recorded may not be immediately 
obvious. They are also weakly typed, without a clear distinction made between the underlying data 
type of the (opaque) storage medium and the formatting of the content on screen. This can cause 
issues during automatic processing of spreadsheet data when data processing tools attempt to infer 


EuroABS Recommendations to the European Commission on Article 5 of STS
spreadsheet data types. XML, conversely, has no such user interface abstraction because it is a text 
based, human-readable raw file format rather than an application. It also comes with a set of 
companion technologies which make the specification of the allowable content for each data item 
configurable and verifiable – it is possible to specify the acceptable representation of each data item 
using a standard non-proprietary syntax, and for any given file to determine whether it complies 
with this specification and where deviations occur. Although it is possible to write validation systems 
for spreadsheets, it is not baked into the technology. 
Spreadsheets assume that data are tabular in nature. Much of the typical Loan Level Data structure 
does indeed fit this model, however certain aspects of it do not. There are items in many of the 
regulatory LLD templates which specify an arbitrary length list of comma separated items as content; 
this is indicative of a data structure which does not fit the tabular model. An example would be a cell 
containing a comma separated list of the dates upon which further advances were granted to a 
borrower and a second cell containing a comma separated list of the amounts of further advances. 
Another example of a workaround for an inherently non-tabular data structure is the use of multiple 
cells for several instances of the same thing; for example, margin revision 1, margin revision 2, and 
final margin. This is similar to the comma separated approach, but makes an assumption about the 
maximum number of items to be allowed. XML allows these items to be precisely specified; to say, 
for example, that a further advance consists of exactly one date and one amount, that the date has a 
given format and the amount has another, that the amount is a positive number and the date is 
after the origination date, and that the allowed number of advances is any, including 0. 
From the point of view of an Information Technology professional, clearly XML is the favourable 
format. It is concise, prescriptive, and unambiguous. It is based on open standards and it comes with 
a wide range of tools and technologies to manipulate it. It has a precise language for specifying 
document structure, and that specification can be applied to a given document programmatically in 
order to validate compliance with the standard. It allows for rules like “This item must be a valid 
number, or else it must be the text ‘ND,’ followed by a single digit between zero and six”, and such 
data can be machine read without the parser assuming that because the first data item is “ND,5” the 
rest of the column must be text rather than numbers. There is no room for subjectivity in such a 
specification, a file either passes or fails.  
While these attributes are extremely attractive to an IT professional or to a data processing 
organisation, the technology is fundamentally unfriendly to the finance professionals who generate 
and consume the data. A spreadsheet is a well understood piece of desktop technology. An investor 
can download a spreadsheet and immediately open it and make use of the data. An XML file is not 
easily readable in a useful way: although the content can easily be viewed in a browser or text 
editor, it needs to be extracted and formatted to become useful. One can provide bespoke programs 
to open an XML file and export the content to a useful spreadsheet format, but this is clearly less 
convenient than simply receiving an Excel file. 
EuroABS is of the opinion that while in an ideal world XML is by far the superior mechanism for data 
interchange, pragmatically, spreadsheets set the technical bar for participation at a level far more 
comfortable for market participants. 
10 

EuroABS Recommendations to the European Commission on Article 5 of STS
4.7.3  Standardised Reporting 
EuroABS generally agrees with the BoE specification of reporting requirements in Annex A: 
http://www.bankofengland.co.uk/markets/Pages/money/eligiblecollateral.aspx 
EuroABS agrees with the detail of the feedback from investors above in 4.1, particularly on 
repayment and prepayment figures. 
4.7.3.1  Consistency of Definition and Reporting of Arrears 
We would advise as far as is possible the setting of a consistent definition, interpretation and 
reporting of payment arrears. 
We have observed that the definition of arrears has generally become accepted by market 
convention as: “the amount of money overdue divided by the amount of money due to be paid this 
month”.  It perhaps needs to be considered within the definition whether any incurred fees should 
be included in the overdue figure. 
Arrears should be reported consistently. Perhaps: >=1 month < 3 months, >=3 months < 6 months, 
>=6 months < 9 months, >=9 months and < 12 months and >= 12 months. 
Transactions with triggers fired by threshold breaches of any additional data points should also 
report the status of those data points (e.g. if there is a 2 month arrears trigger). 
Example of Arrears definition from a UK RMBS prospectus: 
“Arrears are calculated in accordance with standard market practice in the UK. A mortgage is 
identified as being in arrears when, on any due date, the overdue amounts which were due 
on previous due dates equal, in the aggregate, one or more full monthly payments. In 
making an arrears determination, the servicer calculates as of the date of determination the 
difference between the sum of all monthly payments that were due and payable by a 
borrower on any due date up to that date of determination and the sum of all payments 
actually made by that borrower up to that date of determination. The resulting number of 
months in arrears is arrived at by dividing that difference (if any) by the amount of the 
required monthly payment.” 
4.7.3.2  Consistent Deadlines for Report and Data Publication 
Issuers should be required to report in a timely fashion. Perhaps within one month of the most 
recent payment/pool cut-off date. 
We consider that it should be possible for late reporting to be reported to ESMA leading to the 
potential opportunity for the review of the status of the security as STS eligible. 
5  Liabilities Waterfall Modelling 
5.1  What a LWM Is and Is Not – What It’s For and What It’s Not For 
A liabilities waterfall model (LWM) is a formal mathematical or computer code representation of the 
text describing the liabilities waterfall in the official documentation of the transaction. 
11 

