Dies ist eine HTML Version eines Anhanges der Informationsfreiheitsanfrage 'Securitisation Regulation'.



Ref. Ares(2017)3025174 - 16/06/2017
Association for Financial Markets in Europe 
The impact of market behaviour unconnected to asset quality 
on the price volatility of securitisations from 2007-2009 
March 2014 
Introduction 
On 19 December 2013, the European Insurance and Occupational Pensions Authority (EIOPA) published a 
report titled “Technical Report on Standard Formula Design and Calibration for Certain Long-Term Investments”, 
which proposes revised capital charges for securitisations under the standard model (Securitisation Review).  
We remain concerned that the capital charges proposed in the Securitisation Review are still too high and will 
continue to hinder European insurance company investment in securitisation, adversely impacting the ability 
of securitisations to play a role in financing the real economy, including facilitating the funding of SMEs.   
Whilst AFME generally agrees with EIOPA’s methodology in the Securitisation Review, we believe that the 
historical period of data used to calculate the calibration, namely 2007-2013, is inappropriate and produces 
damaging results. We propose that material recalibration is needed to adjust for the exceptional volatility of the 
period used in EIOPA’s analysis (from 2007-2009), which was caused by historical circumstances that were in 
large part unconnected with the credit quality of securitisations and in particular those types of securitisations 
classified as Type 1 in the Securitisation Review.    This volatility was not caused by credit performance of the 
securitisations (which it has been proven has been quite strong other than in respect of US subprime and Alt A 
RMBS and certain types of European CMBS) but rather the rapid withdrawal of much of the leverage that 
underpinned much of the securitisation investor base (i.e. wider prudential issues).   In particular this 
deleveraging occurred through rapid and significant liquidation of ABS portfolios by: 
a. Structured Investment Vehicles (SIVs) and bank sponsored arbitrage investment conduits both of which
made money through a maturity mismatch arbitrage of buying longer dated higher yielding assets and
funding them with inexpensive short dated wholesale funding;
b. other types of investment funds that undertook similar activities but funded themselves with repo
financing from banks;
c. banks that held material amounts of securitisation paper either directly as a primary investor or indirectly
as a result of buying assets out of their sponsored SIVs or conduits (per a. above) or closing out on repos
per b. above; and
d. other types of financial institution investors that liquidated their securitisation holdings because of the
perceived stigma surrounding all securitisations (even good quality Type 1 securitisations) and the
negative impact on these institutions equity prices if they were holding this stigimatised asset class.
In fact it is estimated that approximately 65% of the European ABS investor base pre-crisis was leveraged 
money1 and because of the regulations we refer to below, these types of investors are unlikely to return to the 
market.  As a result the massive liquidation and price volatility that characterised the period between 2007-
2009 is unlikely to recur. 
1 Source: Lloyd’s Bank 


We recommend that a recalibration should be based on the likely performance of the more regulated 
securitisation market going forward and should not incorporate price volatility caused by wider prudential 
risks that were unrelated to asset quality and have been mitigated through recent regulation.  AFME proposes 
that one solution could be to exclude the 2007-2009 data period from the calibration exercise; the remaining 
period of 2010-2013, albeit shorter than the EIOPA time period, is more representative of the price volatility of 
the securitisation market, incorporates a stress period of securitisation instruments (the sovereign debt crisis) 
and considers some of the recent regulatory changes. 
In this note, AFME aims to explain and demonstrate the impact of one type of such market behaviour that 
significantly impacted securitisation price volatility from 2007-2009.  Specifically, we focus on the role of 
levered investors (a. and b. above) that had material maturity mismatches between their assets and liabilities, 
such as SIVs and ABCP arbitrage investment conduits.   These vehicles invested in a significant proportion of 
the securitisation market prior to 2007.  As a result of the impact of the US subprime crisis and the 
stigmatisation of the securitisation product (due to the lack of differentiation between good and bad products), 
these entities suffered a credit and liquidity shortage, which resulted in forced deleveraging and fire sales of 
large volumes of securitisation assets. Despite having been unrelated to the asset quality of much of the 
securitisation paper owned by these vehicles, such behaviour had a large impact on price volatility. We believe 
regulatory reforms introduced since the crisis would make it unlikely for these events to recur.   For these 
reasons, we strongly believe that a forward-looking recalibration for securitisations is necessary and can be 
based on the price performance of securitisations from 2010-2013. 
The impact of leveraged securitisation investors with maturity mismatch 
between assets and liabilities on securitisation price volatility 

