Dies ist eine HTML Version eines Anhanges der Informationsfreiheitsanfrage 'Ethical guidelines for forensic investigators'.









 
Version 3.1 
January 2013 
 
 
CODE ON ETHICS AND INTEGRITY 
OF DG COMP STAFF 
 
 
This version of the code is being revised. 
Main actors in DG COMP 
The Appointing Authority (AA)  
is in most cases the Director-General 
The Internal Compliance Officer (formerly "Ethics compliance officer") 
is part of Unit R2 – Finance and Internal Compliance  
and is available for further clarifications on deontological matters:  
[Emailadresse] 
The HR Business Correspondent (HR BC) 
 is attached to the Director General  
and can be contacted for matters requiring the approval of the AA 
[Emailadresse] 
Sysper module for declarations:  
 
 
 
 
 

link to page 7 link to page 9 link to page 9 link to page 10 link to page 10 link to page 10 link to page 11 link to page 12 link to page 12 link to page 12 link to page 12 link to page 14 link to page 14 link to page 14 link to page 15 link to page 16 link to page 17 link to page 19 link to page 20 link to page 20 link to page 21 link to page 23 link to page 23 link to page 23 link to page 23 link to page 23 link to page 24 link to page 24  
 
 
 
1. 
INTRODUCTION ....................................................................................................... 2 
2. 
GENERAL PRINCIPLES OF STAFF ETHICS AND CONDUCT ........................... 4 
2.1.  Independence, loyalty, impartiality and objectivity in our daily work .............. 4 
2.2.  Duty of dignity - professional and private behaviour ........................................ 5 
2.3.  Respect of colleagues ........................................................................................ 5 
2.4.  Safeguarding Commission resources and assets ............................................... 5 
3. 
THE CONCEPT OF CONFLICT OF INTEREST ...................................................... 6 
4. 
CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATIONS ........................................................ 7 
4.1.  Identification of a possible conflict of interest .................................................. 7 
4.1.1. 
Purpose of the in-house declarations of conflict of interest ................ 7 
4.1.2. 
Types of in-house declarations of conflict of interest ......................... 7 
4.2.  Declaring possible conflicts of interests to the Appointing Authority .............. 9 
5. 
MAIN POTENTIAL CONFLICT OF INTEREST SITUATIONS IN DG COMP ..... 9 
5.1.  General remarks................................................................................................. 9 
5.2.  Holding of financial interests .......................................................................... 10 
5.3.  Previous employment ...................................................................................... 11 
5.4.  Spouse gainful employment ............................................................................ 12 
6. 
INSIDER DEALING ................................................................................................. 14 
7. 
GIFTS /  HOSPITALITIES / DECORATION AND HONOUR .............................. 15 
7.1.  Gifts ................................................................................................................. 15 
7.2.  Hospitality ....................................................................................................... 16 
7.3.  Honours and decorations ................................................................................. 18 
8. 
POLITICAL ACTIVITIES, STANDING FOR PUBLIC OFFICE AND 
OUTSIDE POLITICAL PRESSURE ........................................................................ 18 

8.1.  Political activities and outside political pressure ............................................ 18 
8.2.  Standing for public office ................................................................................ 18 
9. 
FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION AND PROFESSIONAL SECRECY ...................... 19 
9.1.  General principles ............................................................................................ 19 
 

link to page 26 link to page 26 link to page 28 link to page 28 link to page 28 link to page 29 link to page 30 link to page 30 link to page 30 link to page 32 link to page 32 link to page 33 link to page 33 link to page 35 link to page 35 link to page 37 link to page 37 link to page 39 link to page 39 link to page 41 link to page 43 link to page 44 link to page 44 link to page 45 link to page 45 link to page 45 link to page 48 link to page 48  
9.2.  Publications and speeches on EU-related matters: obligation to inform the 
AA in advance ................................................................................................. 21 
9.3.  Publications and speeches on non EU-related matters: no authorisation to 
publish is needed ............................................................................................. 23 
9.4.  Contacts with the media .................................................................................. 23 
9.5.  Relations with citizens .................................................................................... 24 
9.6.  Relations with Interest groups – lobbies ......................................................... 25 
10.  OUTSIDE ACTIVITIES ........................................................................................... 25 
10.1.  General rules .................................................................................................... 25 
10.2.  Drafting publications and speeches (EU or non-EU related) .......................... 27 
10.3.  Procedure for asking authorisation .................................................................. 27 
10.4.  Receiving payments for outside activities ....................................................... 28 
10.5.  Special regime for missions (speeches, presentations, conferences) ............... 28 
11.  ETHICAL OBLIGATIONS DURING LEAVE ON PERSONAL GROUNDS 
(CONGÉ DE CONVENANCE PERSONNELLE - CCP) .......................................... 30 
12.  ETHICAL OBLIGATIONS FOR FORMER STAFF ............................................... 32 
12.1.  Former officials, contract and temporary agents ............................................. 32 
12.2.  Seconded National Experts ............................................................................. 34 
13.  REPORTING IMPROPRIETIES AND  WHISTLEBLOWING .............................. 34 
14.  ADMINISTRATIVE INQUIRIES AND DISCIPLINARY PROCEDURES ........... 36 
ANNEX 1 
Relevant legislation and forms on ethics ........................................... 38 
ANNEX 2 
 Delegation of powers to act as an appointing authority in DG 
COMP  39 
ANNEX 3 
Relevant provisions of Directive 2003/6/EC of the European 
Parliament and of the Council of 28 January 2003 on insider dealing and 
market manipulation (market abuse) (OJ L 96/16 of 12 April 2003) .............. 40 

ANNEX 4  Which authorisation do I need to seek to: draft a text, perform a 
speech, publish a text, receive payment for a speech or a text? ...................... 43 
 
 

Version 3.1  
Abbreviations: 
AA – appointing authority 
CCP – leave on personal grounds 
CoI – conflict of interest 
ECO – Ethics & Compliance Officer 
IDOC - Investigation and Disciplinary Office of the Commission 
SNE - seconded national expert 
SR – Staff Regulations 
 

link to page 19 link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 7 Version 3.1  
 
1. 
INTRODUCTION 
1. 
One of DG COMP’s priorities is to ensure that staff meets the highest possible 
professional and ethical standards.  Competition policy and enforcement are 
areas where the stakes are high for all parties concerned, and DG COMP is 
entrusted with a great responsibility in this regard.  Accordingly, each of us has a 
duty to act with the utmost integrity at all times.   
2. 
One cannot sufficiently stress the importance of all staff in DG COMP being 
familiar with the applicable  rules regarding ethics  and integrity
  in the 
Commission.  These  rules  are meant to protect not only the Commission’s 
interests but also its reputation. They also protect individual staff members and 
third parties from any malicious allegations or misrepresentations. In most cases, 
dealing correctly with ethics is above all a question of common sense and open 
communication.  The existence of a conflict of interest situation constitutes an 
infringement of the ethics rules, if it is not handled appropriately and without 
delay (article 11a of the Staff Regulations).  
3. 
Against this background, the purpose of this DG COMP Code on Ethics and 
Integrity
  is to set out and clarify,  in the specific context of working in DG 
COMP, the rules concerning ethics and integrity that are applicable in the 
Commission. These rules are laid down in the Staff Regulations1 , the Code of 
good administrative behaviour, the Financial Regulation, and  in  various 
Commission decisions  and guidelines.  They are also further explained in the 
Commission's  Communication  on enhancing the environment for professional 
ethics2  and the case-law of the EU Courts.3  This  Code  therefore  aims at 
providing guidance to DG COMP staff via a single document on the application 
of the different Commission's ethical rules.  
4. 
The  DG COMP Code does not  establish  new substantive rules  creating 
obligations other than those set out in the Staff Regulations  and  the relevant 
rules and regulations of the Commission on ethics and integrity.  It has been 
drafted in consultation with DG Human Resources  and Security (DG HR), the 
Secretariat General (SG)  and the Legal Service  (LS), taking into account 
accepted practice in the application and interpretation of the Staff Regulations 
and other relevant texts, as well as relevant case law. 
5. 
The Code touches upon issues that may arise for all staff, including how to 
handle potential conflicts of interest  arising from  personal interests (financial 
                                                 
1   See relevant provisions in title II (rights and obligations of officials) of the Staff Regulations, which are 
not only applicable to Commission officials but also to other staff members such as temporary agents 
and contract staff (see Article 11 and 81 of the Conditions of Employment of Other Servants of the 
European Communities). 
2   Communication of 5 March 2008, SEC (2008) 301 final. 
3   It is recalled that national legislation is also applicable to staff members in case, for instance, of insider 
dealing which constitutes a criminal offence in most national laws (see para 68 below). 
 

link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 8 Version 3.1  
interests,  family interests,  etc.)  when assigned to a case, when and under what 
conditions to accept gifts  and hospitalities, when and under what conditions 
outside  activities  (such as teaching at University, etc.) can be carried out, what 
needs to be done when a staff member wants  to publish an article or speech, 
what are the limitations  on  the  freedom of speech,  etc.  Are not covered in the 
Code the obligations that are the counterpart of administrative rights (education, 
child allowances, expatriation allowances, medical reimbursements, mission 
allowances, etc.), for which false declarations are liable to receive strong 
sanctions. 
6. 
The Code takes into account recommendations made by the Internal Audit 
Service
 in the context of the audit which was carried out in 2008/2009 on ethics 
in DG COMP, further guidance provided on ethics and integrity by DG HR, as 
well as our concrete experience in ethical matters since the DG COMP Code on 
Ethics and Integrity entered into force4.   
7. 
Save as otherwise provided5, this Code applies to all DG COMP staff in active 
service
, including all officials, temporary agents, contract agents and Seconded 
National Experts (SNEs). The Code refers as a rule to the ethical obligations in 
the Staff Regulations. These provisions are not only applicable to officials but 
mutatis mutandis  also to temporary and contract agents.6  The ethical rules 
applicable to SNE's are largely similar but, where the rules are different, this is 
indicated in the text.7 
8. 
Insofar as this Code explains the detailed application of the Staff Regulations it 
does not  directly  apply to persons who work  in DG COMP without having a 
direct contractual relationship with it, such as external service providers8 and 
non-regular external staff, such as persons who work as independent 
contractors on particular projects, consultants, persons commissioned to carry 
out studies,  intérimaires,  etc.9  These persons are, however, subject to the 
provisions on ethics and integrity as set out in the framework contract between 
the Commission and their employer. These provisions are largely similar to the 
ethical obligations imposed on Commission staff and the guidance given in this 
                                                 
4    DG COMP's current Code on Ethics was adopted in 2008 and revised in 2010. 
5   For instance certain sections  of the code apply to former staff or staff on leave on personal grounds 
(CCP). 
6   Articles 11 to 26 of the Staff Regulations apply by analogy to temporary and contract agents by virtue 
of Articles 11 and 81 of the Conditions of Employment of Other Servants. 
7   The ethical rules  applicable to SNEs  are laid down in Article 7 of Commission Decision 
 of  12.11.2008 laying down rules on the secondment to the Commission of national experts 
 and national experts in professional training, C(2008) 6866 final   
(http://myintracomm.ec.europa.eu/hr_admin/en/external_staff/nat_expert/Documents/regime_end_200
9_en.pdf.)
  