EuroABS Recommendations to the European Commission on Article 5 of STS
A LWM does not provide any unknown or subjective data. Any future performance or predicted 
behaviour of the asset pool is out of scope, and is the responsibility of the user of the LWM and their 
inputs to the LWM. 
The purpose of a LWM is to demonstrate to the user, given a set or sets of user defined inputs, how 
the liabilities waterfall behaves in those circumstances - who gets paid, or doesn’t get paid, what and 
when. 
The issuer, or provider of the model, does not take any responsibility for the preparation of or help 
with the inputs, neither does a LWM contain any assumptions or approximations. A LWM is 
therefore not intended to be used in a similar way to a commercially supplied cash flow model for a 
transaction such as those provided by well-known specialist providers (e.g. Intex and Bloomberg). 
See: What exactly do we mean by Liabilities Waterfall Model.pdf 
5.2  Why Disclosure of LWMs is Important 
See: ISLWM Meeting Report.pdf for Report on the Seminar to discuss: Should issuer-supplied 
Liabilities Waterfall Models be a transparency requirement for ‘qualifying‘ securitisations? Held at 
Laytons Solicitors, 2 More London Riverside, London SE1 2AP at 2pm on Monday 27 April 
2015.Attended by interested global securitisation industry participants under the Chatham House 
Rule. 
5.2.1  As a Mechanism to Both Discourage Complexity but Also Give Licence to Issuers 
Where Complexity is Necessary 
The process of conversion of a pool of granular assets to provide a smoothed cash flow for an 
investable security is often a complex process. A multitude of financial devices often need to be 
employed to achieve this. This can lead to an essential introduction of complexity of transaction 
structure and an increase in the number of suppliers providing services (e.g. swap counterparties, 
etc.). All of this will affect the priority of payments to the transaction beneficiaries, note holders, etc. 
With the exception of banning the reversal of the priority of payments, high quality securitisation 
standards suggested by regulators have been silent on limitations on structural complexity. As has 
been discussed in open hearing meetings, this type of restriction could create cliff effects. Instead, 
the requirement for issuers to provide a LWM for each of their transactions allows the issuer to 
structure as they feel necessary, but to procure or produce a model demonstrating exactly how the 
transaction performs in all possible circumstances that the liabilities waterfall documentation states 
consequences for. So issuers have a free hand to do what is necessary with their transactions, but 
must provide mathematical/computer code models that show how they work and must stand 
behind them. 
5.2.2  Mistakes Have Occurred and Do Occur in the Liabilities Waterfall Documentation 
It is common for ABS documentation to be voluminous, complex and drafted in a high-pressure 
situation. There are many examples in these texts where the exact intended meaning is ambiguous. 
The formal process, overseen by the issuer, of the production of a LWM requires an experienced 
third party with no prior involvement in the drafting of the documentation to examine the text and 
give an opinion as to its exact meaning in the form of its mathematical/computer code meaning. This 
typically involves a dialogue between the modelling team and the issuer with a series of positive 
12 

