Dies ist eine HTML Version eines Anhanges der Informationsfreiheitsanfrage 'Workshops on plastics'.


Ref. Ares(2018)803261 - 12/02/2018
Minutes 
Workshop  DG  GROW  "Preparing  the  Plastics  Strategy:  bio-based  and  biodegradable 
plastics"  
18 October 2017, 09:00-12:30  

 
Participants:  
 
  (GROW), 
  (ENV), 
  (AGRI),   
 (RTD) 
 
  (Ecostandard), 
r  (Friends  of  the  Earth  Europe), 
  (EuropaBio),   
(CEN), 
  (Natureworks), 
  (Braskem), 
 
(European  Bioplastics), 
  (PlasticsEurope), 
  (Starch/Cargill),   
(Novamont), 
 (Looplife Polymers), 
 (Neste), 
 
(Fertilizers  Europe), 
  (FEAD), 
  (Compost  Network), 
  (OWS),   
 (BASF), 
 (Universitat fur Bodenkultur Wien)  
GROW  introduced  the  workshop  by  presenting  the  background  and  the  timeframe  of  the  future 
Plastics  Strategy  and explained  the  topics that  were  to  be  discussed  during  the  workshop (see  the 
agenda). GROW stressed that oxodegradable plastics were out of the scope of discussions because 
they are not considered to have biodegradable properties.  
1. Taking stock on the terminology used 
After a quick tour de table, participants discussed the terminology that is currently used (bioplastics, 
bio-based plastics, biodegradable, compostable). Participants agreed that the use of the word "bio" is 
confusing and misleading for the consumer. Strong efforts must be made from the communicational 
point  of  view  to  put  a  clear  and  consumer  comprehensive  borderline  between  different  concepts. 
Participants  also  agreed  on  the  terminology  to  be  used  during  the  workshop  i.e.  clear  distinction 
between bio-based plastics and polymers and biodegradable plastics and polymers, as well as on the 
topics to be discussed. 
Novamont,  OWS  and  other  participants  agreed  that  tools  that  are  currently  available  (standards, 
testing  methods,  etc.)  are  sufficient  in  bio-based  plastics  and  biodegradable  area.  CEN  offered  to 
provide a list of existing tools and the work ongoing. Regarding biodegradable plastics, it was stated 
and agreed that the current use of the terminology is too vague because the term "biodegradable" 
alone  doesn't  provide  any  clear  information  about  the  environment  where  the  biodegradation  is 
supposed to take place (OWS). In this area, a lot of work has been done on test methods. Although 
standards  related to the  testing methodology already exist  and can be  eventually updated, criteria 
and  standards  are  still  lacking  for  biodegradation  that  doesn't  take  place  in  industrial  composting 
facilities e.g. biodegradation in specific environmental compartments. Novamont explained that the 
use  of  "compostable"  is  more  relevant  and  is  used  by  the  industry.  "Biodegradable"  is  used  only 
when plastics go to professional users for in situ biodegradation. The biodegradation of mulch films 
should be maximum 24 months. The risk of accumulation exists in the soil for a period of 1 or 2 years 
maximum.  

