Dies ist eine HTML Version eines Anhanges der Informationsfreiheitsanfrage 'Correspondence on corporate liability'.

 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  Draft report on the third session of the open-ended 
intergovernmental 
working 
group 
on 
transnational  corporations  and  other  business 
enterprises with respect to human rights 

Chair-Rapporteur: Guillaume Long 
 
 
23 – 27 October 2017 

link to page 3 link to page 4 link to page 4 link to page 4 link to page 4 link to page 4 link to page 6 link to page 6 link to page 6 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 11 link to page 12 link to page 14 link to page 15 link to page 17 link to page 18 link to page 20 link to page 21 link to page 22 link to page 23 link to page 23 link to page 23 link to page 24 link to page 24 link to page 25 link to page 27 Contents 
 
Page 
I. 
Introduction ................................................................................................................................................. 3 
II.  Organization of the session ......................................................................................................................... 4 
A. 
Election of the Chair-Rapporteur ........................................................................................................ 4 
B. 
Attendance .......................................................................................................................................... 4 
C. 
Documentation ................................................................................................................................... 4 
D. 
Adoption of the agenda and programme of work ............................................................................... 4 
III.  Opening statements ..................................................................................................................................... 6 
A. 
Keynote Speeches ............................................................................................................................... 6 
B. 
General Statements ............................................................................................................................. 6 
C. 
Debate: Reflections on the implementation of the United Nations Guiding Principles on Business 
and Human Rights and other relevant international, regional and national frameworks ............................. 8 
IV.  Panel discussions ......................................................................................................................................... 8 
A. 
Subject 1: General framework ............................................................................................................ 8 
B. 
Subject 2: Scope of application ........................................................................................................ 11 
C. 
Subject 3: General obligations .......................................................................................................... 12 
D. 
Subject 4: Preventive measures ........................................................................................................ 14 
E. 
Subject 5: Legal liability ................................................................................................................... 15 
F. 
Subject 6: Access to justice, effective remedy and guarantees of non-repetition ............................. 17 
G. 
Subject 7: Jurisdiction ...................................................................................................................... 18 
H. 
Subject 8: International cooperation ................................................................................................. 20 
I. 
Subject 9: Mechanisms for promotion, implementation and monitoring ......................................... 21 
J. 
Subject 10: General provisions ......................................................................................................... 22 
K. 
Panel: The voices of the victims ....................................................................................................... 23 
V.  Recommendations of the Chair-Rapporteur and conclusions of the working group ................................. 23 
A. 
Recommendations of the Chair-Rapporteur ..................................................................................... 23 
B. 
Conclusions of the working group .................................................................................................... 24 
VI.  Adoption of the report ............................................................................................................................... 24 
Annexes 
I.   List of participants ..................................................................................................................................... 25 
II.   List of panellists and moderators ............................................................................................................... 27 
 
 
2 
 

 
I.  Introduction 
1. 
The open-ended intergovernmental working group on transnational corporations and 
other  business  enterprises  with  respect  to  human  rights  was  established  by  the  Human 
Rights  Council  in  its  resolution  26/9  of  26  June  2014,  and  mandated  to  elaborate  an 
international legally binding instrument  to regulate, in international human rights  law, the 
activities of transnational corporations and other business enterprises with respect to human 
rights.  In  the  resolution,  the  Council  decided  that  the  Chairperson-Rapporteur  should 
prepare elements for the draft legally binding instrument for substantive negotiations at the 
commencement  of  the  third  session  of  the  working  group,  taking  into  consideration  the 
discussions held at its first two sessions.1   
2. 
The  third  session,  which  took  place  from  23  to  27  October  2017,  opened  with  a 
video  statement  by  the  United  Nations  High  Commissioner  for  Human  Rights.    He 
congratulated  the  former  Chair-Rapporteur  of  the  working  group  for  successfully  steering 
the  first  two  sessions  in  a  manner  that  laid  a  fertile  ground  for  the  preparation  of  the 
document of elements and recognized that the treaty process enters a new phase to discuss 
such document.  He noted that the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights 
(UNGPs) 2  was  an  important  step  towards  extending  the  human  rights  framework  to 
corporate  actors.    He  stated  that  there  was  no  inherent  dichotomy  between  promoting  the 
UNGPs and drafting new standards at the national, regional, or international level aimed at 
protecting rights and enhancing accountability and remedy for victims of corporate related 
human rights abuses.  He reiterated his commitment and full support to the working group, 
and  expressed  his  hope  that  the  recommendations  from  the  Accountability  and  Remedy 
Project,  conducted  by  the  Office  of  the  UN  High  Commissioner  for  Human  Rights 
(OHCHR), could provide useful contributions to the discussion during the third session. 
3. 
The High Commissioner’s remarks were followed by a statement of the President of 
the  Human  Rights  Council,  who  emphasised  the  role  that  human  rights  must  have  in 
relation to business in a globalized world.   He noted that seeking consensus and engaging 
in  constructive  cooperation  and  dialogue  has  been  the  spirit  of  the  first  two  sessions  and 
will  be  key  to  fulfilling  the  mandate  provided  by  resolution  26/9.    The  President  further 
recalled  the  close  link  between  the  2030  Agenda  and  the  development  of  human  rights 
which  justifies  its  use  as  a  starting  point  to  form  the  objectives  of  the  working  group 
process. 
4. 
The  Director  of  the  Thematic  Engagement,  Special  Procedures  and  Right  to 
Development  Division  of  the  OHCHR  referred  to  the  recommendations  of  the  OHCHR 
Accountability  and  Remedy  Project,  aimed  at  enhancing  the  effectiveness  of  domestic 
judicial systems in ensuring accountability and access to remedy, including in cross-border 
cases, which could inform the working group process.  She expressed the willingness of the 
OHCHR  to  provide  further  substantial  or  technical  advice  to  the  working  group  as 
appropriate. 
 
 
 
1   See A/HRC/31/50; A/HRC/34/47. 
 
2    
A/HRC/RES/17/4. 
 


 
II.  Organization of the session 
 
A. 
Election of the Chair-Rapporteur 
5. 
The working group elected Guillaume Long, Permanent Representative of Ecuador, 
as Chair-Rapporteur by acclamation following his nomination by the delegation of Jamaica 
on behalf of the Group of Latin American and Caribbean States.  
 
B. 
Attendance 
6. 
The  list  of  participants  and  the  list  of  panellists  and  moderators  are  contained  in 
annexes I and II, respectively.  
 
C. 
Documentation 
7. 
The working group had before it the following documents: 
 
(a) 
Human Rights Council resolution 26/9;  
 
(b) 
The provisional agenda of the working group (A/HRC/WG.16/2/1); 
 
(c) 
Other  documents,  notably  a  document  setting  out  elements  for  the  draft 
legally binding instrument on transnational corporations and other business enterprises with 
respect  to  human  rights  (hereinafter  “Elements  Document”),  a  programme  of  work,  and 
contributions  from  States  and  other  relevant  stakeholders,  made  available  to  the  working 
group through the dedicated website.3  
 
D. 
Adoption of the agenda and programme of work 
8. 
In his opening statement, the Chair-Rapporteur explained how the third session will 
involve  substantive  negotiations  based  on  the  Elements  Document  that  was  distributed  in 
advance of the session.  The elements set out in the document were based on deliberations 
during  the  first  two  sessions  as  well  as  over  200  meetings  held  since  2014  involving 
multiple stakeholders.  At the core of the elements is the protection of victims of business-
related human rights abuse, the elimination of impunity, and  access to justice.  He invited 
everyone to participate actively, including civil society, trade unions, national human rights 
institutions (NHRIs), and victims organizations, as their role is crucial to the success of the 
process.    He  emphasized  that  future  generations  should  have  the  right  to  live  in  a  world 
where human rights take primacy over capital and money.  
9. 
The  Chair-Rapporteur  presented  the  draft  programme  of  work  and  invited 
comments.  The European Union (EU)4 expressed its regret that consultations on the draft 
programme of work did not occur until 18 October, providing little time for negotiations on 
such an important document.  Despite the short notice, it was the understanding of the EU 
that a compromise had been reached over the objection of one State, whereby there would 
 
 
 
3  http://www.ohchr.org/EN/HRBodies/HRC/WGTransCorp/Session3/Pages/Session3.aspx. 
 
4   Only delegations that explicitly requested attribution are named in this report. 
4 
 

be  two  additional  elements  included  in  the  programme  of  work.    First,  a  panel  debate 
reflecting  on  the  implementation  of  the  UNGPs  would  be  included  at  the  start  of  the 
session.  Second,  a  footnote  that  was  included  in  the  second  session  programme  of  work 
would be reproduced, stating “this Program of Work does not limit the discussions of this 
Intergovernmental Working  Group,  which can include TNCs as  well as all other business 
enterprises.”    While  the  EU  acknowledged  that  the  first  element  of  the  compromise  was 
mostly incorporated (albeit without any panellists to lead the discussion), it was concerned 
that  the  footnote  was  excluded.    It  stressed  that  this  was  not  a  procedural  issue,  but  a 
substantive one with wide implications, as the inclusion of the footnote would ensure that 
the working group could consider abuses involving purely national companies.  Therefore, 
it requested an amendment to the programme of work to include the footnote. 
10. 
Immediately  after,  several  delegations  intervened  to  express  their  support  for  the 
programme  of  work  as  proposed  by  the  Chair-Rapporteur,  disagreeing  with  the  EU 
proposal  and  requesting  the  flexibility  to  adopt  it  to  start  negotiations.    Some  other 
delegations  supported  the  proposal  of  the  EU  and  regretted  the  lack  of  consensus  with 
regard to the programme of work. 
11. 
 The  delegations  that  rejected  the  EU  proposal  to  amend  the  draft  programme  of 
work  stressed  that  the  mandate  in  resolution  26/9  is  clear  and  that  there  was  no  need  to 
advance  substance  or  prejudge  content  to  be  discussed  and  negotiated.    They  considered 
that  the  footnote  to  the  programme  of  work  would  improperly  attempt  to  amend  a 
resolution of the Human Rights Council.  
12. 
The  EU  did  not  agree  that  including  the  footnote  would  prejudge  the  outcomes  of 
the  negotiations  or  would  amend  resolution  26/9,  which  they  respect,  even  though  that 
resolution restricts the scope and, therefore, prejudges the outcome of the negotiations.  It 
found objections to this proposal puzzling, as they sent  a message to civil society,  human 
rights defenders, and victims that abuses by domestic enterprises should not be treated with 
equal  rigor.    Additionally,  it  reaffirmed  that  this  was  a  compromise  proposal  that  nobody 
objected  to  during  the  consultations  except  for  one  State  and  questioned  the  future  of  the 
process and the trust in the ability to find an agreeable position. 
13. 
Another  delegation  did  not  agree  that  any  compromise  was  reached  at  the  18 
October meeting since many delegations had not been present and recalled that it is not just 
one  State  against  the  EU  proposal.    Additionally,  the  delegation  found  it  peculiar  that  the 
same  delegations  voting  against  resolution  26/9  are  now  calling  for  an  expansion  of  the 
mandate  with  the  intention  to  block  this  session.    Another  delegation  noted  that  the 
discussion was unreasonably delaying negotiations and was ultimately harming those they 
were trying to protect through this process. 
14. 
The  Chair-Rapporteur  shared  the  view  that  a  compromise  had  not  been  reached  to 
amend the program of work and pointed out that further discussion could take place during 
the panel devoted to the scope of the treaty.  He suggested that the working group adopt the 
programme of work as presented and that all delegations’ views be reflected in the report.  
As  no  delegation  expressed  objections  to  this  proposal,  the  programme  of  work  was 
adopted. 
 


