This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Study: The Economic Case for Investing in Europe's Defence Industry'.


Error! No text of specified style in document. 
The Economic Case for  
Investing in Europe’s  
Defence Industry -  
Additional Detailed Sectoral 
Analysis and Comparison 
Between Selected EU Member 
States 
April 2014 
 
 
- 1 - 

 
Europe Economics is registered in England No. 3477100.  Registered offices at Chancery House, 53-64 Chancery Lane, London WC2A 1QU. 
Whilst  every  effort  has been  made to  ensure  the  accuracy  of  the information/material  contained in  this  report,  Europe Economics assumes no 
responsibility  for  and  gives  no  guarantees,  undertakings  or  warranties  concerning  the  accuracy,  completeness  or  up  to  date  nature  of  the 
information/analysis provided in the report and does not accept any liability whatsoever arising from any errors or omissions © Europe Economics.   
 

link to page 5 link to page 9 link to page 10 link to page 11 link to page 12 link to page 13 link to page 14 link to page 16 link to page 17 link to page 20 link to page 21 link to page 21 link to page 21 link to page 22 link to page 22 link to page 23 link to page 23 link to page 24 link to page 26 link to page 28 link to page 28 link to page 29 link to page 39 link to page 39 link to page 40 link to page 41 link to page 42 link to page 42 link to page 43 link to page 43 link to page 43 link to page 43  
Contents 

Executive Summary .............................................................................................................................................. 1 

Introduction ........................................................................................................................................................... 5 

Macroeconomic Impacts..................................................................................................................................... 6 
3.1 
GDP................................................................................................................................................................. 7 
3.2 
Tax revenue .................................................................................................................................................. 8 
3.3 
Employment .................................................................................................................................................. 9 
3.4 
Skilled employment ................................................................................................................................... 10 
3.5 
R&D ............................................................................................................................................................... 12 
3.6 
Exports ......................................................................................................................................................... 13 
3.7 
Capital intensity .......................................................................................................................................... 16 

Comparison with Other Sectors .................................................................................................................... 17 
4.1 
GDP............................................................................................................................................................... 17 
4.2 
Tax revenue ................................................................................................................................................ 17 
4.3 
Employment ................................................................................................................................................ 18 
4.4 
Skilled employment ................................................................................................................................... 18 
4.5 
R&D ............................................................................................................................................................... 19 
4.6 
Exports ......................................................................................................................................................... 19 
4.7 
Capital intensity .......................................................................................................................................... 20 

Conclusions ......................................................................................................................................................... 22 

Appendix 1:  Assumptions, Conceptual Issues and the €100m Investment ........................................ 24 
6.1 
Conceptual issues and assumptions ...................................................................................................... 24 
6.2 
Mapping of defence expenditure categories ........................................................................................ 25 

Appendix 2:  I-O Analysis ................................................................................................................................. 35 
7.1 
Basic set up .................................................................................................................................................. 35 
7.2 
Changes in final demand ........................................................................................................................... 36 
7.3 
Multipliers .................................................................................................................................................... 37 
7.4 
Richer models ............................................................................................................................................. 38 
7.5 
Limitations ................................................................................................................................................... 38 

Appendix 3:  Model of Skilled Employment ................................................................................................. 39 
8.1 
Relationship between productivities ..................................................................................................... 39 
8.2 
Calibration ................................................................................................................................................... 39 
8.3 
Determination of sectoral proportions ................................................................................................ 39 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Executive Summary 
1  Executive Summary 
The primary purposes of defence spending are the preservation of peace, the protection of security, the 
maintenance  of  safe  trade  and  transport  routes,  the  underpinning  of  international  diplomacy,  and  the 
support  of  the  projection  of  national  political  values.    These  primary  purposes  have  profound 
macroeconomic  implications  —  few  countries  can  flourish  economically  without  secure  defence 
arrangements. 
But  defence  expenditure,  like  other  forms  of  public  spending,  has  narrower  short-  to  medium-term 
macroeconomic implications.  Cuts to public spending can be vital to making government budgets and debt 
positions  sustainable.    But  not  all  spending  is  the  same  in  its  short-  to  medium-term  macroeconomic 
impacts.  Cuts to some forms of government spending are likely to induce larger shifts (often, in the short-
term, falls) in GDP than other forms of spending. 
In this context, the EDA asked Europe Economics to consider a hypothetical investment of €100m in the 
defence industry of selected EU Member States and to compare the short- to medium-term impacts of this 
investment with an equivalent level of investment in other industries. 
This work built an analysis that Europe Economics previously conducted for the European Defence Agency 
(EDA) using the I-O tables produced by Eurostat.  The distinguishing feature of this project is the use of the 
more  detailed  I-O  tables  produced  by  the  statistics  offices  of  certain  participating  Member  States 
(specifically,  Germany,  Netherlands,  Poland,  Spain,  and  the  United  Kingdom).    While  it  was  originally 
intended to include France in this study, neither Europe Economics nor the EDA were able to gain access 
to national defence data at the required level of detail (though we are aware that such data exist). 
The comparison of multipliers between results based on national and Eurostat data is the key contribution 
of this current study:  it indicates the extent to which the broad sector definitions in Eurostat affect the 
modelled impacts of an investment in the defence sector of each Member State.1 
1.1.1  Multiplier effects 
Economists distinguish between the short-term macroeconomic impacts of different forms of spending by 
estimating what are called “multipliers”  — i.e. the multiple by which GDP changes for a given change in 
spending.  Multipliers are defined such that if a GDP multiplier is 1, then for every €100m of spending cut in 
that  area  GDP  will  fall  (in  the  short-term)  by  €100m;  whilst  if  a  GDP  multiplier  is  0.5,  then  for  every 
€100m of spending cut in that area GDP will fall (in the short-term) by €50m; and so on. 
Where  some part  of  spending  will  be  on  imports,  a  nationally-estimated multiplier  may  be  lower  than  a 
globally-estimated  multiplier.    So,  for  example,  if  the  delivery  of  some  defence  contract  in  Germany 
requires  the  contractor  to  import  an  intermediate  product  from  Poland,  the  German  multiplier  will  be 
lower than the EU multiplier. 
                                                
1   The results presented in this study should not be compared with the EU-level multipliers reported in our previous 
study for the EDA.  This is because the  structure of the national I-O tables makes it impossible to include spill-
over effects arising from increases in imports at the Member State level.  As such, the estimates for Member States 
in this study should be regarded as lower bounds.  Similarly, comparing estimates based on the national I-O tables 
of  different  countries  would  be  misleading  because  the  tables  used  to  produce  such  estimates  differ  between 
countries. 
- 1 - 

Executive Summary 
Similar  multipliers  can  be  defined  for  other  macroeconomic  variables  such  as  employment,  taxation  and 
capital intensity. 
1.1.2  GDP impacts 
As shown in the table below, our calculations suggest that using Eurostat data leads to an underestimate of 
the impact of an investment in the defence sector on GDP.  Indeed, the fact that estimated GDP effects 
increase with the precision of the definitions of defence activities suggests that the defence sector creates 
more spillovers per unit of investment than the other sectors with which they are grouped in the Eurostat 
tables. 
The difference between the estimates based on Eurostat and national data is most significant for the UK.  
This may, at least in part, reflect the more precise disaggregation of sectors that is available in the UK I-O 
tables (123 sectors) relative to the I-O tables of the other selected Member States.  If correct, this would 
suggest  that  the  estimated  impacts  for  investments  other  countries  would  be  higher  if  the  level  of 
disaggregation  in  those  countries  were  the  same  as  in  the  UK,  although  various  country-specific  factors 
would affect the extent to which this relationship holds. 
pMS  Increase in GDP (€m)   GDP multiplier (national data) 
GDP multiplier (Eurostat data) 
DE 
87.9 
0.9 
0.8 
NL 
51.6 
0.5 
0.4 
PL 
87.4 
0.9 
0.9 
ES 
83.7 
0.8 
0.8 
UK 
164.8 
1.7 
1.2 
Source: Europe Economics’ calculations. 
1.1.3  Tax revenue impacts 
We calculated the effects of an investment in the defence sector on tax for a definition of tax receipts that 
includes social contributions.  These are shown in the table below. As per the GDP results, Eurostat data 
appears  to  underestimate  the  impact  of  a  hypothetical  €100m  in  the  defence  sector  on  tax  revenue, 
particularly for the UK. 
pMS 
Increase in tax 
Tax revenue multiplier 
Tax revenue multiplier 
revenue (€m)  
(national data) 
(Eurostat data) 
DE 
35.9 
0.4 
0.3 
NL 
20.4 
0.2 
0.2 
PL 
28.7 
0.3 
0.3 
ES 
30.7 
0.3 
0.3 
UK 
61.6 
0.6 
0.4 
Source: Europe Economics’ calculations. 
1.1.4  Employment impacts 
As shown in the table below, after accounting for induced effects we find that the use of Eurostat data to 
estimate  the  employment  impacts  of  investing  in  the  defence  sectors  of  the  selected  Member  States 
generally resulted in smaller employment multipliers than those estimated using data provided by national 
statistics offices.  An exception to this rule, however, is Spain for which employment effects estimated using 
national data are lower than those estimated using Eurostat data.  
pMS 
Number of jobs 
Employment multiplier 
Employment Multiplier 
created  
(national data) 
(Eurostat data) 
DE 
1,691 
16.9 
13.8 
NL 
741 
7.4 
6.6 
PL 
5,262 
52.6 
51.2 
- 2 - 

Executive Summary 
pMS 
Number of jobs 
Employment multiplier 
Employment Multiplier 
created  
(national data) 
(Eurostat data) 
ES 
1,796 
18.0 
18.4 
UK 
2,534 
25.3 
18.9 
Source: Europe Economics’ calculations. 
1.1.5  Skilled employment 
The  table below  shows that  the  estimated  impact  on  skilled  employment  using  national  data  significantly 
exceeds that estimated using Eurostat data for all countries.2  For example, estimated impacts using national 
data are 94 per cent greater for Poland, 98 per cent greater for Spain and 257 per cent greater for the 
Netherlands.   
These  results  suggest  that  the  proportion  of  skilled jobs  in  the  defence  sectors  significantly  exceeds  the 
proportion of skilled jobs in civil sectors that belong to the same industry category in the Eurostat data.  
Therefore, a more precise definition of the defence sector in Eurostat data would almost certainly result in 
the  estimated  impact  of  investment  on  skilled  employment  being  greater  than  that  presented  in  our 
previous report to the EDA. 
pMS 
Number of skilled 
Skilled employment multiplier  Skilled employment multiplier 
jobs created  
(national data) 
(Eurostat data) 
DE 
384 
3.8 
2.4 
NL 
495 
5.0 
1.4 
PL 
2,313 
23.1 
11.9 
ES 
908.9 
9.1 
4.6 
UK 
1,020 
10.2 
5.4 
Source: Europe Economics’ calculations. 
1.1.6  R&D 
The results of our analysis are shown in the table below.  The table shows that the estimated impacts of 
defence sector investment on R&D using national data exceed those estimated using Eurostat data for all 
countries other than Poland and Spain. 
The  difference  between  estimated  multipliers  for  the  latter  two  countries  is  very  small  whereas  the 
difference  for  the  UK  is  particularly  significant.    As  noted  above,  this  may  reflect  the  more  precise 
disaggregation of sectors that is available in the UK I-O tables.  Given that R&D is a crucial component of 
the defence sector it is to be expected that the estimated impacts on R&D rise when defence activities are 
more precisely defined. 
pMS 
Increase in R&D 
R&D Multiplier (national data) 
R&D Multiplier (Eurostat 
(€’000)  
data) 
DE 
7,570 
75.7 
72.1 
NL 
2,971 
29.7 
18.1 
PL 
3,882 
38.8 
39.1 
ES 
5,797 
58.0 
58.1 
UK 
14,161 
141.6 
117.4 
Source: Europe Economics’ calculations, 
                                                
2   These estimates should be treated with some caution, given that we have followed a second-best methodology in 
absence of access to micro-data.  The necessity for such caution is indicated by the fact that our model suggests 
that  several  sectors  are  composed  only  of  skilled  or  unskilled  labour,  which  is  unlikely  to  be  supported  by 
evidence.  While these are the best estimates that may be calculated given the data available, they are likely to be 
less accurate than, for instance, the results on total employment. 
- 3 - 

