Dies ist eine HTML Version eines Anhanges der Informationsfreiheitsanfrage 'Contacts with the tobacco industry'.


 
EUROPEAN COMMISSION 
 
 
 
Brussels, 25.6.2018 
C(2018) 4115 final 
 
Mr Olivier HOEDEMAN 
Corporate Europe Observatory 
Rue d'Edimbourg 26 
1050 Brussels 
DECISION OF THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION PURSUANT TO ARTICLE 4 OF THE 
IMPLEMENTING RULES TO REGULATION (EC) N° 1049/20011 
Subject: 
Your  confirmatory  application  for  access  to  documents  under 
Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 - GESTDEM 2018/1205 

Dear Mr Hoedeman, 
I refer to your letter of 8 May 2018, registered on 15 May 2018, wherein you submit a 
confirmatory  application  in  accordance  with  Article  7(2)  of  Regulation  (EC) 
No 1049/2001 regarding public access to European Parliament, Council and Commission 
documents2 (hereafter ‘Regulation 1049/2001’). 
1. 
SCOPE OF YOUR REQUEST 
In  your  initial  application  of  5  February  2018, addressed  to  the  Secretariat-General  and 
handled  by  Directorate  E  (‘Policy  Co-ordination  II’)  of  the  Secretariat-General,  you 
requested access to the following documents: 
-  ‘all  reports  (and  other  notes)  from  meetings  between  the  European  Commission 
and  representatives  of  the  tobacco  industry  (producers,  distributors,  importers 
etc., as well as organisations and individuals that work to further the interests of 
the tobacco industry), since [1] January […] 2017; 
 
 
                                                 
1   Official Journal L 345 of 29.12.2001, p. 94. 
2   Official Journal L 145 of 31.5.2001, p. 43. 
 
Commission européenne/Europese Commissie, 1049 Bruxelles/Brussel, BELGIQUE/BELGIË - Tel. +32 22991111 

-  all  correspondence  (including  emails)  between  the  European  Commission  and 
representatives  of the tobacco industry (producers, distributors, importers etc. as 
well  as  organisations  and  individuals  that  work  to  further  the  interests  of  the 
tobacco industry), since [1] January […] 2017; 
-  a  list  of  all  the  above-mentioned  documents  (including  dates,  names  of 
participants/senders/recipients 
and 
their 
affiliation, 
subject 
of 
meeting/correspondence)’. 
The  European  Commission  has  identified  27  documents  as  falling  under  the  scope  of 
your request. They are listed in the annex to this decision. 
In  its  initial  reply  of  13  April  2018,  Directorate  E  of  the  Secretariat-General  partially 
refused access to these documents  based on the exception of Article  4(1)(b) (protection 
of privacy and the integrity of the individual) of Regulation 1049/2001. 
Through  your  confirmatory  application,  you  request  a  review  of  this  position.  You 
underpin your request with detailed arguments, which I will address in the corresponding 
sections below. 
2. 
ASSESSMENT AND CONCLUSIONS UNDER REGULATION 1049/2001 
When  assessing  a  confirmatory  application  for  access  to  documents  submitted  pursuant 
to  Regulation  1049/2001,  the  Secretariat-General  conducts  a  fresh  review  of  the  reply 
given by the service concerned at the initial stage. 
Following this review, I am pleased to inform you that: 
–  one  document  to  which  you  request  access  (document  3)  is  publicly  available 
online3, 
–  full access is granted to two further documents (documents 5 and 12); and 
–  further partial access is granted to 22 documents (documents 2, 4, 6, 8-11 and 13-
27). 
As regards the remaining redacted parts of documents 2, 4, 6, 8-11 and 13-27, I regret to 
inform you that I have to confirm the initial decision of Directorate E of the Secretariat-
General  to  refuse  access.  Access  is  refused  to  those  parts  pursuant  to  the  exception  of 
Article  4(1)(b)  (protection  of  privacy  and  the  integrity  of  the  individual)  of  Regulation 
1049/2001, for the reasons set out below. 
Finally, I note that two documents (i.e. documents 1 and 7) have already been disclosed 
in their entirety at the initial stage (and not only partially as indicated in the initial reply), 
as they do not contain any personal data. 
                                                 
3   Publicly 
available 
on 
the 
website 
of 
one 
of 
the 
respective 
stakeholders: 
https://www.clivebates.com/documents/TimmermansSnusJune2017.pdf. 