 
III.  Opening statements 
 
A. 
Keynote Speeches 
15. 
María  Fernanda  Espinosa,  Minister  of  Foreign  Affairs  of  Ecuador,  and  former 
Chairperson-Rapporteur of the working group, delivered a keynote statement that explained 
the  background  to  the  establishment  of  the  working  group.    Discussions  surrounding  the 
regulation  of  TNCs  at  the  international  level  date  back  to  the  1970s.    Since  then, 
globalization  had  brought  great  power  to  TNCs,  leading  to  positive  consequences  for 
economic  development  but  also  many  negative  social  consequences.    Non-binding, 
voluntary rules had been valuable but had been unable to ensure victims’ access to remedy 
in cases of corporate human rights  violations.   The  particular date of 26 June 2014 of the 
adoption of resolution 26/9 was a milestone, representing a paradigm shift in the efforts  to 
address corporate abuse.  The  working  group  process  led by Ecuador and South  Africa to 
fill a gap in international law is supported by a wide range of stakeholders including a large 
number of civil society organizations.  Serious companies support it since they want a level 
playing  field.    She  stressed  the  importance  of  prevention  in  the  document  of  elements, 
which  could  have  been  a  key  tool  to  avoid  disasters  like  Rana  Plaza,  the  Niger  Delta 
pollution, and the destruction of lives in the Amazon by Chevron-Texaco.  States support it 
since  they  recognize  that  the  two  paths  of  obligatory  and  voluntary  are  mutually 
reinforcing,  as  demonstrated  by  the  recent  French  law  and  several  other  examples.    Ms. 
Espinosa expressed her appreciation  that hundreds of people have signed up to participate 
in  the  process  and  hoped  that  everyone  would  engage  constructively  and  with  respect  for 
diverse viewpoints. 
16. 
Dominique  Potier,  Member  of  the  French  National  Assembly  highlighted  the 
importance  of  ethics  in  guiding  any  discussion  on  human  rights.    At  the  heart  of  those 
regulatory  processes,  there  always  was  the  respect  for  human  dignity.    Historically, 
attempts  to  fight  slavery  and  provide  labour  protections  were  challenged  as  regulations 
leading  to  “the  end  of  the  world”,  but  ended  up  being  the  “dawn  of  a  new  era.”    Such 
efforts  led  to  significant  drops  in  abuse.    The  recent  French  duty  of  vigilance  law  was  a 
contemporary regulation that can serve as an inspiration for this working group.  The law is 
based on UN principles, including the UNGPs; is process-oriented; focuses on nationality 
rather  than  be  restricted  by  territory;  and  is  progressive  in  that  it  targets  the  largest 
companies so they can lead by example.   
 
B. 
General Statements 
17. 
Delegations  congratulated  the  Chair-Rapporteur  on  his  election  and  thanked  the 
former  Chair-Rapporteur on  her success leading the first two  sessions.    Many delegations 
expressed  appreciation  for  what  they  considered  a  transparent  and  inclusive  process  and 
reaffirmed their trust in the Chair delegation in overseeing this third session. 
18. 
Many delegations voiced their support for establishing a legally binding instrument 
to  regulate,  in  international  human  rights  law,  the  activities  of  transnational  corporations 
and other business enterprises.  While recognizing that business can and do have a positive 
impact  on  human  rights,  especially  with  respect  to  economic  development,  several 
delegations, including a regional group, and NGOs stated that companies have undermined 
6 
 

human  rights  and  contributed  to  adverse  human  rights  impacts  with  impunity.    Efforts  to 
address this accountability gap have been ongoing for over 40 years with little success. 
19. 
Delegations  recognised  that  initiatives  such  as  the  UNGPs  have  been  a  large  step 
forward, but found that voluntary principles have not been enough; a mandatory regulatory 
framework  was  needed  to  ensure  accountability  and  access  to  justice.    Creating  a  legally 
binding  instrument  would  be  complementary  to,  and  not  in  opposition  of,  the  UNGPs.  
Legal lacunae in the UNGPs could be addressed with international obligations, and certain 
aspects of the UNGPs should be made mandatory. 
20. 
A legally binding instrument would benefit victims of business-related human rights 
abuse  by  ensuring  that  companies  are  held  accountable  and  that  victims  have  access  to 
prompt, effective, and adequate remedies.  Additionally, several delegations considered that 
such  an  instrument  could  be  beneficial  to  business  since  it  would  create  a  level  playing 
field.    Uniform  rules  across  jurisdictions  would  create  legal  certainty  that  business  would 
appreciate. 
21. 
Many  delegations  welcomed  the  Elements  Document  put  forward  by  the  Chair 
delegation  as  being  comprehensive,  imposing  obligations  on  TNCs  and  other  business 
enterprises, and contributing to victims’ access to justice. 
22. 
Other  delegations  voiced  concern  over  the  elements,  believing  there  was  a  risk  of 
undermining  the  UNGPs.    These  delegations,  as  well  as  some  NGOs,  regretted  that  the 
Elements  Document  was  published  three  weeks  before  the  session,  allowing  insufficient 
time to fully analyse and formulate official positions on the content.   
23. 
Some  delegations  thought  that  discussions  on  a  legally  binding  instrument  were 
premature.    The  UNGPs  were  unanimously  adopted  six  years  ago,  and  more  time  was 
needed  to  allow  for  States  to  implement  the  UNGPs.  This  process  risked  distracting 
attention away from such implementation.  Other delegations agreed that primacy should be 
afforded  to  the  UNGPs  but  acknowledged  that  both  the  UNGPs  and  a  legally  binding 
instrument  would  have  common  objectives,  and  that  a  smart  mix  of  voluntary  and 
regulatory measures could be beneficial. 
24. 
Many delegations agreed that States have the primary duty to protect against human 
rights abuse by third parties, including business enterprises, and commended the  Elements 
Document  for  reflecting  this  consensus.    However,  there  was  disagreement  as  to  which 
business enterprises should be covered by a legally binding instrument.  Several delegations 
expressed the view that transnational corporations and all other business enterprises should 
be covered by the instrument, a view shared by many NGOs.  Given the complex nature of 
corporate  structures  and  the  prevalence  of  domestically  incorporated  subsidiaries,  these 
delegations feared that transnational corporations could find ways to fall outside the scope 
of an instrument regulating only transnational activities.  While some delegations expressed 
the view that resolution 26/9 and the proposed elements permitted all business enterprises 
to be covered, other delegations rejected this as expanding  the  mandate in resolution 26/9 
and noted that domestic laws already regulate domestic companies. 
25. 
Delegations  disagreed  about  the  extent  to  which  an  instrument  should  permit  the 
exercise of extraterritorial jurisdiction.  One delegation suggested that the instrument could 
incorporate  extraterritorial  obligations  as  laid  out  in  the  Maastricht  Principles,  while 
another delegation rejected the idea that  a legally binding instrument  should  permit States 
to exercise any form of extraterritorial jurisdiction. 
 


26. 
Multiple  delegations  welcomed  that  the  Elements  Document  include  provisions  on 
international  cooperation  and  capacity  building.    The  legally  binding  instrument  should 
recognize  the  differing  capacities  of  States  and  allow  for  assistance  in  order  to  ensure 
effective implementation of the treaty. 
27. 
Some  delegations  and  multiple  NGOs  insisted  that  the  treaty  ensure  specific 
protections  for  certain  vulnerable  populations,  such  as  indigenous  peoples.    Given  the 
disproportionate effect that human rights abuse has on women and girls, there was a call for 
a gendered approach to the treaty. 
28. 
Some  delegations  and  NGOs  also  discussed  the  need  for  the  instrument  to  take 
account  of  conflict  situations  and  provide  special  protections  in  cases  of  occupation  and 
other types of armed conflict. 
29. 
While several NGOs called for the instrument to clearly assert the primacy of human 
rights  over  trade  and  investment  agreements,  one  delegation  argued  that  there  is  no 
hierarchy between norms in international law, with the exception of jus cogens norms. 
30. 
There  was  wide  consensus  among  most  delegations  and  civil  society  that,  going 
forward, the process would benefit from a transparent, inclusive, and constructive dialogue 
involving  multiple  stakeholders.    However,  some  delegations  and  business  organizations 
were concerned that business was not well represented in the process.   
 