8   These are the external service providers who work in the IT Unit R.3 of DG COMP. 
9   For more details on non-regular external experts see: 
 
http://myintracomm.ec.europa.eu/HR_ADMIN/EN/EXTERNAL_STAFF/Pages/non_regular.aspx  


link to page 9 link to page 9 link to page 9 link to page 9 Version 3.1  
COMP Code is therefore to a large extent also of relevance for external staff 
working in DG COMP. 
9. 
Trainees are subject to the Code on Ethics and Integrity of DG COMP 
Trainees10. 
10. 
The COMP Code on ethics and integrity also applies to the cabinet members of 
the Commissioner for Competition. 
11. 
There are frequent references in the text to the "Appointing Authority" (AA), 
who has the power to decide on ethical issues11. In general terms the Appointing 
Authority's powers are exercised by the Directorate General12.  In some cases, 
mainly for staff members above the level of director, these powers are exercised 
by the Director-General for Human Resources and Security, or the Member of 
the Commission responsible for Human Resources. For Cabinet members it will 
be the Head of Cabinet (or DG HR for disciplinary matters) and for the Head of 
Cabinet the Commissioner responsible for COMP  (or the College/HR 
Commissioner for disciplinary matters) .  
12. 
The Code is a living document that is regularly reviewed. DG COMP Staff will 
be informed on any major updates of the Code. Should you have any questions 
or identify any gaps, please do not hesitate to contact  the ECO (Benjamin 
DESURMONT  -  COMP.R.2, tel. 84236, functional mailbox: comp-
[Emailadresse]).
 The main function of the ECO is to monitor the consistent 
and coherent implementation of ethical rules and to act as a first port of call on 
the ethical issues covered in the different regulations and associated guidance 
documents.13 
2.  GENERAL PRINCIPLES OF STAFF ETHICS AND CONDUCT  
13. 
The  overarching principles guiding staff behaviour in the Commission are: 
independence, loyalty, impartiality, objectivity and dignity.   
2.1.  Independence, loyalty, impartiality and objectivity in our daily work  
14. 
First and foremost, the work of DG COMP staff should be guided by the general 
obligations of loyalty, independence and impartiality, as laid down in Article 11 
(1) 
of the Staff Regulations. According to that provision, staff is required to act 
solely with the interests of the Union  in mind, to carry out duties objectively, 
                                                 
10   http://raphael.comp.cec.eu.int/intranet/general/index.cfm?action=view&subaction=page&page=20843.  
11   See Commission Decision of 15  June 2010 on the exercise of powers conferred by the Staff 
Regulations on the Appointing Authority and by the Conditions of Employment of other Servants on 
the Authority Empowered to Conclude Contracts of Employment, C(2010)3680 final. 
12    On 5 October 2010, the Director General for Competition delegated some of his powers to the 
Director of Directorate R and the Head of Unit COMP/R.2. See Annex 2.  
13   To  ensure  overall consistency the ECO  will,  in case of doubt  as regards the implementation of the 
Code, consult DG HR's Ethics, Rights and Obligations Unit (HR.B.1). 


link to page 24 link to page 24 link to page 24 Version 3.1  
impartially and in keeping with the duty of loyalty not to seek or take 
instructions from outside the institution. 
15. 
Conclusions or decisions should be balanced and based on a thorough analysis 
of the relevant rules and underlying facts.  
16. 
The duty of loyalty requires that  DG COMP staff aims  at achieving the 
Commission’s objectives effectively and efficiently, and dutifully implement its 
legitimate decisions. In other words, once the Commission or DG COMP has 
adopted a final position, DG COMP staff must stay loyal to this position. Staff 
must ensure that any conflict which could arise between their personal views and 
the Commission position is handled properly.  See also  section  9  "Freedom of 
expression"

2.2. Duty of dignity - professional and private behaviour  
17. 
Article 12 of the Staff Regulations obliges Commission staff to refrain from any 
behaviour that might reflect adversely upon his/her position. This duty targets 
the professional and private behaviour of the entire staff of DG COMP and is 
broadly defined to cover any acts that are "sufficiently serious", as to reflect 
badly on the European Public service and/or which bring it into disrepute. 
2.3. Respect of colleagues  
18. 
DG COMP staff is expected to address colleagues and superiors in DG COMP 
as well as colleagues in other DGs/institutions and external stakeholders with 
respect and consideration.  Even in case of conflicting views, e.g. between 
different  DGs, it is important to remain polite and to uphold the common 
objective of seeking a constructive solution to the problem.  In case of 
harassment, a specific procedure is in place as described on IntraComm  
2.4. Safeguarding Commission resources and assets 
19. 
In using Commission resources, such as computer equipment, e-mail and 
internet access, telephones, mobile phones and fax equipment,  photocopying 
machines or even the cafeteria utensils, DG COMP staff should constantly bear 
in mind three basic  principles. First of all, staff must ensure the proper and 
efficient use of the resources so as to protect the financial interests of the 
European Union. Secondly, using Commission resources for non-professional 
purposes can adversely affect the reputation of the Commission. Thirdly, the 
interest of the service requires that working hours are used for work. 
20. 
For instance,  communication tools  (e-mail and internet access, telephones, 
mobile phones and faxes)  have been installed by the Commission for official 
use. However, these facilities may be used for private purposes as long as it is on 
a purely occasional basis and does not amount to extensive use of the equipment 
for private purposes. As regards telephones and mobile phones, occasional 
personal use is permitted at the user’s expense. Either a PIN code has to be used 
for each private communication by telephone or staff may indicate in GESTEL 
the private numbers they have dialled during a certain period. Further guidelines 


link to page 11 link to page 11 link to page 11 Version 3.1  
on what constitutes an acceptable use of the Commission's ICT Services have 
been laid down in Administrative Notice 45-200614
21. 
Specifically regarding the internet, it should be remembered that the 
infrastructure the Commission has to establish in order to provide staff with 
access to the internet is costly. The more the internet is used the more 
infrastructure and manpower are needed.  
22. 
You should be aware that the Commission may monitor the use of Internet and 
other information and communication technologies. Moreover some categories 
have been blocked. They are related to information security, malware, sexual 
content, illegal drugs, violence, hate,  racism, games,  remote access tools and 
proxy avoidance. Categories that consume high bandwidth, such as audio and 
video, are not blocked but should be used for work-related purposes only. 
3.  THE CONCEPT OF CONFLICT OF INTEREST 
23. 
Article 11a  of the Staff Regulations establishes an obligation for all staff15  to 
avoid situations of conflict of interest in the performance of their duties.   
24. 
Article 11a (1) and (3) of the Staff Regulations says: 
"1. An official shall not, in the performance of his duties and save as hereinafter provided, deal 
with a matter in which, directly or indirectly, he has any personal interest such as to impair his 
independence, and, in particular, family and financial interests. 

3. An official may neither keep nor acquire, directly or indirectly, in undertakings which are 
subject to the authority of the institution to which he belongs or which have dealings with that 
institution, any interest of such kind or magnitude as might impair his independence in the 
performance of his duties". 

25. 
The concept of conflict of interest in Article 11a of the Staff Regulations is a 
broad concept. It comprises not only real and potential but also apparent 
conflicts of interest. An apparent or perceived conflict of interest may be defined 
as a situation where there is a personal interest  (such  as family ties;  personal 
friendships; holding of financial interests; previous employment; gifts, favours 
and donations; external activities and remunerations; political affinities,  etc.) 
which might reasonably be thought by others to influence the public official’s 
duties, even if there is not, in fact, such an undue influence16. 
26. 
A conflict of interest exists, therefore, where there is a risk that policy 
recommendations, decisions or negotiations might be influenced as a result of 
the existence of a direct or indirect interest in one of the parties involved. The 
assessment as to whether a personal interest is of such magnitude as to impair 
                                                 
14   For more details see http://www.cc.cec/guide/publications/infoadm/2006/ia06045_en.html  
15   Article 11a SR applies to Commission officials and by analogy also to temporary and contract agents 
(see para 7). Similar rules apply to SNEs under the Commission Decision of 12.11.2008 (see footnote 
7 above). 
16   See case T-21/01 Zavvos v Commission [2002] ECR p. II-483. 


link to page 12 Version 3.1  
the official’s independence does not rest solely with the staff member.  This 
assessment exercise will be carried out together with his/her management and in 
close coordination with the ECO. 
For example, if you are involved in a case, or are in a position to influence the decision-making 
process through the procedures within DG COMP, and a member of your family works in a 
company involved in the case, this fact should be made known immediately. 

4.  CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATIONS 
4.1.  Identification of a possible conflict of interest  
4.1.1.  Purpose of the in-house declarations of conflict of interest 
27. 
DG COMP requests its staff members to make an 'in-house' declaration for any 
possible  conflict of interest,  recalling their obligations regarding personal 
interests (in particular family or financial).17   
28. 
The purpose of the in-house declarations  is to raise awareness  of  and help 
identify possible conflict of interest situations so that these can be addressed and 
avoided  at an early stage. If  it is  considered  that  there is a conflict of interest 
situation, the staff member concerned will not be assigned to the case, project or 
task  in  which  s/he  appears to have an interest  and thus the conflict of interest 
situation  would  be avoided.  In case a staff member is assigned to a case for 
which s/he has made a declaration of conflict of interest, and for which her/his 
superior has maintained the assignment, the staff member  may invoke Article 
21a of the Staff Regulations. 
4.1.2.  Types of in-house declarations of conflict of interest 
29. 
There are two types of in-house declarations of conflict of interest situations, a 
case/horizontal task declaration and an inspection declaration.  
30. 
All members of a  case team (including the case manager  and case 
secretaries/assistants) need to make  a  case specific  declaration  of CoI  when 
they are assigned to a case. An automated procedure via the case management 
applications (Natacha for antitrust, CMS for mergers and ISIS for state aid) has 
been developed in this regard. Under the automated system, all members of the 
case team receive an automatic e-mail  alert  when they are  assigned to a case, 
with a link to the relevant case application. The link leads to the CoI module of  
 
                                                 
17   The obligation to make in-house conflict of interest declarations applies to DG COMP staff in active 
service. DG COMP staff on CCP or on secondment is not required to make in house declarations, but 
they remain under the obligation to make a declaration to the AA in appropriate cases.  


link to page 13 Version 3.1  
the case management application where the case team member is  requested  to 
reflect on the possible existence of a conflict of interest and to tick  the 
appropriate box  ("possible  conflict of interest" or "no possible  conflict of 
interest")18.  
31. 
Horizontal tasks (HTs) are also covered on an "opt in" basis,  except for filing 
HTs  which are excluded from the CoI module by definition. Managers who 
create new HTs have the option to signal to Unit R1 whether they wish the CoI 
module to be included. The inclusion of the CoI module in HTs is  only be 
possible once, at the creation of a new HT.  
32. 
The case members who fail to tick a CoI box in a case management application 
will not be active in the case team. This implies that s/he will receive no e-mail 
alerts for new documents, will not appear on reports, will have no access to 
hidden cases and/or protected documents, and  will receive no  "work-load 
points" for mergers. It is therefore in the best interest of staff to act without delay 
once they receive the alert. 
33. 
The application sends automatic periodic alerts to the case members and the case 
managers until the relevant box is ticked. The ECO is automatically notified if 
case-handlers declare a possible conflict of interest.  
34. 
Further instructions on the in-house conflict of interest forms are given in the 
case management applications.  
35. 
In addition, all DG COMP staff, including those not working on cases, are 
required to acknowledge  yearly  their awareness  of ethical and,  in particular, 
conflict of interest rules. This is done automatically the first time they connect to 
the DG's Intranet after the new year.  
36. 
Furthermore, participants in antitrust and merger inspections are required to 
make a specific inspection CoI declaration.  
37. 
Case managers must ensure that inspectors make  the  declaration  before they 
participate in inspections. Normally this is done immediately when an inspector 
finds out which company s/he is going to inspect (in principle  2-3 days before 
the inspection when s/he receives the briefing file). Should a possible conflict of 
interest arise, an assessment on a  case by case basis should be done  by the 
Appointing Authority to determine if such a conflict really exists and, if so, what 
measures should be taken (e.g. changing the  inspector to another team, not 
participating in the inspection). In most cases the risk of a CoI will be remote but 
it is important to address possible CoI issues at an early stage rather than being 
confronted with them during the inspection itself. 
                                                 
18    The message is as follows: "I hereby declare that, to the best of my knowledge, I have no possible 
conflict of interest with this case. If it is unclear to me whether I have a possible conflict of interest or 
not, or if my situation changes during the case, I will immediately consult the case manager. (see DG 
COMP's Code on Ethics and Integrity for guidelines)" 
 


link to page 8 link to page 9 link to page 14 link to page 14 link to page 14 link to page 14 Version 3.1  
4.2.  Declaring possible conflicts of interests to the Appointing Authority  
38. 
While the case- and inspection-specific  declaration forms are meant to identify 
possible conflict of interest situations and allow for measures at an early stage to 
remove possible conflicts, it should be kept in mind that it is ultimately the 
Director General  who  is responsible for deciding  whether there is a conflict of 
interest situation within the meaning of Article 11a of the Staff Regulations and, 
if so, whether the staff member concerned may continue to deal with the matter 
and under what conditions.  
39. 
Indeed, pursuant to Article 11a of the Staff  Regulations19, staff members must 
inform the AA20  whenever they deal with matters in which, directly or 
indirectly, they have any personal interest such as to impair their independence.  
40. 
Where it is considered that there is a potential risk that the independence of staff 
might be impaired, a specific CoI declaration form has to be filled in and sent to 
the AA21.  The staff member can also propose, in that form, measures to avoid 
any conflict of interest arising.This form has to be signed by the staff member's 
hierarchy, who are required to give their opinion on whether personal interest 
could impair their independence.  Staff members may  wish to  consult the ECO 
for advice. Once signed, the staff member will retain the original. A copy must 
in any event be sent by COMP/R/2 to HR/B/1 where it will be put into the 
personal file. 
41. 
The procedure is different for SNEs. Instead of informing the  AA  in case of a 
potential conflict of interest they are required to inform their Head of Unit 
(preferably by e-mail) who has the power to remove the national expert from the 
case.22 
5.  MAIN POTENTIAL CONFLICT OF INTEREST SITUATIONS IN DG COMP 
5.1.  General remarks 
42. 
Most of DG COMP's staff is directly or indirectly involved in competition 
investigations. To avoid a (perceived) conflict of interest it is important that staff 
is not assigned to cases in which they have a personal interest which could be 
perceived as impairing their independence.  
                                                 
19   For temporary and contract staff Article 11a applies by analogy (see para 7 above). 
20   In this case the AA is the Director General for Competition in respect of all grades. The AA for the 
Director General for Competition is the Member of the Commission responsible for Human Resources. 
See also para 11 above. 
21 
The Article 11a Staff Regulations declaration form is available at: 
http://raphael.comp.cec.eu.int/intranet/general/index.cfm?action=view&subaction=page&page=20127  
22   See Article 7 (1) d of Commission Decision of 12.11.2008 laying down rules on the secondment to the 
Commission of national experts and national experts in professional training, C(2008) 6866 final. 


link to page 11 Version 3.1  
43. 
The most relevant situations in DG COMP in this regard are personal interests 
deriving from financial  interests in companies involved in the competition 
investigation; activities of a staff member's spouse/relative/friend who might be 
involved in the case on behalf of the company concerned, a law firm, 
consultancy firm, government body deciding on aid,  etc;  or because the staff 
member has been involved in the case in his/her  previous employment. These 
situations are explained in further detail hereinafter. 
5.2.  Holding of financial interests 
44. 
One of the most common causes of conflict of interest is the holding of financial 
interests. Article 11a (1) of the Staff Regulations forbids the staff from dealing 
with any matter in which they have a financial interest.  
A conflict of interest might arise, for example, if you were to handle a case or otherwise take part in the 
decision-making process (including through consultation) involving a company in which you  
have a  financial interest.  