Executive Summary 
1.1.7  Exports 
Exports are an exogenous final use in the I-O framework and so are invariant to changes in other variables, 
meaning that it is not possible to  calculate the effects of the investment on exports though I-O analysis.  
We therefore employed an alternative approach involving econometric analysis of macroeconomic data to 
determine the relationship between defence exports and defence expenditure. 
Based on this analysis, we found that for high defence expenditure countries (France, Germany and the UK) 
a  one  percentage  point  increase  in  the  growth  rate  of  defence  expenditure  is  associated  with  a  1.04 
percentage  point  increase  in  the  growth  rate  of  defence  exports.    For  low  expenditure  countries  (the 
Netherlands, Poland and Spain) a one percentage point increase in the growth rate of defence expenditure 
is associated with a 6.35 percentage point increase in the growth rate of defence exports. 
1.1.8  Capital intensity 
Several Member States do not publish data on the consumption of fixed capital in their input-output tables.  
Therefore, the value of a Member State level analysis is limited in this case.  For completeness, however, 
the results for the selected Member States are shown in the table below. 
pMS 
Increase in 
Capital intensity multiplier 
Capital intensity multiplier 
consumption of fixed 
(national data) 
(Eurostat data) 
capital (€’000)  
DE 
13,187 
131.9 
Data not available 
NL 
Data not available 
Data not available 
53.1 
PL 
11,077 
110.8 
121 
ES 
Data not available 
Data not available 
Data not available 
UK 
Data not available 
Data not available 
Data not available 
Source: Europe Economics’ calculations. 
1.1.9  Summary and conclusions 
Based  on  the  evidence  presented  in  this  report,  it  appears  that  using  Eurostat  data  to  model  the 
macroeconomic effects of a hypothetical investment in the defence sector results in an underestimate of 
the true impacts.  The core reason for this seems to be the relatively low level of disaggregation of sectors 
in the Eurostat data, meaning that defence activities cannot be separated from some less productive civil 
activities.   
The national I-O data permit a somewhat more precise definition of the defence sector, resulting in higher 
estimates  of  macroeconomic  effects.    The  impact  on  the  results  of  further  refining  the  definition  of  the 
defence sector cannot be known but it is entirely possible that the estimated impacts would increase once 
again.    This  hypothesis,  and  the  implications  for  the  macroeconomic  impact  estimates  of  an  EU-wide 
investment  in  the  defence  sector,  could  only  be  tested  at  such  a  time  as  it  becomes  possible  to  more 
precisely identify defence activities in Eurostat data. 
Overall, these results suggest that the estimated economic impacts of investing in the EU defence sector (as 
presented  in  an  earlier  Europe  Economics  report  to  the  EDA)  would  have  been  higher,  in  some  cases 
significantly so, if detailed data for the defence activities had been available at the European level.  
- 4 - 

Introduction 
2  Introduction 
The primary purposes of defence spending are the preservation of peace, the protection of security, the 
underpinning  of  international  diplomacy,  and  the  support  of  the  projection  of  national  political  values.  
These  primary  purposes  have  profound  macroeconomic  implications  —  few  countries  can  flourish 
economically without secure defence arrangements. 
However, defence expenditure, like other forms of public spending, has narrower short- to medium-term 
macroeconomic implications.  Cuts to public spending can be vital to making government budgets and debt 
positions  sustainable.    But  not  all  spending  is  the  same  in  its  short-  to  medium-term  macroeconomic 
impacts.  Cuts to some forms of government spending are likely to induce larger shifts (often, in the short-
term, falls) in GDP than other forms of spending. 
In this context, the EDA asked Europe Economics to consider a hypothetical investment of €100m in the 
defence industry of selected EU Member States and to compare the short- to medium-term impacts of this 
investment with an equivalent level of investment in other industries. 
This work built an analysis that Europe Economics previously conducted for the European Defence Agency 
(EDA) using the I-O tables produced by Eurostat.  The distinguishing feature of this project is the use of the 
more  detailed  I-O  tables  produced  by  the  statistics  offices  of  certain  participating  Member  States 
(specifically, Germany, Netherlands, Poland, Spain, and the United Kingdom (UK)).  While it was originally 
intended to include France in this study, neither Europe Economics nor the EDA were able to gain access 
to national defence data at the required level of detail (though we are aware that such data exist). 
Estimating short-term macroeconomic effects 
We have used Input-Output (I-O) analysis to assess the impacts of a €100m investment on the economies 
of  the  selected  EU  Member  States.    Our  approach  assumes  that  the  additional  investment  would  be 
distributed in accordance with past expenditure, and so those activities that have proven to be in demand 
would receive proportionally more of the additional investment.  Our analysis includes impacts on:  GDP; 
tax revenue; employment; skilled employment; R&D; exports and capital intensity. 
Our estimates of the impacts of a €100m investment in the defence sector are contained in Chapter 3 of 
this report, while comparisons with other sectors are in Chapter 4.  Conclusions are drawn in Chapter 5. 
- 5 - 

Macroeconomic Impacts 
3  Macroeconomic Impacts 
The EDA asked Europe Economics to consider a hypothetical investment of €100m in the defence industry 
of  selected  participating  Member  States  and  to  compare  the  short-  to  medium-term  impacts  of  this 
investment  with  an  equivalent  level  of  investment  in  other  industries.  We  have  used  I-O  techniques  to 
complete this analysis. 
I-O analysis is a very simple general-equilibrium model which links various sectors in the economy through 
fixed linear relationships between the output of a sector and the inputs from other sectors. 
The main attraction of I-O analysis is that fixed linear relationships make it possible to calculate the effects 
of  an  increase  in  final  demand  for  one  sector  on  every  other  sector  of  the  economy  and  on  various 
macroeconomic  variables  –  GDP,  employment,  tax  revenue,  incomes  and  so  on.    Another  interesting 
feature is that ‘multipliers’ may be easily calculated.  These ‘multipliers’ indicate the percentage change in 
any macroeconomic quantity (GDP, tax revenue, income, employment, etc.) as a result of a unit increase in 
final demand for a particular sector.3 
There are, however, two main drawbacks of I-O analysis. 
  The  reliance  on  fixed  linear  relationships  assumes  no  change  in  production  technologies.  
Consequently, I-O is not accurate when analysing long-run effects.  The results of I-O analyses should 
always be viewed as rough approximations to true short-run effects. 
  I-O  analysis  only produces  close approximations  when economies  are not  close to  full  employment.  
Close to full employment, the additional resources required to produce extra output would simply not 
be available. 
In the case of the current research, we focus on the short-run impacts of a hypothetical investment and so 
technological  change  does  not  present  any  difficulties.    Furthermore,  given  the  current  economic 
circumstances of the EU, for the purposes of this study we operate on the assumption that none of the 
selected participating Member States is currently operating close to full employment. 
In preparation for I-O analysis, we divided the €100m defence investment across I-O sectors for each of 
the selected participating Member States.  For each macroeconomic variable included in our analysis, we 
have calculated three kinds of effects: 
  Direct effects:  These are the first round effects caused by an increase in output of a sector.  Direct 
effects  include  the  increases  in  output,  value  added,  employment,  tax  and  so on  that occur  in  those 
sectors that increase their output in order to meet the additional demand. 
  Indirect effects:  These are caused by all sectors adjusting outputs to allow for an increase in demand 
for intermediate inputs that would accompany any increase in output by any sector. 
  Induced  effects:    These  are  the  higher  order  effects  caused  by  the  factors  of  production  (including 
providers  of  labour,  capital  and  entrepreneurship)  spending  the  additional  income  arising  from  the 
direct and indirect increases in output.  An important point to note is that the structure of the I-O 
tables available from the national statistical offices does not allow us to calculate induced effects using I-
O analysis, and so we used national income multipliers as the basis for these calculations.  
In this section, we report results that include all of these effects. 
                                                
3   We  calculate  direct,  indirect  and  induced  effects.    Direct  effects  occur  in  the  defence  I-O  sectors  that  receive 
additional investment.  Indirect effects occur as other sectors adjust to increased demand for intermediate inputs.  
Induced effects arise as the higher output boosts wages and employees spend their additional income. 
- 6 - 

Macroeconomic Impacts 
3.1  GDP 
3.1.1  Approach 
We used the linear relationships inherent in the I-O tables to calculate the impacts of the €100m defence 
investment on the GDP of each selected Member State.  In particular we used the tables as follows.  
  To estimate the extra output required of each sector in order to fulfil the direct additional demand due 
to  the  investment,  we  relied  on  the  relationships  between  sectors  inherent  in  the  tables.    We  also 
estimated the indirect effects arising from the increase in demand for inputs by various sectors.4  Given 
sectoral  estimates  we  simply  summed  the  additional  output  across  all  sectors  to  obtain  the  total 
additional output for the Member State.   
  To  calculate the  additional  GDP  as  a  result  of  the  investment,  we  first  calculated  the  proportion  of 
output of each sector that represents value creation.5  We then used the same proportions to estimate 
the value added consistent with the increased outputs as a result of the investment. 
  To  calculate  the  GDP  multiplier  due  to  direct  and  indirect  effects,  we  simply  divided  the  additional 
GDP by the additional investment in that Member State (i.e. €100m). 
  The induced effects of an increase in demand (i.e. the impacts of an increase in consumption due to the 
increase in household incomes associated with an increase in demand) cannot be calculated by using I-
O tables because the household sector is regarded as extraneous.  We have calculated these effects 
indirectly using data on income multipliers.  To do this, we first estimated income multipliers based on 
savings  and  import  rates.6    We  then  multiplied  the  GDP  effects  (excluding  induced  effects)  by  the 
income multipliers to arrive at the total effects (including induced effects).  It should be noted that this 
analysis was conducted only at the Member State level, not at the sectoral levels. 
  The  higher  order  effects  of  an  increase  in  demand  for  products  of  other  geographical  regions  (as 
represented by ‘Rest of World Multipliers’) could not be calculated in this study.7 
3.1.2  Results 
The results of our analysis are shown in the table below.  Our calculations suggest that using Eurostat data 
led to an underestimate of the impact of an investment in the defence sector on GDP.  Indeed, the fact that 
estimated GDP effects increase with the precision of the definitions of defence activities suggests that the 
defence sector creates more spillovers per unit of investment than the other sectors with which they are 
grouped in the Eurostat tables. 
The difference between the estimates based on Eurostat and national data is most significant for  the UK.  
This may, at least in part, reflect the more precise disaggregation of sectors that is available in the UK I-O 
                                                
4   Technically, the additional output vector was calculated according to the formula  (𝑰 − 𝑨)−𝟏 ⋅ 𝑿𝑫, where 𝑨 is the 
input coefficients matrix and 𝑿𝑫 is the vector of additional demand. 
5   This proportion was calculated as value added divided by sectoral output. 
6   The formula used was  1 , where 𝑠 is the gross savings rate (that part of GDP that is not consumed by either the 
𝑠+𝑚
government or the private sector) and 𝑚 is the import rate (that part of GDP which is spent on imports).  The 
denominator of any multiplier formula contains that part of GDP which does not immediately lead to new value 
addition  in  the  economy.    Savings  lead  to  investment,  which  leads  to  capital  formation  in  the  future,  whereas 
imports  lead  to  immediate  value  creation  in  the  rest  of  the  world.    The  other  components  of  GDP  (domestic 
consumption and exports) lead to direct value creation in the home economy, and are thus not included. 
7   ‘Rest  of  the  world  multipliers’  operate  as  follows.    An  increase  in  demand  in  a  geographical  region  increases 
demand  for  products  from  the  rest  of  the  world.    In  turn,  this  increases  demand  within  countries  outside  the 
geographical region that experienced the increase in demand.  Assuming that there is two-way trade between the 
countries, this will create a feedback effect that results in a further increase in demand in the geographical region 
which experienced the original boost to demand. 
- 7 - 