Prior to 2007 & early 2007: SIVs and ABCP arbitrage investment conduits invested in 
large amounts of securitisations 

Prior to 2007, securitisation was attractive to many types of investors because it had a historical reputation of 
strong performance, in terms of both credit and price.  However, large buyers of securitisation included highly 
levered vehicles (e.g. SIVs and ABCP arbitrage investment conduits).  Many SIVs and ABCP arbitrage investment 
conduits  were  bank-owned  or  bank-sponsored  investment  vehicles  that  invested  mainly  in  medium-  and 
longer-term financial  assets and funded those investments by issuing commercial paper or other short-term 
debt or drawing on short-term credit lines. 
Securitisation  was  especially  attractive  to  these  vehicles  because  of  the  asset  yields,  historical  performance, 
predictable cash flows and typically floating rate return (important because SIVs did not wish to take interest 
rate risk).   
In early 2007, the total asset holdings of SIVs rated and surveyed in Europe2 was around USD 297bn3 (c. EUR 
229bn)4.  Of the assets that SIVs held, 57%, on average, were structured finance products (approximately USD 
169bn).  Therefore, not only did these vehicles primarily purchase securitisations but also they held a material 
portion of the market5.  It should be noted that in addition to SIVs’ holdings of ABS, as of 31 December 2007 an 
additional $121 billion of assets were held in ABCP Credit Arbitrage programmes.  92% of these assets were 
AAA rated securitisations.  After the crisis, many of these securities also were sold into the market at distressed 
prices.    Further details of these ABCP Credit Arbitrage vehicles are available as needed.   
2 Source: S&P 
“SIV Outlook 2007 – Another Bumper Year Ahead for SIVs After Assets Approach $300 Billion in 2006”. 26 February 2007, 
Standard and Poor’s 
4 Based on exchange rate as at 1 Feb 2007 – www.oanda.com 
5 The total outstanding European securitisation in Q1 2007 was EUR 1366.8bn (including volumes retained on bank 
balance sheet).  Source: AFME 



Chart 1: Average SIV portfolio breakdown by asset type (as at February 2007) 
Financial institutions 
40% 
Structured finance 
57% 
Corporates 
2% 
Sovereign 
1% 
Source: Standard & Poor’s 
Notably, SIVs mostly invested in AAA-rated assets (67.59% - around USD 114bn) – please see Appendix 1 for 
the  complete  breakdown  of  SIV  investment  by  credit  rating6.    Also,  SIVs  invested  in  a  diverse  range  of 
securitisation assets, including a large proportion of European securitisations.  For example, as at 2 November 
2007, the majority of EMEA SIV assets were US securitisations at 49%; however, 36% of their assets were UK, 
German,  Dutch  and  French  securitisations  –  please  see  Appendix  4  for  the  breakdown7.      It  is  difficult  to 
determine the precise volume of paper that SIVs and other similar vehicles purchased because of the manner in 
which orders were placed into books (i.e. banks would put in one aggregate order both for their own balance 
sheet and for their sponsored vehicles); some of the large pre-crisis UK RMBS issuers estimate that at least 30% 
of their paper was purchased by SIVs and other leveraged buyers8. 
SIVs and ABCP arbitrage investment conduits invested were mostly funded through 
short term credit lines 