EuroABS Recommendations to the European Commission on Article 5 of STS
feedback iterations resulting in multiple experienced expert parties agreeing that the documentation 
and at least one LWM representation of it match. Both are then made available for inspection by the 
Market. 
5.3  Why Models Should Be Provided By Issuers 
The LWM needs to be presented to the Market on the same terms as all other regulatory required 
disclosure on a fair and equal basis. This logically means that charging a commercial fee for access 
would not be acceptable and the burden of expense of production would need to be met by the 
issuer. 
These transactions are brought to the Market by the issuer and it is hard to see how ultimate 
responsibility for regulatory required LWM production could be met by any third party. 
N.B. The production and availability of a LWM by the issuer does not obviate the requirements of 
other investment regulations which may state that investors need to understand the transactions 
they are entering into and, perhaps, check that the modelling has been performed correctly by using 
their own model or procuring one from a commercial modelling service such as those provided by 
e.g. Bloomberg or Intex 
5.4  BoE Liabilities Waterfall Models 
See BoE LWM specification in Annex B here: 
http://www.bankofengland.co.uk/markets/Documents/marketnotice121002abs.pdf 
5.5  EuroABS Recommendations on LWM Specification 
EuroABS broadly agrees with the LWM specification provided by the BoE (example in the above link), 
however we would also recommend the inclusion of the following:- 
 Fresh pair of eyes - LWM work must be done by someone who was not involved in the
documentation drafting
 LWMs to be made available free of charge to the user and at the expense of the issuer
 The LWM itself contains no subjectivity and makes no projections or assumptions as to the
performance of the transaction’s underlying asset pool. Instead these elements are inputs to
the LWM which are the full responsibility of the user
 The LWM must provide the user with input opportunities for every variable the liabilities
waterfall documentation states consequences for
 Total transparency – all code and logic used must be available for inspection by the user with
full disclosure of the contents of any plug-ins or components used
 The LWM must be a full and complete model providing logic for every eventuality the
liabilities waterfall documentation states consequences for. The LWM would therefore not
be expected to change during the life of the transaction unless the liabilities waterfall
documentation changes
6  Disclosure of Documentation 
In our experience with working with transactions looking to achieve BoE eligibility, we have seen 
some differences in opinion as to whether some documents should be disclosed or not. The 
13 

EuroABS Recommendations to the European Commission on Article 5 of STS
confusion appears to be caused by the word ‘public’ in paragraph 17 on page 3 of the BoE Market 
Notice document: 
http://www.bankofengland.co.uk/markets/Documents/marketnotice121002abs.pdf 
6.1  EuroABS Recommendations 
EuroABS considers that the BoE Market Notice is broadly correct, but would recommend the 
deletion of the word ‘public’ from paragraph 17, below:- 
“17. The prospectus, together with the closing transaction documents, including any public 
documents referenced in the prospectus or which govern the workings of the transaction 
(excluding legal opinions), will be required to be made available to investors, potential 
investors and certain other market professionals acting on their behalf. Where applicable 
these will include, but not be limited to: the asset sale agreement (and any relevant 
declaration of trust), servicing, back-up servicing, administration and cash management 
agreements, trust deed, security deed, agency agreement, account bank agreement, 
guaranteed investment contract, incorporated terms or master” 
7  How the Data Should Be Made Available and To Whom 
7.1  ECB Public Consultation 
The ECB held a public consultation on the provision of ABS loan-level information in the Eurosystem 
collateral framework in February 2010 
https://www.ecb.europa.eu/paym/cons/previous/html/abs.en.html 
This included section 3 and Question 5: 
“Data-handling infrastructure 
In  order  to  provide  the  ABS  loan-by-loan  information,  a  data-handling  infrastructure  would 
be  needed  to  collect,  store,  handle  and  process  the  information  and  to  distribute  it  to  the 
market.  
Two different scenarios could be considered that would leverage existing market solutions. In 
scenario 1, a single data portal would be created to perform the envisaged tasks. In scenario 2, 
several  eligible  data  portals  would  compete  to  offer  the  service  to  the  market.  These  two 
models can be seen as two opposite extremes. Between these, other combinations could also 
be  possible.  In  whichever  case,  the  Eurosystem  would  like  to  rely  on  market  solutions  and 
would therefore neither take part in the implementation of the solution nor in its operation.  
In  scenario  1,  originators/servicers  would  have  a  clear  single  entry  point  for  submitting  the 
data. The single data portal could be selected from among existing market data platforms that 
are willing to take up the role of portal provider. The portal would need to ensure that the data 
are made available to other data providers and that the users of the portal services would be 
charged an appropriate price.  
In scenario  2, originators/servicers would have the option to choose from a set of registered 
portal providers. A list of registered data portal providers would be established using a set of 
broad criteria against which the potential portal providers would be evaluated and selected. In 
14 

EuroABS Recommendations to the European Commission on Article 5 of STS
this scenario, the registered portal providers would compete to provide the best service at the 
lowest cost to their users.  
Which of the scenarios presented, or combination thereof, would provide the best 
solution to the market, taking into account considerations such as data consistency and 
quality, competition, governance, cost, ease of data transmission, etc.?”
 