Macroeconomic Impacts 
tables (123 sectors) relative to the I-O tables of the other selected Member States.  If correct, this would 
suggest  that  the  estimated  impacts  for  investments  other  countries  would  be  higher  if  the  level  of 
disaggregation  in  those  countries  were  the  same  as  in  the  UK,  although  various  country-specific  factors 
would affect the extent to which this relationship holds. 
Table 3.1:  GDP effects and multipliers by Member State (including induced effects) 
pMS  Increase in GDP (€m)   GDP multiplier (national data) 
GDP multiplier (Eurostat data) 
DE 
87.9 
0.9 
0.8 
NL 
51.6 
0.5 
0.4 
PL 
87.4 
0.9 
0.9 
ES 
83.7 
0.8 
0.8 
UK 
164.8 
1.7 
1.2 
Source: Europe Economics’ calculations. 
3.2  Tax revenue 
3.2.1  Approach 
We combined the tax data contained in the I-O tables and supplementary tax data from Eurostat with our 
results on GDP effects to calculate the impact of the €100m investment on tax revenue. 
Our analysis of production taxes proceeded as follows: 
  We first divided total production taxes in each sector (including ‘taxes less subsidies on production’ 
and ‘other net taxes on production’) by sectoral output to obtain an estimate of the proportion of the 
value of output that was appropriated by tax. 
  To  calculate  direct  effects,  we  multiplied  these  tax  rate  estimates  by  the  direct  increase  in  sectoral 
output, i.e. the amount of investment in each sector. 
  To calculate indirect effects, we multiplied the tax rate estimates by the direct and indirect increase in 
sectoral output. 
We then moved to our analysis of the effect on total tax receipts.  In order to incorporate taxes which do 
not appear in I-O tables (i.e. income taxes, capital taxes, etc.) we used data from Eurostat on tax receipts 
as a percentage of GDP.  We conducted two sets of calculations, one for total tax receipts and another for 
total tax receipts plus social contributions. 
  We obtained data from Eurostat on tax receipts as a percentage of GDP in the years corresponding to 
the various national and EU I-O tables. 
  To  calculate  direct  effects,  we  multiplied  these  percentages  by  the  direct  increases  in  GDP  in  each 
Member State. 
  To include indirect effects, we multiplied these percentages by the direct plus indirect increases in GDP 
in each Member State. 
  To  include  induced  effects,  we  multiplied  these  percentages  by  the  total  increase  in  GDP  (including 
induced effects) in each Member State. 
This method is consistent with the assumption that the additional GDP (direct, indirect and induced) has 
the  same  composition  in  terms  of  tax  liability  as  pre-existing  GDP.    This  assumption  is  unlikely  to  be 
entirely accurate because the direct and indirect GDP increases have a different sectoral composition when 
compared to pre-existing GDP, which in turn may not have the same tax liability as each other.  Therefore, 
estimates obtained using this method should be regarded as an approximation.8 
                                                
8   A  more  exact  way  to  calculate  the  impacts  on  tax  revenue  would  be  to  calculate  effects  within  an  I-O  model 
where households, capital and government are endogenous sectors.  Here, payments by households and owners of 
- 8 - 

Macroeconomic Impacts 
3.2.2  Results (total tax receipts including social contributions) 
We calculated the effects of an investment in the defence sector on tax for a definition of tax receipts that 
includes social contributions.  These are shown in the table below. As per the GDP results, Eurostat data 
appears  to  underestimate  the  impact  of  a  hypothetical  €100m  in  the  defence  sector  on  tax  revenue, 
particularly for the UK. 
Table 3.2:  Total tax effects (including social contributions) and multipliers by Member State (including 
induced effects) 
pMS 
Increase in tax 
Tax revenue multiplier 
Tax revenue multiplier 
revenue (€m)  
(national data) 
(Eurostat data) 
DE 
35.9 
0.4 
0.3 
NL 
20.4 
0.2 
0.2 
PL 
28.7 
0.3 
0.3 
ES 
30.7 
0.3 
0.3 
UK 
61.6 
0.6 
0.4 
Source: Europe Economics’ calculations. 
3.3  Employment 
3.3.1  Approach 
We used employment data in conjunction with I-O data and the results of our GDP impacts analysis to 
estimate the number of jobs created by sector and by Member State.  In particular: 
  We used Eurostat data on employment by NACE code to derive employment by I-O sector for the 
year corresponding to the latest available I-O tables for each Member State and the EU-27. 
  We  then  divided  total  employment  by  sectoral  output  (in  €m)  to  obtain  the  number  of  domestic 
workers per €m output. 
  We multiplied the additional output (in €m, calculated during the GDP impacts analysis) in each sector 
and  Member  State  by  the  number  of  domestic  workers  per  €m  output  in  order  to  estimate  the 
number of jobs that would be created.9  This was estimated for both direct effects (multiplying with 
direct increases in output) and indirect effects (multiplying with indirect increases in output). 
  The following methodology was used to calculate the induced employment effects: 
  Using national level employment data and data on GDP at current prices, we calculated the number 
of domestic workers per €m GDP for the year corresponding to the latest available I-O table. 
  We multiplied this figure by the additional GDP due to induced effects in €m to obtain an estimate 
of the number of additional jobs created due to induced effects. 
3.3.2  Results 
As shown in the table below, after accounting for induced effects we find that the use of Eurostat data to 
estimate  the  employment  impacts  of  investing  in  the  defence  sectors  of  the  selected  Member  States 
                                                                                                                                                            
capital to government would be regarded as tax, and the effects of income, production and capital taxes could be 
analysed.    However,  the  structure  of  Eurostat  I-O  tables regard  households  and  the  government  as  exogenous, 
making such analysis infeasible. 
9   It  is  important  to  distinguish  between  additional  employment  and  jobs  created.    An  increase  in  employment 
opportunities would almost always be higher than the actual increase in employment, as those that fill the new jobs 
might  leave  another  job  to  do  so.    Such  ‘displacement  effects’  depend  on  several  factors,  including  the  level  of 
unemployment, the mix of skills and so on.  Estimating these effects is beyond the scope of the project, and hence 
they are not taken into account here. 
- 9 - 

Macroeconomic Impacts 
generally resulted in smaller employment multipliers than those estimated using data provided by national 
statistics offices.  An exception to this rule, however, is Spain for which employment effects estimated using 
national data are lower than those estimated using Eurostat data.  
The  particularly  large  multiplier  observed  for  Poland  reflects  that  country’s  relatively  low  labour 
productivity, which means that a greater amount of labour is required to meet a given increase in demand, 
meaning that the impact of the  €100m investment on employment would be greater for Poland than for 
other Member States, all else being equal.  
Table 3.3:  Employment effects and multipliers by Member State (including induced effects) 
pMS 
Number of jobs 
Employment multiplier 
Employment Multiplier 
created  
(national data) 
(Eurostat data) 
DE 
1,691 
16.9 
13.8 
NL 
741 
7.4 
6.6 
PL 
5,262 
52.6 
51.2 
ES 
1,796 
18.0 
18.4 
UK 
2,534 
25.3 
18.9 
Source: Europe Economics’ calculations. 
3.4  Skilled employment 
3.4.1  Approach 
In estimating the impacts on skilled employment, we used data from the EU Labour Force Survey (LFS) on 
highest  levels  of  education  in  conjunction  with  our  results  on  total  employment.    Our  methodology  for 
direct and indirect effects was: 
  define skilled employment; 
  calculate the percentage of skilled workers in each sector; and 
  apply these percentages to the total increases in employment calculated in the previous section. 
For induced effects, a similar methodology was followed with percentages being calculated at the Member 
State level, and applied to our estimates of induced employment impacts. 
Regarding the first step of our methodology, we defined skilled employment as employment that requires at 
least a tertiary qualification.  This coincides with levels five and six in the ISCED 1997 classification.10  We 
then  assumed,  for  simplicity,  that  skilled  jobs  are  filled  by  skilled  workers  only  (i.e.  those  with  tertiary 
education) and non-skilled jobs are filled by non-skilled workers only.  Then, the proportion of skilled jobs 
would simply be the proportion of workers with education levels five or six. 
The second step of our methodology was more problematic because data on education levels attained by 
sector are not readily available.  Even for Member States with abundant data availability, such as the UK, a 
cross-tabulation  of  education  levels  and  economic  sectors  is  not  available  at  a  sufficiently  granular  level.  
Moreover,  although  organisations  such  as  CEDEFOP  regularly  publish  material  regarding  skill  levels  in 
Europe, they do so based on EU Labour Force Survey (EU-LFS) micro-data, and a skills level breakdown by 
I-O  sector  is  not  available  from  CEDEFOP  publications.    We  are  aware  that  the  EU-LFS  micro-data  set 
contains, for each observation, the highest level of education according to the ISCED 1997 classification as 
                                                
10   The International Standard Classification of Education (ISCED) was designed by UNESCO in the early 1970s.  For 
the 1997 classification of education levels, see 
http://www.unesco.org/education/information/nfsunesco/doc/isced_1997.htm. 
- 10 - 

Macroeconomic Impacts 
well  as  the  economic  activity  according  to  NACE  codes.    However,  access  to  the  EU-LFS  micro-data  is 
severely limited.11 
Given these constraints, it was necessary to adopt the following (second-best) approach based on a simple 
economic model.  We assumed that (i) there are only two types of workers – skilled and unskilled – each 
with a given level of productivity; and (ii) workers earn wages in proportion to productivity.12  In such a 
setup, we can show that productivity at a national level is given by the average of productivities of skilled 
and unskilled workers, weighted by the proportion of skilled and unskilled workers. 
To calibrate the model we gathered the following data: 
  value added per worker in the year of the latest I-O table; 
  proportion of workers with tertiary education in the economy, i.e. the proportion of skilled workers; 
and 
  income distribution, which shows the average income earned by those with various levels of education.  
By assumption, in our model incomes are  proportional to value added per worker.  Combined with 
data  from  the  EU-LFS  on  the  number  of  workers  at  each  education  level,  this  gave  us  the  relative 
productivity level of skilled and unskilled workers.   
Using  these  data,  and  the  fact  that  national  productivity  is  a  weighted  average  of  skilled  and  unskilled 
productivities in our model, we calculated the absolute levels of skilled and unskilled productivity for each 
selected Member State.  
We estimated the proportions of highly skilled workers in each sector that are consistent with the sector 
level productivity (as calculated when analysing employment impacts) while keeping the absolute levels of 
skilled and unskilled productivity levels constant.  The main drawback of this method is the assumption that 
there  are  two  groups  of  homogeneous  workers,  implying  two  levels  of  productivity  and  two  levels  of 
income.  In reality, we know that there is a wide spread of productivities across sectors, and even within 
sectors.   
Moreover,  the  share  of  wages  in  total  value  added  per  worker  in  a  capital-intensive  industry  might  be 
smaller than that in a labour-intensive industry.  It is therefore not surprising that our analysis resulted in 
numerous cases where actual sector productivity was below the calculated unskilled worker productivity, 
or above the calculated skilled worker productivity.  In such cases, we assumed that the sector comprised 
entirely  unskilled  and  skilled  workers,  respectively.    Given  the  abundance  of  such  cases,  the  estimates 
should be viewed with caution.13  
3.4.2  Results 
The  table below  shows that  the  estimated  impact  on  skilled  employment  using  national  data  significantly 
exceeds  that  estimated  using  Eurostat  data  for  all  countries.  14    For  example,  estimated  impacts  using 
                                                
11   According  to  Eurostat,  “Access  is  in  principle  restricted  to  universities,  research  institutes,  national  statistical 
institutes, central banks inside the EU and EEA countries, as well as to the European Central Bank”. If an exception 
cannot be made, then a formal application procedure would take 6 months, which would mean that the data would 
not be available in time for the completion of the project.  See 
  http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/portal/page/portal/microdata/documents/EN-LFS-MICRODATA.pdf 
12   The distribution of capital between workers would depend on the shape of the production function.  
13   More  precise  estimates  for  direct  and  indirect  effects  could  be  obtained  with  access  to  the  EU-LFS  micro-data.  
This problem does not apply to our estimates of induced effects because the actual proportions of skilled workers 
are easily and reliably available at the national and EU level. 
14  These estimates should be treated with some caution, given that we have followed a second-best methodology in 
absence of access to micro-data.  The necessity for such caution is indicated by the fact that our model suggests 
that  several  sectors  are  composed  only  of  skilled  or  unskilled  labour,  which  is  unlikely  to  be  supported  by 
- 11 - 