45. 
Article 11a (3) of the Staff Reglations (see para 24) refers to all kind of financial 
interests which can include, for instance, any form of individual holding in 
company capital or in collective investment funds (investing in shares, bonds, 
etc. ) or pension schemes. 
46. 
As the Article only refers to an “interest of such kind or magnitude that  might 
impair  one's  independence in the performance of duties”, the Commission 
enjoys a certain margin of discretion to determine whether the financial interest 
is substantial enough to give rise to a conflict of interest,  depending  on  the 
circumstances of each case.  
47. 
The  assessment whether a conflict of interest exists inevitably requires a case-
by-case approach. Some of the factors that may have to be taken into account 
are: 
•  The nature of the financial interest.  For example, deposits, especially 
guaranteed deposits, would seem to entail a more remote possibility of 
influencing the staff member than shares or other forms of investments. 
•  The effect that the Commission decision may potentially have on that interest. 
For example, the effect of a Commission decision to allow or to prohibit state 
aid to a bank may have little or no influence on a guaranteed deposit but may 
affect significantly the value of other investments in the bank. 
•  The magnitude of the financial interest. Obviously, the higher the value of the 
financial interest the bigger the risk of undue influence; no fixed thresholds 
are established and this again requires a case-by-case assessment. 
•  The role of the member of staff in the decision-making process in the case. 
•  The risk of a perceived conflict, even if it is not considered to be an actual or 
potential conflict in view of the criteria above. In this regard the priority of the 
case could also be taken into account (dealing with priority cases in sensitive 
sectors, in which  the media  is very active,  is more likely to  give the 
10 

Version 3.1  
appearance of a conflict of interest, even if it does not exist, than dealing with 
non-priority complaint in a non-sensitive sector). 
48. 
In cases which do not appear to raise a clear-cut CoI situation, operational 
criteria
  may also have to be taken into account, such as whether the staff 
member is indispensable to handle the case or whether it could also be done by 
another colleague, taking account of language requirements, experience, etc. 
Example 1: If you only have invested €1000 in a fund and the company concerned represents 
only 0,5% of its portfolio, there is obviously a low likelihood that such holding might reasonably 
be seen as influencing your decision.  However, if the amounts are significantly higher, or if you 
own direct shares in the relevant company, there might be a risk that your independence be 
impaired.  . 
 
Example 2: If you have a bank account opened under the general rules of the bank and which is 
guaranteed by the public authorities then, unless there are special circumstances, working on a 
case in which this bank is involved would not be a conflict of interest situation. Special 
circumstances in this regard could be for instance a situation where your bank account is not 
guaranteed, you have negotiated a special interest rate with the bank which may be affected 
depending on the outcome of the matter on which you are working or where under the particular 
circumstances there is a risk that the state guarantee of the account may not cover the amount in 
full. 

5.3.  Previous employment 
49. 
Conflicts of interest might arise also from previous employment of DG COMP 
staff. In order to address such issues adequately, upon recruitment, Unit R2 asks 
newcomers to fill-in an ethics questionnaire  and informs  recruiting units of 
possible conflict of interest situations. The screening should include information 
on ethics obligations undertaken by new staff vis-à-vis their previous employers. 
The findings of the screening will be presented to the Head of the recruiting unit 
so that s/he  can ensure that conflicts  of interest in regard of the previous 
employment of the staff member are avoided. Where there is an ethics issue that 
is clear from the CV or the information voluntarily provided by the candidate at 
interviews, including with the panel, the interviewers have to inform the Head of 
Unit R2.  
50. 
Staff must respect the ethical rules undertaken vis-à-vis their previous employers 
and promptly inform  their HoU and Director thereof. The Director concerned 
should ensure that the staff members concerned are not assigned to cases which 
may bring  them  in  conflict with  the conditions and obligations undertaken by 
them towards their former employers. 
51. 
As a basic ethical rule staff should not deal with pending cases where it has been 
involved in for a previous employer. There is no cut-off date, the rule applies as 
long as the case is pending (including before the General Court and the Court of 
Justice). A case by case assessment shall be done taking into account the level of 
involvement in the case. To facilitate the assessment the new staff member will, 
without prejudice to possible professional secrecy obligations imposed by 
his/her previous employer, produce, together with the ethics questionnaire, a list 
containing all pending EC competition cases where s/he has had direct 
responsibility or has been directly involved to his/her HoU and Director.  This 
rule also applies to former self-employed individuals (e.g. lawyers, consultants, 
etc.). 
11 

link to page 18 link to page 18 link to page 17 Version 3.1  
52. 
Staff which was previously dealing with EU competition cases can in principle 
also deal with new cases handled with by their previous employer to the extent 
that they were not involved in them before. 
53. 
There is in principle no reason to apply a distance rule, according to which they 
could not be in contact with their previous employer for a certain period of time. 
However, the assessment should be done on a case-by-case basis. 
5.4.  Spouse gainful employment 
54. 
Since a spouse’s professional activities may also create a conflict of interest, it 
should  be remembered that Article 13 of the Staff Regulations states: "If the 
spouse of an official is in gainful employment, the official shall inform the 
appointing authority of his institution. Should the nature of the employment 
prove to be incompatible with that of the official and if the official is unable to 
give an undertaking that it will cease within a specified period, the appointing 
authority shall, after consulting the Joint Committee, decide whether the official 
shall continue in his post or be transferred to another post
".  
55. 
This obligation is not to be confused with the declaration that staff is expected to 
make to PMO relating to the income of the spouse. PMO is only concerned with 
possible pecuniary consequences.  
56. 
Therefore, if the staff member's  spouse is in gainful employment s/he  must 
inform the AA  by filling out the  appropriate form23.  S/he  must provide  a 
description of her/his  duties, a description of her/his  spouse/partner’s  activities 
and information on the links between their respective duties as well as between 
his/her employer  and the Commission.  It can be very relevant to point out the 
responsibilities and the post occupied by the staff member's partner/spouse, e.g. 
whether s/he is a partner, an associate, a paralegal, etc. (see below paras. 59-61). 
The detail to be provided will depend on the staff member's opinion on the 
existence of a real or a potential conflict of interest. This form has to be signed 
by the superior, who is required to give an opinion on whether the professional 
position of staff member's partner could impair her/his independence. While the 
staff member will be returned the signed original, a copy must be sent by 
COMP/R/2 to HR/B/1 for insertion into the personal file. 
57. 
This obligation applies also to non-married couples who meet the criteria 
provided in Article 1(2)(c) of Annex VII of the Staff Regulations (couples 
entitled to household allowance), as such partnerships are treated as married 
pursuant to the second subparagraph of Article 1d(1) of the Staff Regulations. 
58. 
It is also important to underline that the AA must  be informed, if necessary, 
about changes in the spouse's employment situation and that this obligation 
                                                 
23   The AA for the purposes of Article 13 Staff Regulations is the Director General for Competition in 
respect of advisers, heads of units, AD and AST staff. The AA for the Director General and the deputy 
Director General, Advisers Hors Classe, Directors and Principal Advisers is the Director General for 
Human Resources and Security. The form "Declaration of a gainful employment of a spouse" (can be 
found under: 
http://raphael.comp.cec.eu.int/intranet/general/index.cfm?action=view&subaction=page&page=20127  
12 

Version 3.1  
applies whatever the nature, the duration or the importance of the gainful 
employment of the member staff's spouse. Again, a copy of the duly signed form 
must be sent by COMP/R/2 to HR/B/1 for insertion into the personal file. 
59. 
As a general ethical rule applicable for everybody, staff whose spouse works in a 
company should not deal with any cases involving that company (the so-called 
"mono block"). 
60. 
The mere fact that a staff member's spouse/partner works in a law firm, a 
consultancy or a Member State's administration involved in EC competition or 
State aid matters is not as such a situation that creates a conflict of interest that 
requires the staff member concerned to be moved to another post.  
61. 
However, DG COMP staff whose spouse works in a law firm, consultancy firm, 
government body, lobbying firm etc.  dealing with EC competition matters 
should as a general ethical rule not deal with any cases where they know that 
their spouse is involved in. This may imply checking with the spouse whether 
s/he is personally involved in a case that the staff member is working on, but this 
can of course only be done once the opening (not necessarily the formal 
opening) of that case has come in the public domain. Where staff becomes aware 
that his or her spouse is working on the same case that person is required to 
immediately report this to his/her hierarchy, case manager/Head of Unit and/or 
Director, who will  have to assess the possible conflict of interest and take 
appropriate corrective measures. 
62. 
The possible conflict of interest arising out of staff members' spouse activities 
must be assessed on a case-by-case basis and measures to remove the conflict of 
interest have to be proportionate to the risk involved. 
63. 
Criteria for assessing the existence of a conflict of interest under Article 13 of 
the Staff Regulations are for example:  
•  The competition issue/case at stake and its likely impact on the business of 
the company. 
•  The role of the staff member in the decision making process of the case. 
•  The role of the spouse/partner  in the company  under  investigation,  the 
likelihood of his/her direct or indirect involvement in the case concerned as 
well as whether he or she holds direct financial interest in the firm (e.g. an 
equity partner). 
•  The risk of a perceived conflict, even if it is not considered to be an actual or 
potential conflict in view of the criteria above. In this regard the priority of 
the case could also be taken into account (dealing with priority cases in 
sensitive sectors, in which the media is very active, is more likely to give the 
appearance of a conflict of interest, even if it does not exist, than dealing 
with non-priority complaints in a non-sensitive sector). 
64. 
In cases which do not appear to raise a clear-cut CoI situation also operational 
criteria
 may have to be taken into account such as whether the staff member is 
13 

link to page 19 link to page 19 Version 3.1  
indispensable to do the case or whether it could also be done by another 
colleague, taken account of language requirements, experience etc. 
Example 1: Spouse working in a law firm. If your spouse works in the Brussels office of a law 
firm which also has an office in one of the Member States and if you are dealing with a 
competition case in which the latter office of that law firm is involved but not the Brussels office 
where your spouse works, then in principle the personal interest you may have in  the matter 
would seem too remote to have an impact on your independence.  

Example 2: Both spouses are working on the same case. If you are working on a case involving 
a company in which your spouse is working and you are member of the case team carrying out 
the investigation in that company there would seem to be a conflict of interest that would require 
you to be removed from the case.  This rule applies regardless the responsibilities or position 
occupied by your spouse in the company and regardless of whether the spouse is actually 
involved in the case.  

Example 3: Spouse works in a law firm and holds a direct financial interest in the case. If your 
spouse works in a law firm as a partner and although s/he does not deal directly the same case 
as you but by reason of the profit-sharing arrangements between the partners holds a direct 
financial interest in the case then a conflict of interest may arise. 