C. 
Debate: Reflections on the implementation of the United Nations 
Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights and other relevant 
international, regional and national frameworks 

31. 
One  regional  group  expressed  its  appreciation  for  including  this  session  in  the 
Programme  of  Work.    It  recalled  how  in  the  last  six  years,  there  have  been  numerous 
positive  initiatives  aimed  at  implementing  the  UNGPs.    Since  the  working  group  process 
can  be  expected  to  take  a  long  time  to  conclude,  it  was  suggested  that  States  should  take 
steps to implement the UNGPs now in order to ensure protection for victims. 
32. 
A  number  of  delegations  expressed  their  support  for  the  UNGPs,  as  they  were 
unanimously  endorsed  as  an  authoritative  global  standard.    Additionally,  delegations 
discussed different initiatives implementing the UNGPs, in particular national action plans.  
Support  was  expressed  for the OHCHR  Accountability  and Remedy Project, the Working 
Group  on  Business  and  Human  Rights,  as  well  as  the  annual  Forum  on  Business  and 
Human Rights. 
33. 
Some delegations noted that the UNGPs are not purely voluntary since they discuss 
substantive  obligations  of  States  under  international  human  rights  law.    Other  delegations 
and one NGO did not agree that the UNGPs could guarantee protection of human rights.   
 
IV.  Panel discussions 
 
A. 
Subject 1: General framework 
34. 
The first panellist noted that these negotiations are the product of a strong grassroots 
process.    Consumers  need  access  to  information  to  influence  business  habits;  thus,  there 
8 
 

should be transparent human rights due diligence processes throughout supply chains.  She 
noted  that  the  European  Parliament  has  mandated  its  representative  to  maintain  a 
constructive  dialogue  with  the  working  group  because  it  believes  that  there  needs  to  be  a 
legally  binding  instrument  regulating  business  and  human  rights.    The  panellist  lamented 
the position of  the EU delegation as it goes against the common position of the European 
Parliament and therefore does not represent it. 
35. 
The  second  panellist  offered  a  development  perspective  to  the  discussion.  He 
discussed  the  economist,  Joseph  Stiglitz,  who  has  argued  that  globalization  distinctly 
disadvantaged developing countries, and that large financial corporations pose a particular 
barrier to development in the Global South. Market failure and the dominant role of finance 
not  only  affected  inequality  between  nations,  but  also  within  nations,  including  within 
advanced  economies.  The  high  prevalence  of  rent-seeking  behaviour  by  corporations 
creates  a  “winner  takes  most  society.”    For  example,  intellectual  property  rights  have 
become  a  way  for  corporations  to  corner  markets  and  gouge  citizens  rather  than  being  a 
source of innovation and entrepreneurial drive.  It was argued that the predatory features of 
the  current  economy  impede  the  SDGs,  but  that  there  is  a  growing  trend  to  combat  this.  
For example, the United States is revisiting its long history of anti-trust legislation and the 
OECD is attacking tax avoidance by large internet companies. 
36. 
The third panellist addressed the accelerating pace of challenges faced by the global 
community with respect to development and the recognition of human rights. He found the 
proposed elements useful in reflecting the main perspectives expressed during the previous 
two  sessions.    The  panellist  highlighted  three  objectives  in  the  draft  elements:  (1) 
guaranteeing  the  respect,  promotion,  and  fulfilment  of  human  rights,  (2)  guaranteeing 
access to remedies, and (3) strengthening international cooperation.  
37. 
Some  delegations  found  that  the  chapter  on  the  “General  framework”  in  the 
Elements Document should be made more concise, while others expressed appreciation for 
the comprehensive approach.  To facilitate shortening the chapter, it was proposed merging 
the  subsections  on  “Principles,”  “Purpose,”  and  “Objectives.”    Other  delegations  thought 
that only the subsections on “Purpose” and “Objectives” should be merged and questioned 
what  the  difference  was  between  the  two  given  that  there  were  similar  elements  in  both 
categories. 
38. 
With respect to the  “Preamble,” several delegations commented on the selection of 
instruments  listed,  with  some  arguing  that  there  were  too  many  instruments  and  others 
arguing that certain instruments were missing (e.g., ILO Declaration on Social Justice for a 
Fair  Globalization,  Sustainable  Development  Goals,  environmental  treaties  and 
declarations,  Declaration  on  Human  Rights  Defenders,  Declaration  on  the  Rights  of 
Indigenous Peoples, and WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control). One regional 
group  and  some  NGOs  questioned  why  treaties  were  contained  in  the  same  list  as  non-
binding instruments. 
39. 
Some  delegations  suggested  that  there  should  be  reference  to  the  positive  impact 
business can have on human rights,  while other  delegations suggested including reference 
to  the  negative  effects  of  TNCs  in  the  context  of  globalization.    Additionally,  NGOs 
recommended that language should be included regarding corporate capture. 
40. 
Several delegations appreciated the references made to the right to development and 
economic,  social,  and  cultural  rights.    Additionally,  delegations  and  NGOs  welcomed  the 
reaffirmation  of  the  UNGPs,  showing  this  process  is  complementary  to  the  UNGPs.  
 


However,  one  delegation  found  it  inappropriate  to  include  reference  to  the  UNGPs  since 
they  were  not  developed  and  negotiated  by  States.    One  business  organization  questioned 
why there was a reference to the norms on the responsibilities of TNCs when that process 
was abandoned by the UN over a decade ago. In his response, the Chair Rapporteur pointed 
out  that  many  elements  contained  in  those  norms  were  cited  approvingly  in  the  first  two 
sessions. 
41. 
Much discussion focused on the sub-section of the elements on “Principles”.  Many 
delegations  and  NGOs  welcomed  the  recognition  of  the  primacy  of  human  rights 
obligations over trade and investment agreements.  However, one regional group and other 
delegations questioned the legal basis for this and wondered how it would apply in law and 
practice.    It  was  queried  whether  this  would  require  the  renegotiation  of  existing  treaties, 
and  whether  this  implied  that  States  could  disregard  provisions  of  trade  and  investment 
treaties,  citing  human  rights.  Concern  was  also  expressed  whether  this  could  result  in  the 
fragmentation of international law.  
42. 
Delegations  questioned  whether  recognizing  special  protection  of  certain  human 
rights signalled a hierarchy of certain human rights over others.  One regional group noted 
that  this  provision  could  potentially  conflict  with  another  provision  discussing  the 
universality, indivisibility, interdependence, and interrelationship of all human rights.  The 
Chair Rapporteur clarified that the intention of the provision was not to create a hierarchy 
but to note specific rights that are more likely to be affected by business activities.   
43. 
Some  delegations  voiced  concern  over  the  language  used  to  recognize  the  special 
protection of vulnerable groups.  Acknowledging that certain groups require  differentiated 
treatment, it was feared that including a list of some groups could indicate the exclusion of 
others.    Others  requested  that  the  language  be  altered  to  reflect  even  a  more  positive, 
empowering tone. 
44. 
One delegation noted that the reference to the duty of States to prepare human rights 
impact assessments was inappropriate in this section since this was not a “principle.”  The 
same delegation also expressed concern about the provision recognizing the responsibility 
of  States  for  private  acts  since  it  believed  it  was  worded  too  generally  and  failed  to 
recognize that such responsibility only arises in certain circumstances 
45. 
Several  elements  under  the  section  on  “Purpose”  also  received  attention.    While 
some delegations approved of a reference to the civil, administrative, and criminal liability 
of  business,  one  delegation  did  not  agree  with  the  reference  since  many  States’  legal 
systems do not criminally punish legal entities.  This delegation thought it should be up to 
States’ discretion as to how to enforce the treaty. 
46. 
Delegations  and  NGOs  welcomed  the  reaffirmation  that  States’  human  rights 
obligations extend beyond territorial borders, with some requesting that the contours of this 
should  be  elaborated  in  the  instrument.    One  regional  group  questioned  whether  this 
provision  conflicted  with  one  in  the  preamble  reaffirming  the  sovereign  equality  and 
territorial integrity of States. 
47. 
Regarding  the  “Objectives”  of  the  instrument,  delegations  welcomed  the  provision 
referencing  international  cooperation  and  mutual  legal  assistance  as  necessary  for  the 
effective implementation of the instrument. 
10 
 

 
B. 
Subject 2: Scope of application  
48. 
The first panellist noted that the Elements Document refers to the activities of TNCs 
and other business enterprises that have a transnational character, regardless of the mode of 
creation, control, ownership, size or structure.  This indicates an inclusive approach in line 
with the UNGPs.  The panellist also noted that the focus of the  Elements Document is on 
business  “activities”  rather  than  their  corporate  ownership.    Thus,  the  legally  binding 
instrument  will  cover  parents  and  subsidiaries  so  long  as  they  operate  across  different 
jurisdictions.    Finally,  she  supported  the  scope  of  application  to  cover  all  internationally 
recognized human rights. 
49. 
The second panellist also expressed support for extending the scope of application to 
all internationally recognized human rights,  reflecting their universality, indivisibility, and 
interdependence.  She also supported reference to labour and environmental rights, as well 
as  corruption.    The  panellist  questioned  restricting  the  elements  to  acts  of  a  transnational 
character since from the victim’s perspective it is irrelevant whether an act is domestic or 
transnational.    She  suggested  that  the  instrument  should  make  reference  to  omissions  of 
companies when these result in a deprivation of human rights.  The panellist also suggested 
that  the  instrument  not  be  restricted  to  regional  economic  integration  organizations  and 
apply to other national and regional organizations as well. 
50. 
The third panellist emphasized that the working group is acting under a mandate of 
the  Human  Rights  Council;  thus,  human  rights  must  prevail,  not  investment  and  trade.  
There should also be more of a focus on human rights defenders.  This panellist noted that a 
legally  binding  instrument  should  address  gaps  in  voluntary  initiatives,  and  direct 
obligations on business should be explored. 
51. 
With respect to the rights covered by a binding instrument, most delegations agreed 
that all internationally recognized human rights should be included.  Delegations mentioned 
that this covers certain rights, such as  the right  to development, the right to property, and 
the  right  to  permanent  sovereignty  over  natural  resources.    It  was  suggested  that  the 
instrument  should  also  ensure  protection  of  nationally-recognized  rights.    Another 
delegation  suggested  that  the  wording  of  this  provision  in  the  Elements  Document  was 
overbroad  by  including  “other  intergovernmental  instruments”  beyond  human  rights 
treaties since these instruments were neither binding nor universal. 
52. 
Other delegations disagreed that all human rights should be included due to the lack 
of universality of many human rights. 
53. 
Regarding  the  provision  covering  acts  subject  to  the  instrument’s  application,  the 
EU and some NGOs were concerned that it was unclear what was included and suggested 
that  the  phrase  “business  activity  that  has  a  transnational  character”  be  defined  to  ensure 
effectiveness of the instrument.  It was noted that if liability is involved, defining the phrase 
is  mandatory.    While  a  delegation  and  panellist  disagreed,  it  was  suggested  that  guidance 
could  be  drawn  from  international  instruments  covering  transnational  crime  without 
borrowing definitions. 
54. 
The  EU  raised  questions  relating  to  the  acts  to  be  covered  by  a  future  instrument, 
including  whether the provision discriminated between foreign and domestic companies if 
domestic  companies  were  categorically  excluded  from  the  scope.   In  response,  a  panellist 
disagreed that this would constitute discrimination since the provision focuses on conduct, 
not nationality. 
 