OWS also stressed that plastics should not designed for littering as it seems to be the case for plastics 
with  biodegradable  properties  from  the  consumers'  perspective.  The  design  should  be  thought  in 
terms of intended use and depend on the end of life. This point of view was shared by several other 
participants.  Conflicting  objectives  should  be  avoided  and  both  functionality  and  behaviour  in  the 
environment/end  of  life  of  materials  should  be  consistent  (Fertilizers  Europe).  Compost  Network 
stressed  that  currently  because  of  the  lack  of  harmonisation  of  waste  management  practices  it  is 
impossible,  so  far,  to  deliver  unique  instructions  to  consumers  and  the  message  depends  on  the 
country. It was stressed that the harmonisation of waste management sorting should be promoted 
providing clear instructions to consumers. 
European  Bioplastics  explained  that  the  effort  should  be  put  into  enhancing  separate  collection 
obligation  for  both  plastics  and  organic  waste.  Infrastructure  should  be  upgraded  accordingly  and 
across the EU.  
2. Bio-based plastics  
Natureworks,  Neste,  Braskem  and  BASF  explained  their  production  processes  and  feedstock  that 
they use (corn starch, surgar beet, organic waste, oils, fats, cellulose). Participants stated that the 1st 
generation feedstock is largely available and stable. According to European Bioplastics it makes sense 
to  switch  to  waste  or  CO2  as  a  new  feedstock.  Natureworks  stressed  that  1st  and  2nd  generation 
(cellulosic) feedstock are equivalent in terms of sustainability. Therefore the focus should be on the 
most  efficient  use  of  land.  BASF  explained  that  the  choice  of  the  feedstock  depends  on  the  final 
product, the intended use, the overall sustainability and the additional benefits that the material can 
provide.  
FoE Europe and others agreed that in some cases avoidance should be preferred as a solution rather 
than simply switching to an alternative material or feedstock.  
The  main  benefit  of  using  alternative  feedstock  is  in  terms  of  GHG  emission  savings.  Bio-based 
material  industry  (including  bio-based  plastics)  can  also  contribute  to  creating  jobs  and  growth. 
Europabio gave an overview of job and growth opportunities for the EU created in the bio-economy 
sector.   
Regarding the end of life issues, no distinction is to be made with conventional plastics. The use of 
bio-based plastics has no impact on the amount of waste generated.   
Regarding  the  use  and  applications  of  bio-based  plastics,  European  Bioplastics  stated  that 
generalisation of applications rather than specialisation makes sense. According to Natureworks the 
fact that currently bio-based plastics are more expensive than conventional plastics, in practice leads 
to specification. However, this situation could be balanced if new functionalities and properties are 
added to bio-based plastics (the extra costs then would be justified). Most of the time the choice for 
one or another material is made taking into account functionality, intended use as well as the price. 
There  is  no  legal  obligation  to  communicate  whether  a  material  is  made  from  bio-based  or 
conventional plastics but reliable certification schemes exist for those who want to put it forward.  
As to barriers to be lifted, stakeholders identified several: 

  Some incentives should be provided in order to close the price gap to encourage operators to 
replace  crude  oil  based  plastics  with  renewable ones  (e.g.  market  based  incentive  systems 
including  mandates  for  bio-based  materials,  reduction  of  subsidies  for  fossil  fuels,  public 
procurement, etc.), 
  Actions in the Plastics Strategy should be in line with the Bio-economy Strategy,  
  A level playing field should be created for bio-based plastics, 
  A system of harmonised LCA for all types of plastics being material and technology neutral,  
  A better use of certification schemes, 
  Staying material and technology neutral (not excluding of raw materials or technologies per 
se), 
  Take into account mass balanced approach.  
GROW asked to participants to send their contributions in writing by Friday, 20 October (cob).  
3. Biodegradable plastics 
Participants  agreed  with the  problems  listed (see  the  Agenda).  A  remark was  made  about  the  fact 
that biodegradable plastics is not only a problem but should also be seen as an opportunity providing 
innovation, environmental impact, economy, etc. and provided that provided separate collection of 
biodegradable  waste  and  the  respective  waste  infrastructure  are  in  place. 
 
explained that biodegradable plastics are degraded in around 80% of CO2 and around 20% are used 
by microorganisms and in total biodegradable plastics are 100% biodegradable. 
As said above, the main issue currently is the communication towards consumers (non-professional 
users) and also across the value chain (from producers to brand owners and recyclers). When talking 
about  biodegradable  properties,  one  should  always  specify  in  what  kind  of  environment  they 
biodegrade and according to which standard they are to be considered biodegradable (OWS).  
The most promising future use of biodegradable plastics is their use as organic waste collection bags. 
Compost Network explained the Italian experience on biodegradable plastics used to collect organic 
waste.  Coupled  with  enhanced  obligation  to  separately  collect  organic  waste,  the  use  of 
biodegradable  plastic  waste  could  help  to  create  compost  and  deviate  organic  waste  from 
incineration. Biodegradable plastics could also be used in fresh food packaging. In order to reflect on 
the  most  appropriate  applications  for  biodegradable  plastics,  a  platform  gathering  actors  from  the 
whole value chain (plastic producers, professional users, recyclers, civil society and public authorities) 
might be the best way forward. Natureworks in that regard explained the positive/negative list that 
was established in collaboration with the Dutch composting industry.  
Regarding the recycling of biodegradable plastics, there are currently two issues: 
1.  Conventional waste stream contamination by biodegradable plastics, 
2.  Biodegradable plastics not disintegrating even in industrial composting plants: more details 
were  asked  to  be  provided  by  FEAD  from  its  members.  Participants  agreed  that  if 
biodegradable/compostable plastics are labelled as such, they normally biodegrade. If this is 
not  the  case,  there  might  be  an  issue  with  the  composting  facility.  It  is  a  case  by  case 
problem, depending on polymers, materials used and composting plants.  