In order to fund their portfolio investments, SIVs almost exclusively issued debt – mostly short term paper.  In 
early 2007, the total senior debt of SIVs rated and surveyed in Europe9 totalled approximately USD 271bn10 (c. 
EUR  209bn11).      The  majority  of  senior  debt  issued  was  through  US  MTN  programs12  at  approximately  USD 
169bn (c. EUR 130bn13); USD 21.52bn (c. EUR 16.52bn14) was from European Commercial Paper – please see 
“SIV Outlook 2007 – Another Bumper Year Ahead for SIVs After Assets Approach $300 Billion in 2006”. 26 February 2007, 
Standard and Poor’s 
“Moody’s Update on Structured Investment Vehicles”, International Structured Finance: Europe, Middle East Africa: Special 
Report, Moody’s Investor Service, 16 January 2008 
8 8 Lloyds Banking Group per Permanent and Arkle 2006-7 RMBS issuance. 
9 Source: S&P 
10 “SIV Outlook 2007 – Another Bumper Year Ahead for SIVs After Assets Approach $300 Billion in 2006”. 26 February 2007, 
Standard and Poor’s 
11 Based on exchange rate as at 1 Feb 2007 – www.oanda.com 
12 Medium Term Notes 
13 Based on exchange rate as at 1 Feb 2007 – www.oanda.com 
14 Based on exchange rate as at 1 Feb 2007 – www.oanda.com 


Appendix  2.      There  was  even  a  greater  volume of  ABCP  outstanding:  approximately  EUR  377bn of  US  and 
European ABCP outstanding in Q1 2008 (EUR 26.8bn European ABCP outstanding)15.  
The  debt  issued  by  SIVs  and  ABCP  arbitrage  vehicles  was  typically  short-dated  –  liabilities  generally  had 
Weighted Average Lives (WALs) of 6-9 months for SIV debt and even shorter for ABCP arbitrage vehicles.  The 
WAL of the liabilities indicates the time frame in which the vehicle needs to obtain new funding and so points to 
the levels of near-term funding pressures these vehicles.  A vehicle with liabilities with very short WALs will 
have a very high level of funding pressure.  If such a vehicle is unable to obtain new funding at maturity of its 
liabilities,  it  will  need  to  take  urgent  action,  such  as  liquidating  assets  or  drawing  down  backstop  liquidity 
facilities if available, and may be forced into receivership if it cannot raise enough money to pay its maturing 
debts.  Table 1 illustrates the WAL-based funding pressures of the SIVs in November 2007 – the average WAL 
of senior debt issued by SIVs was 5.5 months, the shortest was 3.5 months and the longest was 11.6 months16.  
It should be noted that the WAL of debt issued by ABCP credit arbitrage vehicles would have been shorter. 
Table 1: SIV senior debt WAL (months) – as at 16 November 2007 
Average 
5.5 
Shortest 
3.5 
Longest 
11.6 
* Average figures include vehicles in enforcement (which, for the purpose of computing these averages, are  set to zero, but are ignored in 
the search for the shortest WAL).
 
Source: Moody’s Investment Services 
The  funding  pressures  of  these  vehicles  were  exacerbated  by  the  great  deal  of  maturity  mismatch  between 
their assets and liabilities.  As explained above, the length of WALs of SIV and ABCP arbitrage vehicles liabilities 
was months.  However, SIV and ABCP credit arbitrage vehicle assets typically had asset WALs of years - usually 
3-4 years.  
15 ESF Securitisation Data Report: Q1 2008 
16 “Moody’s Update on Structured Investment Vehicles”, International Structured Finance: Europe, Middle East Africa: 
Special Report, Moody’s Investor Service, 16 January 2008 



Chart 2: Weighted average life of SIV assets compared with weighted average life of liabilities 



As the SIV and ABCP credit arbitrage vehicle markets grew, leverage increased 
From 2003 to 2007, SIV and ABCP credit arbitrage vehicle investment portfolios grew.  From 2006 to 2007, 
there was an increase of 43.8% in SIV total asset holdings from the previous year.  As a consequence of the 
funding model of SIVs – short-term credit lines to fund longer assets – SIV leverage also increased17. 
Chart 3: SIV average leverage compared to discount margin 
2007-2009: the subprime crisis made it impossible for SIVs and ABCP credit arbitrage 
vehicles to refinance their short term funding, resulting in forced deleveraging 