11 

55. 
Concerning which actors should be subject to the instrument, some argued that only 
States  would  be  the  proper  subjects.    Another  delegation  was  open  to  the  provision 
covering organizations of regional economic integration but questioned why these were not 
mentioned elsewhere in the document.  Further, there was concern that these organizations 
would  be  difficult  to  regulate  in  practice  given  the  relationship  between  individual  States 
and such institutions.  
56. 
Several delegations considered that TNCs and other business enterprises  should be 
subject  to  the  instrument  but  not  domestic  companies.    Other  delegations  noted  that  such 
companies are subject to  national laws and need not be included in the instrument; in this 
regard, they emphasized that negotiations must go on guided by the mandate of resolution 
26/9.    One  intergovernmental  organization  pointed  out  that  TNCs  are  regulated  by  the 
national laws of the countries they operate in.  It was highlighted that domestic businesses 
should be included as they can  also be responsible for human rights abuses.   There was  a 
call for the inclusion of online corporations in the scope of application.  Several delegations 
emphasized  that  the  discussions  about  the  scope  should  continue  within  the  mandate  of 
resolution 26/9. 
57. 
Some  delegations  voiced  concern  over  the  provision  subjecting  natural  persons  to 
the  instrument,  taking  into  account  the  mandate  of  resolution  26/9,  noting  this  was 
unnecessary since international criminal law covers individuals.  Other delegations  were of 
the opinion that individuals should be subject to the instrument. 
58. 
Some  delegations  emphasized  the  importance  of  including  regulations  of  business 
activities  in  conflict  and  post-conflict  areas  as  businesses  can  exploit  these  situations  for 
natural resources. 
 
C. 
Subject 3: General obligations  
59. 
The  first  panellist  explained  that,  under  international  law,  States  have  the  duty  to 
regulate business activity to protect human rights.  A treaty could ensure that victims have 
access  to  remedy  by  clarifying  that  States  must  regulate  the  extraterritorial  actions  of 
companies  domiciled  within  their  jurisdiction.    Additionally,  States  can  ensure  that 
companies  disclose  information  about  their  operations  when  acting  transnationally.  
Various domestic laws already require this, particularly for larger companies.  The panellist 
also  discussed  the  obligation  of  companies  to  comply  with  internationally  recognized 
human rights law, regardless of whether the host State has ratified a particular convention.  
With  respect  to  international  organizations,  the  panellist  noted  that  these  organizations 
already have a duty to respect human rights and that States must ensure these organizations 
comply.  Given all of this, the elements largely reaffirm international human rights law, and 
are therefore not unorthodox. 
60. 
The  second  panellist  did  not  support  the  content  of  the  Elements  Document  and 
voiced  concern  over  imposing  international  law  obligations  on  companies.    Establishing 
human  rights  obligations  on  companies  could  lead  to  States  delegating  their  duties  to  the 
private  sector,  undermining  the  full  protection  of  human  rights.    Furthermore,  generally 
imposing such duties on all TNCs and other business enterprises was impractical given the 
amount  and  diversity  of  the  actors  involved.    This  panellist  warned  that  reopening  the 
debate on business and human rights would lead to confusion and could subvert the UN’s 
authoritative voice on these issues. 
12 
 

61. 
The third panellist saw many positive aspects of the Elements Document but decided 
to focus his remarks on gaps in the document.  With respect to the obligations of States, he 
regretted  that  concepts  of  corporate  law,  such  as  separate  legal  personality,  were  absent 
from  the  ambit  of  the  elements.    Corporations  are  creatures  of  statute,  and  a  successful 
instrument must address these issues.  Regarding the obligations of companies, it would be 
important  to  go  beyond  the  UNGPs  by  placing  binding  legal  obligations  on  corporations.  
However,  for  this  to  be  effective,  the  instrument  should  clarify  what  constitutes  an 
actionable  violation.    Additionally,  the  instrument  could  impose  positive  obligations  on 
companies. 
62. 
The  fourth  panellist  emphasized  workers’  support  of  the  working  group  and  noted 
that  labour  rights  must  be  included.    States  should  uphold  human  rights  in  all  legal 
agreements  and  not  support  any  legislation  contrary  to  human  rights.    Furthermore,  the 
instrument should oblige companies to exercise due diligence and provide remedies. While 
acknowledging  that  some  provisions  in  the  Elements  Document  are  vague,  more  detail 
could be developed during the negotiation process. 
63. 
While  many  delegations  supported  the  proposed  elements  under  “General 
obligations,”  some  noted  the  need  to  continue  with  negotiations  on  certain  specific 
provisions.  More specifically,  provisions of a legally binding instrument  must be  worded 
clearly if legal consequences will attach. 
64. 
Regarding  the  provisions  on  “State  obligations,”  it  was  noted  that  many  elements 
seemed to restate existing obligations, and it was questioned what added value there  would 
be from including these in the instrument.  There was concern that the provisions requiring 
States to adapt domestic legislation and impose restrictions on public procurement contracts 
interfered  with  the  internal  affairs  of  States,  as  it  should  be  up  to  each  State  to  determine 
how to implement its treaty obligations.  Additionally, there were calls for more specificity 
in the provisions regarding reporting and disclosure requirements, as well as the provision 
requiring States to ensure that human rights be considered in their contractual engagements. 
65. 
Other  delegations  commended  the  drafting  of  the  section,  specifically  voicing 
support  for  the  recognition  that  States  have  the  primary  duty  to  protect  human  rights  and 
must  take  measures  to  prevent,  investigate,  punish,  and  redress  violations  to  ensure 
companies respect human rights throughout their activities.  Some  welcomed the provision 
requiring States to ensure that companies conduct human rights and environmental impact 
assessments.  However,  one  delegation  expressed  that  it  was  beyond  the  working  group’s 
mandate to discuss environmental impact assessments. 
66. 
Throughout the discussion, there were several suggestions regarding  what could be 
added  to  this  section,  including  reference  to  international  cooperation  and  mutual  legal 
assistance,  clarification  as  to  extraterritorial  obligations,  regulation  of  State-owned 
companies, reference to conflict-areas, and the protection of human rights defenders. 
67. 
Concerning the inclusion of a section on  “Obligations of transnational corporations 
and other business enterprises”, some delegations asked for information on the  legal basis 
for imposing international human rights obligations on companies.  Additionally, questions 
were raised as to how this would work in practice and whether this would be appropriate in 
the  absence  of  a  structure  capable  of  law  enforcement.    Other  delegations  found  it 
appropriate  to  impose  international  obligations  on  companies  and  referenced  several 
treaties  establishing  obligations  on  legal  entities.    In  their  view,  such  obligations  were 
necessary to ensure the effectiveness of the instrument. 
 
13 

68. 
Delegations suggested that additional obligations should be imposed on companies, 
including  to  mandate  human  rights  due  diligence  and  reporting;  ensure  free,  prior,  and 
informed  consent  when  operations  could  adversely  affect  communities;  prevent  corporate 
capture;  oblige  companies  to  pay  taxes  in  countries  they  operate  in;  and  to  positively 
promote human rights. 
69. 
With  respect  to  the  section  on  obligations  of  international  organizations,  it  was 
questioned whether the provision belonged under “General obligations” since it appeared to 
concern an obligation of States and not international organizations as such.  To the extent 
that  the  provision  did  create  obligations  for  international  organizations,  some  delegations 
expressed their disfavour in making limitations on bodies  created by different instruments 
with different mandates. 
 
D. 
Subject 4: Preventive measures 
70. 
The  first  panellist  noted  that,  among  the  many  allegations  of  human  rights  abuses 
received as Special Rapporteur, most involved corporate activities and affected vulnerable 
groups.  In his view, this illustrated not only an existing accountability gap for victims, but 
also  the  gross  failure  of  States  to  prevent  such  human  rights  abuses.    Thus,  the  panellist 
argued  that  the  instrument  should  oblige  States  to  require  effective  and  binding  due 
diligence processes from all companies.  This should not be limited to the supply chain but 
should include the complete lifecycle of a product, including its disposal.  He also stressed 
the  need to clarify the types  of activities to  which preventive  measures  should apply.   He 
noted that several provisions in the section on “Preventive measures” did not seem directly 
relevant to prevention and suggested moving them to a more appropriate section.  
71. 
The second panellist  argued that preventive measures in the treaty should focus on 
two components: (1) preventing acts by TNCs that adversely affect  human rights, and (2) 
preventing  corporate  capture.    Regarding  corporate  capture,  the  panellist  proposed  that 
States  should  ensure  transparency  and  disclosure  of  documents  and  contracts  with  TNCs.   
Additionally,  States  should  prohibit  political  contributions  from  TNCs  and  forbid 
outsourcing of security services to companies. 
72. 
The third panellist highlighted the essential character of preventive measures in the 
instrument.    She  made  several  recommendations  as  to  how  the  elements  could  be 
strengthened in this respect, including by  referring  to due diligence obligations relating  to 
development  institutions,  the  use  of  independent  assessors  in  case  of  impact  studies,  the 
coverage of labour and environmental rights, the inclusion of a gender perspective, the use 
of  ex  ante  and  ex  post  impact  assessments,  as  well  as  the  inclusion  of  the  free,  prior,  and 
informed consent principle.  
73. 
Delegations  and  NGOs  highlighted  the  importance  of  prevention  and  welcomed  a 
section dedicated to it in the document.  It was questioned whether, conceptually speaking, 
the  elements  in  this  section  should  be  linked  with  the  section  on  obligations  as  the 
provisions addressed the obligations of States and companies.  Some sought more precision 
in  the  wording  of  the  provisions,  wanting  to  know  whether  the  terms  “adequate”  or 
“necessary  measures”  took  proper  account  of  differing  capacities  among  States.    One 
business organization expressed concern that the language used reopened an issue that had 
been resolved in the UNGPs, potentially causing confusion and unintended consequences. 
14 
 