Macroeconomic Impacts 
national data are 94 per cent greater for Poland, 98 per cent greater for Spain and 257 per cent greater for 
the Netherlands.   
Table 3.4:  Skilled employment effects and multipliers by Member State (including induced effects) 
pMS 
Number of skilled 
Skilled employment multiplier  Skilled employment multiplier 
jobs created  
(national data) 
(Eurostat data) 
DE 
384 
3.8 
2.4 
NL 
495 
5.0 
1.4 
PL 
2,313 
23.1 
11.9 
ES 
908.9 
9.1 
4.6 
UK 
1,020 
10.2 
5.4 
Source: Europe Economics’ calculations. 
These  results  suggest  that  the  proportion  of  skilled jobs  in  the  defence  sectors  significantly  exceeds  the 
proportion of skilled jobs in civil sectors that belong to the same industry category in the Eurostat data.  
Therefore, a more precise definition of the defence sector in Eurostat data would almost certainly result in 
the  estimated  impact  of  investment  on  skilled  employment  being  greater  than  that  presented  in  our 
previous report to the EDA. 
It  is  also  interesting  to  note  that  there  is  a  wide  spread  of  skilled  employment  multipliers  after  induced 
effects have been accounted for.  As for the total employment effect estimate above, the particularly large 
multiplier observed for Poland reflects that country’s relatively low labour productivity, which means that a 
greater amount of labour is required to meet a given increase in demand.  Hence, the €100m investment in 
the Polish defence sector would lead to a greater increase in skilled employment, all else being equal, than 
would an identical investment in other Member States.  
3.5  R&D 
3.5.1  Approach 
The direct and indirect additions to value added in the R&D sector were calculated during the process of 
estimating  GDP  impacts  (where  the  GDP  impacts  in  each  sector  were  estimated).    In  order  to  include 
induced effects, we first calculated the percentage of national value added accounted for by the R&D sector 
and then applied this percentage to the additional GDP due to induced effects in each  selected  Member 
State. 
3.5.2  Results 
The results of our analysis are shown in the table below. The table shows that the estimated impacts of 
defence sector investment on R&D using national data exceed those estimated using Eurostat data for all 
countries other than Poland and Spain. 
The  difference  between  estimated  multipliers  for  the  latter  two  countries  is  very  small  whereas  the 
difference  for  the  UK  is  particularly  significant.    As  noted  above,  this  may  reflect  the  more  precise 
disaggregation of sectors that is available in the UK I-O tables.  Given that R&D is a crucial component of 
the defence sector it is to be expected that the estimated impacts on R&D rise when defence activities are 
more precisely defined. 
                                                                                                                                                            
evidence.  While these are the best estimates that may be calculated given the data available, they are likely to be 
less accurate than, for instance, the results on total employment. 
- 12 - 

Macroeconomic Impacts 
Table 3.5:  R&D effects and multipliers by Member State (including induced effects) 
pMS 
Increase in R&D 
R&D Multiplier (national data) 
R&D Multiplier (Eurostat 
(€’000)  
data) 
DE 
7,570 
75.7 
72.1 
NL 
2,971 
29.7 
18.1 
PL 
3,882 
38.8 
39.1 
ES 
5,797 
58.0 
58.1 
UK 
14,161 
141.6 
117.4 
Source: Europe Economics’ calculations. 
3.6  Exports 
3.6.1  Approach 
Since  exports  are  an  exogenous  final  use  in  the  I-O  framework  they  are  invariant  to  changes  in  other 
variables and so it is impossible to calculate the effects of the investment on exports though I-O analysis.  
We  have  therefore  employed  an  alternative  approach  involving  econometric  analysis  of  macroeconomic 
data to determine the relationship between defence exports and defence expenditure. 
3.6.1.1  Data 
We procured the following data for the six countries under study for the years 1988-2011. 
  defence export data in $m in 1990 prices from the Arms Trade database;15   
  defence expenditure data in $m in 2010 prices from the SIPRI Military Expenditure Database 2011;16 
and   
  GDP  data  in  $  in  2005  prices  from  the  National  Accounts  Estimates  of  Main  Aggregates,  United 
Nations Statistics Division.17   
There were no missing data points and in this respect we had a complete panel.18 
3.6.1.2  Methodology 
Our  methodology  centred  on  trying  to  establish  a  relationship  between  defence  spending  and  defence 
exports,  and  then  to  use  this  relationship  to  determine  the  effect  on  exports  of  a  €100m  increase  in 
defence  expenditure.    To  do  this,  we  used  multiple  regression  analysis19  to  determine  the  effects  of  an 
increase in defence expenditure on defence exports, controlling for the effects of GDP on defence exports.   
The first step in our approach was to convert the three data series (defence exports, defence expenditure 
and GDP) into a common unit with the same base year.  To do this, we converted the GDP figures from $ 
                                                
15   http://armstrade.sipri.org/armstrade/page/toplist.php 
16   http://milexdata.sipri.org. 
17   http://data.un.org/Data.aspx?q=gdp+at+constant+price&d=SNAAMA&f=grID%3a102%3bcurrID%3aUSD%3bpc 
Flag%3a0. 
18   In econometric terminology, a dataset is in panel form when there it involves both a cross-sectional as well as a 
time component.  Here, the cross-sectional component was fulfilled by the 81 countries, and the time component 
was  fulfilled  by  the  fact  that  each  country  had  data  for  up  to  12  years.    Random  effects  models  allow  for  each 
country to have its own idiosyncratic effect on the dependent variable. 
19   Multiple  regression  analysis  is  a  statistical  technique  aimed  at  finding  the  effects  of  changes  in  independent  or 
explanatory  variables  on  dependent  variables,  controlling  for  changes  in  other  variables  that  might  affect  the 
dependent variable.  The goal is to discover underlying relationships between variables which are consistent with 
the observed data.  For an overview of multiple regression analysis, see any textbook on econometric analysis (e.g. 
Greene, William H. (2003) Econometric Analysis, 5th Edition, New Jersey: Prentice Hall). 
- 13 - 

Macroeconomic Impacts 
to $m, and converted defence exports and defence expenditure figures into 2005 prices using price deflator 
data. 
Given that our dataset was in the form of a panel, we employed random effects panel data models.  Panel 
data models exploit variations both across individual countries as well as within the same country over time 
to uncover underlying relationships that would have given rise to the data.  The use of panel data models 
specifically allows country-specific effects to be taken into account. 
Choosing the correct sample is of the utmost importance, as an implicit assumption in running a regression 
is  that  the  underlying  relationships  between  variables  are  the  same  across  the  entire  sample  (unless 
specifically  modelled  otherwise).    We  constructed  six  samples,  based  on  (i)  the  number  of  countries 
included and (ii) the time period included. 
The samples formed based on the countries included were 
  all selected countries; 
  countries with high expenditure on defence (annual expenditure of more than €40bn); and 
  countries with low expenditure on defence (annual expenditure of less than €20bn). 
For each of these three samples, the two samples based on the time period included were 
  the entire period 1988-2011; and 
  the period 2000-2011. 
It  was  not  possible  to  conduct  analysis  at  the  individual  Member  State  level  due  to  the  fact  that  the 
maximum number of data points for any one country was 24, which is not enough for reliable econometric 
analysis.20  All models were run on each of the six samples. 
All our regressions had the following basic form: 
Table 3.6:  Basic form of regressions for export effect analysis 
Dependent variable 
Explanatory variables 
Control variables 
Defence exports 
Defence expenditure 
GDP 
Square of defence expenditure 
Square of GDP 
 
The inclusion of squared terms aimed to allow for non-linearities in the relationships.  While the basic form 
of the regressions remained the same, we investigated five different models, depending on how the terms 
were defined: 
  Absolute levels:  all the variables were defined as absolute levels.  
  First differences:  here all the variables were defined as the difference between the absolute levels of 
this period and the previous period.  First differencing is beneficial in that it removes any systematic 
error that is constant within a country. 
  Logarithms:    all  variables  were  defined  as  logarithms  of  absolute  levels.    This  is  consistent  with  a 
multiplicative  relationship between  variables  rather  than  the  additive  relationship  consistent  with  the 
absolute levels and first differences models. 
  Growth rate:  all variables were defined as growth rates of absolute levels over the previous period’s 
absolute  levels.    This  is  almost  exactly  equal  to  first  differencing  logarithms,  which  is  how  the 
calculations  were  done  in  the  modelling  exercise.    Due  to  first  differencing,  any  country-specific 
systematic errors would be removed. 
  Arellano-Bond:    this  is  a  more  sophisticated  model,  where  a  lag  of  the  dependent  variable  is  also 
included  as  an  explanatory  variable.    We  applied  the  Arellano-Bond  framework  to  the  growth  rate 
                                                
20   While it would be feasible to run an econometric model on so few observations, the results would not be reliable 
and so we did not run such models during this project. 
- 14 - 

Macroeconomic Impacts 
model, so that the growth rate of defence exports could potentially depend not only on the growth 
rates of defence expenditure and GDP (and their squares), but also on the growth rate of the previous 
year.  This framework allows for the introduction of dynamism, i.e. causal links across time.  
In order to evaluate which models were to be chosen for the final analysis, we relied on two main tests. 
  Normality  of  residuals.    An  important  assumption  of  all  the  models  we  used  was  that  the  random 
errors associated with each observation, i.e. the part of the variation in defence exports that cannot be 
explained  by  variations  in  defence  expenditure  or  GDP,  are  distributed  according  to  the  normal 
distribution.21  In order to test whether the residual variations in defence exports (after accounting for 
the part consistent with the relationships uncovered through the regression) were normally distributed, 
we plotted the distribution of the residuals and visually compared this to the normal distribution. 
  Specification of functional form.  To test whether the functional form of the model was correct (i.e. 
multiplicative vs. linear, omission of non-linear terms), we relied on the Ramsey RESET test.22 
3.6.2  Results 
First,  all  the  models  were  run  on  the  three  samples  corresponding  to  the  time  period  1988-2011.    We 
found that the absolute levels, first differences, logarithms and growth rate models were inconsistent with 
the  normality  of  residuals  assumption,  and  were  thus  rejected  outright.    However,  we  found  that  the 
Ramsey RESET test indicated that the only remaining model – the Arellano-Bond model – was not specified 
correctly.    Thus,  we  could  not  carry  out  any  meaningful  analysis  on  any  sample  if  the  full  24-year  time 
period was included. 
Next, we shifted to the three samples where only data for the years 2000-2011 were included.  We found 
that  the  logarithms  and  first  differences  models  were  inconsistent  with  the  normality  of  residuals 
assumption for all three samples, so these were rejected outright.  For the absolute levels model, only the 
sample  with  the  three  high  expenditure  countries  was  not  inconsistent  with  normal  residuals,  but  this 
model failed the Ramsey RESET test.  The logarithms model was consistent with the normality of residuals 
assumption for the low expenditure and high expenditure country samples, but both of these also failed the 
Ramsey  RESET  test.    The  remaining  model  –  the  Arellano-Bond  model  –  was  consistent  with  normal 
residuals for all three samples, but only the high expenditure and low expenditure samples also passed the 
Ramsey RESET test. 
Based on the analysis described above, the two models using the Arellano-Bond methodology on the high 
expenditure and the low expenditure countries were chosen as our central models. 
  High expenditure countries.  The Arellano-Bond model suggests that a one percentage point increase 
in the growth rate of defence expenditure is associated with a 1.04 percentage point increase in the 
growth rate of defence exports. 
  Low expenditure countries.  The Arellano-Bond model suggests that a one percentage point increase in 
the  growth  rate  of  defence  expenditure  is  associated  with  a  6.35  percentage  point  increase  in  the 
growth rate of defence exports. 
As an illustration, the following table uses these relationships to find the increase in defence exports in each 
of the six countries if defence expenditure had been increased by €100m in the same year for which the 
input-output analysis has been carried out. 
                                                
21   The normal distribution is a special distribution where a majority of observations are in the vicinity of the mean, 
and the frequency of observations deviating from the mean reduces as the deviations become larger.  The normal 
distribution is very commonly used in statistics and econometrics because of its abundance in the real world, and 
the fact that it has several attractive statistical properties. 
22   Ramsey, J.B. (1969) ‘Tests for Specification Errors in Classical Linear Least Squares Regression Analysis’ Journal of 
the Royal Statistical Society, Series B., Vol 31, No 2, p350–371. 
- 15 - 

Macroeconomic Impacts 
Table 3.7: Increase in exports by country 
Country 
Year 
Increase in exports (€m) 
Germany 
2009 
 8.1  
Netherlands 
2011 
 56.7  
Poland 
2005 
 5.6  
Spain 
2005 
 8.5  
UK 
2005 
 2.9  
 