In  mid-2007,  when  the  US  subprime  housing  market  collapsed,  adversely  impacting  the  financial  industry’s 
perception of all securitisation (including high quality securitisation).  In many cases (i.e. European RMBS and 
ABS and US ABS (credit cards, autos, etc.) the negative perception was not directly related to the actual credit 
risk of the assets, which is demonstrated by the strong credit performance of most European assets throughout 
the  crisis  (see  Appendix  3).      However,  the  result  of  the  market-wide  negative  perception  was  that  highly 
levered vehicles (including SIVs and ABCP arbitrage investments)  with short-term refinancing pressures and 
significant maturity mismatch between their assets and liabilities and other vehicles, irrespective of whether 
they were holding good or bad quality assets (due to the lack of distinction between the two) could not obtain 
financing.  The lack of financing forced SIVs and other similar vehicles to delever: they either entered into fire 
sales,  selling  off  their  securitisation  assets,  or  parent  banks  took  the  assets  onto  balance  sheet  to  slowly 
liquidate the assets.  This process of liquidation by parent banks was in itself highly challenging, as the  small 
number of banks and insurers remaining who retained any appetite for ABS with good underlying credit risk 
were not able to buy from the forced sellers at any price due to regulatory changes.  The only buyers left were 
therefore  hedge  funds,  not  buy  and  hold  investors,  and  whose  pricing  expectations  reflected  both  this  and 
prevailing market conditions.  All of these factors combined to create a “perfect storm” which  caused further 
sharp falls in the market price and liquidity of securitisation assets. 
17 “SIV Outlook 2007 – Another Bumper Year Ahead for SIVs After Assets Approach $300 Billion in 2006”. 26 February 2007, 
Standard and Poor’s 



Chart 4 shows the aggregate sector refinancing needs of SIVs from December 2007 to November 200818 and 
demonstrates  the  amount  the  sector  would  need  to  refinance  through  alternative  funding  arrangements  or 
asset liquidations. 
Chart 4: SIV Refinancing Needs: Net Outflow Profile (USD Millions) 
Source: Moody’s Investment Services 
Chart  5  illustrates  the  dramatic  decrease  in  SIV  liabilities  from  January  2008  to  December  2008  (the  chart 
produced  in  May  2008  forecasts  the  decrease  in  liabilities  based  on  the  maturity  of  the  liabilities).  Further, 
Chart  6  illustrates  the  sudden  decline  in  SIV  assets  through  forced  selling.  In  July  2007,  SIV  assets  totalled 
approximately USD 400bn (c. EUR 295bn19), by November 2007, the assets decreased to USD 300bn (c. EUR 
208bn20) – a decrease of USD 100bn of assets in 4 months21. 
18 “This is computed by netting daily asset inflows with liability outflows across the sector for each month” “Moody’s Update 
on Structured Investment Vehicles”, International Structured Finance: Europe, Middle East Africa: Special Report, Moody’s 
Investor Service, 16 January 2008 
19 Based on exchange rate as at 2 July2007 – www.oanda.com 
20 Based on exchange rate as at 1 November – www.oanda.com 
21 “Moody’s Update on Structured Investment Vehicles”, International Structured Finance: Europe, Middle East Africa: 
Special Report, Moody’s Investor Service, 16 January 2008 




Chart 5: Total outstanding SIV and LPFC Senior Liabilities Due from April – December 200822 
Source: Standard & Poor’s23 
Chart 6: Assets under management of EMEA SIVs24 
Source: Moody’s Investment Services 
Moody’s estimated that SIVs liquidated a total of USD 55.6 billion of assets between 1 June and 16 November 
2007 – a drop of 16% of the sector’s total assets under management on May 31 2007.  As a result of this sudden 
delveraging, price volatility dramatically increased for securitisation in all sectors.  
22 Data includes 29 SIVs and one limited purpose finance company (LPFC).  Among the 30 vehicles, 25 SIVS and one LPFC 
still had senior liabilities due after March 31 2008.  The remaining four SIVs had no senior liabilities due after March 31 
2008.  The senior liabilities included a liquidity facility and senior repurchase funding.  Data for all of the vehicles senior 
liabilities was as of March 31 2008, except for four SIVS whose senior liabilities data was as of Dec 31 2007 
23 “A first look at structured investment vehicles remaining debt outstanding and their asset portfolio sector allocations”
Standard & Poor’s, 22 May 2008 
24 “Moody’s Update on Structured Investment Vehicles”, International Structured Finance: Europe, Middle East Africa: 
Special Report, Moody’s Investor Service, 16 January 2008 