74. 
Delegations welcomed the provision requiring States to mandate companies to adopt 
and  implement  due  diligence  policies  and  processes.    It  was  suggested  that  this  provision 
should  ensure  that  States  implement  uniform,  minimum  standards.    A  delegation  and 
several NGOs thought risk assessments under this provision should address environmental 
impacts.  Concern was expressed that since these measures were to apply to “all the TNCs 
and OBEs in [a State’s] territory or jurisdiction, including subsidiaries and all other related 
enterprises  throughout  the  supply  chain,”  it  would  allow  States  to  exercise  extraterritorial 
jurisdiction  improperly.    The  Chair-Rapporteur  clarified  that  the  due  diligence  obligation 
was meant for the parent company domiciled in a State, and that a company was to assess 
risks throughout its supply chain. 
75. 
Concern was expressed about the provision requiring consultation processes, as one 
delegation  was  unsure  when  this  would  be  required  and  for  what  purpose.    Other 
delegations and several NGOs saw value in the provision.  Some NGOs suggested that this 
provision  should  clearly  require  free,  prior,  and  informed  consent  of  communities,  in 
particular  indigenous  communities,  when  TNC  projects  threatened  adverse  human  rights 
impacts. 
76. 
Concerning the provision requiring dissemination of the instrument to everyone in a 
State’s  territory  in  a  language  they  can  understand,  some  delegations  stressed  the 
importance  of  the  populace  knowing  their  rights;  however,  one  delegation  felt  this 
provision interfered with States’ right to determine how to implement the instrument. 
77. 
Some  sought  clarification  on  the  provisions  requiring  periodic  reporting,  with  one 
NGO  indicating  that  this  provision  would  have  no  teeth  without  an  enforcement 
mechanism. 
78. 
Some  delegations  and  NGOs  suggested  adding  language  in  this  section  aimed  at 
preventing the capture of public institutions by vested business interests, and drew attention 
to  article  5(3)  of  the  WHO  Framework  Convention  on  Tobacco  Control  for  guidance.  
Additionally,  there  was  a  call  for  the  section  to  include  enhanced  due  diligence  for 
businesses operating in the context of armed conflict. 
 
E. 
Subject 5: Legal liability 
79. 
The first panellist welcomed a section in the Elements Document on legal liability, 
although  he  noted  that  a  “sue  and  damages”  approach  should  be  complemented  by 
prevention.    He  emphasized  that  the  instrument  should  cover  environmental,  health  and 
safety, and  workers’ rights, as  well as corporate  complicity in State  violations.  Criminal 
liability  will  be  hard  to  enforce  given  a  range  of  pragmatic  difficulties,  including  lack  of 
motivation by regulators; thus, the focus should be on civil liability for multinational parent 
companies.  Several challenges arise in the civil context as well, particularly issues related 
to  extraterritorial  jurisdiction,  forum  non  conveniens,  lack  of  access  to  information,  and 
legal assistance.  Unless these challenges are resolved, it will remain difficult for victims to 
obtain redress. 
80. 
The  second  panellist  noted  the  comprehensive  nature  of  the  provisions  on  legal 
liability and recognized how they could be relevant in a variety of legal systems.  Focusing 
his remarks on criminal legal liability, the panellist described increasing recognition at the 
international  and  regional  levels  of  criminal  liability  of  legal  entities  and  their  agents.  
Specifically, he recalled the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child 
 
15 

on  the  sale  of  children,  child  prostitution  and  child  pornography;  the  Draft  Protocol  on 
Amendments to the Protocol on the Statute of the African Court of Justice; and Council of 
Europe Recommendation  CM/Rec (2016)3 on human rights and business.  He stressed the 
necessity  of  criminal  liability  to  serve  as  a  deterrent,  better  protect  individuals  and 
communities’ rights, and provide access to justice for victims. 
81. 
The  third  panellist  appreciated  that  the  elements  called  for  the  adoption  of  legal 
measures  on  the  national  level  and  recognized  differences  in  national  legal  systems.  
Additionally,  he  welcomed the inclusion of a provision ensuring that civil liability should 
not be made contingent upon a finding of criminal liability.  The panellist cautioned against 
including provisions that mandate specific legal actions, as this could be contrary to certain 
legal  systems  and  counterproductive  to  the  goals  of  the  instrument.    He  further  suggested 
that  the  provision  discussing  due  diligence  procedures  should  be  placed  in  a  different 
section. 
82. 
Delegations  signalled  their  approval  for  including  a  section  on  legal  liability, 
although  some  suggested  this  section  should  be  clearer  and  more  concise.    Some 
recognized  legal  liability  could  also  encompass  natural  persons.    Most  delegations  and 
NGOs agreed that criminal, civil, and administrative liability should attach to legal entities, 
and  some  delegations  shared  national  laws  that  imposed  these  types  of  liability  on 
companies.  It was noted that the different types of liability were complementary; however, 
some  delegations  were  concerned  at  the  lack  of  differentiation  between  them.    In  their 
view,  differentiated  language  was  needed  to  reflect  whether  a  provision  referred  to 
criminal,  civil,  or  administrative  liability.    Furthermore,  it  was  noted  that  some  legal 
systems  do  not  allow  for  the  imposition  of  criminal  liability  on  legal  entities;  thus, 
provisions  requiring  such  liability  would  be  inappropriate.    States  should  have  the 
flexibility to choose how best to incorporate the treaty into domestic law.  Concerns were 
also raised about the appropriateness of imposing international obligations on legal entities. 
83. 
Some  delegations  called  for  greater  detail  and  clear,  minimum  standards  regarding 
the  measures  States  must  take  to  establish  the  different  forms  of  legal  liability  in  their 
jurisdictions.    Others  appreciated  the  flexibility  provided  for  in  the  elements,  allowing 
States to adopt their own legal measures in accordance with their national systems. 
84. 
It  was  noted  that  the  two  provisions  dealing  with  the  commission  and  attempt  of 
criminal  offenses  were  unnecessary  given  the  general  provision  in  the  section  covering 
civil,  criminal,  and  administrative  offenses.    It  was  also  questioned  why  “international 
applicable human rights instruments” was used in these sections when other sections used 
different terminology. 
85. 
Clarification  was  sought  as  to  the  meaning  of  the  provision  establishing  civil 
liability for companies for participating in the “planning, preparation, direction of or benefit 
from human rights violations” caused by other companies, with one delegation suggesting 
this  should  cover  indirect  benefits  as  well.    Similarly,  some  delegations  called  for  more 
precision as to the contours of the provisions dealing with immunities, State responsibility 
for  the  actions  of  companies  under  their  control,  and  complicity.    Regarding  the  issue  of 
complicity, it was queried whether States would become automatically responsible for any 
harm committed by a company. 
86. 
One delegation also considered that the provision promoting decent work in supply 
chains fell outside the scope of the mandate given by resolution 26/9. 
16 
 

87. 
It  was  suggested  that  language  should  be  added  to  the  section  to  address  parent 
company  liability.    Additionally,  an  NGO  suggested  that  international  crimes  should  be 
included in the section. 
 
F. 
Subject 6: Access to justice, effective remedy and guarantees of non-
repetition 

88. 
The  first  panellist  noted  that  a  binding  instrument  must  build  on  and  complement 
existing  international  standards,  such  as  the  UNGPs.    Certain  ambiguities  exist  in  the 
Elements Document, and he hoped that these would be resolved as negotiations progressed.  
Regarding access to remedy, the panellist discussed the importance of national action plans 
in  facilitating  victims’  access  to  justice.    The  remedy  process  should  be  sensitive  to  the 
experiences  of  different  groups  of  rights-holders,  requiring  consideration  of  the  gender 
dimension  and  preventing  victimization  of  rights-holders  and  human  rights  defenders 
seeking  remedies.  Furthermore,  rights-holders  must  be  able  to  seek,  obtain,  and  enforce 
different types of remedies.   
89. 
The second panellist stated that there is a clear legal basis to establish liability, in the 
and the elements could be made clearer on this.  He also welcomed the provision on legal 
aid.    In  order  to  strengthen  this  provision,  he  suggested  that  an  online  resource  could  be 
established  which  would  provide  information  to  victims,  such  as  the  relevant  law  and  the 
applicable burden of proof, and which would link victims to NGOs and lawyers willing to 
help.  Additionally,  the  panellist  noted  the  importance  of  recognition  and  enforcement  of 
judgments 
90. 
The  third  panellist  discussed  how  important  it  would  be  was  for  victims  to  have 
access  to  courts  in  the  home  States  of  TNCs  without  experiencing  delays  caused  by 
jurisdictional challenges.  To better confront problems such as piercing the corporate veil, 
he  recommended  reversing  the  burden  of  proof  and  improving  victims’  access  to 
disclosure.    He  also  suggested  that  damages  should  be  calculated  based  on  home  State 
calculations, called for the abolishment of the “loser pays” principle, and hoped for proper 
cost recovery mechanisms to encourage legal representation. 
91. 
Delegations  and  NGOs  welcomed  the  inclusion  of  this  section  in  the  document, 
noting  that  it  was  crucial  to  address  gaps  in  legal  protection  and  that  doing  so  would 
constitute  important  added  value  of  a  future  instrument.    In  particular,  efforts  to  remove 
practical  and  legal  barriers  to  effective  access  to  justice  were  appreciated;  however,  some 
NGOs  warned  that  by  listing  specific  barriers,  it  could  be  read  as  excluding  others  not 
mentioned.  It  was suggested  that the  section  should clearly state the right of everyone to 
have  access  to  remedy  regardless  of  the  perpetrator,  borrowing  language  from  the  UN 
Basic  Principles  and  Guidelines  on  the  Right  to  a  Remedy  and  Reparation  for  Victims  of 
Gross  Violations  of  International  Human  Rights  Law  and  Serious  Violations  of 
International Humanitarian Law. 
92. 
The  EU  expressed  approval  of  the  wording  of  the  chapeau  of  the  section  but 
questioned whether the provisions mostly restated existing obligations.  Another delegation 
suggested the complete removal of the section, arguing that a  more holistic approach  was 
warranted and that the current approach would force States to adopt a system that could be 
inappropriate in local circumstances.  A business organization noted that the root problem 
 