6.  INSIDER DEALING 
65. 
It goes without saying that DG COMP staff should in no circumstances try to 
make a profit or assist others to make a profit by using inside information s/he 
comes across in the performance of her/his duties. 
66. 
Inside information is defined in Directive 2003/6/EC of 28 January 2003 on 
insider dealing and market manipulation (market abuse)24 as: 
"information of a precise nature which has not been made public, relating, 
directly or indirectly, to one or more issuers of financial instruments or to one or 
more financial instruments and which, if it were made public, would be likely to 
have a significant  effect on the prices of those financial instruments or on the 
price of related derivative financial instruments."
25 
67. 
Unlike conflicts of interest, insider dealing does not require any influence over 
recommendations or decisions. Indeed, a staff member would be guilty of insider 
dealing if s/he were to use, or cause others to use, directly or indirectly, inside 
information which comes to his/her knowledge within DG COMP (either in the 
course of his/her work or by accident) in order to make a personal profit through 
trading in securities of a firm or to encourage third persons to do so.  
68. 
Insider dealing is a criminal offence in most national laws. For instance, the 
Belgian Act on insider dealing of 4 December 1990 as amended by the Act of 6 
April 1995, which transposes Council Directive 89/592/EEC coordinating 
regulations on insider dealing into national law, is also applicable to EU 
                                                 
24   OJ L 96 of 12.4. 2003, p. 16. 
25   Article 1(1) of the Directive. See also the other relevant provisions of the Directive concerned in 
Annex 2. 
14 

link to page 9 link to page 20 link to page 20 link to page 20 link to page 20 link to page 20 Version 3.1  
officials. It applies to actions performed in Belgium or in another country
where those actions relate to securities listed on a stock exchange in Belgium or 
on a regulated market in another Member State. The Belgian Act lays down 
penal sanctions for infringements.26 
69. 
In the light of the above, in regard of the sensitive nature of the information 
received by DG COMP and so as to be able to trace back information flows in 
case of allegation of insider dealing, measures are taken to ensure, under specific 
circumstances, the traceability of the information. Case managers have thus the 
obligation to establish a "who27 knew what and when" document28 covering 
the following periods of time: in antitrust, all the preparatory phase of the 
inspections and the setting of the level of fines until the second Advisory 
Committee on fines takes place and, in mergers, all the pre-notification stage of 
sensitive 'not yet-announced' acquisition plans.  Further details on these forms 
can be found in the Manual of Procedures concerned29
7.  GIFTS /  HOSPITALITIES / DECORATION AND HONOUR 
7.1.  Gifts  
70. 
A gift is understood to mean: 
• 
A sum of money or any physical object; or, 
• 
The possibility to participate for free in events which are open to the 
public or are private in nature, are only accessible in return for payment 
and represent a certain value (such as complimentary tickets for sports 
events, concerts, theatre, conferences, etc.); or, 
• 
Any other advantage with a pecuniary value such as transport costs. 
71. 
Article 11(2) of the Staff Regulations requires Commission staff not to accept 
gifts,  favours or donations
  from any source outside the institution without 
obtaining prior permission from the Director General,  who acts as Appointing 
Authority30.   
                                                 
26   A prison sentence, a fine and a financial penalty representing up to three times the material advantage 
derived from the offence.  
27   All staff members involved in the case, whatever their function, are concerned. 
28   The Who knew what when forms are available at IntraComm Ethics page: 
http://raphael.comp.cec.eu.int/intranet/general/index.cfm?action=view&subaction=page&page=20843.  
29   Further guidance on security can be found at IntraComm Security page: 
http://raphael.comp.cec.eu.int/intranet/general/index.cfm?action=view&subaction=page&page=20842  
30   In respect of some grades the Director General has delegated his function as an appointing authority in 
this matter to Directorate R (see Annex 2 of the Code and para 11 above.). For the Director General 
himself the AA is the Member of the Commission responsible for Human Resources.  
15 

link to page 21 link to page 21 Version 3.1  
72. 
Staff is  advised to be particularly careful when gifts/favours/donations are 
offered in relation to her/his  work at the Commission. As a general rule, it is 
recommended  to  decline all  such offers that have more than merely symbolic 
value (such as diaries, calendars, small desk items, etc)31. Any offers entailing a 
sum of money, regardless of the amount, must be directly refused.   
73. 
Although prior permission by the Appointing Authority is  presumed to be 
granted for gifts worth up to € 50, staff members may not consider themselves at 
liberty to accumulate a number of gifs below this threshold. 
74. 
Explicit prior permission by the Appointing Authority is required for gifts worth 
between  € 50 and € 150.  If the  staff member wants  to accept them,  s/he  must 
apply for permission  from  the  Director General,  who acts as Appointing 
Authority32, via the Ethics Module in Sysper2.  
75. 
In deciding on whether to authorise the gift/favour the AA  will consider the 
intention behind offering the gift, favour or donation, the possible consequences 
for the Commission's interests,  the nature of the gift, the nature of the source 
offering the gift etc. . In light of this information and if s/he considers that there 
is no ethical issue the AA may authorise her/him to accept the gift/ favour if its 
value is less than or equal to € 150 
76. 
Authorisation for gifts with a value of more than € 150 will be refused by the 
AA.  In this case or if a gift is unwanted, it can be returned to the source, if this 
is feasible or given to the institution (to  the  OIB,  which will give it to an 
appropriate charitable organisation, or to the COMP library in case of a work-
related book). 
For  example, invitations from third parties to attend a major sporting event or other trips or 
excursions,  as well as invitations for holidays, boat trips, etc., must be categorically refused, 
unless their acceptance would be clearly in the interest of the service, following prior 
authorisation of the management. 

7.2.  Hospitality 
77. 
Hospitality offers are considered to be one particular type of favour.  Hospitality 
is defined as an offer of food, drink, accommodation and/or entertainment from 
any source outside the institution. 
78. 
Permission is presumed to be granted if the lunch/dinner is strictly linked to the 
function of the official who participates in agreement with his/her hierarchy and 
is not prejudicial to the interests of the Commission.   
                                                 
31   Information from DG HR 
is available on the IntraComm website: 
http://myintracomm.ec.europa.eu/hr_admin/en/ethics/obligations/conflicts_interest/Pages/conflicts_inte
rest.aspx a
nd specifically on gifts at: 
 
http://myintracomm.ec.europa.eu/hr_admin/en/ethics/obligations/conflicts_interest/Pages/gift.aspx.  
32   In respect of some grades the Director General has delegated his function as an appointing authority in 
this matter to Directorate R (see Annex 2 of the Code). 
16 

Version 3.1  
79. 
Permission is also presumed to be granted, in accordance with Art. 11 of the 
Staff Regulations  for  occasional offers of simple  meals, refreshments, snacks, 
etc. 
80. 
Explicit prior permission by the AA is required in other cases than the one 
mentioned in § 78  and 79 or if there is a doubt as to the appropriateness of 
accepting or refusing a hospitality offer.  
81. 
During a mission, the staff member who has been instructed to attend an event 
as part of her/his  work  can accept hospitality offers as long as they do not go 
beyond what is reasonable and necessary for such an event.  Mission orders 
and/or expense claims must of course include details of any hospitality offered 
so that the hierarchy can take its decision in full knowledge of all relevant 
elements and so that appropriate deductions may be made from mission 
allowances. 
Example: You are sent on a mission in another country to attend a conference on Competition 
law and the organisers of the event send a minibus to the airport to pick you up. You can accept 
the favour because in any event transportation from the airport to your hotel or the venue where 
the conference will take place is strictly necessary for your mission and does not appear 
unreasonable.  

82. 
Whatever is being accepted  as  hospitality  must remain strictly necessary to 
better achieve the  professional objectives in the interest of the service. Full 
transparency should be ensured vis-à-vis  the  hierarchy, and guidance should 
always be sought when in doubt. 
Example:  Thus, it would for example be inappropriate to accept  invitations to leisure events 
offered in the framework of a conference (e.g.  an invitation to a sporting event, a boat trip or 
other favour that bears no relationship with the mission of the staff member)  without at least 
requesting prior formal authorisation to accept it.  Financing of the participation of a 
companion, who is not a Commission official, is clearly not in the interest of the Commission 
and this offer should in any case be rejected. 

83. 
Particular prudence is necessary in sensitive situations. For instance, staff 
members participating in inspections should whenever possible inform their 
immediate superior or team leader on an ad hoc basis when hospitality is offered 
during such missions. 
84. 
The question in all such situations should be whether accepting the hospitality 
could compromise –or  perceived as compromising-  the staff member's 
autonomy, independently of its value. If case of uncertainty, an  advice can be 
asked to the hierarchy or directly to the ECO and if the staff member is not in a 
position, given the context, to consult them it is strongly recommend, if possible, 
to decline diplomatically, while referring to the obligations the staff is subject to. 
17 

link to page 8 link to page 23 link to page 23 link to page 23 link to page 23 Version 3.1  
7.3.  Honours and decorations 
85. 
Honours and  decorations cannot be accepted without having received 
authorisation in advance, except for services rendered before the official 
appointment or during special leave for military or other national service33 
8.  POLITICAL ACTIVITIES,  STANDING FOR PUBLIC  OFFICE  AND OUTSIDE POLITICAL 
PRESSURE 
8.1.  Political activities and outside political pressure 
86. 
In principle there are no obstacles for staff to take part in the life of a political 
party  insofar as the  staff  member  respects the requirements  of the  Staff 
Regulations to have a neutral and independent position in the execution of his or 
her duties and the other relevant provisions of the Staff Regulations (see notably 
Articles 11, 17, 17a). 
87. 
Although Staff Regulations require officials to take a neutral and independent 
position in the execution of their duties, a staff member could be under pressure 
from political groups or a national government. It is the staff member's duty to 
inform the hierarchy about such situations and to take the necessary measures to 
avoid that her/his independence is threatened or compromised. 
8.2.  Standing for public office 
88. 
If an official, contract or temporary agent34  wishes to stand for public office, 
such as standing as a candidate in municipal, regional, national or European 
elections,  s/he must notify the AA35, as stipulated in Article 15 of the Staff 
Regulations. After the Director-General has given his/her opinion, the AA will 
decide whether, in the period up to the date of the election or appointment, the 
staff member must make a request for leave on personal grounds (CCP), take 
annual leave, can be authorised to work part-time or can continue to work with 
no change of the working hours. 
89. 
The performance of duties stemming from the tenure of public office is a special 
case in that there is no obligation to request authorisation. For officials, 
temporary or contract agents  who have been elected or appointed to public 
office
  Article 1536  of the Staff Regulations establishes the obligation to inform 
                                                 
33   The form "Authorisation to accept a decoration or an honour can be found at : 
http://raphael.comp.cec.eu.int/intranet/general/index.cfm?action=view&subaction=page&page=20127 
34   No provision of Commission Decision of 12.11.2008 provides for the possibility that a SNE stands for 
public office. This possibility is therefore not open to SNEs. 
35   The AA in this case is the Director General of DG HR. The from "Candidature for public office" can 
be found at  : 
http://raphael.comp.cec.eu.int/intranet/general/index.cfm?action=view&subaction=page&page=20127  
36   Article 15 of the Staff Regulations applies mutatis mutandis to temporary and contract agents (see para 
7 above).  
18 

link to page 33 link to page 33 link to page 33 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 24 link to page 24 link to page 24 link to page 24 link to page 24 Version 3.1  
the AA37, which will decide whether and under what modalities the official may 
continue to discharge  his/her duties. The AA will decide whether s/he  must 
make a request for leave on personal grounds38 (CCP), take annual leave, can be 
authorised to work part-time or can continue to work with no change to his/her 
working hours.  
90. 
Officials, temporary and contract agents that are elected or appointed to public 
office and who continue working are subject to the obligations that normally 
apply to officials (and mutatis mutandis to contract and temporary agents). Any 
payment made to an official, contract or temporary agent in that connection shall 
not count toward the ceiling for net remuneration of € 4.50039
9.  FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION AND PROFESSIONAL SECRECY  
9.1.  General principles 
91. 
All staff enjoy a right to freedom of expression as recognised by Article 17a of 
the Staff Regulations, which states that “an official40 has the right to freedom of 
expression, with due respect to the principles of loyalty and impartiality
”. This 
right, however, should be understood together with the obligations laid down in 
Articles 11,12 and 17 of the Staff Regulations. These establish, respectively, the 
“duty of loyalty to the Union” and the obligation to refrain from “any action or 
behaviour that might reflect adversely upon (their) position”. 
92. 
Article 17 of the Staff Regulations establishes the obligation for officials, 
contract and temporary agents41 to refrain from “any unauthorised disclosure 
of information received in the line of duty
, unless that information has already 
been made public or is accessible to the public.” Therefore, whether in public or 
in private, the staff member should not disclose any information s/he has come 
across in the performance of her/his duties unless s/he has received authorisation 
to do so and/or is sure that such information is already publicly available. S/he 
should of course also refrain from disclosing, whether intentionally or not, any 
confidential information received in the line of duty, whether it concerns 
                                                 