Article  4(1)(b)  of  Regulation  1049/2001  provides  that  ‘[t]he  institutions  shall  refuse 
access to a document where disclosure would undermine the protection of […] privacy 
and  the  integrity  of  the  individual,  in  particular  in  accordance  with  Community 
legislation regarding the protection of personal data’. 
In  accordance  with  the  Bavarian  Lager  ruling4,  when  a  request  is  made  for  access  to 
documents  containing  personal  data,  Regulation  45/20015  becomes  fully  applicable. 
Article 2(a) of Regulation 45/2001 defines personal data as ‘any information relating to 
an identified or identifiable natural person’. 
In  its  Nowak  judgment6,  the  Court  of  Justice  stated  that  the  use  of  the  expression  ‘any 
information’  in  the  definition  of  the  concept  of  ‘personal  data’  reflects  the  aim  of  the 
EU legislature to assign a wide scope to that concept. It clarified that that concept is not 
restricted  to  information  that  is  sensitive  or  private,  but  ‘potentially  encompasses  all 
kinds of information, not only objective but also subjective […], provided that it “relates” 
to the data subject’. 
The Court of Justice also clarified that, for information to be treated as ‘personal data’, 
‘there  is  no  requirement  that  all  the  information  enabling  the  identification  of  the  data 
subject must be in the hands of one person’7
In  this  instance,  documents  2,  4,  6,  8-11  and  13-27  contain  information  related  to 
identified or identifiable individuals that needs to be protected. In particular, they contain 
the  names,  functions  and  contact  data  of  the  non-senior  European  Commission  staff  or 
the  non-senior  staff  of  the  interest  representatives.  The  documents  also  contain  the 
contact data and handwriting (including signatures) of senior European Commission staff 
or senior staff of the interest representatives. 
Pursuant  to  settled  case  law,  the  concept  of  ‘private  life’  must  not  be  interpreted 
restrictively  and  there  is  no  reason  of  principle  to  justify  excluding  activities  of  a 
professional nature from the notion of ‘private life’8. 
The  above-mentioned  information  relating  to  individuals  and  other  information  from 
which their identity can be deduced clearly constitutes personal data within the meaning 
of Article 2(a) of Regulation 45/2001. Their public disclosure would therefore constitute 
processing  (transfer)  of  personal  data  within  the  meaning  of  Article 8(b)  of 
Regulation 45/2001. 
                                                 
4   Judgment of 29 June 2010, Commission v Bavarian Lager, C-28/08 P, EU:C:2010:378. 
5   Regulation (EC) No 45/2001 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 18 December 2000 on 
the  protection  of  individuals  with  regard  to  the  processing  of  personal  data  by  the  Community 
institutions and bodies and on the free movement of such data (Official Journal L 8 of 12.1.2001, p. 1) 
– hereinafter referred to as ‘Regulation 45/2001’. 
6   Judgment of 20 December 2017, Nowak v Data Protection Commissioner, C-434/16, EU:C:2017:994, 
paragraphs 34-35. 
7   Idem, paragraph 31. 
8   See, amongst others, judgment of 20 May 2003, Rechnungshof v Österreichischer Rundfunk, C-465/00, 
EU:C:2003:294, paragraph 73. 


Pursuant to Article 8(b) of Regulation 45/2001, personal data shall only be transferred to 
recipients if they establish the necessity of having the data transferred and if there is no 
reason to assume that the data subject's legitimate interests might be prejudiced. 
Those two conditions are cumulative9, and only the fulfilment of both conditions and the 
lawfulness  of  processing  in  accordance  with  the  requirements  of  Article  5  of 
Regulation 45/2001 enables one to consider the processing (transfer) of personal data as 
compliant with the requirements of Regulation 45/2001. 
In its ClientEarth judgment, the Court of Justice ruled that the institution does not have 
to examine, of its own motion, the existence of a need for transferring personal data. It 
also  stated  that  if  the  applicant  has  not  established  a  need  to  obtain  the  personal  data 
requested,  the  institution  does  not  have  to  examine  the  absence  of  prejudice  to  the 
person's legitimate interests10. 
In that context, whoever requests such a transfer must first establish that it is necessary. If 
it  is  demonstrated  to  be  necessary,  it  is  then  for  the  institution  concerned  to  determine 
whether  there  is  reason  to  assume  that  that  transfer  might  prejudice  the  legitimate 
interests  of  the  data  subject.  If  there  is  no  such  reason,  the  transfer  requested  must  be 
made, whereas, if there is such a reason, the institution concerned must weigh the various 
competing interests in order to decide on the request for access11. 
In  the  above-mentioned  Bavarian  Lager  ruling,  the  Court  of  Justice  clarified  that  the 
necessity  of  transfer  must  be  demonstrated  by  express  and  legitimate  justifications  or 
convincing arguments12. 
In  your  confirmatory  application,  you  argue  that  ‘[t]he  names  of  professional  lobbyists 
and the organisations and companies they work for are not personal data’. You stress that 
this  information  should  be  accessible  to  the  public  ‘to  enable  scrutiny  of  who  is 
influencing EU decision-making’. In your view, there is ‘a clear public interest and this is 
what  constitutes  the  necessity  of  having  the  redacted  data  transferred’.  You  claim  that 
there  is  ‘no  reason  at  all  to  assume  that  the  legitimate  rights  of  the  persons  concerned 
might  be  prejudiced  by  disclosure  of  the  names  of  professional  lobbyists  and  the 
organisations and companies they work for’
As explained above, wider access is given to most of the documents requested, including 
the  names  of  organisations  and  companies  of  the  tobacco  industry.  As  regards  the 
remaining  redacted  parts  of  the  documents,  which  are  exclusively  personal  data, 
I consider that your considerations are of a general and abstract nature, and that you do 
not support them with any evidence. 
                                                 