Whilst we accept that this is a fairly crude measure, the ECB’s Results documentation shows that 14 
preferred option 1 (single portal) and 19 preferred option 2 (multiple portals with choice). 
Clearly there is support for both options, with a larger group preferring multiple portals with 
consumer choice. 
7.2  US SEC – EDGAR 
For all regulatory filings required by the US SEC a publicly owned repository called EDGAR is used. 
There is no firewall or password protection of EDGAR content and it is free-of-charge and 
internationally publicly available. 
See the final rules on ABS LLD disclosure released in September 2014 here: 
https://www.sec.gov/rules/final/2014/33-9638.pdf 
It appears that these rules are predicated on full public disclosure via EDGAR which, because of fears 
of ‘re-identification’ of obligors (see section 4.4, above) lead to the data requirement specification 
being changed and resulting in, in our opinion, a less useful dataset. In particular the requirement to 
provide the exact purchase price for the property/transaction appears to have been dropped, which 
reduces the ability of users of the data to be able to accurately calculate e.g. loan-to-value ratios. 
This, in turn, perpetuates the problem of information asymmetry between market participants and 
the rating agencies and reduces the ability of other independent third parties to provide market 
oversight, innovation, competition and consumer choice in these markets. 
7.3  BoE Example 
The BoE requires issuers to disclose all qualifying regulatory disclosures on a password protected 
website at the expense of the issuer. The data and documentation must be made available to the 
following types of users: 
a) Banks and other recognised financial institutions
b) Any person or institution that has invested in asset backed securities and covered bonds
c) Organisations or individuals compiling research to be distributed to financial institutions and
other wholesale investors
d) Market data or cash flow model providers to the investor community
e) Governmental bodies, regulatory authorities and central banks
f)
Recognised rating agencies
g) Any other party which would normally be considered to be a market professional and is a
potential investor in asset backed securities and covered bonds
h) Professional advisers representing any of the above.
15 

EuroABS Recommendations to the European Commission on Article 5 of STS
7.4  EuroABS Recommendations 
 Because of LLD sensitivity we agree with the BoE that LLD should be kept on a website
behind a password protected firewall and we agree with their list of required access users
(in 7.3, above). We also agree that this access should be controlled by the data owner
(issuer).
 In addition to the list of eligible users in 7.3 we consider also provision should be made for
use by academia.
 Authorised users of such websites should be required to register their name, company name
and contact details.
 Password information must be stored using one-way encryption and not in clear text nor in
any form that can be decoded.
 The data controller responsible for the website must register the required details with the
local data protection office (in the UK the Information Commissioner’s Office).
 Access logs should be kept as to which users have accessed and downloaded which files or
data sets and when and from which IP address.
 We consider that investor reports do not carry the same risks of re-identification and
therefore should be made freely and publicly available with no password protection or
restriction to access.
As an erstwhile start-up business in these markets, we at EuroABS know how difficult it can be to be 
taken seriously and given access to these datasets. As has been discussed above, there are good 
reasons to restrict access to these data, but they must never be used to prevent fair competition, 
new market entrants, innovation and consumer choice that will drive up quality and intensity of 
market oversight and drive down costs. We would therefore strongly recommend that restrictions 
on access come with a health warning that they should not prevent competition, although all those 
that access the data should be required to agree to a reasonable ‘acceptable use policy’. 
7.4.1  Some Thoughts on Acceptable Use Policy Criteria 
 Data receivers must not pass on any loan level data to any third party
 Access to the loan level data must only be provided to those with the receiving organisation
that need to access it for the purposes permitted, and each of these people must be made
aware of the acceptable use policy and adhere to it
 All reasonable efforts must be made by the receiving party to prevent any form of
unauthorised access to the data
 Only aggregated versions of the data may be made available to third parties unless the
explicit permission is received from the data owner
N.B. Clearly this is more of a consideration for data owners/issuers and may or may not be 
something that regulators want to provide guidance on. 
7.4.2  The Role of ESMA 
At our meeting on 17th November at the European Commission, it was explained that ESMA does not 
currently have a budget that covers the construction and maintenance of a website that could 
manage the hosting of all the data and documentation requirements for STS. 
16 

EuroABS Recommendations to the European Commission on Article 5 of STS
We consider that under these circumstances and due to the fact that many issuers have made a 
variety of arrangements for the secure hosting of their data and documentation, ESMA’s efforts may 
be better employed acting as a directory for all this information. i.e that ESMA should run a website 
that lists all STS qualifying ABS issues and provides links to the web location of all the transparency 
information. Publication by ESMA of the URL for a transaction would be a prerequisite to STS 
compliance. 
We also consider that ESMA may be well placed (better than any other organisation) to act as a focal 
point for information on compliance (or non-compliance) of ABS issuers. ESMA could act as the 
ultimate arbiter as to whether an issue complies or does not comply, receiving requests and reports 
from all and any interested parties. 
17