37  The  AA in this case is the Director-General HR. The form to be filled out can be found at: 
http://raphael.comp.cec.eu.int/intranet/general/index.cfm?action=view&subaction=page&page=20127.  
This form has to be sent to Directorate B of DG HR  
38   Where temporary or contract staff member holds a contract for fixed period, the duration of leave on 
personal grounds in order to take up public office shall be limited to the remainder of the term of the 
contract (see Article 11 and 81 of CEOS).  
39   See Article 3 Commission Decision on outside activities and assignments. Also see para 140 in section 
10.4 "Receiving payments for outside activities" below.  
40   This applies mutatis mutandis also to contact and temporary agents (see para 7 and footnote 6 above). 
The same rule applies to SNEs by virtue of Article 7(1)f of Decision of 12.11.2008 (see footnote 7). 
41   The same rule in substance applies to SNEs by virtue of Article 7(1)e of the Decision of 12.11.2008 
(see footnote 7 above). 
19 

link to page 25 link to page 25 link to page 25 link to page 25 link to page 25 link to page 25 link to page 25 Version 3.1  
business secrets of a company or details of the internal decision-making 
processes of the Commission42.  
93. 
The right to freedom of expression is a fundamental right but does not constitute 
an unfettered prerogative and is subject to certain limitations. A staff member is 
free to publicly express her/his personal opinions, even if they are critical of 
decisions taken by the Commission43.  However,  s/he, when expressing her/his 
views in public  (whether  in written or oral format),  should  make it absolutely 
clear that these are her/his  personal opinions,  do not necessarily reflect the 
views of the Commission and/or DG COMP44 and may not cause any prejudice 
to the interests  of the European Union45. This will have to be assessed on the 
basis of specific, objective factors.46  Relevant factors may be for example the 
lapse of time (obviously differing opinions on issues which are still pending 
(including before the Courts) are likely to seriously prejudice the legitimate 
interests of the Union), the forum in which the personal opinions are made (e.g. 
academic journal v/ press), the position of the person concerned in the institution 
and her/his involvement in the subject matter. 
94. 
Even  when  the staff member is  simply expressing opinions as a private 
individual it  is worth considering in this regard that those views can carry a 
certain weight with those hearing them, who will probably see her/him  as a 
Commission official as well as a private individual. 47 
95. 
The principles of loyalty and dignity require that  the staff member should not 
make demeaning or offensive statements that impugn the honour of the persons 
or institutions against whom they were made.48 
                                                 
42   Further guidance on security can be found at IntraComm Security page: 
http://raphael.comp.cec.eu.int/intranet/general/index.cfm?action=view&subaction=page&page=20842  
43   See, for instance, Case T-82/99 Cwik v Commission [2000] ECR-SC I-A-155 and II-713, paragraph 58, 
upheld in appeal (case C-340/00). 
44   When publishing a text on a professional or EU matter in their private capacity all staff (regardless of 
their position) should use a disclaimer.  
45   See, for instance, Case C-274/99 P Connolly v Commission [2001] ECR I-1611, paragraphs 47 and 57. 
46   Case C-340/00 Cwik v Commission [2000], paragraphs 19 and 23. 
47   The CFI has taken three factors into consideration when assessing the risk of an official's personal 
opinion being mistaken for that of the institution employing him: i) whether the institution has publicly 
and clearly expressed its view on the question; ii) the (management) responsibilities of the official 
expressing a personal view; and iii) the addressees of the lecture/publication containing the personal 
view  (specialist readership being likely to be well informed about the views of the institution). See 
Case C-340/00 Cwik v Commission , paragraphs 25 and 26.  
48   The duty of loyalty requires not only that the official concerned refrains from conduct which reflects on 
his position and is detrimental to the respect due to the institution and its authorities (see, for example, 
the judgment in Williams I, paragraph 72, and Case T-293/94 Vela Palacios v ESC [1996] ECR-SC I-
A-297, II-893, paragraph 43), but also that he must conduct himself, particularly if he is of senior 
grade, in a manner that is beyond suspicion in order that the relationship of trust between that 
institution and himself may at all times be maintained (N v Commission, paragraph 129). (Case C-
274/99 P Connolly v Commission, paragraph 128). 
20 

link to page 28 link to page 8 link to page 30 link to page 26 link to page 26 link to page 26 link to page 26 link to page 26 link to page 26 link to page 26 Version 3.1  
96. 
The  obligation of loyalty means that the staff member should avoid creating 
confusion or uncertainty when making public statements (see para 110 below on 
contacts with the media). Therefore, the staff member should avoid discussing 
any case or policy matter which is still at the preparation or discussion 
stage and on which the Commission has not adopted an official position.
 
97. 
These rules also apply when making use of social networks49. 
98. 
In view of the serious consequences that a breach of Article 17 could carry for 
the Commission’s reputation, cases of unauthorised disclosure of information 
not yet made public concerning any aspect of DG COMP  work, whether 
intentional or not, will be investigated and may, ultimately, lead to disciplinary 
action and/or financial claims for serious neglect, in application of the relevant 
procedures (see section 14 below).  
9.2.  Publications and speeches on EU-related matters: obligation to inform the 
AA in advance 
99. 
Article 17a(2) of the Staff  Regulations creates an obligation for officials50
contract or temporary agents51 to inform the AA52 of their intention to publish or 
have published any matter dealing with the work of the Union53. The mere fact 
of issuing a publication concerned with the work of the  Union, without first 
notifying to the AA, constitutes an infringement of Article 17a of the Staff 
Regulations.54 
100. 
The official, contract or temporary agent shall inform55  the AA before 
publishing
 the matter dealing with the work of the Union. If the AA is able to 
demonstrate that the publication is liable to seriously  prejudice the legitimate 
interest of the Union,  the AA shall inform the official, contract or temporary 
                                                 
49   Social Media Guidelines for all staff – Administrative Notice n° 34/2011 
50   In this context, do not forget that an official on CCP does not lose his status as an official during the 
period of leave and therefore remains subject to the obligations incumbent upon every official (see, for 
instance, Case C-274/99 P Connolly v Commission [2001] ECR I-1611.)  
51   See para 7 above. 
52   The AA is the Director General (except for the Director General for whom the AA is the Member of 
the  Commission  responsible for Human Resources).  In respect of some grades, the Director General 
has delegated the function of appointing authority in this matter to the Director and Head of Unit 
responsible for Human Resources (see Annex 2 of the Code). 
53   This should be understood to include any matter dealing with the work of the European Union. 
Publication of materials on EU matter may be considered  also  an external activity (see para  125 
below).  
54   If no publication is envisaged there is no need to ask for authorisation of the AA but in so far as the 
speech relates to a professional or EU matter and is drafted within  the scope of the staff member's 
duties, it must be approved by the DG COMP management (see table attached to this Code).  
55   The form can be found at: 
 
http://raphael.comp.cec.eu.int/intranet/general/index.cfm?action=view&subaction=page&page=20127  
21 

link to page 30 link to page 8 link to page 27 link to page 27 Version 3.1  
agent within 30 working days of receipt of the information. If no such decision is 
notified within the specified period,  the AA shall be deemed to have had no 
objections. Although these rules may appear to require a mere notification of the 
staff's intention to publish,  the staff member cannot publish if the AA gives a 
negative opinion. Thus in practice the procedure introduces an authorisation 
procedure.  
101. 
The rules on publications apply also to speeches where they are intended to be 
published. Thus if a staff member gives a speech and provide third parties with 
the written text of the speech delivered (or the slides of the presentation) s/he 
should ask whether there is a possibility that it may be published. If the 
organisers state that they intend to publish the speech then s/he  should either 
refuse to provide them with the text or inform the AA in accordance with the 
procedure set out above. 
102. 
The rules applicable to SNEs  in respect of publications are in  substance  the 
same. The relevant provision is  Article 7(1)f  of Commission Decision of  
12.11.200856. However, SNEs are required to notify their Head of Unit who has 
the power to issue a decision objecting to publication.   
103. 
It must be born in mind that a publication on EU or other professional matters 
may at the same time constitute and external activity, notably when it is paid or 
performed under contract (see para 125 below).  
104. 
Even if a staff member has been instructed to draft a text as part of her/his work 
by her/his manager, if published under the staff member's name, an authorisation 
of the Appointing Authority is needed.  
105. 
In addition, according to Article 18(1) of the Staff Regulations, "All rights in 
any writings or other work done by any official in the performance of his duties 
shall be the property of the Commission  to whose activities such writings or 
work relate. The Commission  shall have the right to acquire compulsorily the 
copyright in such works."57  Contact the CPI unit to arrange for the copyright 
licence. 
For example, if you are instructed by your Head of Unit or Director to write an article for the 
"Competition Policy Newsletter" on a recent case you have worked on, the copyright of this 
article belongs to the EU.  

106. 
It is also worth noting that royalties received for publications to which the AA 
raised no objections are not subject to the net annual ceiling of €  4.500 that 
applies to work a staff member is authorised to undertake outside the 
Commission. 
                                                 
56   See footnote 7 above. 
57   Further information available 
in 
the OPOCE webpage: 
http://intracomm.cec.eu-
admin.net/publications/publicare/services/copyright_en.html 
22 

link to page 33 link to page 33 link to page 28 link to page 28 Version 3.1  
9.3.  Publications and speeches on non EU-related matters: no authorisation to 
publish is needed 
107. 
For publications and speeches on non EU-related matters, no authorisation to 
publish is needed. 
108. 
However, if the publication entitles to receive remuneration, one must request 
an authorisation by filling out a specific form58.  
109. 
If it is considered as an "external activity", notably when it is paid or performed 
under contract, a prior authorisation from the AA59 is also needed. 
9.4.  Contacts with the media  
110. 
Contacts with the media should be handled carefully by all Commission staff. 
This is of specific relevance for DG COMP staff, given the nature of the work 
and the immediate consequences that any public statement may have on the 
business world. 
111. 
In principle, contacts with the media shall be restricted to the Commissioner's 
spokesperson  and press officer. Requests for information or statements made 
directly to DG COMP should be re-directed to the office of the spokesperson. 
Whenever necessary, the spokesperson may re-direct questions from journalists 
to staff in DG COMP. AD-level staff may therefore be authorised by their 
hierarchy to make statements to the media, for example in the context of an 
information/communication event.  
112. 
When participating in conferences or other  work-related events, the possibility 
of spontaneous requests from the media should be anticipated.  A  line to take 
should be approved by the hierarchy and/or the Spokesperson, except for cases 
on which the Commission has already taken a line.  
113. 
The spokesperson’s office should be kept informed of any contacts with media 
on the part of DG COMP staff, whenever these take place, especially in the case 
of policy statements on  matters still under discussion within the DG or within 
the Commission itself. If approached, especially if the request for information is 
made on the phone, the staff member should re-direct the question to the 
spokesperson. Staff members shall deflect requests by politely but firmly saying, 
“I am not in a position to reply to your question. I suggest you contact the 
Commissioner’s spokesperson at ….”. 
114. 
When  making  a public statement, the staff member is acting  de facto  as a 
spokesperson for the Commission.  Therefore the message should be accurate, 
clear and consistent in order to avoid any misinterpretation.  
 
                                                 
58   The form "Authorisation to accept Remuneration for Publication or Speech" can be found at: 
http://raphael.comp.cec.eu.int/intranet/general/index.cfm?action=view&subaction=page&page=20127  
59   See also section 10.4 "Receiving payments for outside activities" below. 
23 

link to page 29 link to page 29 Version 3.1  
115.  In general, DG COMP officials should respect the following guidelines: 
•  Any form of contact attempted from the side of the media in whatever form 
(e-mail, telephone, casual conversation,…) must be reported to the hierarchy 
and should be referred to the Spokesperson Service. Information can only be 
supplied with the agreement of the Spokesperson Service, under the control 
of the hierarchy, and after informing the CPI. 
•  Any public announcement of a new policy initiative or provision of new 
information to the media or the outside world on ongoing activities and cases 
shall be made by the Commissioner, either personally or through a 
spokesperson, unless he asks the Director General, or through him other DG 
COMP officials to take charge of the task. 
•  The Directorate General shall keep the spokesperson informed of ongoing 
case and policy work which is the subject of public debate and where it is 
necessary to put special emphasis on certain messages. The Communication 
Officer shall provide the spokesperson with background information 
necessary in this respect. 
•  The spokesperson will inform the Director General or his staff, as well as the 
Commissioner and the Cabinet, of any issue arising from a draft statement or 
a response to a request from the media which might have significant policy 
implications. 
9.5.  Relations with citizens 
116. 
All staff members are at the service of EU citizens. 
117. 
The Code of Good Administrative Behaviour lays down several rules regarding 
written correspondence, phone calls and e-mails60
118. 
For written correspondence, a substantive answer or at least a holding response 
should be provided within 15 working days. When replying, the language of the 
citizen must be used, provided it is one of the 23 EU languages61
119. 
When answering the phone, the staff member should identify her(him)self and 
treat the caller in a courteous manner. When dealing with enquiries within the 
staff member's responsibility, it has to be checked whether the information is 
already accessible to the public. If it is not, it is important to ask the hierarchy if 
it can be made public or to explain to the citizen why it is not possible to 
disclose the information. For subjects outside the staff member's competence, 
s/he should redirect the call to the appropriate service. 
                                                 