The  extremely  large  figure  for  the  Netherlands  is  due  to  a  combination  of  two  factors  –  (i)  a  strong 
relationship between export growth and expenditure growth and (ii) the value of exports is high in relation 
to  total  expenditure.    Some  other  countries  with  strong  relationships  between  export  growth  and 
expenditure growth have low export levels in relation to expenditure levels and vice versa. 
3.7  Capital intensity 
3.7.1  Approach 
To estimate the impact on capital intensity, we derived the additional fixed capital that would be required 
to  sustain  output  increases  consistent  with  those  derived  in  the  GDP  impacts  section.    To  do  this,  we 
relied on data on the consumption of fixed capital (CFC) in the I-O tables. 
To calculate direct and indirect effects, we first calculated, for each sector, the percentage of output that 
was accounted for by CFC by dividing the CFC figure by total output.  We then multiplied this figure in 
each  sector  with  the  corresponding  direct  and  indirect  output  increase  as  a  result  of  the  additional 
investment. 
To  calculate  induced  effects  we  calculated  the  proportion  of  national  GDP  accounted  for  by  CFC,  and 
multiplied the increase in GDP as a result of induced effects with these percentages for each Member State. 
3.7.2  Results 
Several Member States do not publish data on the consumption of fixed capital in their input-output tables.  
Therefore, the value of a Member State level analysis is limited in this case.  For completeness, however, 
the results for the selected Member States are shown in the table below. 
Table 3.8:  Capital intensity effects and multipliers by Member State (including induced effects) 
pMS 
Increase in 
Capital intensity multiplier 
Capital intensity multiplier 
consumption of fixed 
(national data) 
(Eurostat data) 
capital (€’000)  
DE 
13,187 
131.9 
Data not available 
NL 
Data not available 
Data not available 
53.1 
PL 
11,077 
110.8 
121 
ES 
Data not available 
Data not available 
Data not available 
UK 
Data not available 
Data not available 
Data not available 
Source: Europe Economics’ calculations. 
- 16 - 

Comparison with Other Sectors 
4  Comparison with Other Sectors 
Comparisons across sectors were carried out by calculating the various multipliers for three other sectors 
with high levels of public spending, and comparing these to defence.  The three sectors chosen were: 
  transport services, particularly land transport, as public subsidies in the transport sector are focused 
mainly on bus and rail; 
  public health services; and 
  education services. 
Our analysis was based on data obtained from national statistical offices in the selected Member States and 
the methodology employed was as follows. 
  For each type of impact, we calculated the increase that would result from a €1 investment in every 
sector.  This corresponds to the multiplier covering only direct and indirect effects.  
  To incorporate induced effects, we employed the same methodology used to calculate induced effects 
for each type of macroeconomic effect. 
4.1  GDP 
The GDP results by Member State are shown below. 
Table 4.1:  GDP multiplier comparison by Member State 
Member 
State 
Transport (1) 
Transport (2) 
Education 
Health 
Defence 
DE 
1.2 

1.6 
1.5 
0.9 
NL 
0.7 

0.9 
0.8 
0.5 
PL 
1.2 

1.7 
1.6 
0.9 
ES 
1.6 
1.3 
1.7 
1.6 
0.8 
UK 
2.1 
2.0 
2.1 
2.1 
1.7 
Source: Europe Economics’ calculations. 
Note: ES and UK have 2 sectors relating to land transport. For the purpose of this table, Transport 1 refers to railway transport and Transport 2 
refers to other land transport for ES and UK. 
In general, there is a very clear ranking across Member States, with education having the highest multiplier, 
followed  by  health,  transport  and  defence.    The  differences  between  sectors  are  fairly  substantial.  
However, not too much should be read into this as the sectors have varying degrees of ‘rest of the world 
leakages’, i.e. the proportion of value added in each of these sectors domestically varies substantially. 
In general, defence has more linkages with the rest of the world and, since intra-EU trade is not captured in 
national multipliers, these multipliers are bound to be lower. 
4.2  Tax revenue 
The tax revenue results by Member State are shown below. 
- 17 - 

Comparison with Other Sectors 
Table 4.2:  Total tax revenue (including social contributions) multiplier comparison by Member State 
Member 
Transport (1) 
Transport (2) 
Education 
Health 
Defence 
State 
DE 
0.5 

0.6 
0.6 
0.4 
NL 
0.3 

0.4 
0.3 
0.2 
PL 
0.4 

0.6 
0.5 
0.3 
ES 
0.6 
0.5 
0.6 
0.6 
0.3 
UK 
0.8 
0.7 
0.8 
0.8 
0.6 
Source: Europe Economics’ calculations. 
Note: ES and UK have 2 sectors relating to land transport. For the purpose of this table, Transport 1 refers to railway transport and Transport 2 
refers to other land transport for ES and UK. 
Again,  there  is  a  very  clear  ranking  across  Member  States,  with  education  having  the  highest  multiplier, 
followed by health, transport and defence.  The differences between sectors are substantial.  Again, not too 
much should be read into this, as these multipliers depend directly on the GDP effects, which are sensitive 
to the extent of ‘rest of the world leakages’. 
4.3  Employment 
The employment results by Member State are shown below. 
Table 4.3:  Employment multiplier comparison by Member State 
Member 
Transport (1) 
Transport (2) 
Education 
Health 
Defence 
State 
DE 
22.0 

25.2 
30.6 
12.0 
NL 
11.7 

17.9 
16.7 
7.4 
PL 
75.8 

130.4 
121.5 
52.6 
ES 
38.2 
30.5 
43.9 
37.1 
18.0 
UK 
32.7 
32.5 
45.1 
38.6 
25.3 
Source: Europe Economics’ calculations. 
Note: ES and UK have 2 sectors relating to land transport. For the purpose of this table, Transport 1 refers to railway transport and Transport 2 
refers to other land transport for ES and UK. 
The  results  show  that  education  almost  has  the  highest  multiplier  in  most  countries,  though  health  is 
slightly higher in Germany.  Moreover, in most cases the defence multiplier is the smallest by a fair margin 
but this is, again, due more to the greater ‘rest of the world leakages’ associated with the sector. 
4.4  Skilled employment 
The results for skilled employment are shown below. Again, due to the reliance on the second-best model 
for estimating skilled employment effects, skilled employment multiplier estimates should be viewed as less 
precise than other estimates. 
Table 4.4:  Skilled employment multiplier comparison by Member State 
Member 
Transport (1) 
Transport (2) 
Education 
Health 
Defence 
State 
DE 
2.9 

3.1 
3.1 
3.3 
NL 
0.6 

0.3 
0.3 
5.0 
PL 
14.2 

11.7 
12.3 
23.1 
ES 
7.6 
6.3 
6.5 
6.3 
9.1 
UK 
16.9 
10.9 
6.7 
6.3 
10.2 
Source: Europe Economics’ calculations. 
Note: ES and UK have 2 sectors relating to land transport. For the purpose of this table, Transport 1 refers to railway transport and Transport 2 
refers to other land transport for ES and UK. 
- 18 - 

link to page 23 Comparison with Other Sectors 
The  results  show  that  the  defence  sector  has  the  highest  skilled  employment  multiplier  in  all  selected 
Member States other than the UK and is significantly greater than those of the comparison sectors in the 
Netherlands and Poland. 
Among the comparison sectors, the general ranking of transport, health and education is not  consistent.  
This could be due to different employment patterns regarding the proportions of skilled workers in each 
sector  across  Member  States,  but  the  imprecision  introduced  by  using  the  second-best  model  in  the 
absence of micro-data would also probably be an important factor. 
4.5  R&D 
Investment  in  defence  has  by  far  the  largest  R&D  multiplier.    The  table  below  shows  that  the  defence 
multiplier  is  between  six  and  297  times  the  multipliers  for  the  comparison  sectors.    This  result  is  not 
surprising because a significant portion of investment in defence is channelled directly into the R&D sector 
leading  to  the  presence  of  direct  effects,  whereas  investment  in  the  comparison  sectors  would  only 
generate indirect and induced effects. 
Table 4.5:  R&D multiplier comparison by Member State 
Member 
State 
Transport (1) 
Transport (2) 
Education 
Health 
Defence 
DE 
6.0 

13.1 
7.9 
75.7 
NL 
0.2 

0.7 
0.1 
29.7 
PL 
3.0 

3.5 
3.4 
38.8 
ES 
4.0 
3.0 
3.4 
3.7 
56.0 
UK 
7.4 
6.2 
10.4 
16.0 
141.6 
Source: Europe Economics’ calculations. 
Note: ES and UK have 2 sectors relating to land transport. For the purpose of this table, Transport 1 refers to railway transport and Transport 2 
refers to other land transport for ES and UK. 
4.6  Exports 
A statistical comparison of export intensity multipliers between sectors is not possible because of the fact 
that  exports  are  an  exogenous  final  use  in  the  I-O  framework  and  so  are  invariant  to  changes  in  other 
variables.    Therefore,  it  is  impossible  to  calculate  the  effects  of  the  investment  on  exports  though  I-O 
analysis. 
While  we  conducted  a  separate  econometric  analysis  to  estimate  the  export  intensity  of  the  defence 
industry, similar exercises for the comparison sectors were beyond the scope of this study.  We therefore 
offer  a  more  qualitative  comparison,  using  information  on  the  quantity  of  exports  in  each  comparison 
sector in conjunction with heuristic arguments to infer the likely effect on exports following investments in 
these sectors and compare them with the defence sector.  
Table  4.6  shows  the  percentage  of  output  for  each  of  the  comparison  sectors  that  is  accounted  for  by 
exports.   
Table 4.6:  Exports as percentage of total output by Member State 
Member 
Transport (1) 
Transport (2) 
Education 
Health 
Defence 
State 
DE 
3.1% 

0.0% 
0.0% 
7.8% 
NL 
33.4% 

0.0% 
0.5% 
8.7% 
PL 
14.1% 

0.1% 
0.2% 
0.8% 
ES 
3.6% 
14.7% 
0.0% 
0.0% 
1.3% 
UK 
4.5% 
4.1% 
6.1% 
0.7% 
2.8% 
Source: Europe Economics’ calculations. 
- 19 - 

Comparison with Other Sectors 
Note: ES and UK have 2 sectors relating to land transport. For the purpose of this table, Transport 1 refers to railway transport and Transport 2 
refers to other land transport for ES and UK. 
The table shows that the share of exports in the transport sector is very high for the Netherlands.  This is 
not  entirely  surprising  because,  by  their  very  nature,  land  transport  services  may  only  be  exported  at 
borders  and  access  to  borders  is  presumably  greater  in  countries  such  as  the  Netherlands,  which  has  a 
relatively large land border relative to its geographic area. 
The table further shows that the education sector is highly domestic and the small amount of exports is, 
presumably,  due  to  students  from  outside  the  country  coming  to  study  within  it,  or  due  to  national 
institutions conducting distance-learning programmes.  Both of these are most likely to be significant in only 
the  higher  education  sub-sector.    Therefore,  any  investment  in  education  is  mostly  likely  to  benefit 
domestic consumers of education services. 
Finally,  the  figures  presented  above  indicate  that  the  health  sector  is  almost  entirely  domestic.    Exports 
could be due to instances of ‘medical tourism’, i.e. patients from other countries coming to  the relevant 
country  for  medical  treatment.    However,  the  flow  of  medical  tourists  within  Europe  generally  involve 
Western  Europeans  travelling  to  Central  or  Eastern  Europe  and  so  is  unlikely  to  be  significant  for  the 
majority of countries included in this study.23  While medical equipment might have significant exports this 
is not included in the health services sector, which is the recipient of most public funding.  The effects of an 
investment in the health sector are most likely, therefore, to be felt domestically 
Comparison with defence exports 
Investments in the defence sector are likely to have a greater impact on the exports of individual Member 
States than are the comparison sectors.  The pattern of EU defence production is generally complementary 
at the Member State level.  For instance, there are very few Member States that can produce sophisticated 
warships,  and  so  the  remaining  EU  Member  States  must  buy  from  either  these  suppliers  or  from  other 
international  suppliers.    In  2009  and  2010,  the  UK  won  export  orders  worth  £7.3bn  and  £5.8bn, 
respectively.24    In  2010,  Germany’s  total  exports  of  defence  equipment  to  EU  countries  amounted  to 
€1,528m.25 
The main difference between the export patterns in the transport and defence sectors are that transport 
exports are more likely to be to neighbouring countries, and are more likely to exist in equal measure in 
both directions while defence exports are less balanced and are made irrespective of geographical distance.  
This,  along  with  imports  from  the  US,  is  indicative  of  global  rather  than  regional  markets  for  defence 
products. Therefore, any investment that makes European firms more competitive would be likely to lead 
to increased exports, as business would be captured from international competitors rather than just other 
EU firms. 
In conclusion, it seems that investment in defence is likely to have a much greater export impact than in any 
of the three comparison sectors. 
4.7  Capital intensity 
Several Member States do not publish data on the consumption of fixed capital in their input-output tables.  
Therefore, the value of a Member State level analysis is limited in this case.  For completeness, however, 
the results for the selected Member States are shown in the table below. 
                                                