17 

regarding access to justice was a lack of the rule of law, and the instrument would need to 
find ways of incentivizing States to implement existing obligations. 
93. 
States  and  many  NGOs  appreciated  the  inclusion  of  a  provision  emphasizing  the 
need  for  access  to  justice  for  vulnerable  groups;  however,  it  was  suggested  that  more 
empowering  and  positive  language  should  be  employed.    An  NGO  also  suggested  that 
language from the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples should be included, 
in particular to recognize the  different legal  systems and customs of certain communities.  
One delegation was concerned that specific groups were being recognized at all, indicating 
that  there  would  be  unfair  and  special  treatment  for  those  listed.    A  panellist  disagreed, 
arguing that fairness dictated that different groups be treated differently. 
94. 
Clarification  was  requested  regarding  the  provision  concerning  non-judicial 
mechanisms not being a substitute for judicial mechanisms.  It was mentioned that recourse 
to non-judicial mechanisms could be in the interest of victims, as they are sometimes faster 
and  more  appropriate.    One  panellist  agreed  that  non-judicial  mechanisms  have  a  role  to 
play, but argued they are complementary, noting that judicial mechanisms should always be 
available. 
95. 
Organizations  appreciated  the  provision  on  reducing  regulatory,  procedural  and 
financial obstacles in access to remedy, in particular mentioning the importance of ensuring 
class actions, access to information, and limiting  forum non conveniens.  Many welcomed 
inclusion  of  a  provision  concerning  the  reversal  of  the  burden  of  proof;  however,  one 
business organization argued this provision would upset a fair balance between parties and 
potentially  violate  due  process.    Panellists  disagreed,  noting  that,  in  some  cases,  raising  a 
displaceable  presumption  would  be  appropriate,  and  that  reversing  the  burden  of  proof 
exists in some domestic systems. 
96. 
Several  delegations  and  NGOs  welcomed  a  provision  addressing  the  need  to 
guarantee  the  security  of  victims,  witnesses,  and  human  rights  defenders,  although  it  was 
questioned  whether  the  provision  went  beyond  what  States  are  already  obliged  to  do.  
NGOs  thought  the  provision  could  be  stronger  by  prohibiting  interference  with  human 
rights defenders, and giving defenders a legal claim if they experience retaliation. 
97. 
States and NGOs also expressed support for a number of other provisions, including 
on the different forms of remedy, the right to equality of arms and legal aid, and access to 
information relevant to substantiating claims. 
98. 
Multiple NGOs suggested that a provision addressing piercing of the corporate veil 
should be explicitly included in the section. 
 
G. 
Subject 7: Jurisdiction  
99. 
While  the  first  panellist  welcomed  the  inclusion  of  a  dedicated  section  in  the 
Elements  Document  on the topic of jurisdiction,  she  noted  that a  number of  key concepts 
related to State obligations and access to justice still need clarification.  In this respect, she 
mentioned  that  provisions  on  jurisdiction  could  also  be  included  in  other  parts  of  the 
instrument.    Taking  into  account  that  this  section  was  focused  on  the  concept  of 
prescriptive  jurisdiction,  as  opposed  to  adjudicative  or  enforcement  jurisdiction,  she 
stressed  that  international  law  already  allows  the  exercise  of  this  type  of  jurisdiction 
extraterritorially.  Care should be taken when referring to territory and jurisdiction to avoid 
18 
 

a  restrictive  interpretation.    In  her  view,  enforcement  jurisdiction  should  be  given  careful 
attention  in  cases  involving  extraterritoriality  or  transnational  elements  and  should  be 
addressed in the section on international cooperation.  
100.  The second panellist expressed serious caution with regards to the broad approach to 
the  concept  of  jurisdiction  adopted  in  the  Elements  Document.    Extending  jurisdiction 
beyond the host State ignores the reality of corporate relationships, where companies often 
have  no  control  over  downstream  suppliers.    Asserting  extraterritorial  jurisdiction  over 
entities  with  a  tenuous  connection  to  the  forum  State  could  raise  issues  relating  to  the 
principles of international comity and exhaustion of local remedies.  He recommended that 
voluntary  efforts  undertaken  by  companies  to  ensure  their  suppliers  are  compliant  with 
international standards should not be subject to a threat of liability but rather be positively 
encouraged.    Although  many  countries  have  relevant  legislation,  enforcement  remains  an 
issue and attention should be focused on strengthening incentives to enforce existing laws.  
The  panellist  insisted  that  the  instrument  address  the  particular  situation  of  State-owned 
enterprises and cautioned that sovereign immunity could attach to these entities. 
101.  The  third  panellist  argued  that  States  should  address  accountability  gaps  related  to 
TNCs by recognizing jurisdiction over domestic companies  whose activities  have impacts 
abroad.   She insisted on the need to establish relevant laws, ensure their enforcement and 
recognize  jurisdiction  to  address  abuses.    In  particular,  the  instrument  should  clearly 
indicate when a cause of action arises in the home State.  Additionally, barriers to access of 
justice  should  be  removed,  in  particular  the  doctrine  of  forum  non  conveniens  since  it  is 
often used maliciously as a delaying and obstructive tactic. 
102.  Delegations  and  NGOs  agreed  on  the  importance  of  containing  a  section  on 
“Jurisdiction,”  in  the  Documents  Elements  as  many  TNCs  and  other  business  enterprises 
escape liability through jurisdictional challenges.  This section was considered  essential to 
address accountability gaps, clarify when courts could consider claims for abuses occurring 
abroad, and enhance victims’ access to justice.  Given the importance of this section, some 
delegations emphasized the need for clarity.  While many found that the elements formed a 
good  starting  point  calls  were  made  for  more  precision  in  the  provisions.    For  instance, 
some questioned the contours of the definition of “under the jurisdiction” in the section’s 
chapeau,  asking  for  clarity  as  to  the  meaning  of  “substantial  activities  in  the  State 
concerned” and the extent of control needed by parent companies.  Some NGOs called for 
coherence  between  the  concepts  in  this  section  and  references  to  “territory  and/or 
jurisdiction”  elsewhere  in  the  document,  as  well  as  the  reaffirmation  in  the  “Purpose” 
section that State obligations do not stop at their territorial borders. 
103.  Most  of  the  discussion  centred  on  whether  the  language  should  permit 
extraterritorial  jurisdiction  and  the  extent  of  that  jurisdiction.    Several  delegations  and 
NGOs  found  it  crucial  that  the  instrument  permit  courts  to  consider  claims  arising  out  of 
activities abroad.  These delegations indicated that the use of extraterritorial jurisdiction has 
been  approved  by  a  range  of  judicial  bodies  and  instruments,  including  domestic  court 
cases, treaties, and other international instruments.  Other delegations suggested that clear 
references to the bases for jurisdiction should be included.  In their view, international law 
required a real and substantial link between a forum and the parties and claims concerned.  
This  could  be  based  on  prescriptive  jurisdiction  principles  such  as  nationality,  passive 
personality,  and  the  protective  principle.    Additionally,  too  much  reliance  on  home  State 
jurisdiction could disincentive host States from ensuring access to justice.  Concerns were 
 
19 

raised  that  an  expansive  view  of  jurisdiction  had  the  potential  to  violate  the  territorial 
integrity and sovereign equality of States, principles which  are reaffirmed in the preamble 
of the Elements Document.  However, panellists considered that these risks were overstated 
as  this  section  did  not  authorize  extraterritorial  enforcement  jurisdiction,  and  risks 
associated  with  such  jurisdiction  were  allayed  with  the  inclusion  of  a  section  on 
“International cooperation.”  
104.  With  respect  to  specific  provisions,  delegations  expressed  most  concern  with  the 
provision authorizing jurisdiction over “subsidiaries throughout the supply chain domiciled 
outside  [States’]  jurisdiction.”    Additionally,  concern  was  raised  over  the  provision 
permitting jurisdiction over  “abuses alleged to have  been committed by TNCs and OBEs 
throughout their activities, including their branches, subsidiaries, affiliates, or other entities 
directly or indirectly controlled by them.”  These delegations argued that this wording was 
too broad and could cover legal entities with little connection to the forum State. 
105.  Clarification  was  sought  as  to  the  provision  permitting  claims  by  victims  within  a 
State’s  jurisdiction.    It  was  queried  whether  this  referred  to  nationals,  residents,  or 
something else. 
106.  Additionally, it was proposed that certain provisions be added to this section.  Some 
delegations  and  NGOs  suggested  explicitly  prohibiting  the  use  of  forum  non  conveniens.  
Another delegation and NGO recommended adding a provision to address conflict of laws.  
Calls  were  made  to  address  conflict  situations,  as  local  courts  are  often  unavailable  in 
situations  of  armed  conflict.    One  delegation  suggested  that  jurisdiction  over  online 
enterprises be addressed.  Further, it was proposed that universal jurisdiction be established 
for conduct constituting international crimes. 
 