60 http://www.cc.cec/guide/codepers/code_en.htm 
61    As stated in the Commission's administrative agreements with Spain and the UK, any correspondence 
to the Commission written in one of the additional languages recognised on all or part of their territory 
(Basque, Catalan and Galician in Spain; Scottish Gaelic and Welsh in the UK), should first be 
translated (in Spanish and English respectively) by the bodies designated by the Member States 
concerned. 
24 

link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 30 link to page 30 link to page 30 link to page 30 Version 3.1  
120. 
E-mails should be treated as promptly as a phone call, but if by their nature they 
are equivalent to a letter, they should be handled according to the guidelines on 
written correspondence. 
9.6.  Relations with Interest groups – lobbies 
121. 
Staff  members  have  a wide discretion in deciding whom to meet, and the 
Commission should remain an open, accessible institution, on the basis of the 
important principle of equality of treatment. 
122. 
However, staff members  are  advised to refuse any invitation from interest 
representatives which could put the institution in a delicate situation. In any 
case,  they  should be transparent with their  hierarchy whenever they are  in 
contact with lobbyists. 
123. 
Staff members  are  also advised to document and record, where possible, any 
substantive contact and how it may affect Commission policy (information 
received and given). 
124. 
When a staff member is approached by unregistered interest representatives, s/he 
should invite them to sign up to the Register for Interest Representatives. 
10.  OUTSIDE ACTIVITIES 
10.1.  General rules  
125. 
Article 12b of the Staff Regulations establishes an obligation to obtain 
permission before engaging in any activity, whether paid or unpaid, outside 
the  Commission
62.  This obligation applies irrespective of a distinction 
regarding the nature or the importance of the activities concerned. 
126. 
Detailed  rules governing outside  activities  are laid down in the  Commission 
Decision  on  external  activities and assignments (hereinafter referred to as “the 
Commission Decision”).63  These rules  are  directly  applicable to officials and 
mutatis mutandis  to  temporary and contract  agents64  and seconded national 
experts (SNE).65 
                                                 
62   Prolongation or renewal shall be requested at least two months before the expiration period. See 
Commission Decision C(2004) 1597/10 of 28 April 2004, articles 2 and 12. 
63   See C(2004) 1597/10 of 28 April 2004. This decision is currently being reviewed by DG HR. 
64   See para 7 above. 
65   Under Article 7(1)b of Commission Decision of 12.11.2008 (see footnote 7) SNEs wishing to engage 
in an outside activity, whether paid or unpaid, or to carry out any assignment outside the European 
Union shall be subject to the Commission's rules on prior authorisation for officials. The Commission 
Decision further states that Article 12b of the Staff Regulations and provisions implementing it shall 
apply mutatis mutandis. 
25 

link to page 33 link to page 31 Version 3.1  
127. 
Outside activities can be either assignments or outside activities. An assignment 
is the taking on of a defined, time-limited task. An outside  activity is any 
activity, paid or unpaid, that is of an occupational character or otherwise goes 
beyond what can reasonably be considered a leisure activity, such as giving 
lectures  in the framework of university courses  or  writing a book  under  a 
contract with a publishing house
.  For example activities that take up a 
significant amount of time may fall under the category outside activity. There are 
no clear-cut criteria for distinguishing between assignments and outside 
activities. For practical purposes this is not absolutely necessary as the regime to 
be applied is in practice the same.  
128. 
It is important to underline that outside  activities are not a priori  considered 
negative in this context. Article 12b of the Staff Regulations clearly states that 
authorisation shall be denied “only if the activity or assignment in question is 
such as to interfere with the performance of the official’s duties or is 
incompatible with the interests of the institution
”. The obligations established in 
articles 11, 12, 16, 17, 17a 18, 19, and 55 of the Staff Regulations should be kept 
in mind in this context. 
129. 
At a practical level, an outside activity should not: 
•  be so time consuming  as to impact negatively on staff's work at the 
Commission, or constitute a job in itself;  
•  give rise to any possible appearance of a conflict of interest or be in some 
other way discreditable, so as to risk bringing the Commission into 
disrepute.  
130. 
Furthermore, the amount of the remuneration should be reasonably related to the 
amount of work performed or the ordinary remuneration for the  same kind of 
service or product66. 
131. 
Normally voluntary work would be permitted. However, no outside activity or 
work  may be performed either on the premises of the Commission  or during 
normal working hours. 
132. 
Staff are not allowed to carry out any of the following types of work, for 
example: 
•  outside work, whether paid or unpaid, in a "profession" (such as architect, 
lawyer, economist, accountant, IT professional, engineer, interpreter, doctor, 
translator, consultant etc);  
•  work in or for private companies, even if it is unpaid and the role is 
merely nominal (such as non-executive director, unpaid adviser, etc.);  
•  teaching  or other pedagogical work, whether paid or not, for more than 
100 hours per academic year, unless your Appointing Authority, after 
                                                 
66   See also para140 on receiving payments for external activities. 
26 

link to page 26 link to page 32 link to page 26 link to page 26 link to page 26 link to page 26 link to page 32 link to page 32 Version 3.1  
consulting the Director-General for  Human Resources  and Security, deems 
such work beneficial to the Commission. 
10.2.  Drafting publications and speeches (EU or non-EU related) 
133. 
Drafting texts (whether books, chapters of a book, articles, speeches,  etc.) on 
whatever topics may in particular constitute an external activity where:  
•  you will be paid, or  
•  you draft the text under a contract, or 
•  when the drafting takes a significant amount of your time
134. 
If a staff member drafts articles occasionally (regardless of the topic) and neither 
receives  remuneration for that nor is the drafting done under contract then that 
would normally be considered a leisure activity. However, if s/he  signs  a 
contract with a publishing house to regularly write  and submit  texts that may 
constitute an outside activity. 
135. 
If  a staff member undertakes  to draft a publication that constitutes an outside 
activity and if the publication is on EU matters, apart from the authorisation for 
an  outside  activity,  s/he  will  also  have  to notify the AA 30 days before 
publication (see para 99). 
136. 
If case of doubts, the staff member is invited to consult the ECO who will assess 
the particular situation. The criteria given in para 133 are not exhaustive and the 
assessment is always conducted on a case-by-case basis. 
10.3.  Procedure for asking authorisation 
137. 
If you are in active service and wish to perform an outside activity (e.g. accept 
an assignment,  or engage in  an  external  activity)  –  such  as giving  speeches67
participating as lecturer in a conference or course, or writing an article68  – 
whether or not you are offered a fee and where the activity in question is not part 
of a mission or the staff member's normal work, s/he  should  introduce  two 
months before the start of the external activity 
her/his request via the Ethics 
module in Sysper 2.  
138. 
A permission granted under Article 12b is valid for a maximum of one year from 
the date of the decision, or a lesser period, which will be stated in the decision.  
If the staff member wishes to extend or renew his or her permission a new 
                                                 
67   Giving an occasional speech does not constitute an external activity. However, giving speeches on a 
regular basis may be considered an external activity. Giving regular speeches under a contract is 
certainly an external activity. 
68   See also para 99, section 9.2  above "Publications and speeches on EU-related matters: obligation to 
inform the AA in advance". Publications on any matter dealing with the work of the EU will need to be 
notified (in practice authorised) under the freedom of expression rules.   
27 

link to page 26 link to page 27 link to page 33 link to page 33 link to page 33 link to page 33 link to page 33 link to page 33 Version 3.1  
request  must be submitted. Prolongation or renewal shall be requested at least 
two months before the expiration period. 
139. 
Each case shall be assessed on its own merits with regard to the type of activity 
proposed. Permission may be refused if work staff members will be performing 
or the office they will be holding are liable to undermine their independence or 
prejudice the work of the EU. 
10.4.  Receiving payments for outside activities 
140. 
It is not prohibited to receive payment for an outside  activity, as long as 
authorisation has been granted and the limits set in the Commission’s Decision 
are respected69. The maximum annual ceiling for net remuneration, including 
any fees, which can be received  in connection with all assignments or outside 
activities combined is € 4.500. Any amount in excess of this should be passed to 
the Commission.  Reimbursement of costs (for example transportation costs), 
royalties for publications and remuneration for exercising a public office70 shall 
not be taken into account for this purpose71. The staff member must also apply 
for authorisation to receive any prize or award linked to an assignment or 
outside activity.72  
10.5.  Special regime for missions (speeches, presentations, conferences) 
141. 
Activities such as giving speeches, making presentations or participating in 
conferences, when carried out in the framework of a mission,  are  not 
considered  outside  activities in the sense of Article 12b of the Staff 
Regulations73. 
142. 
Mission orders are signed by the authorising officer (the authorising officers are 
the Directors; for Directors and staff above the level of Directors the authorising 
officer is the Director General). The authorising officer must check that there are 
no potential conflicts of interest and confirm accordingly on the mission order74
However, if the text of a speech or presentation made during a mission is to be 
published, it is compulsory under Article 17a of the Staff Regulations to inform 
the AA (see section 9.2 above). 
                                                 
69   Commission Decision C(2004) 1597/10 of 28 April 2004, article 9. 
70   See Article 3 of Commission Decision on outside activities and assignments C(2004) 1597/10. 
71   Commission Decision C(2004) 1597/10 of 28 April 2004, article 9.  
72   Article 10 of the Commission Decision C(2004) 1597/10 of 28 April 2004 states that “permission shall 
only be refused if the acceptance of the prize or award is incompatible with the interests of the 
institution or could impair the independence of the official”. 
73   For publication of a speech carried out in the framework of a mission you will need to notify your AA 
under Article 17a (see para 104). 
74   See Commission Decision of 18.11.2008 C (2008) 6215 final General implementing provisions 
adopting the Guide to missions for officials and other servants of the European Commission. 
28 

link to page 34 Version 3.1  
143. 
Currently  Article 4 of the Commission Decision on  outside  activities  and 
assignments specifically forbids all staff from accepting any payment offered in 
exchange for work done in the framework of a mission. However, according to 
this Commission decision staff should ask for the costs of the mission 
(accommodation, transport) to be reimbursed by the organizer.75  
144. 
Against this background DG COMP advises its staff, where they participate in a 
conference which is considered to be in the interest of the DG and authorised in 
the context of a mission, to in principle ask for a reimbursement of the costs by 
the organizer
. Although normally in this type of missions this does not raise any 
conflict of interest,   where accepting reimbursement of the costs  could 
reasonably lead to a presumption of bias or loss of independence staff should not 
ask, and if offered should refuse reimbursement of the costs by the organizer. In 
assessing whether this may be the case the following criteria may be used: 
•  the identity of the organizer (e.g. perceived conflict of interest situations 
may arise where the organiser is a law firm, lobbyist or an undertaking 
involved in pending competition cases. Even if participation in the 
conference may in certain circumstances be in the interest of the DG, 
acceptance of reimbursement of the costs may lead to a perceived conflict of 
interest. However, if the organiser is an independent body such as university, 
institute, etc. then normally reimbursement of the costs would not raise a 
conflict of interest); 
•  the purpose of the meeting (discussion of general policy issues or concrete 
or discussion of concrete pending cases); 
•  the attendance of the meeting (event open to the public or participants pre-
selected by the organizers); 
•  the monetary value of the travel expenses offered by the organiser  (of 
course costs of private companions,  etc.  should not be reimbursed by the 
organisers); 
•  the  number of reimbursements  made to the same official by the same 
organiser in a given year. 
145. 
At times, it may be unclear whether an invitation to give a speech or make a 
presentation outside the Commission should be considered a mission or not. 
Disseminating information about the Commission’s work in the area of 
competition policy is an important aspect of DG COMP tasks. However, the 
number of invitations addressed to a single unit or person may at times be 
excessive, or the target audience too small or not important enough for the event 
to be worth sending an official on mission.  
146. 
The staff member should therefore consult with her/his  immediate superior 
whether to accept an invitation or not. Several factors will be taken into 
                                                 
75   If the organisation responsible for organising the conference offers to reimburse the mission costs such 
reimbursement shall be declared and deducted from the mission costs. 
29 

link to page 35 link to page 35 link to page 35 Version 3.1  
consideration, mainly: the purpose of the event and the nature of the body 
organizing it; the interest of the Directorate General and/or the Commission in 
participating; and the priority the event has in relation to her/his  other 
responsibilities and the unit’s workload76. In any event there must be an intrinsic 
value in the event to pursuing DG COMP policy objectives. Under no 
circumstances should there be additional leisure activities linked to the event.  
147. 
To accept an invitation to participate in an event that the hierarchy does not 
consider as a mission, the staff member should  request  an  annual leave. Being 
on leave, however, does not relieve the staff from the obligation to request 
authorisation to engage in an external  activity. Whether on mission or not, the 
obligations  established in articles 11, 12, 17 and 17a of the Staff Regulations 
should be recalled in this context. 
11.  ETHICAL OBLIGATIONS  DURING  LEAVE ON PERSONAL  GROUNDS  (CONGÉ DE 
CONVENANCE PERSONNELLE - CCP) 
148. 
The leave on personal grounds is an administrative status which may be granted 
to officials, temporary or contract agents at their own request (see Article 40 of 
the Staff Regulations, Article 17 and 91 CEOS). Staff members on CCP are not 
former staff, as they are entitled to reintegration into Commission services. 
Thus, they are subject to the same obligations as staff members in active 
employment, in particular those established in articles 11, 11a, 12, 13, 15, 16, 17 
and 17a of the Staff Regulations77. They are also subject to the relevant 
stipulations of Chapter 2 of Commission Decision C(2004) 1597/10 of 28 April 
2004 concerning the authorisation of outside activities while on CCP. 
149. 
Professional activities are allowed during a CCP, but they must be authorised in 
advance. Requests to engage in occupational activities, paid or unpaid, made 
during  a  CCP or in connection with a request to take CCP, shall be submitted 
through SYSPER2's ethics module.  
150. 
The general rule is that staff members  must  provide  all relevant information 
needed to make an informed decision regarding the possibility of the requested 
activity conflicting with the interests of the institution78. The DG may make the 
permission to engage in occupational activities subject to any conditions which 
                                                 
76   In that context, DG COMP has decided that, in principle, no more than two officials from DG COMP 
and the Cabinet of the Commissioner, taken together, should speak at any one event (conferences or 
other external events). Therefore, when you receive invitations to conferences and other events, it is 
requested that you systematically ask the organisers who else from DG COMP or the Cabinet has been 
invited and, if appropriate, to raise the issue with hierarchy (Head of Unit, Director) before giving your 
acceptance.  The Communications Policy and Inter-institutional Relations Unit (CPI) is in charge of 
coordinating attendance to big events/conferences. 
77   These provisions concern ethical behaviour for staff both during and after leaving office, conflict of 
interest, spouse activity, public office and freedom of expression (publications and speeches).  
78   For details, see articles 14 to 17 of the Commission Decision C(2004) 1597/10 of 28 April 2004 for the 
rules applicable to officials on CCP. 
30 

link to page 26 Version 3.1  
are  considered necessary to ensure that officials comply with their obligations,. 
The decision is taken after consultation of DG HR.  
For  example, when an official requests CCP to take a job in the private sector working in the 
field of competition law (e.g. law firms or consultancy) the authorization decision by DG COMP 
after consultation of DG  HR  may include restrictions concerning work not only on particular 
cases, but also specific companies or enterprises. In certain cases, the exercise of the activity 
concerned during the CCP can even be refused. 