23   See  Lunt,  N.  et  al  (2011),  “Medical  Tourism:  Treatments,  Markets  and  Health  System  Implications:  A  scoping 
review”, page 13. 
24   United Kingdom Defence Statistics 2011, Table 1.13. The Air sector accounted for 68 per cent of 2010 exports. 
25   Bericht  der  Bundesregierung  über  ihre  Exportpolitik  für  konventionelle  Rüstungsgüter  im  Jahre  2010: 
Rüstungsexportbericht 2010, seite 38 (“sämtliche Kriegswaffenausfuhren 2010 (kommerziell und BMVg)”. Exports 
by the Bundesministerium für Verteigigung (BMVg) accounted for 2 per cent of total exports in 2010 (page 38).  
- 20 - 

Comparison with Other Sectors 
Table 4.7:  Capital intensity multiplier comparison by Member State 
Member 
Transport (1) 
Transport (2) 
Education 
Health 
Defence 
State 
DE 
214.5 
 
201.9 
213.9 
131.9 
NL 
Data not 
 
Data not available  Data not available  Data not available 
available 
PL 
207.4 
 
150.9 
155.3 
110.8 
ES 
Data not 
Data not 
Data not available  Data not available  Data not available 
available 
available 
UK 
Data not 
Data not 
Data not available  Data not available  Data not available 
available 
available 
Source: Europe Economics’ calculations. 
Note: ES and UK have 2 sectors relating to land transport. For the purpose of this table, Transport 1 refers to railway transport and Transport 2 
refers to other land transport for ES and UK. 
- 21 - 

Conclusions 
5  Conclusions 
Based  on  the  evidence  presented  in  this  report,  it  appears  that  using  Eurostat  data  to  model  the 
macroeconomic effects of a hypothetical investment in the defence sector results in an underestimate of 
the true impacts.  The core reason for this seems to be the relatively low level of disaggregation of sectors 
in the Eurostat data, meaning that defence activities cannot be separated from some less productive civil 
activities.   
The national I-O data permit a somewhat more precise definition of the defence sector, resulting in higher 
estimates  of  macroeconomic  effects.    The  impact  on  the  results  of  further  refining  the  definition  of  the 
defence sector cannot be known but it is entirely possible that the estimated impacts would increase once 
again.    This  hypothesis,  and  the  implications  for  the  macroeconomic  impact  estimates  of  an  EU-wide 
investment  in  the  defence  sector,  could  only  be  tested  at  such  a  time  as  it  becomes  possible  to  more 
precisely identify defence activities in Eurostat data. 
Overall, these results suggest that the estimated economic impacts of investing in the EU defence sector (as 
presented  in  an  earlier  Europe  Economics  report  to  the  EDA)  would  have  been  higher,  in  some  cases 
significantly so, if detailed data for the defence activities had been available at the European level. 
 
- 22 - 


Conclusions 
 
Appendices 
 
- 23 - 

Appendix 1:  Assumptions, Conceptual Issues and the €100m Investment 
6  Appendix 1:  Assumptions, 
Conceptual Issues and the €100m 
Investment 
6.1  Conceptual issues and assumptions 
6.1.1  Activities covered by defence investment 
The EDA classifies defence expenditure into four broad categories:  personnel costs; investment; operation 
and maintenance; and other.  We assumed that a €100m ‘investment’ would not be spent on deploying or 
recruiting  more  personnel  (as  this  is  a  function  of  military  need),  and  would  therefore  be  spent  in  the 
second category as well as the infrastructure part of the fourth category. 
We also note that the ‘investment’ category is further broken down into defence equipment procurement 
expenditure  and  defence  R&D  expenditure  (which  has  a  further  Research  and  Technology  (R&T)  sub-
category). 
We  therefore  assumed  that  the  €100m  investment  would  be  broken  down  between  the  following 
expenditure categories:  equipment procurement; non-R&T R&D; R&T and infrastructure.  We inspected 
recent trends in expenditure and based our calculations on the average of the last three years of defence 
spending in each selected Member State. 
6.1.1.1  Supply side’s reaction to investment 
In our quantitative analysis, we have treated the one-off €100m investment as an increase in final demand 
for the relevant products and services in each selected Member State. 
The response of companies to this increase in demand would determine the follow through effect on the 
various macroeconomic variables.  In particular, the level of capital formation as a response to this increase 
in  demand  would  depend  on  whether  companies  respond  by  creating  additional  capacity  as  well  as 
employment (a ‘long run’ response), or by temporarily increasing employment but working with the fixed 
capital  already  in  place  (a  ‘short  run’  response).    This,  in  turn  depends  in  large  part  upon  whether 
companies  view  the  additional  demand  as  permanent  or  temporary.    An  expectation  of  permanent 
increases in demand usually leads to higher levels of capital formation than an expectation of  temporary 
increases in demand. 
The  relationships  inherent  in  the  input-output  tables  are  consistent  with  companies  responding  to  a 
mixture  of  temporary  and  permanent  demand  changes,  and  would  therefore  not  be  useful  to  quantify  a 
response to an event that companies know represents a wholly temporary demand increase.  However, we 
consider that it is reasonable to assume that the nature of the €100m investment would be such that the 
companies  would  initially  be  unable  to  fully  assess  whether  the  demand  increase  is  temporary  or 
permanent.  As capacity building decisions are, in fact, made in response to expected rather actual future 
demand, we assume that companies would build an expectation of the mix of temporary and permanent 
demand changes likely to occur in their relevant industry, and respond accordingly.   
- 24 - 

link to page 29 Appendix 1:  Assumptions, Conceptual Issues and the €100m Investment 
Furthermore, as €100m is a relatively negligible amount compared to total investment expenditure in the 
defence  sectors  of  the  selected,  we  consider  that  past  experience  would  serve  as  a  good  basis  to  form 
expectation  regarding  the  mixture  of  temporary  and  permanent  demand  in  the  future.    Therefore,  the 
relationships inherent in input-output tables would be a good indicator of the companies’ response to the 
€100m injection. 
6.2  Mapping of defence expenditure categories 
6.2.1  Step 1:  Latest available tables by Member State 
We collected the latest available I-O tables from each selected Member State from the relevant national 
statistics  office.    The  date  of  the  most  recent  table,  and  the  standard  classification  system  on  which  the 
national classification used in the table is based, are shown in the table below. 
Table 6.1:  Latest available tables by Member State 
Member State 
Latest available table 
Basis of classification system 
DE 
2009 
CPA 
NL 
2011 
NACE Rev 2 
PL 
2005 
NACE Rev 1.1 
ES 
2005 
NACE Rev 1.1 
UK 
2005 
NACE Rev 1.1 
 
6.2.2  Step 2:  Mapping defence categories to I-O sectors 
The next step was to map the defence categories to I-O categories.  The mapping from the four defence 
sector categories to I-O sectors was carried out as follows 
  Official definitions (confidential) were received from EDA for (i) Equipment procurement, (ii) Research 
and Development (R&D), (iii) Research and Technology (R&T) and (iv) Infrastructure. 
  These definitions were used to identify the products and / or services that are included within each of 
the four defence sector categories. 
  Broad sectors containing these products and / or services were identified using official documentation 
on the national classification systems. 
  The relevant I-O sectors were identified as those containing the corresponding national NACE / CPA 
code.  Each I-O sector corresponds to at least one two digit NACE / CPA code level in each country.  
Thus, no NACE / CPA sector had to be broken down to arrive at the corresponding I-O sector. 
Table 6.2 presents the results of the mapping exercise. 
Table 6.2:  Mapping exercise results:  relevant codes in national statistics 
Member 
Equipment 
R&D 
R&T 
Infrastructure 
State 
procurement 
DE 
25 
72 
72 
41 
26.1-26.4 
43 
26.5-26.8 
27 
29 
30 
45 
NL 
25 
72 
72 
41 
26 
43 
27 
- 25 - 

link to page 29 link to page 31 Appendix 1:  Assumptions, Conceptual Issues and the €100m Investment 
Member 
Equipment 
R&D 
R&T 
Infrastructure 
State 
procurement 
29 
30 
45 
PL 
29 
73 
73 
45 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
50 
ES 
31 
59 
59 
40 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
41 
UK 
67 
108 
108 
88 
69 
70-71 
72 
73 
74 
75 
76 
77 
78 
80 
89 
6.2.3  Step 3:  From mapping to division of expenditure 
As shown in Table 6.2, only two of the defence spending categories correspond to a single I-O sector in 
every Member State (R&D and R&T).  Therefore, it was necessary to divide the expenditure on each of the 
other categories between the several corresponding I-O sectors.  In this section, we describe our approach 
to each defence category in turn. 
6.2.3.1  Equipment procurement 
The optimal approach to allocating the total expenditure on equipment procurement between I-O sectors 
would be to use data on relative expenditure on each I-O category.  The difficulty with this approach is that 
breakdowns of defence spending by industrial sector are rarely published and, to our knowledge, only the 
UK publishes a detailed enough breakdown.  Therefore, we chose to apportion equipment procurement 
expenditure  to  I-O  categories  based  on  UK  data  and  assumed  that  similar  patterns  of  expenditure  are 
observed across the EU.  The following paragraphs describe our approach in greater detail. 
Table 6.3 shows the sectoral breakdown of UK defence expenditure from 2004/05 to 2010/11. 
- 26 - 


Appendix 1:  Assumptions, Conceptual Issues and the €100m Investment 
Table 6.3:  UK defence spending by sector 
 
Source: United Kingdom Defence Statistics 2012, Table 1.12. 
Using these data, we estimated the percentage of equipment procurement expenditure accounted for by 
individual product categories.  Our approach required the following assumptions: 
  percentages are the same for equipment procurement and Operations and Maintenance spending; 
  ships and aircraft are not purchased through retail or wholesale channels, but directly from producers; 
  the breakdown between wholesale and retail is in proportion to the relative size of the wholesale and 
retail sectors at the Member State level; and 
  the manufacturing sub-categories correspond to I-O sectors as follows. 
Manufacturing category 
DE 
NL 
PL 
ES 
UK 
Weapons & Ammunition 
25.4 
25.4 
29 
31 
67 
Data Processing Equipment 
26.1, 26.2 
26.1, 26.2 
30 
32 
69 
Other Electrical Engineering 
27 
27 
31 
33 
70-71,72 
Electronics 
26.4 
26.4 
32 
34 
73,74,75 
Precision Instruments 
26.5, 26.7, 26.8 
26.5, 26.7, 26.8 
33 
35 
76 
Motor Vehicles & Parts 
29 
29 
34 
36 
77 
Shipbuilding & Repairing 
30.1 
30.1 
35 
37 
78 
Aircraft & Spacecraft 
30.3 
30.3 
35 
37 
80 
 
Given  these  assumptions,  we  calculated  the  total  expenditure  on  each  manufacturing  category  between 
2004/05 and 2010/11: 
DE 
NL 
PL 
ES 
UK 
I-O 
Spend (£ 
I-O 
Spend (£ 
I-O 
Spend (£ 
I-O 
Spend (£ 
I-O 
Spend (£ 
sector 
m) 
sector 
m) 
sector 
m) 
sector 
m) 
sector 
m) 
25 
 8,060  
25 
 8,060  
( 29 ) 
8,060 
31 
8,060 
67 
8,060 
26.1-26.4 
 6,830  
26 
 11,350  
( 30 ) 
550 
32 
550 
69 
550 
26.5-26.8 
 4,520  
27 
 1,510  
( 31 ) 
1,510 
33 
1,510 
70-71 
882 
27 
 1,510  
29 
 2,520  
( 32 ) 
6,280 
34 
6,280 
72 
628 
- 27 - 

Appendix 1:  Assumptions, Conceptual Issues and the €100m Investment 
DE 
NL 
PL 
ES 
UK 
I-O 
Spend (£ 
I-O 
Spend (£ 
I-O 
Spend (£ 
I-O 
Spend (£ 
I-O 
Spend (£ 
sector 
m) 
sector 
m) 
sector 
m) 
sector 
m) 
sector 
m) 
29 
 2,520  
30 
 25,720  
( 33 ) 
4,520 
35 
4,520 
73 
1,958 
30 
 25,720  
45 
 1,950  
( 34 ) 
2,520 
36 
2,520 
74 
2,774 
 
 
 
 
( 35 ) 
25,720 
37 
25,720 
75 
1,555 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
76 
4,520 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
77 
2,520 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
78 
10,860 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
80 
14,860 
 