The  participants  were  also  informed  about  the  possible  link  between  the Plastics  Strategy  and  the 
biodegradability criteria in the revised Fertilizers regulation.  
Regarding  the  plastic  mulches  used  for  agricultural  and  horticultural  purposes,  participants  were 
informed about the recent adoption of the EN 17033 Biodegradable mulch films for use in agriculture 
and horticulture standard (date of ratification 13/11/2017).  
Participants agreed that both options, i.e. collection/recycling of plastics mulches and biodegradable 
plastic  mulches,  should  be  kept  open  for  further  discussion.  The  recyclability  of  plastic  mulches 
depends on the thickness of the film. Currently, the main difficulty is to collect used plastic mulches 
and the level of contamination (soil, organic materials, pesticides etc.). In case where biodegradable 
plastic  mulches  are  considered  to  be  the  way  forward,  they  should  be  labelled  and  certified  as 
biodegradable in soil. The littering issue (e.g. plastic mulches blown away or fragmenting and ending 
up in rivers) is currently not taken into account. The fact that additives are allowed and might not be 
biodegradable should also be kept in mind1.  
GROW asked to participants to send their contributions in writing by Friday, 20 October (cob).  
 
 
 
 
                                                           
1 During the workshop diverse opinions were expressed. After the workshop, it was brought to GROW attention 
by ECOS and FoEE that the attached formal opinion on the standard explains that while the added constituents 
to the mulch film cannot amount to more than 10%, the constituents do not need to be tested separately for 
biodegradation. European Bioplastics informed GROW that mulching films certified to be biodegradable in soil 
(e.g. according to prEN 17033) may also contain constituents below 1 % without demonstrated 
biodegradability, provided, however, the sum of such constituents is not higher than 5%.  

ANNEX I 
Agenda 
Workshop 
"Preparing the Plastics Strategy: bio-based and biodegradable plastics"  
18 October 2017, 09:00-12:30 
DG GROW (Room BREY – 05/A)  
Avenue d'Auderghem / Oudergemselaan 19 
Brussels (Belgium) 
 
Scene setter 
The European Commission is working on the definition of a European Strategy for Plastics that will be 
announced  at  the  end  of  this  year.  This  Strategy  intends  to  support  and  complement  the  existing 
acquis  and  tackle  the  interrelated  problems  associated  to  plastics,  including  fossil  feedstock 
dependence,  low  reuse  and  recycling,  and  plastics  leakage  into  the  environment.  The  Plastics 
Strategy is part of our broader agenda aiming at the modernisation of our economy, with long-term 
societal  objectives  in  mind:  a  competitive,  low-carbon,  circular,  sustainable  economy  that  creates 
jobs and growth, and increases the quality of life of our citizens.  
The  ongoing  work  focuses  amongst  other  topics  on  how  to  support  the  shift  from  fossil  based 
feedstock  to  domestically  available  alternative  feedstock  and  on  how  to  limit  the  negative 
externalities of plastics.  
Bio-based  and  biodegradable  polymers  and  plastic  materials  have  been  developed  in  response  to 
multiple environmental concerns. However, a number of issues need to be explored to exploit in a 
sustainable way their potential contributions to the Plastics Strategy objectives.  
We  believe  that  in  order  to  feed  the  ongoing  work  on  the  Plastics  Strategy  and  to  ensure  a 
comprehensive  and  balanced  approach  it  is essential  to  involve  in  the  discussion  those  actors  that 
have the highest knowledge of the products and the necessary technology.  
The  objective  of  the  meeting  is  to  exchange  views  with  key  stakeholders/actors  to  identify  and 
better  understand  what  the  issues  to  tackle  are  and  what  would  be  the  necessary  tools  and 
instruments to put in place.  
 