151. 
While there may be considerable benefits for DG COMP officials being able to 
gain professional experience outside the Commission staff members  on  CCP  
should be especially mindful of their obligations vis-à-vis the institution, and in 
particular as regards avoiding any situation in which a conflict of interest might 
emerge.  
152. 
Such a conflict may emerge not only during the CCP but also when entering into 
negotiations in respect of any professional activity the staff member plans  to 
undertake while on CCP.  It is therefore strongly recommended to discuss with 
the hierarchy or with the ECO any negotiations engaged in this period to avoid 
any conflict of interest before or during CCP. 
153. 
Where circumstances could give rise to any possible appearance of a conflict of 
interest, either at the negotiation stage or following submission of a formal 
request for CCP, the DG reserves the right to adopt, if necessary, internal 
instructions concerning the execution of the staff member's day to day duties 
during the period preceding your departure.  
Examples  of such measures may include the modification of your access profile in the case 
management applications ("need to know", see the "Guidelines on Security in DG COMP"), 
restriction of access to information, modification of case or sector assignment or even transfer to 
another post within the DG if the nature of your proposed activity is considered incompatible 
with your current position. Each case will be assessed on its own merits and in full compliance 
with the principle of proportionality. 

154. 
Officials should be aware that, while on CCP, they remain subject to Article 17a 
of the Staff Regulations which requires them, inter alia, to notify the Appointing 
Authority 30 working days prior to publication (see section 9.2 above for more 
details).  
155. 
Furthermore, according to Article 16(3) of the Commission Decision on outside 
activities and assignments, an official on CCP may not participate in meetings or 
have contacts of a professional nature with his or her former Directorate General 
or service for a period of: 
•  1 year where the official occupied a management function in this Directorate 
General or service; 
•  6 months in all other cases. 
156. 
The purpose of this so-called distance rule is to avoid appearance of conflict of 
interest situations.  
31 

link to page 8 link to page 39 link to page 37 link to page 37 link to page 37 link to page 37 link to page 37 Version 3.1  
12.  ETHICAL OBLIGATIONS FOR FORMER STAFF79  
12.1.  Former officials, contract and temporary agents 
157. 
Former officials are all those who have definitively left the service (Article 47 of 
the Staff Regulations80), e.g. following resignation, retirement, dismissal or 
removal from the post, and those who have been retired in the interests of the 
service pursuant to Article 50 of the Staff Regulations.  
158. 
Former contract and temporary agents are those who have definitely left service 
(Articles 47 to 50a of CEOS). 
159. 
Article 16(1)81  of the Staff Regulations states that former officials, contract or 
temporary agents82: “continue to be bound by the duty to behave with integrity 
and discretion as regards the acceptance of certain appointments”. Moreover, 
pursuant to Article 17(1)  83  and (2) of the Staff Regulations, former officials 
remain under the obligation to refrain from any unauthorised disclosure of 
information received in the line of duty, unless that information has already been 
made public or is accessible to the public.  
160. 
Under Article 339 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union, the 
officials and other servants of the Union are required, even after their duties 
have ceased, not to disclose information of the kind covered by the obligation of 
professional secrecy, in particular information about undertakings, their business 
relations or their costs components. 
161. 
In view of DG COMP policy area, the situation of former staff members who 
left DG COMP and continue their career as lawyers, consultants or lobbyists is 
of special interest. 
162. 
At the occasion of the "exit interviews" which Directorate R organises  on  a 
voluntary basis, leaving  staff members  are reminded of their obligations under 
the Staff Regulations and in particular Articles 16 and 17 (2) thereof. 
163. 
Should  the former member of staff  infringe the obligations  provided for in 
Article 16 of the Staff Regulations in the performance of his/her new duties, be 
                                                 
79   This applies also to former contract and temporary agents (see Articles 11 and 81 of the Conditions of 
Employment of other Servants of the European Communities). Former SNEs are subject to Article 7(3) 
of Commission decision of 12.11.2008 (see footnote 7) which stipulates that they continue to have a 
duty of loyalty to the Communities and remain bound by the obligation to act with integrity and 
discretion after leaving the Commission.  
80   Articles 47 and 50 of the Staff Regulations do not apply to contract and temporary agents (see para 7 
above). 
81   Article 16 of the Staff Regulations applies mutatis mutandis to contract and temporary staff by virtue 
of Article 11 and 81 of CEOS (see para 7 above).  
82   For SNEs see para 171  below. 
83   Article 17a of the Staff Regulations applies mutatis mutandis to contract and temporary staff by virtue 
of Article 11 and 81 of CEOS.  
32 

link to page 9 link to page 38 link to page 38 link to page 38 link to page 38 Version 3.1  
it five or ten years after leaving the service, the Commission will be liable to 
sanction the failure concerned. 
164. 
Under Article 16(2) of the Staff Regulations and Article 18 of Commission 
Decision on outside activities and assignments if a former official or temporary 
agent  decides to engage him/herself in a professional activity,  whether  paid or 
unpaid, before the expiry of two years after s/he left the Commission, s/he must 
ask for prior authorisation to do so from the AA84. If a contract agent had access 
to sensitive information (such as on competition cases), this rule also applies to 
her/him85.
165. 
The Commission shall decide and notify the former official, contract or 
temporary agent  within thirty days whether the intended occupation could 
conflict with its legitimate interests86.  If the proposed activity is related to 
work the former official,  contract or temporary agent has carried out 
during the last three years of service and could lead to a conflict of interest, 
the AA may either forbid the former official, contract or temporary agent 
from undertaking the proposed activity or may impose specific conditions 
in the light of the particular circumstances of the case.
 Such conditions could 
concern  –  depending on the grade of the former official, contract or temporary 
agent and the nature of the former responsibilities - specific cases, undertakings, 
economic sector or competition instruments. 
166. 
In practice, DG HR (the Appointing Authority in this regard) consults 
Directorate R  of DG COMP and asks for its  opinion before imposing any 
conditions. In principle, as a general rule, DG COMP considers that former DG 
COMP  officials should not handle in the course of their new authorised 
activities  pending competition cases on which they have worked as part of the 
case-team or otherwise have been directly responsible for in the last three years 
of the performance of their duties at DG COMP87. To this purpose a list 
containing all such  cases will be produced. The ECO will keep a copy of this 
list.  
167. 
Such a conflict of interest may emerge before the staff member leaves  the 
Commission, since the start of negotiations and even, under certain 
circumstances, since the intention to enter in such negotiations with a potential 
future employer. Once a staff member has informed the AA of her/his intention 
                                                 
84   The AA in this case is the Director General for  Human Resources and Security. See also  para  11 
above. 
85   See Article 21(2) of Commission Decision on external activities and assignments. 
86   Article 16 of the Staff Regulations states:“(I)f the activity is related to the work carried out by the 
official during the last three years of service and could lead to a conflict with the legitimate interests 
of the institution, the Appointing Authority may, having regard to the interests of the service, either 
forbid him 
(the official) from undertaking it or give its approval subject to any conditions it thinks fit.” 
See also articles 18 to 20 of Commission Decision C(2004) 1597/10 of 28 April 2004. 
87   As regards the Chief Economist, who is a temporary agent on a three-year contract, it is considered that 
he/she should not handle, within the context of the position(s) he/she takes up after his/her departure 
from the Commission, cases on which s/he was directly involved during the period of his/her contract. 
33 

link to page 16 link to page 8 link to page 39 Version 3.1  
to leave  the Commission, this situation may require the adoption of internal 
instructions as regards her/his daily work at DG COMP. 
168. 
Since a person assisting a party in a meeting, a hearing or an inspection could 
influence its outcome by virtue of his/her previous responsibilities within the 
DG, a so-called distance rule is put in place to avoid appearance of conflict of 
interest situations. This means that the staff member may not participate in 
meetings or have contacts of a professional nature with his or her former 
Directorate General or Service  for a period of 1 year where the official occupied 
a management function in this Directorate General or service, 6 months in all 
other cases.. 
169. 
In addition, to the extent that it is possible and subject to its awareness of the 
situation, DG COMP requires its currently employed staff, to inform 
immediately his/her (immediate) superior of his/her potential participation in a 
meeting with former members of management (unless it is obvious that the 
person concerned left DG COMP such a long time ago that there is no longer 
any risk88). This will permit to assess accordingly whether a risk exists that the 
staff member concerned will find her/himself in a sensitive situation requiring 
the adoption of appropriate and proportionate measures as regards the 
organisation of the meeting.  
170. 
DG  COMP notes that similar rules on professional knowledge (see para  49 
above) and distance apply to staff returning to DG COMP after having worked, 
for instance, in a law firm, a national competition authority or a National 
Administration (State Aid cases). In this case, a staff member may feel impeded 
from dealing with a particular case in DG COMP because of the duty not to use 
knowledge gained in a previous position. If this is the case, the staff member 
should approach her/his  (immediate) superior and request to be assigned to a 
different case.  
12.2.  Seconded National Experts 
171. 
According to Article 7 of Commission Decision of 12.11.2008 (see footnote 7 
above) at the end of secondment SNEs shall continue to have a duty of loyalty to 
the Union and be bound by the obligation to act with integrity and discretion in 
the exercise of new duties assigned to them and in accepting certain post and 
advantages.  
13.  REPORTING IMPROPRIETIES AND  WHISTLEBLOWING 
172. 
Pursuant Article 22a and b of the Staff Regulations, a staff member is obliged 
without delay to report  in writing either  her/his  immediate superior or the 
Director-General/Head of service.  or, if she/he  considers  it more appropriate, 
directly to  the Secretary-General  or the European Anti-Fraud Office (OLAF) 
facts discovered in line of duty which point to the existence of serious 
                                                 
88   Apart from the application of the distance rule stricto sensu, it has to be kept in mind that former 
officials should not use or take advantage of fact and information learned about cases during their 
service unless those facts are in the public domain or have been obtained legitimately. 
34 

Version 3.1  
irregularities (including fraud, corruption or serious professional wrongdoings).  
The whistleblower has to act in good faith. 
173. 
Without prejudice to articles 22a and 22b of the Staff Regulations and article 
60(6) of the Financial Regulation, the following procedure should be 
implemented in cases of suspected or alleged irregularities: 
•  The recipient of the information is obliged to transmit it without delay; 
•  Where the recipient of the information is in a position of conflict of interest, 
s/he shall declare so and recuse her/himself; 
•  OLAF or the Commission must give the whistleblower within 60 days of 
receipt of the information an indication of the period of time that it considers 
reasonable and necessary to take appropriate action; 
•  If no action is taken within that period or if the period of time set is 
unreasonable in light of all the circumstances of the case, the whistleblower 
may  make use of the possibility of external whistleblowing, outside of the 
Commission  (to  the President of either the Council,  the Parliament or the 
Court of Auditors, or to the Ombudsman).  External disclosure is limited to 
other EU institutions. 
174. 
This rule  applies  to all discovered serious irregularities, illegal activities 
including fraud and corruption and serious professional wrongdoings and 
particularly those that may be detrimental to the financial interests of the EU.  
175. 
The ECO can be consulted for guidance and support. This guidance function is 
without prejudice to the possibility of staff members to consult their line 
manager or a specialised service (such as OLAF, IDOC, DG HR/B1, SG/B4). 
176. 
Protection for the whistleblower is foreseen: 
•  Confidentiality of identity  -  her/his name will not be revealed to the 
person(s) potentially implicated in the alleged wrongdoings or to any other 
person without a strict need to know; 
•  Mobility  -  if the whistleblower wishes to be moved, the Commission will 
take reasonable steps to facilitate the move; 
•  Appraisal and promotion -  the whistleblower will suffer no adverse 
consequence in this context; 
•  Penalties for those taking retaliatory action  -  any form of retaliation 
undertaken by a staff member against any person for reporting a serious 
irregularity in good faith is prohibited.  Disciplinary measures will be taken. 
Anonymous reporting is not encouraged. 
35 

link to page 41 Version 3.1  
Staff Member 
Possibility of initial dialogue with  
specialised staff 
– 
OLAF Fraud Notification System 
– 
Guidance and support from Ethics 
Correspondents 
– 
Other specialised COM services 
or with line manager 
Internal 
whistleblowing 
Feedback 
Feedback 
Option 1: Hierarchy / 
Option 2: OLAF 
Secretary General 
Option of last resort: 
external whistleblowing 
 