In addition to the manufacturing I-O sectors presented in the table above, one service sector is included in 
our  definition  of  equipment  procurement  (a  measure  of  wholesale,  retail  and  repair  of  motor  vehicles).  
Combining the figures for these sectors with those of the manufacturing categories results in the following 
division of defence equipment procurement expenditure between I-O categories: 
DE 
NL 
PL 
ES 
UK 
I-O 
Spend 
I-O 
Spend 
I-O 
Spend 
I-O 
Spend 
I-O 
Spend 
sector 
(£ m) 
sector 
(£ m) 
sector 
(£ m) 
sector 
(£ m) 
sector 
(£ m) 
25 
 8,060  
25 
 8,060  
( 29 ) 
8,060 
31 
8,060 
67 
8,060 
26.1-26.4 
 6,830  
26 
 11,350  
( 30 ) 
550 
32 
550 
69 
550 
26.5-26.8 
 4,520  
27 
 1,510  
( 31 ) 
1,510 
33 
1,510 
70-71 
882 
27 
 1,510  
29 
 2,520  
( 32 ) 
6,280 
34 
6,280 
72 
628 
29 
 2,520  
30 
 25,720  
( 33 ) 
4,520 
35 
4,520 
73 
1,958 
30 
 25,720  
45 
 1,950  
( 34 ) 
2,520 
36 
2,520 
74 
2,774 
45 
1,950 
45 
1,950 
( 35 ) 
25,720 
37 
25,720 
75 
1,555 
 
 
 
 
50 
1,950 
41 
1,950 
76 
4,520 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
77 
2,520 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
78 
10,860 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
80 
14,860 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
89 
1,950 
 
6.2.3.2  Research and development 
The R&D defence category corresponds to a single I-O sector and so the full additional expenditure on 
R&D would be allocated to the I-O sector relating to construction. 
6.2.3.3  Research and technology 
As R&T forms a subset of R&D, we have allocated all the R&T funds to the I-O sector corresponding to 
R&D. 
6.2.3.4  Infrastructure 
The infrastructure defence category corresponds to a single I-O sector in three Member States and so the 
full additional expenditure on infrastructure would be allocated to that I-O sector. 
In Germany and the Netherlands, however, two categories are relevant and hence the question arises of 
how to distribute infrastructure expenditure between these categories.  Our approach was to distribute 
the expenditure based on the relative sizes of the two construction sectors in each country.  On this basis, 
approximately  22  per  cent  of  the  expenditure  was  allocated  to  sector  41  in  Germany  while  the 
corresponding figure for the Netherlands was 48 per cent.  The remainder was allocated to sector 43 in 
each case. 
- 28 - 

Appendix 1:  Assumptions, Conceptual Issues and the €100m Investment 
6.2.4  Step 4:  Final division of funds 
The following final steps were carried out 
  We calculated the average over the three most recent years of defence expenditure in each of the four 
defence categories. 
  Using the preceding discussion, we broke this average down for each Member State into the various I-
O sectors. 
  We divided the €100m investment across I-O sectors according to this distribution. 
 
 
- 29 - 

Appendix 1:  Assumptions, Conceptual Issues and the €100m Investment 
Table 6.4:  Additional demand by I-O sector (€) 
DE 
NL 
PL 
ES 
UK 
I-O sector 
Additional 
I-O sector 
Additional 
I-O sector 
Additional 
I-O sector 
Additional 
I-O sector 
Additional 
demand 
demand 
demand 
demand 
demand 


































 10  









11-14 





07-09 



 15  



6-7 

10-12 



 16  





13-15 



 17  





16 



 18  



10 

17 

10 

 19  

10 

11 

18 

11 

 20  

11 

12 

19 

12 

 21  

12 

13 

20 

13 

 22  

13 

14 

21 

14 

 23  

14 

15 

22 

15 

 24  

15 

16 

23.1 

16 

 25  

16 

17 

23.2-23.9 

17 

 26  

17 

18 

24.1-24.3 

18 

 27  

18 

19 

24.4 

19 
12437245 
 28  

19 

20 

24.5 

20 
17513986 
 29  
11,567,404 
20 

21-23 

25 
10404106 
21 
2330055 
 30  
789,339 
21 

24-27 

26.1-26.4 
8816383 
22 

 31  
2,167,094 
22 

28 

26.5-26.8 
5834561 
23 
3888568 
 32  
9,012,816 
23 

29-30 

27 
1949156 
24 
39688082 
 33  
6,486,931 
24 

31 

28 

25 

 34  
3,616,608 
25 

32 

29 
3252897 
26 

 35  
36,912,361 
26 

33 

30 
33200200 
27 

 36  

27 

34 

31-32 

28 

 37  

28 

35 

33 

29 

 40  

29 

36 

- 30 - 

Appendix 1:  Assumptions, Conceptual Issues and the €100m Investment 
DE 
NL 
PL 
ES 
UK 
I-O sector 
Additional 
I-O sector 
Additional 
I-O sector 
Additional 
I-O sector 
Additional 
I-O sector 
Additional 
demand 
demand 
demand 
demand 
demand 
35.1, 35.3 

30 

 41  

30 

37-38 

35.2 

31 
7610459 
 45  
20,823,313 
31 
12,752,769 
39-41 

36 

32 

 50  
2,798,565 
32 
870,226 
42 

37-39 

33 
8216816 
 51  

33 
2,389,166 
43 

41 
4109535 
34 
3009011 
 52  

34 
9,936,401 
44 

42 

35 

 55  

35 
7,151,677 
45-46 

43 
14721275 
36 

 60  

36 
3,987,218 
47 

45 
2517122 
37 

61-62 

37 
40,694,941 
48 

46 

38 

 63  

38 

49 

47 

39 

 64  

39 

50 

49 

40 

 65  

40 
9,268,318 
51-52 

50 

41 

 66  

41 
3,085,347 
53 

51 

42 

 67  

42 

54-56 

52 

43 

 70  

43 

57 

53 

44 

 71  

44 

58 

55-56 

45 

 72  

45 

59 

58 

46 

 73  
5,825,569 
46 

60 

59-60 

47 

 74  

47 

61 

61 

48 

 75  

48 

62 

62-63 

49 

 80  

49 

63 

64 

50 

 85  

50 

64 

65 

51 

 90  

51 

65 

66 

52 

 91  

52 

66 

68 

53 

 92  

53 

67 
10,606,888 
69-70 

54 

 93  

54 

68 

71 

55 

 95  

55 

69 
723,795 
72 
15194765 
56 
5305778 
 
 
56 

70-71 
1,160,194 
73 

57 

 
 
57 

72 
826,953 
74-75 

58 

 
 
58 

73 
2,568,458 
77 

59 

 
 
59 
9,863,937 
74 
3,650,240 
78 

60 

 
 
60 

75 
2,045,726 
- 31 - 

Appendix 1:  Assumptions, Conceptual Issues and the €100m Investment 
DE 
NL 
PL 
ES 
UK 
I-O sector 
Additional 
I-O sector 
Additional 
I-O sector 
Additional 
I-O sector 
Additional 
I-O sector 
Additional 
demand 
demand 
demand 
demand 
demand 
79 

61 

 
 
61 

76 
5,948,280 
80-82 

62 

 
 
62 

77 
3,316,298 
84.1-84.2 

63 

 
 
63 

78 
14,291,663 
84.3 

64 

 
 
64 

79 

85 

65 

 
 
65 

80 
19,555,628 
86 

66 

 
 
66 

81 

87-88 

67 

 
 
67 

82 

90-92 

68 

 
 
68 

83 

93 

69 

 
 
69 

84 

94 

70 

 
 
70 

85 

95 

71 

 
 
71 

86 

96 

72 

 
 
72 

87 

97-98 

73 

 
 
73 

88 
7,679,853 
 
 
74 

 
 
 
 
89 
2,566,183 
 
 
75 

 
 
 
 
90 

 
 
76 

 
 
 
 
91 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
92 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
93 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
94 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
95 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
96 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
97 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
98 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
99 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
100 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
101 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
102 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
103 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
104 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
105 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
106 

- 32 - 

Appendix 1:  Assumptions, Conceptual Issues and the €100m Investment 
DE 
NL 
PL 
ES 
UK 
I-O sector 
Additional 
I-O sector 
Additional 
I-O sector 
Additional 
I-O sector 
Additional 
I-O sector 
Additional 
demand 
demand 
demand 
demand 
demand 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
107 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
108 
25,059,842 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
109 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
110 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
111 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
112 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
113 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
114 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
115 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
116 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
117 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
118 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
119 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
120 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
121 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
122 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
123 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
115 NM 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
116 NM 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
117 NM 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
118 NM 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
119 NM 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
121 NM 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
101 NPISH 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
108 NPISH 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
114 NPISH 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
116 NPISH 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
117 NPISH 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
118 NPISH 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
120 NPISH 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
121 NPISH 

- 33 - 

Appendix 1:  Assumptions, Conceptual Issues and the €100m Investment 
DE 
NL 
PL 
ES 
UK 
I-O sector 
Additional 
I-O sector 
Additional 
I-O sector 
Additional 
I-O sector 
Additional 
I-O sector 
Additional 
demand 
demand 
demand 
demand 
demand 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
122 NPISH 

- 34 - 

Appendix 2:  I-O Analysis 
7  Appendix 2:  I-O Analysis 
Input-output  (I-O)  analysis  was  pioneered  by  Russian-American  economist  Wassily  Leontief  in  the 
1930s as a model of general equilibrium where various sectors of the economy are inter-linked.26  The 
computational  tractability  of  the  model  made  it  very  useful  for  analysing  the  effects  of  otherwise 
complicated inter-industry transactions on the economy.  This work won Leontief the Nobel Prize in 
Economics in 1973. 
The  tractability  of  the  model  arises  from  a  very  restrictive  assumption  regarding  production 
technology  –  that  of  fixed  coefficients.    Producing  one  unit  of  any  good  or  service  requires  certain 
quantities of various inputs in a fixed proportion.  This means that inputs are not substitutable at all.  
Fixed coefficients is an extreme assumption, and can only be said to hold true in the short run – in the 
medium run input proportions can and do change.  Therefore, all I-O analysis must be understood in a 
purely short run context.  Moreover, the use of I-O analysis should be restricted to understanding or 
predicting the short run effects of a change in status quo.  Its use by the former socialist bloc countries 
for  setting  production  targets  in  five-year  plans  and  the  resultant  problems  exposed  its  limited 
usefulness for long-term analysis.  
7.1  Basic set up 
For  illustrative  purposes,  assume  that  the  economy  has  three  sectors:    agriculture,  industry  and 
services.    There  are  two  factor  inputs:   labour  and capital.    The  end  uses  for  the  products of  each 
sector are surmised in one quantity called final demand (in a more complicated model, this would be 
broken down into household consumption expenditure, government consumption expenditure, gross 
fixed capital formation and net exports).   
In this simplistic model, the production of any sector can be looked at by use – the produce is used as 
inputs by any or all of the three sectors, and is sold to final demand.  The entire economy may be 
surmised in the following three equations. 
𝑋𝐴𝐴 + 𝑋𝐴𝐼 + 𝑋𝐴𝑆 + 𝑋𝐴𝐷 = 𝑋𝐴 
𝑋𝐼𝐴 + 𝑋𝐼𝐼 + 𝑋𝐼𝑆 + 𝑋𝐼𝐷 = 𝑋𝐼 
𝑋𝑆𝐴 + 𝑋𝑆𝐼 + 𝑋𝑆𝑆 + 𝑋𝑆𝐷 = 𝑋𝑆 
Here: 
  Sectors are represented by the following subscripts:  A = agriculture, I = industry, S = services; 
  𝑋𝑖𝑗 is the intermediate demand for the produce of sector 𝑖 by sector 𝑗, where 𝑖, 𝑗 ∈ {𝐴, 𝐼, 𝑆}; 
  𝑋𝑖𝐷 is the final demand for the produce of sector 𝑖; 
  𝑋𝑖 is the total production of sector 𝑖; and 
  all units are in money terms. 
The assumption of fixed coefficients is interpreted in the following way.  Take the industry sector.  It 
needs  to  use  𝑋𝐴𝐼  of  the  produce  of  the  agriculture  sector  to  produce  𝑋𝐼  of  final  produce.  
Consequently,  it  needs  𝑋𝐴𝐼 = 𝑎
𝑋
𝐴𝐼  worth  of  the  agricultural  produce  that  to  produce  product  worth 
𝐼
one  unit  currency.    The  assumption  is  that  𝑎𝐴𝐼  is  the  fixed  technical  coefficient  of  intermediate 
                                                
26   See Leontief, Wassily (1936) ‘Quantitative Input and Output Relations in the Economic System of the United 
States’  Review  of  Economic  Statistics,  Vol.  18,  p105-125,  Leontief,  Wassily  (1937)  ‘Interrelation  of  Prices, 
Output,  Savings  and  Investment’  The  Review  of  Economic  Statistics,  Vol.  19,  p109-132  and  Leontief,  Wassily 
(1941) The Structure of the American Economy 1919-1939, Cambridge (Mass.). 
- 35 - 