Securitisations suffered further price volatility as banks holding SIV assets were bailed-
out 

As SIVs liquidated their assets, sponsor/parent banks took a significant portion of these assets on their own 
balance sheets, usually with the aim of unwinding the positions over time.  By 2009, the placed issuance of 
securitisation decreased by approximately 80%; however, the percentage of outstanding securitisation debt 
retained on banks’ balance sheets increased by 30% from Q1 2008 to Q1 2009.  When the banks began to be 
bailed out from 2007-2009, they began to develer.  As a consequence of the large securitisation retention on 
banks’ balance sheets, these events introduced even further price volatility in the securitisation market.  Charts 
7 and 8 illustrate the change in the volume of placed securitisation issuance from 2008 to 2012 and the volume 
of retained outstanding securitisation compared to placed outstanding securitisation. 
Chart 7: Placed issuance of securitisation from 2008-2012 
120.00 
100.00 
80.00 

n
(b

60.00 
EUR 
40.00 
20.00 
0.00 
2008 
2009 
2010 
2011 
2012 
Source: AFME/SIFMA members, AFME, Bloomberg, Dealogic, Thomson Reuters 



Chart 8: Securitisation placed outstanding compared to retained outstanding 
Regulatory reform 
As explained above, there were many market practices, unrelated to the quality of securitisation that resulted 
in the dramatic price volatility of securitisations from 2007-2009.  AFME believes that as a result of regulatory 
reform, circumstances similar to those explained above are extremely unlikely to recur.  Governments and 
regulatory authorities have implemented or are in the course of developing a number of prudential regulations 
that would prevent such practices, including, amongst others: the introduction of the Liquidity Coverage Ratio 
(Basel III/CRR), Net Stable Funding Ratio (Basel III), recovery and resolution directive (BRRD), Fundamental 
Review of the Trading Book (Basel) and Shadow Banking Recommendations.  AFME’s Regulatory Reform Map 
(March 2014)
 illustrates the specific ways in which these and other regulations mitigated for both 
securitisation-specific issues and market practices unrelated to securitisation (for SIV and other similar 
vehicles-related issues, see – Refinancing Risk).
10 


Appendix 1 
Chart 9: Rating of SIV assets (as at February 2007) 
BBB 
0% 

16% 
AA 
16% 
AAA 
68% 
Source: Standard & Poor’s 
11 


Appendix 2 
Chart 10: Outstanding SIV senior debt (as at February 2007) 
12 

Appendix 3 
Table 3: Securitisation default rates from mid-2007 to Q3 2013 
Original Issuance (EUR 
billion) 
Default Rate (%) 
Europe 
Credit Cards 
33.2 
0.00 
RMBS 
755.7 
0.08 
Other consumer ABS 
68.0 
0.13 
Leveraged loan CLOs 
71.3 
0.1 
Other ABS 
71.3 
0.16 
Corporate Securitisations 
65.8 
0.34 
Synthetic Corporate CDOs 
254.3 
2.76 
CMBS 
163.2 
9.08 
Other CDOs 
77.8 
6.37 
CDOs of ABS 
28.9 
40.21 
Source: Standard & Poor’s 
13 


Appendix 4 
Chart 11: Country composition of SIV assets (2 November 2007) 
Other 
11% 
UK 
US 
22% 
48% 
Australia 
5% 
Germany 
4% 
France 
The Netherlands 
4% 
6% 
Source: Moody’s Investment Services 
14