14.  ADMINISTRATIVE INQUIRIES AND DISCIPLINARY PROCEDURES 
177. 
It is the interest of DG COMP's staff to be aware of the fact that the infringement 
of the obligations spelled out in the Staff Regulations and implementing 
provisions can be subject to disciplinary sanctions and, possibly, to personal 
financial liability.  
178. 
Moreover, it should be reminded  that the disciplinary system (administrative 
inquiries and disciplinary procedures by OLAF or IDOC) applies to any failure 
by a member or former member of staff to comply with his/her obligations under 
the Staff Regulations, whether intentionally or through negligence. This can 
include conduct in private life and offences under national criminal law. In that 
context, it is important to bring to the attention of DG COMP staff that the 
finding of a failure to comply with the obligations of the Staff Regulations is not 
subject to the condition that the member of the staff concerned benefited from 
this failure or that the said failure caused damage to the Commission89. 
                                                 
89   See Joined Cases T-28/98 and T-241/99 E v Commission [2001] ECR II-681, paragraph 76. 
36 

link to page 42 link to page 42 Version 3.1  
179. 
As regards the latter aspect, one should be aware that financial liability can also 
be claimed when the Commission has suffered damage as a result of the serious 
misconduct of an official in the course of, or in connection with, the 
performance of his/her duties90
180. 
It will be the responsibility of DG COMP hierarchy to refer cases to the AA 
(Director General for Competition), the Investigation and Disciplinary Office of 
the Commission (IDOC), or the European Anti-Fraud Office (OLAF) where 
necessary.91 
181. 
The Appointing Authority may impose one of the following penalties: 
(a)  written warning; 
(b) reprimand; 
(c) deferment of advancement to a higher step for a period of between one 
and 23 months; 
(d) relegation in step; 
(e) temporary downgrading for a period of between 15 days and one year; 
(f) downgrading in the same function group; 
(g) classification in a lower function group, with or without downgrading; 
(h) removal from post and, where appropriate, reduction pro tempore of a 
pension or withholding, for a fixed period, of an amount from an 
invalidity allowance  
 
                                                 
90   See Article 22 of the Staff Regulations. 
91   See also Article 22a of the Staff Regulations pursuant to which any official has the duty to inform if he 
becomes aware of wrong doing.  
37 

Version 3.1  
ANNEX 1 
Relevant legislation and forms on ethics  
 
LEGISLATION 
•  Staff Regulations (see in particular Title II: Rights and Obligations of Officials). 
http://www.cc.cec/statut/index_en.htm 
•  Conditions of Employment of Other Servants of the European Communities. 
http://www.cc.cec/statut/_en/ind_raa.htm 
•  Commission Decision C(2004) 1597/10 of 28 April 2004 on outside  activities  and assignments. 
http://www.cc.cec/guide/publications/infoadm/2004/ia04085_en.html  
•  Commission Decision of 12.11.2008 laying down rules on the secondment to the Commission of 
national experts and national experts in professional training, C(2008) 6866 final: 
http://myintracomm.ec.europa.eu/hr_admin/en/external_staff/nat_expert/Documents/regime_end_200
9_en.pdf 

FORMS 
Link to the relevant forms:  
http://raphael.comp.cec.eu.int/intranet/general/index.cfm?action=view&subaction=page&page=20127  
38 

Version 3.1  
ANNEX 2 
 
Delegation of powers to act as an appointing authority in DG 
COMP 
 
The Director General for Competition has delegated the function of appointing authority 
in the following way: 
 
I:\_forum\Ivana F\Delegation of power in DG COMP - 05-10-2010.doc 
 
39 

Version 3.1  
ANNEX 3 
Relevant provisions of Directive 2003/6/EC of the European 
Parliament and of the Council of 28 January 2003 on insider dealing and market 
manipulation (market abuse) (OJ L 96/16 of 12 April 2003) 

 
Article 1 
For the purposes of this Directive: 
1. ‘Inside information’ shall mean information of a precise nature which has not been made public, 
relating, directly or indirectly, to one or more issuers of financial instruments or to one or more financial 
instruments and which, if it were made public, would be likely to have a significant effect on the prices of 
those financial instruments or on the price of related derivative financial instruments. 

In relation to derivatives on commodities, ‘inside information’ shall mean information of a precise nature 
which has not been made public, relating, directly or indirectly, to one or more such derivatives and which 
users of markets on which such derivatives are traded would expect to receive in accordance with accepted 
market practices on those markets. 

For persons charged with the execution of orders concerning financial instruments, ‘inside information’ 
shall also mean information conveyed by a client and related to the client's pending orders, which is of a 
precise nature, which relates directly or indirectly to one or more issuers of 

financial instruments or to one or more financial instruments, and which, if it were made public, would be 
likely  to have a significant effect on the prices of those financial instruments or on the price of related 
derivative financial instruments. 

2. ‘Market manipulation’ shall mean: 
a transactions or orders to trade: 
— which give, or are likely to give, false or misleading signals as to the supply of, demand for or price of 
financial instruments, or 
— which secure, by a person, or persons acting in collaboration, the price of one or several financial 
instruments at an abnormal or artificial level, unless the person who entered into the transactions or 
issued the orders to trade establishes that his reasons for so doing are legitimate and that these 
transactions or 

orders to trade conform to accepted market practices on the regulated market concerned; 
b transactions or orders to trade which employ fictitious devices or any other form of deception or 
contrivance; 

(c) dissemination of information through the media, including the Internet, or by any other means, which 
gives, or is likely to give, false or misleading signals as to financial instruments, including the 
dissemination of rumours and false or misleading news, where the person who made the dissemination 
knew, or ought to have known, that the information was false or misleading. In respect of journalists when 
they  act in their professional capacity such dissemination of information is to be assessed, without 
prejudice to Article 11, taking into account the rules governing their profession, unless those persons 
derive, directly or indirectly, an advantage or profits from the dissemination of the information in question. 
In particular, the following instances are derived from the core definition given in points a, b and (c) 
above: 

 
40 

Version 3.1  
— conduct by a person, or persons acting in collaboration, to secure a dominant position over the supply 
of or demand for a financial instrument which has the effect of fixing, directly or indirectly, purchase or 

sale prices or creating other unfair trading conditions, 
 
— the buying or selling of financial instruments at the close of the market with the effect of misleading 
investors acting on the basis of closing prices, 
 
— taking advantage of occasional or regular access to the traditional or electronic media by voicing an 
opinion about a financial instrument (or indirectly about its issuer) while having previously taken positions 
on that financial instrument and profiting subsequently from the impact of the opinions voiced 
on the price of that instrument, without having simultaneously disclosed that conflict of interest to the 
public in a proper and effective way. The definitions of market manipulation shall be adapted so as to 
ensure that new patterns of activity that in practice constitute market manipulation can be included. 

 
3. ‘Financial instrument’ shall mean: 
—  transferable securities  as defined in Council Directive 93/ 22/EEC of 10 May 1993 on investment 
services in the securities field (1), 

— units in collective investment undertakings, 
— money-market instruments, 
— financial-futures contracts, including equivalent cashsettled instruments, 
— forward interest-rate agreements, 
— interest-rate, currency and equity swaps, 
— options to acquire or dispose of any instrument falling into these categories, including equivalent cash-
settled instruments. This category includes in particular options on currency and on interest rates, 

— derivatives on commodities, 
—  any other instrument admitted to trading on a regulated market in a Member State or for which a 
request for admission to trading on such a market has been made. 

4. ‘Regulated market’ shall mean a market as defined by Article 1(13) of Directive 93/22/EEC. 
5. ‘Accepted market practices’ shall mean practices that are reasonably expected in one or more financial 
markets and are accepted by the competent authority in accordance with guidelines adopted by the 
Commission in accordance with the procedure laid down in Article 17(2). 

6. ‘Person’ shall mean any natural or legal person. […] 
  
 
41 

Version 3.1  
Article 2 
1. Member States shall prohibit any person referred to in the second subparagraph who possesses inside 
information from using that information by acquiring or disposing of, or by trying to acquire or dispose of, 
for his own account or for the account of a third party, either directly or indirectly, financial instruments 
to which that information relates. 

The first subparagraph shall apply to any person who possesses 
that information: 
a by virtue of his membership of the administrative, management or supervisory bodies of the issuer; or 
b by virtue of his holding in the capital of the issuer; or 
(c) by virtue of his having access to the information through the exercise of his employment, profession or 
duties; or 

(d) by virtue of his criminal activities. 
2. Where the person referred to in paragraph 1 is a legal person, the prohibition laid down in that 
paragraph shall also apply to the natural persons who take part in the decision to carry out the transaction 
for the account of the legal person concerned. […] 

 
42 

Version 3.1  
ANNEX 4 Which authorisation do I need to seek to: draft a text, perform a speech, publish a text, receive payment for a speech or a text? 
NOTICE: 
These rules apply to all Commission statutory staff (civil servants, temporary agents, contractual agents, seconded national experts), including when on leave (on personal grounds, on 
parental leave, etc.). 
As for other activities, you shall refrain from any action or behaviour which might reflect adversely upon your position. 
Drafting a text (including a 
Receiving payment for a 
 
Performing a speech 
Publishing a text (including a speech) 
speech) 
speech or a text 
Speech/text on non-
No authorisation is needed for the 
No authorisation is needed to perform a 
No authorisation is needed for the 
An authorisation is needed 
professional or EU matter 
drafting activity, unless it is part 
speech on non-professional or EU matter, 
publication of a text (including a speech) on 
to receive payment for a 
(freedom of expression, 
of an assignment or external 
with due respect to the principles of loyalty 
a non-professional or EU matter, with due 
speech or a publication.  
private life). 
activity, in which case a request 
and impartiality. If part of an assignment or 
respect to the principles of loyalty and 
has to be introduced in the Ethics 
external activity, a request has to be 
impartiality. 
Done outside working hours 
module in Sysper 2. 
introduced in the Ethics module in Sysper 
2. 
Speech/text on professional 
No authorisation is needed for the 
If a speech on a professional or EU matter 
An authorisation is needed for the 
An authorisation is needed 
or EU matter outside the 
drafting activity, unless it is part 
outside the scope of duties is to be 
publication of a text (including a speech) on 
to receive payment for a 
scope of duties (freedom of 
of an assignment or external 
published or there is a likelihood that it will  a professional or EU matter outside the 
speech or a publication.  
expression, not speaking on 
activity, in which case a request 
be published, an authorisation is needed.  
scope of duties. Add a disclaimer in the text 
behalf of the Commission) 
has to be introduced in the Ethics 

If the speech is performed as part of an 
module in Sysper 2. 
Done outside working hours 
assignment or external activity, a request 
has to be introduced in the Ethics module 
in Sysper 2. 
Speech/text on professional 
To be approved as requested by 
To be approved as requested by manager: 
1) If published under your own name, an 
Such a payment is normally 
or EU matter within the 
manager: e-mail, signataire, etc. 
e-mail, signataire, etc. As this is part of 
authorisation of the Appointing Authority is 
not allowed. If confronted 
scope of duties (part of your 
As this is part of work, no 
work, no authorisation of the Appointing 
needed. Copyright remains with the 
to such a situation, contact 
work, speaking on behalf of 
authorisation of the Appointing 
Authority is needed. 
Commission. Add a copyright and 
DG COMP's Ethics & 
the Commission) 
Authority is needed. 
disclaimer notice in the text (see below), 
Compliance Officer (ECO). 
Inform the CPI Unit before performing the 
contact the CPI unit to arrange for the 
speech. 
copyright licence. 
2) If published as a Commission document 
to be approved as requested by manager. 
Disclaimer: The views expressed in this article are those of the author. 
Copyright & disclaimer notice: This article was written by [name of the author], Directorate-General Competition, © European Union, [year]. [Reproduction is authorised provided the source 
is acknowledged.]  The views expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the official position of the European Commission. 
 

Document Outline