Dies ist eine HTML Version eines Anhanges der Informationsfreiheitsanfrage 'DG GROW contacts re. pharma incentives study'.






Ref. Ares(2018)5071418 - 03/10/2018
Ref. Ares(2019)631504 - 04/02/2019
 
 
 
 
Ms Elżbieta BIEŃKOWSKA 
 
 
Commissioner 
Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs 
European Commission  
Rue de la Loi 200  
1040 Bruxelles  
 
Brussels, 3rd October 2018 
 
 
 
 
OBJECT: URGENT CALL TO SUPPORT A COMPREHENSIVE SPC MANUFACTURING WAIVER  
 
 
Dear Commissioner Bieńkowska, 
 
 
I am writing this letter to draw your attention to the recent proposal of the European Commission to amend 
the  Regulation (EC) No 469/2009 concerning the Supplementary Protection Certificate for medicinal products 
by introducing an SPC manufacturing waiver. As stated in several legal and economic studies published by the 
European  Commission,  this  proposal  would  have  a  significant  impact  on  European  patients  and  the  entire 
European Pharmaceutical ecosystem, if   applied correctly. 
 
The  generic  and  biosimilar  industry,  while  welcoming  the  proposal  and  its  rapid  approval,  has  regretfully 
noticed  that  the  current  text  proposed  by  the  European  Commission  will  not  deliver  any  of  the  results 
announced  by  all  the  independent  studies  published  by  the  European  Commission  itself,  since  the  waiver 
would hardly be used. 
 
Indeed, it is essential to amend the text with the following three key points. It is fundamental to bear in mind 
that all three topics are linked and only by enabling them all together can the SPC manufacturing waiver  have 
the positive effects described by the European Commission. 
 
  Introduce “Day-1 launch” to produce in Europe for Europe 
  Remove anti-competitive, unjustified and unnecessary anti-diversion measures  
  Immediate Applicability while ensuring predictability  
 
The  current  text  proposed  by  the  European  Commission  covers only  an  Export  waiver without  providing the 
possibility to European manufacturers to be ready on the so called “Day-1 launch”, after the expiry of the SPC 
protection,  to  put  their  products  on  the  European  market.  The  Day-1  provision  is  an  essential  condition  to 
resolve the problems created by unintended effects of the 1992 SPC regulation as stated also by the studies 
published by the European Commission.  
 
As the European Commission asserts, both in the Impact Assessment and in the Explanatory Memorandum that 
accompany the proposal for generic and biosimilar companies, it is essential to be the first one on the market 
once competition is open from Day-1:  
 
 
 
Rue d’Arlon 50 - 1000 Brussels - Belgium 
T: 
 F: 
 
www.medicinesforeurope.com 
1  





 
“These problems faced by EU-based generics and biosimilars manufacturers are aggravated by the dynamics of 
the generics/biosimilars markets where frequently only the first products to enter markets in a timely way after 
protection expires capture a significant market share and are financially viable. In the EU, generic firms entering 
one year after the first generic entrant only capture 11% of the first entrant’s market share. Even though the 
decline in prices for biosimilars is not as steep as in the case of generics, there is a race in this market to launch 
first,  since  later  entrants  have  difficulty  in  gaining  market  share  without  a  further  reduction  in  prices.  For 
biosimilars, studies show that in 2016, the first biosimilars to reach the market captured over 70% market share 
(biosimilar  volume).  Second  and  third  biosimilar  entrants  captured  respectively  30-40%  and  5-22%  market 
share.”
 
 
Without  the  inclusion  of  the  “Day-1  launch”,  in  order  to  remain  competitive  in  the  European  market, 
European manufacturers would be still forced to delocalise, this would jeopardize the whole purpose of the 
SPC manufacturing waiver. Where it is not a European company entering the market on Day-1, it will be a 
Chinese,  Indian  or  US  company.  SMEs  will  be  always  penalised,  because  they  do  not  have  the  capacity  to 
delocalise their production.  
 
Furthermore, as legal studies  demonstrate with strong evidence, in the context of Supplementary Protection 
Certificates (“SPCs”), “Day-1 launch” is in accordance not only with the applicable EU legislative framework but 
also  with  existing  Free  Trade  Agreements  (“FTAs”) that  the  European  Union  negotiated  with  third  countries, 
particularly the EU-Canada Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (“CETA”).  
 
Europe needs to sustain its industry by creating prosperous conditions to boost European manufacturing and 
incentivise  competitiveness  when  the  European market  is  legitimately open.   The  current  proposal  has  huge 
potential but if the text is not amended, unfortunately,
 it will not have any positive impact. 
 
I take advantage of this letter to request an urgent meeting to further discuss with you the content of the 
proposal. 
 
I remain at your disposal for any information you may need. 
 
 
 
Yours sincerely,  
 
Adrian van den Hoven  
Director General  
Medicines for Europe 
 
Medicines for Europe 
 
Medicines for Europe (formerly EGA) represents the generic, biosimilar and value added medicines industries 
across  Europe.  Its  vision  is  to  provide  sustainable  access  to  high  quality  medicines  for  Europe,  based  on  5 
important pillars: patients, quality, value, sustainability and partnership.  Its members employ 160,000 people 
at  over  350  manufacturing  and  R&D  sites  in  Europe,  and  invest  up  to  17%  of  their  turnover  in  medical 
 
innovation. 
patients • quality • value • sustainability • partnership 
Electronically signed on 04/02/2019 15:18 (UTC+01) in accordance with article 4.2 (Validity of electronic documents) of Commission Decision 2004/563
2