9   Judgment in Commission v Bavarian Lager, cited above, paragraphs 77-78. 
10   Judgment  of  16  July  2015,  ClientEarth  v  European  Food  Safety  Authority,  C-615/13  P, 
EU:C:2015:489, paragraphs 47-48. 
11   Judgment  in  Commission  v  Bavarian  Lager,  cited  above,  paragraphs  77-78;  judgment  of 
2 October 2014,  Strack  v  Commission,  C-127/13  P,  EU:C:2014:2250,  paragraphs  107-108;  and  also 
judgment  of  9  November  2010,  Schecke  and  Eifert  v  Land  Hessen,  C-92/09  and  C-93/09, 
EU:C:2010:662, paragraph 85. 
12   Judgment in Commission v Bavarian Lager, cited above, paragraph 78. 


Indeed,  the  Court  of  Justice  held,  in  its  ClientEarth  ruling,  that  a  general  reference  to 
‘transparency’  is  not  sufficient  to  substantiate  a  need  to  obtain  personal  data,  as  ‘no 
automatic  priority  can  be  conferred  on  the  objective  of  transparency  over  the  right  to 
protection of personal data’13. 
In  this  respect,  the  Court  of  Justice  has  confirmed,  in  its  Strack  judgment,  that  a  mere 
interest  of  members  of  the  public  in  obtaining  certain  personal  data  cannot  be  equated 
with a necessity to obtain the said data in the meaning of Regulation 45/200114. 
In accordance with the Dennekamp judgment, the mandatory application of Article 8(b) 
of  Regulation  45/2001  results  in  the  applicant  being  required  to  prove  that  the  measure 
concerned  is  proportionate  and  the  most  appropriate  means  of  attaining  the  aim 
pursued15. 
You do not indicate either in your initial or confirmatory application, why the disclosure 
of  all  personal  data  contained  in  the  documents  would  be  the  most  appropriate  and 
proportionate of measures for attaining your objective. 
Against  this  background,  I  consider  that  you  have  not  provided  sufficient  arguments 
and/or justifications that would show in what respect the processing (i.e. transfer) of the 
redacted  personal  data  was  necessary  to  satisfy  a  public  (and  not  a  private)  interest. 
Consequently,  your  arguments  do  not  substantiate  the  necessity  of  transferring  the 
respective personal data. 
Therefore, the redacted personal data in the respective documents may not be disclosed 
as  the  need  for  public  disclosure  of  that  personal  data  has  not  been  substantiated,  and 
there is reason to assume that the data subjects' legitimate interests might be prejudiced. 
In  light  of  this,  I  must  conclude  that  the  transfer  of  personal  data  contained  in  the 
documents  requested  cannot  be  considered  as  fulfilling  the  requirement  of 
Regulation 45/2001  and  that  such  a  transfer  is  consequently  also  prohibited  under 
Article 4(1)(b) of Regulation 1049/2001. 
Finally,  I  would  like  to  draw  your  attention  to  the  fact  that  Article  4(1)(b)  of 
Regulation 1049/2001  does  not  include  the  possibility  for  the  exception  defined  therein 
to be set aside by an overriding public interest. 
 
 
                                                 
13   Judgment in ClientEarth v European Food Safety Authority, cited above, paragraph 51. 
14   Judgment in Strack v Commission, cited above, paragraphs 107 and 108. 
15   Judgment  of  15  July  2015,  Dennekamp  v  European  Parliament,  T-115/13,  EU:T:2015:497, 
paragraphs 59 and 60. 



3. 
PARTIAL ACCESS 
In  accordance  with  Article  4(6)  of  Regulation  1049/2001,  I  have  considered  the 
possibility of granting further partial access to the documents requested. 
As explained above, one document is already in the public domain, full access has been 
provided to four documents and wider partial access has been provided to 22 documents. 
As  regards  the  remaining  redacted  parts  of  the  documents,  for  the  reasons  explained 
above, no meaningful further partial access is possible without undermining the interests 
described above. 
Consequently, I conclude that the redacted parts of the documents requested are covered 
in their entirety by the invoked exception to the right of public access. 
4. 
MEANS OF REDRESS 
Finally, I draw your attention to the means of redress available against this decision. You 
may  either  bring  proceedings  before  the  General  Court  or  file  a  complaint  with  the 
European  Ombudsman  under  the  conditions  specified,  respectively,  in  Articles  263  and 
228 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union. 
Yours sincerely, 
For the Commission 
Martin SELMAYR 
Secretary-General 

 
 
 
Enclosures:   Annex (List of documents) and 24 documents 


Document Outline