H. 
Subject 8: International cooperation  
107.  The  first  panellist  noted  that  in  a  globalized  economy,  domestic  legal  systems 
remain  fragmented  and  disjointed,  leaving  room  for  TNCs  to  take  advantage  of  a  lack  of 
cooperation between States.  Thus, a section on international cooperation was an important 
means  of  addressing  this  fundamental  problem.    The  panellist  suggested  two  ways  to 
strengthen  this  section.    First,  he  called  for  the  inclusion  of  sub-sections  to  address 
cooperation  in  the  civil,  criminal,  and  administrative  contexts  separately.    Second,  he 
suggested  that  a  public  register  be  established  to  help  with  the  coordination  of  research.  
The panellist further encouraged delegations and NGOs to provide creative and pragmatic 
models that could be used in the instrument. 
108.  The second panellist stressed the importance of international cooperation in ensuring 
access  to  remedy.    He  discussed  how  cooperation  should  generally  address  treaty 
implementation,  helping  States  with  national  implementation,  and  enforcement  of 
judgments.    Additionally,  the  panellist  suggested  five  specific  ways  to  ensure  appropriate 
international  cooperation.    First,  States  should  ensure  access  to  information  for 
investigatory  functions.    Second,  rules  should  be  adopted  to  ensure  mutual  judicial 
cooperation.   The  European Convention  on  Mutual  Assistance  on  Criminal  Matters  could 
help in this regard.  Third, States should ensure adequate standards of due process.  Fourth, 
States  should  consider  reflecting  the  principle  of  comity  in  the  instrument.    Fifth, 
inspiration  for  the  means  of  international  cooperation  should  be  drawn  from  existing 
instruments and standards. 
20 
 

109.  Many delegations and NGOs agreed on the importance of international cooperation.  
One of the main obstacles to the effective regulation of TNCs is the fact that they operate in 
multiple  jurisdictions;  thus,  cooperation  between  States  is  necessary  to  ensure  abuses  are 
properly addressed.  NGOs shared cases where victims were unable to obtain redress due to 
a  lack  of  international  cooperation.    Major  obstacles  to  justice  for  these  victims,  such  as 
difficulties  in  obtaining  information,  could  be  rectified  with  proper  cooperation  between 
States.    Thus,  it  is  important  for  States  to  agree  on  certain  standards  to  ensure  efficient 
investigation, prosecution, and enforcement.  Some delegations referred to other processes 
and instruments for guidance, such as the UN Convention against Transnational Organized 
Crime and UN Convention against Corruption. 
110.  One delegation and a business organization argued that the existence of these other 
processes and instruments on international cooperation made a section on this unnecessary.  
In their view, international cooperation should be developed generally and not focus on this 
specific  regime.    There  was  a  fear  that  developing  new  obligations  on  international 
cooperation  could  conflict  with  other  processes  or  send  contradictory  messages  as  to  UN 
standards.  Instead, States should focus on strengthening existing international cooperation 
mechanisms. 
111.  The EU referred to the OHCHR Accountability and Remedy Project, as it provides 
recommendations  on  how  to  strengthen  international  cooperation  and  identifies  issues  in 
current  regimes.    One  such  issue  was  the  lack  of  prosecutorial  resources  to  investigate 
TNCs,  and  this  organization  questioned  how  a  future  instrument  could  provide  pragmatic 
solutions  to  such  issues.    Some  delegations  and  a  panellist  suggested  that  provisions  on 
technical assistance could be included to address some of these challenges. 
112.  Delegations  called  for  greater  specificity  in  the  provisions  of  this  section.  
Specifically, there  were  multiple suggestions to differentiate the section based on  whether 
cooperation was  needed  for civil, criminal, or administrative matters, and to include  more 
precise provisions on the means of cooperation needed for these different types of regimes.  
Additionally,  there  were  calls  for  more  detail  into  what  processes  should  be  required,  in 
particular for evidence collection and sharing.  It was also noted that a provision should be 
included to ensure reciprocity would be respected amongst States. 
 
I. 
Subject 9: Mechanisms for promotion, implementation and monitoring 
113.  The first panellist suggested that drafters focus on four principles when  developing 
the  section on  “Mechanisms  for promotion, implementation and  monitoring.”  The  first  is 
accountability.  The panellist suggested drawing lessons from other processes that regulate 
business conduct outside of  the  human rights context,  such as the World Bank  Inspection 
Panel.    The  second  principle  is  transparency.    Access  to  information  is  so  important,  the 
panellist thought it could warrant its own section in the instrument.  Third, the principle of 
participation  deserves  attention,  but  the  panellist  cautioned  against  abuse  by  the  private 
sector.  Finally, a principle of cooperation should be ensured at the national, regional, and 
international levels.  
114.  The  second  panellist  discussed  cases  where  victims  were  unable  to  achieve  justice 
through existing institutions.  Noting this lack of judicial oversight over TNC abuses at the 
national level, she argued for the creation of an international court for affected individuals 
and  communities  to  hold  TNCs  accountable.    While  supportive  of  the  creation  of  an 
 
21 

ombudsman, as proposed in the elements, she claimed that this  would  not be an adequate 
substitute for an international judicial body.   
115.  The third panellist welcomed this section in the Elements Document and noted that 
international  mechanisms  are  needed.    Implementation  lies  foremost  with  national 
jurisdictions,  but  a  complementary  international  court  should  exist  when  national 
jurisdictions fail.  This court should have enough resources to ensure its proper functioning.  
The treaty body proposed in the elements would also be welcome and should be endowed 
with the ability to make recommendations, as well as referrals to the international court. 
116.  Several  delegations  and  NGOs  welcomed  the  inclusion  of  this  section  and  the 
creation  of  mechanisms  to  promote,  implement,  and  monitor  a  future  instrument.    Many 
called for the ability of victims to directly access these mechanisms, and it was mentioned 
that  a  provision  should  be  included  to  protect  against  retaliation  by  those  who  engaged 
these  mechanisms.    Some  argued  that  without  enforcement  mechanisms,  the  instrument 
would  not  be  properly  implemented.    Other  delegations  questioned  the  usefulness  of 
creating  a  new  mechanism,  arguing  that  the  focus  should  be  on  strengthening  existing 
institutions.  One delegation expressed the view that States have the prerogative to decide 
how to enforce its treaty commitments and argued against establishing any mechanism.  It 
was also noted that there should be more reliance on national action plans. 
117.  Several  delegations  approved  of  the  establishment  of  an  international  judicial 
mechanism  to  hear  complaints  regarding  violations  by  TNCs,  noting  that  victims  and 
certain  States  have  been  calling  for  the  creation  of  such  institutions  for  some  time.  
However, questions were raised as to whether an international court could be effective, and 
there  were  concerns  of  budgetary  and  political  issues  involved  with  establishing  a  court.  
Regarding  the  provision  suggesting  expanding  the  jurisdiction  of  existing  institutions,  a 
questions  was  asked  whether  this  referred  to  past  deliberations  over  the  International 
Criminal Court and whether the proposal was feasible. 
118.  Delegations  expressed  support  for  the  creation  of  an  international  committee  to 
monitor the treaty, although it  was  noted that the creation  of a committee did not exclude 
the  possibility  of  creating  other  institutions.    Some  delegations  approved  of  the  proposed 
functions  of  this  committee  in  the  elements,  including  examining  periodical  reports  and 
individual and collective communications.  It was suggested that this body could also foster 
international cooperation, technical assistance, and share best practices. 
119.  Additionally,  some  delegations  proposed  the  establishment  of  a  non-judicial,  peer 
review  mechanism, and some NGOs suggested creating a  monitoring centre that could  be 
jointly run by States and civil society. 
 
J. 
Subject 10: General provisions  
120.  One  NGO  welcomed  a  provision  in  the  section  on  “General  provisions”  regarding 
the primacy of a future instrument over other obligations from trade and investment legal 
regimes.  This organization also stressed the importance of allowing for the participation of 
civil society and affected communities. 
121.  Another  NGO  thanked  the  working  group  for  the  opportunity  to  participate  in  the 
session and requested clarification as to the next steps of the process. 
22 
 

 
K. 
Panel: The voices of the victims  
122.  Five  panellists  provided  introductory  remarks,  commenting  on  a  range  of  issues, 
including violations of indigenous peoples’ rights, abusive practices in drug patenting and 
pricing,  harms  of  agricultural  projects,  impunity  relating  to  toxic  pollution,  development 
projects  displacing  communities,  and  the  role  of  international  financial  institutions  in 
supporting harmful practices.   
123.  The  panellist  presentations  were  followed  by  interventions  from  delegations  and 
NGOs,  highlighting  specific  cases  of  abuse  as  well  as  lack  of  State  implementation  of 
existing  human  rights  obligations.    Some  delegations  called  for  the  strengthening  of 
existing  institutions  and  implementation  of  existing  instruments,  such  as  the  UNGPs,  and 
noted  that  guidance  in  this  regard  could  be  drawn  from  initiatives  like  the  OHCHR 
Accountability  and  Remedy  Project.    Others  expressed  the  view  that  existing  institutions 
and instruments are failing to ensure protection of victims, and that the creation of a legally 
binding  instrument  to  oblige  States  and  TNCs  and  OBEs  to  comply  with  human  rights 
standards,  and  the  creation  of  mechanisms  to  enforce  such  obligations,  are  necessary  to 
address  shortcomings  in  the  current  system.    Delegations  and  NGOs  stressed  the 
importance of victims’ participation in these processes, the need to ensure that they obtain 
redress  when  their  rights  are  violated,  and  the  importance  of  protecting  human  rights 
defenders.  
 
V.  Recommendations of the Chair-Rapporteur and conclusions 
of the working group 
 
A. 
Recommendations of the Chair-Rapporteur 
124.   Following the discussions held during the first three sessions of the OEIGWG, 
in  particular  discussion  of  the  elements  for  the  draft  legally  binding  instrument  on 
transnational  corporations  and  other  business  enterprises  with  respect  to  human 
rights presented by the Chair-Rapporteur, and pursuant to its mandate, as spelled out 
in  operative  paragraph  1  of  Resolution  26/9,  and  acknowledging  different  views 
expressed, the Chair-Rapporteur should: 

(a) 
Invite  States  and  different  stakeholders  to  submit  their  comments  and 
proposals on the draft element paper no later than the end of February 2018. 
(b) 
Present a draft legally binding instrument on transnational corporations 
and  other  business  enterprises  with  respect  to  human  rights,  on  the  basis  of  the 
contributions from States and other relevant stakeholders, at least four months before 
the  fourth  session  of  the  Working  Group,  for  substantive  negotiations  during  its 
fourth and upcoming annual sessions until the fulfilment of its mandate. 

(c) 
Convene a fourth session of the Working  Group to be held in 2018 and 
undertake  informal  consultations  with  States  and  other  relevant  stakeholders  on  its 
programme of work. 

 
23 

 
B. 
Conclusions of the working group 
125.   At the final meeting of its third session, on 27 October 2017, the working group 
adopted  the  following  conclusions,  in  accordance  with  its  mandate  established  by 
resolution 26/9: 

(a) 
The  Working  Group  welcomed  the  opening  messages  of  the  United 
Nations  High  Commissioner  for  Human  Rights,  Zeid  Ra’ad  Al  Hussein  and  of  the 
President  of  the  Human  Rights  Council,  Joaquín  Alexander  Maza  Martelli,  and 
thanked  the  Minister  of  Foreign  Affairs  of  Ecuador,  Minister  María  Fernanda 
Espinosa  Garcés,  and  the  Member  of  the  French  National  Assembly,  Dominique 
Potier,  for  their  participation  as  keynote  speakers.  It  also  thanked  the  independent 
experts  and  representatives  who  took  part  in  panel  discussions,  the  interventions, 
proposals  and  comments  received  from  Governments,  regional  and  political  groups, 
intergovernmental  organizations,  civil  society,  NGOs  and  all  other  relevant 
stakeholders, which contributed to the substantive discussions of this session.  