Agenda
1.  Introduction (DG GROW): 
a.  Purpose of the Plastics Strategy - On-going works – Timing 
b.  Quick tour de table  
c.  Take stock on the terminology used during the workshop: bio-based polymers and 
plastics, biodegradable polymers and plastics  
 
2.  Bio-based plastics 

a.  Problem identification:  
  Access to feedstock (availability, primary/secondary feedstock, competition and 
trade-offs)  
  Environmental and economic benefits from switching to bio-based feedstock  
  End  of  life  of  bio-based  polymers  and  plastics  (not  decreasing  the  amount  of 
plastic  waste  generated,  recyclability,  recycling  within  the  existing 
infrastructure, misgivings (recyclers, consumers, professional users)) 
b.  To be discussed:  
  How can bio-based polymers and plastics contribute to a low-carbon and more 
circular plastics economy?  
  What  are  the  perspectives  in  market  development?  Specialisation  or 
generalisation?  In  which  applications  are  they  most  promising  to  substitute 
currently  non-bio-based  polymers  and  plastics?  Are  there  any  targeted 
applications  where  the  use  of  bio-based  polymers  and  plastics  should  be 
preferred to conventional polymers and plastics?  
  What  would  be  the  impacts  along  the  life-cycle  if  the  market  for  bio-based 
polymers and plastics develops (in the EU and globally)?  
  Could  bio-based  polymers  and  plastics  respond  to  the  objective  of  improving 
resources-efficiency? 
  What could be done to ensure that while substituting fossil fuel based polymers 
and  plastics  with  bio-based  we  do  not  create  additional  environmental 
problems?  
  Other instruments to be developed? Other barriers to be lifted? How should the 
Plastics Strategy help? Which instruments do we need to develop? 
 
3.  Biodegradable plastics: 
a.  Problem identification: 
  Need  for  a  framework  to validate  claims of  biodegradability  for  polymers  and 
plastics. 
  Consumer  perception  of  biodegradability  of  polymers  and  plastics  in  the 
environment  (confusing  terminology,  misunderstandings,  false  green  claims, 
labelling schemes)  
  Biodegradability  of  polymers  and  plastics  in  different  environmental 
compartments  (risks  of  generation  of  micro-plastics  and  of  accumulation, 
testing and standards)   
  Impacts on plastic waste streams and recycling  
b.  To be discussed: 
  Which  place  in  the  market  do  they  occupy?  For  which  applications?  How  are 
their biodegradability feature tested, certified, labelled? 
  What  are  the  perspectives  in  market  development?  Specialisation  or 
generalisation?  In  which  applications  are  they  most  promising  to  substitute 
currently non-bio-based polymers and plastics? 
  What  can  be  done  to  ensure  that  consumers  fully  or  at  least  correctly 
understand  the  concept  of  biodegradation  in  different  settings  and 
environmental compartments? 
  Should  biodegradable  polymers  and  plastics  be  seen  as  contaminants  to  the 
recycling of conventional polymers and plastics? What are the risks that because 
of  the  consumers'  behaviour,  both  waste  streams  are  mixed  before  reaching 
recycling plants? 
  For  which  applications  make  the  use  of  biodegradable  polymers  and  plastics 
sense?   
  Building  upon  the  availability  of  biodegradability  related  standards,  for  what 

purposes  should  biodegradability  standards,  technical  specifications  and/or 
technical  reports  be  either  amended/updated  or  newly  set  (testing, 
differentiated  biodegradability  in  different  environmental  compartments, 
targeted application etc.)?  
  Need for other instruments to be developed including research and innovation? 
Other  barriers  to  be  lifted?  How  should  the  Plastics  Strategy  help?  Which 
instruments do we need to develop?