Appendix 2:  I-O Analysis 
consumption that provides one link between the industry and agriculture sectors – regardless of the 
amount  that  the  industry  sector  produces  this  proportion  would  remain  constant.    Similar 
intermediate consumption coefficients may be calculated for links between each pair of sectors. 
𝑋
𝑎
𝑖𝑗
𝑖𝑗 =
 𝑓𝑜𝑟 𝑖, 𝑗 = 𝐴, 𝐼, 𝑆 
𝑋𝑗
The system of equations can then be represented in terms of the fixed technical coefficients, the total 
production of each sector and the final demand facing each sector as follows. 
𝑎𝐴𝐴𝑋𝐴 + 𝑎𝐴𝐼𝑋𝐼 + 𝑎𝐴𝑆𝑋𝑆 + 𝑋𝐴𝐷 = 𝑋𝐴 
𝑎𝐼𝐴𝑋𝐴 + 𝑎𝐼𝐼𝑋𝐼 + 𝑎𝐼𝑆𝑋𝑆 + 𝑋𝐼𝐷 = 𝑋𝐼 
𝑎𝑆𝐴𝑋𝐴 + 𝑎𝑆𝐼𝑋𝐼 + 𝑎𝑆𝑆𝑋𝑆 + 𝑋𝑆𝐷 = 𝑋𝑆 
Using matrix notation, this may be re-written as follows. 
𝑎𝐴𝐴 𝑎𝐴𝐼 𝑎𝐴𝑆 𝑋𝐴
𝑋𝐴𝐷
𝑋𝐴
[𝑎𝐼𝐴
𝑎𝐼𝐼 𝑎𝐼𝑆] [𝑋𝐼] + [𝑋𝐼𝐷] = [𝑋𝐼] ⇒ 𝑨 ⋅ 𝑿 + 𝑿𝑫 = 𝑿 
𝑎𝑆𝐴 𝑎𝑆𝐼 𝑎𝑆𝑆 𝑋𝑆
𝑋𝑆𝐷
𝑋𝑆
7.2  Changes in final demand 
With  this  set  up,  it  now  becomes  possible  to  analyse  the  effects  on  the  economy  when  the  final 
demand changes for the produce of a certain sector.  The problem is straightforward – we have a new 
set of final demands 𝑋𝑖𝐷 (contained in the vector 𝑿𝑫) and a set of technical coefficients 𝑎𝑖𝑗 (which are 
contained in the matrix 𝑨) that are known.  We need to know what the total produce of each sector 
should  now  be,  i.e.  we  need  to  find  the  𝑋𝑖s  (contained  in  the  vector  𝑿).    In  terms  of  the  three-
equation set up, the problem is simple – there are three equations with three unknown variables to 
solve for.  Simple algebraic manipulation leads us to the new final outputs. 
For  computational  reasons,  it  is  easier  to  work  with  matrices,  as  in  actual  models  the  number  of 
sectors is much higher than three, and algebraic manipulation becomes harder.  Thus, in matrix terms, 
the solution is given by manipulation of the basic set-up equation. 
𝑿 = (𝑰 − 𝑨)−𝟏 ⋅ 𝑿𝑫 
Here 
  𝑰 is an identity matrix with 1 along the diagonal and 0 elsewhere; and 
  (𝑰 − 𝑨)−𝟏 is the inverse of the matrix (𝑰 − 𝑨) 
Once  the  new  total  outputs  have  been  calculated,  the  effects  on  several  macro  variables  may  be 
obtained. 
  GDP  effects:    Since  GDP  is  simply  the  sum  total  of  all  goods  and  services  produced  in  the 
economy, the new GDP is obtained by adding up all new total production figures for all sectors in 
the economy. 
  Income  effects:    to  calculate  these,  one  simply  needs  to  multiply  the  change  in  output  in  each 
sector  with  the  per  unit  compensation  of  employees  in  that  sector.    This,  again,  is  a  fixed 
coefficient, and is derived in the same way as the other technical coefficients. 
  Employment effects:  to calculate these, one needs to multiply the change in output in each sector 
with the number of employees it takes to produce one currency unit worth of produce.  This is 
also a fixed coefficient, and can be calculated using initial total produce and initial employment. 
  Capital effects:  to calculate the increase in earnings of capital, one needs to multiply the change in 
output in each sector with the per unit contribution of capital. 
  Tax effects:  in richer models (such as the one proposed for the project), with explicit inclusion of 
the government and taxes, one would need to multiply the change in sectoral output by the tax 
rate, which is also assumed to be fixed. 
- 36 - 

Appendix 2:  I-O Analysis 
7.3  Multipliers 
When the final demand for any particular sector changes, any effects on macro variables are the result 
of three kinds of effect: 
  Direct effect:  This is the effect of the concerned sector having to produce more output to meet 
an increase in final demand.  This would result in additions to GDP, employment, income, taxes, 
etc. 
  Indirect effect:  In order to produce more, the sector concerned would need more inputs from 
other  sectors  than  earlier,  thus  increasing  the  demands  faced  by  a  variety  of  sectors.    Other 
sectors  would  then  need  to  increase  their  production  to  fulfil  this  additional  demand  for 
intermediate  consumption.    But,  in  turn,  such  increases  in  output  would  increase  demand  for 
intermediate consumption, necessitating a further increase in output of various sectors.  The sum 
total of these knock-on effects is the indirect effect. 
  Induced effect:  In richer models than the one described here, an increase in incomes would lead 
to further increases in final demand across some or all sectors, over and above the initial increase 
in final demand.  The consequent changes to production, output, etc. are the induced effects. 
A multiplier in the I-O context is simply the change in any macro variable as a result of a unit change in 
final demand.  From the above, it is clear that if final demand for agricultural produce increased by a 
unit, the increase in total agricultural produce would be greater than one unit, as the indirect effects of 
having to produce more intermediate inputs and the induced effects of having to respond to higher 
final  demand  due  to  an  increase  in  incomes  would  mean  that  significantly  more  would  have  to  be 
produced than just to satisfy a unit increase in demand.  Similarly, the increase in GDP would also be 
greater than one unit, given that the direct, indirect and induced effects on all other sectors would also 
be taken into account. 
Multipliers can be of various types.  The output/GDP multiplier is the increase in GDP as a result of a 
unit  increase  in  final  demand  for  the  sector.    Similarly,  we  may  have  income,  employment,  tax  and 
other multipliers. 
The attraction of the I-O system as represented in matrix form is that multipliers for each sector can 
be derived very simply from the (𝑰 − 𝑨)−𝟏 matrix and comparisons can be made across sectors.  For 
instance,  once  the  GDP  multipliers  have  been  calculated  for  all  sectors,  the  one  with  the  highest 
multiplier would have the greatest effect on GDP for a unit increase in final demand.  The derivation of 
the various multipliers is given as follows. 
  Output/GDP  multiplier:    for  sector  𝑖,  this  is  the  sum  of  all  elements  in  the  𝑖th  column  of  the 
matrix (𝑰 − 𝑨)−𝟏. 
  Income multiplier:  for sector 𝑖, this is the 𝑖th element of the vector 𝑾 ⋅ (𝑰 − 𝑨)−𝟏, where 𝑾 is 
the vector of wage coefficients27 for each sector. 
  Employment multiplier:  for sector 𝑖, this is the 𝑖th element of the vector 𝑬 ⋅ (𝑰 − 𝑨)−𝟏, where 𝑬 
is the vector of employment coefficients28 for each sector. 
  Tax multiplier:  for sector 𝑖, this is the 𝑖th element of the vector 𝑻 ⋅ (𝑰 − 𝑨)−𝟏, where 𝑻 is the 
vector of tax coefficients29 for each sector. 
  Capital multiplier:  for sector 𝑖, this is the 𝑖th element of the vector 𝑪 ⋅ (𝑰 − 𝑨)−𝟏, where 𝑪 is the 
vector of capital coefficients30 for each sector. 
Lastly, it must be noted that multipliers can be calculated with or without induced effects.  To include 
induced effects, households must be included as one of the productive sectors in the economy.   
                                                
27   Calculated as the initial proportion of compensation of employees to total output for each sector. 
28   Calculated as the initial proportion of sectoral employment to total output for each sector. 
29   Calculated as the initial proportion of net taxes to total output for each sector. 
30   Calculated as the initial proportion of capital requirements to total output for each sector. 
- 37 - 

Appendix 2:  I-O Analysis 
7.4  Richer models 
The basic I-O framework can be modified or made richer through various extensions.  Some of them 
are as follows.31 
  Endogenous  final  demand:    here  the  final  demand  sections  are  regarded  not  as  external,  but 
dependant  on  the  level  of  output.    Household  consumption,  household  investment  and 
government are all included as productive sectors in the economy. 
  Dynamic  models:    here,  linkages  across  time  are  allowed,  and  it  is  assumed  that  induced 
investment in one period will lead to an increase in output in the next period. 
The  model  chosen  in  this  proposal  is  a  static  model  with  exogenous  final  demand.    However,  the 
granularity of sectors and final demand is more than in the simple example followed in this section. 
7.5  Limitations 
The  primary  limitation  of the  I-O  framework  is that  it  is  essentially  a  short  run  approximation,  and 
does not work well when sectors are operating at full capacity.  To capture long-term effects, macro-
economic growth models would need to be used.  
A secondary limitation is that effects of an increase in final demand may be greatly exaggerated if the 
economy  is  already  close  to  full  employment.    In  full  employment  conditions,  the  extra  resources 
required to effect increased production may simply not be available. 
                                                
31   For a more detailed discussion, see Eurostat (2008) ‘Eurostat Manual of Supply, Use and Input-Output Tables’ 
http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/cache/ITY_OFFPUB/KS-RA-07-013/EN/KS-RA-07-013-EN.PDF, p510-534. 
- 38 - 

Appendix 3:  Model of Skilled Employment 
8  Appendix 3:  Model of Skilled 
Employment 
Let the economy consist of a large but finite number (𝑁) of workers.   
Let the following assumptions hold: 
  Workers may be of two types:  skilled (𝑆) and unskilled (𝑈).  Thus, we have 𝑁𝑈 + 𝑁𝑆 = 𝑁, where 
𝑁𝑖 is the number of workers of type 𝑖.  Each type is defined by a (constant) productivity level, 𝑝𝑈 
or 𝑝𝑆. 
  The economy is close to competitive, so that wages are reflective of productivity. 
Define the proportion of skilled workers as 𝑥 = 𝑁𝑆. 
𝑁
Let 𝑉, 𝑉𝑆 and 𝑉𝐿 denote total, skilled and unskilled output, where 𝑉𝑈 + 𝑉𝑆 = 𝑉. 
8.1  Relationship between productivities 
Productivity is defined as output per worker.  It can be shown that national productivity (𝑝 = 𝑉) and 
𝑁
the  productivities  of  the  two  types  of  worker  (𝑝𝑖 = 𝑉𝑖 , 𝑖 ∈ {𝑈, 𝑆})  are  related  according  to  the 
𝑁𝑖
following equation. 
𝑝 = 𝑥𝑝𝑆 + (1 − 𝑥)𝑝𝑈 
8.2  Calibration 
  Eurostat data gives value added per worker while calculating employment impacts for the Member 
State in question as a whole.  This would fix 𝑝. 
  Publicly  available  EU-LFS  data  gives  information  on  the  proportion  of  workers  with  tertiary 
education in the economy as a proportion of total worker, i.e. this would fix 𝑥. 
  Eurostat data on income distribution gives the average income earned by those with various levels 
of education.  By assumption, wages equal productivity in our model.  Combined with data from 
the  EU-LFS  on  the  number  of  workers  at  each  education  level,  this  would  give  us  the  relative 
𝑝
productivity level of skilled and unskilled workers, i.e. this would fix  𝑆.   
𝑝𝑈
  Solve for 𝑝𝑆 and 𝑝𝑈 
8.3  Determination of sectoral proportions 
The productivity relationship given above can also be shown to hold for each sector, i.e.  
𝑝𝑗 = 𝑥𝑗𝑝𝑆 + (1 − 𝑥𝑗)𝑝𝑈 
Here, the superscript 𝑗 denotes the sector. 
To  determine  𝑥𝑗  we  simply  need  to  use  the  calibrated  values  of  𝑝𝑆  and  𝑝𝑈  and  the  sectoral 
productivity as calculated based. 
- 39 -