(b) 
The  Working  Group  took  note  of  the  elements  for  the  draft  legally 
binding instrument on transnational corporations and other business enterprises with 
respect  to  human  rights,  prepared  by  the  Chair-Rapporteur  in  accordance  with 
operative  paragraph  3  of  HRC  Resolution  26/9  and  the  substantive  discussions  and 
negotiations and the presentation of various views thereof.  

(c) 
The  Working  Group  requests  the  Chair-Rapporteur  to  undertake 
informal  consultations  with  States  and  other  relevant  stakeholders  on  the  way 
forward on the elaboration of a legally binding instrument pursuant to the mandate of 
Human Rights Council Resolution 26/9. 

 
VI.  Adoption of the report 
126.  At  its  10th  meeting,  on  27  October  2017,  the  working  group  adopted  ad 
referendum
  the  draft  report  on  its  third  session  and  decided  to  entrust  the  Chair-
Rapporteur  with  its  finalization  and  submission  to  the  Human  Rights  Council  for 
consideration at its thirty-seventh session. 

24 
 

Annex I 
 
  List of participants 
 
 
States Members of the United Nations 
Algeria,  Angola,  Argentina,  Australia,  Austria,  Azerbaijan,  Bahrain,  Bangladesh,  Belarus, 
Belgium,  Bolivia  (Plurinational  State  of),  Botswana,  Brazil,  Burundi,  Central  African 
Republic, Chile, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czechia, Democratic 
Republic of the Congo, Ecuador, Egypt, Estonia, Ethiopia, Finland, The Former Yugoslav 
Republic  of  Macedonia,  France,  Georgia,  Germany,  Ghana,  Greece,  Guatemala,  Haiti, 
Honduras,  India,  Indonesia,  Iran  (Islamic  Republic  of),  Iraq,  Ireland,  Israel,  Italy,  Ivory 
Coast,  Jamaica,  Jordan,  Kazakhstan,  Kenya,  Lesotho,  Liechtenstein,  Lithuania, 
Luxembourg,  Madagascar,  Malta,  Mauritania,  Mexico,  Monaco,  Morocco,  Mozambique, 
Myanmar,  Namibia  Netherlands,  Nicaragua,  Nigeria,  Norway,  Pakistan,  Panama,  Peru, 
Philippines, Portugal, Qatar, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Russian Federation, 
Rwanda,  Saudi  Arabia,  Serbia,  Singapore,  Slovakia,  Slovenia,  Somalia,  South  Africa, 
Spain, Sudan, Sweden, Syrian  Arab Republic, Switzerland,  Thailand, Trinidad & Tobago, 
Tunisia,  Turkey,  Ukraine,  United  Arab  Emirates,  United  Kingdom  of  Great  Britain  and 
Northern Ireland, Uruguay, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), Zambia. 
 
 
Non-member States represented by an observer 
Holy See; State of Palestine. 
 
 
United Nations funds, programmes, specialized agencies and related 
organizations 

United Nations Conference on Trade and Development. 
 
 
Intergovernmental organizations 
European  Union,  International  Chamber  of  Commerce,  International  Development  Law 
Organization, Organisation of Islamic Cooperation, South Centre. 
 
 
Special procedures of the Human Rights Council 
Working  Group  on  the  issue  of  human  rights  and  transnational  corporations  and  other 
business  enterprises,  Special  Rapporteur  on  the  implications  for  human  rights  of  the 
environmentally  sound  management  and  disposal  of  hazardous  substances  and  wastes, 
Independent Expert on the promotion of a democratic and equitable international order. 
 
25 

 
 
National human rights institutions 
The  National  Human  Rights  Council  of  Morocco,  German  Institute  for  Human  Rights, 
Danish Institute for Human Rights. 
 
 
Non-governmental organizations in consultative status with the 
Economic and Social Council 

Academic  Council  on  the  United  Nations  System;  Al-Haq;  Law  in  the  Service  of  Man; 
American  Bar  Association;  Amnesty  International;  Asia  Pacific  Forum  on  Women,  Law 
and  Development  (APWLD);  Association  for  Women's  Rights  in  Development  (AWID); 
Centre  Europe  –  Tiers  Monde  –  Europe-Third  World  Centre  (CETIM);  Center  for 
International  Environmental  Law  (CIEL);  Comité  Catholique  contre  la  Faim  et  pour  le 
Développement  (CCFD);  Conectas  Direitos  Humanos;  Coopération  Internationale  pour  le 
Développement  et  la  Solidarité  (CIDSE);  Corporate  Accountability  International  (CAI); 
Fondation  pour  l'étude  des  relations  internationales  et  du  développement;  FIAN 
International  e.V.;  Franciscans  International;  Friends  of  the  Earth  International;  Global 
Policy Forum; Indian Movement "Tupaj Amaru;" Indigenous Peoples' International Centre 
for Policy Research and Education (Tebtebba); Institute for Policy Studies (IPS); Instituto 
Para la Participación  y el Desarrollo-INPADE-Asociación  Civil; International  Association 
of  Democratic  Lawyers  (IADL);  International  Commission  of  Jurists;  International 
Federation  for  Human  Rights  Leagues  (FIDH);  International  Institute  of  Sustainable 
Development;  International  Organisation  of  Employers  (IOE);  International  Service  for 
Human Rights (ISHR); International Trade Union Confederation; IT for Change; iuventum 
e.V.;  Legal  Resources  Centre;  Oxfam  International;  Public  Services  International  (PSI); 
Réseau  International  des  Droits  Humains  (RIDH);  Sikh  Human  Rights  Group;  Social 
Service  Agency  of  the  Protestant  Church  in  Germany;  Society  for  International 
Development;  Stichting  Global  Forest  Coalition;  Swiss  Catholic  Lenten  Fund;  Tides 
Center; Verein Sudwind Entwicklungspolitik; Women’s International League for Peace and 
Freedom (WILPF). 
26 
 

Annex II 
 
  List of panellists and moderators 
 
 
Monday, 23 October 2017 
 
 
Keynote speakers 
•  H.E. María Fernanda Espinosa, Minister of Foreign Affairs of Ecuador, and former 
Chairperson-Rapporteur of the open-ended intergovernmental working group 
•  Dominique Potier, Member of the French National Assembly 
Subject I – General framework  (15:00-18:00)  
•  Lola Sánchez, Member of the European Parliament 
•  Richard Kozul-Wright, Director of the Division of Globalization and Development 
Strategies, UNCTAD 
•  Vicente Yu, Deputy Executive Director, South Centre 
 
 
 
 
 
Tuesday, 24 October 2017 
 
 
Subject II – Scope of application (10h00-13h00) 
•  Kinda Mohamedieh, South Centre 
•  Sigrun Skogli, Professor, University of Lancaster  
•  Manoela Roland, Professor, Universidade Federale de Juiz de Fora 
 
 
Subject III – General obligations (15h00-18h00) 
•  Olivier De Schutter, Professor, Université de Louvain 
•  Linda Kromjong, Secretary-General of the International Organization of Employers 
•  David Bilchitz, Professor, University of Johannesburg and Director, South African 
Institute of Advances Constitutional, Public, Human Rights and International Law  
•  Makbule Sahan, representative of the International Trade Union Confederation  
 
 
 
Wednesday, 25 October 2017  
 
 
Subject IV – Preventive measures 
(10h00-13h00) 
•  Baskut Tuncak, UN Special Rapporteur on hazardous substances and wastes 
•  Ana María Suárez-Franco, FIAN International 
•  Iván González, representative of the Confederación Sindical de Trabajadores de las 
Américas, CSA 
 
27 

 
 
Subject V – Legal liability (10h00-13h00) 
•  Richard Meeran, Partner, Leigh Day & Co. 
•  Carlos López, International Commission of Jurists 
•  Humberto Cantú Rivera, Professor, University of Monterrey 
 
 
Subject VI – Access to justice, effective remedy and guarantees of non-repetition 
 

(15h00-18h00)   
•  Surya  Deva,  Chairperson  of  the  United  Nations  Working  Group  on  Business  and 
Human Rights 
•  Gilles Lhuilier, Professor, Ecole Normale Supérieure (ENS) Rennes, France 
•  Richard Meeran, Partner, Leigh Day & Co.  
 
 
 
 
 
Thursday, 26 October 2017 
 
 
Subject VII - Jurisdiction  (10h00-13h00)  
•  Sandra Epal Ratjen, International Advocacy Director, Franciscans International 
•  Gabriela Quijano, Amnesty International  
•  Lavanga Wijekoon, Littler Mendelson 
 
 
Subject VIII – International cooperation 
(10h00-13h00) 
•  Harris  Gleckman,  Center  for  Governance  and  Sustainability,  University  of 
Massachusetts, Boston 
•  Vicente Yu, Deputy Executive Director, South Centre  
 
 
Subject IX - Mechanisms for promotion, implementation and monitoring            
(15h00-18h00)  

•  Baskut Tuncak, UN Special Rapporteur on hazardous substances and wastes 
•  Anne van Schaik, Friends of the Earth Europe 
•  Melik Özden, CETIM 
 
 
Subject X – General provisions  (15h00-18h00)  
 
 
 
Friday, 27 October 2017 
 
 
Panel – The voices of the victims (selected cases from different sectors and regions)
 

 (10h00-13h00)  
•  Alfred  de  Zayas,  United  Nations  Independent  Expert  on  the  promotion  of  a 
democratic and equitable international order 
•  Lorena di Giano, Red Latinoamericana por el Acceso a los Medicamentos 
28 
 

•  Mohamed Hakech, La Vía Campesina MENA region 
•  María del Carmen Figueroa, Asamblea Nacional de Afectados Nacionales 
•  Hemantha Withanage, Friends of the Earth – CEJ 
 
 
 
 
 
29