Dies ist eine HTML Version eines Anhanges der Informationsfreiheitsanfrage 'Contacts with the tobacco industry'.



Ref. Ares(2017)5557950 - 14/11/2017
Ref. Ares(2018)4014499 - 30/07/2018
Oman’s breach of its WTO obligations 
 
In  December  2015,  the  Supreme  High  Committee  of  the  Gulf  Cooperation  Council  took  a 
decision  which  amended  the  fixed  amount  (minimum  specific)  duty  on  tobacco  and  its 
derivatives  in  the  Common  External  Tariff  of  the  Gulf  Cooperation  countries.  This 
amendment  was  equivalent  to  doubling  the  fixed  amount  applicable  to  tobacco  products. 
The decision of the Supreme High Committee also specified that the implementation of that 
amendment  was  conditional  upon  the  Gulf  Cooperation  countries  not  breaching  their  WTO 
commitments.   
 
On  1  September  2016,  Oman  doubled  the  fixed  amount  of  its  customs  tariff  on  imports  of 
tobacco products.  Before 1 September 2016, Oman’s customs tariff was the highest of: 

100% of the price of the product or 

a fixed amount of 10 Omani Riyals / 1000 cigarettes. 
 
Since 1 September 2016, Oman has imposed a new customs tariff; i.e. the highest of: 

100% of the price of the product or 

a fixed amount of 20 Omani Riyals / 1000 cigarettes. 
 
As  a  Member  of  the  WTO,  Oman  has  made  commitments  when  joining  the  organisation, 
binding the maximum customs duties it may levy on imported products, including cigarettes.  
Article  II.1(b)  of  the  General  Agreement  on  Tariffs  and  Trade  (GATT)  prohibits  Members 
from imposing ordinary customs duties exceeding the bound rates.   
 
Oman’s  WTO  Schedule  binds  cigarettes  to  a  150%  duty  on  the  price of  the  product.    The 
application  of  Oman’s  new  tariff  results,  for  cigarettes  within  a  certain  price  range,  in  the 
application  of  duties  significantly  higher  than  the  150%  bound  rate.    Oman’s  new  tariff  is 
thereby a clear violation of its obligation under Article II.1(b) GATT and is highly disruptive to 
trade. 
 
If  Oman  is  not  convinced  to  retract  its  law,  other  GCC  countries  are  likely  to  follow  its 
example,  particularly  given  the  tendency  of  GCC  countries  to  harmonise  tariffs.    This  will 
further affect EU exports.