Dies ist eine HTML Version eines Anhanges der Informationsfreiheitsanfrage 'DG CNECT cabinet meetings with religious lobbyists'.



 
Ref. Ares(2019)3683410 - 07/06/2019
EUROPEAN COMMISSION 
DIRECTORATE-GENERAL FOR COMMUNICATIONS NETWORKS, CONTENT AND 
TECHNOLOGY 
 
 
The Director-General 
 
 
Brussels,  
CONNECT/R4 
 
Mr. Álvaro Merino 
Calle Ricardo Ortiz 61, 1B 
Madrid 
Spain 
 
 
By email only:  
                                                                                xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxx.xxx  
 
Subject: 
Your application for access to documents – GestDem 2019/1526 
 
Dear Mr. Merino, 
We  refer  to  your  access  to  documents  application  submitted  under  Article  2(1)  of 
Regulation 1049/2001 on public access to documents (hereinafter, ‘Regulation 1049/2001’) 
received  on  13/03/2019  and  registered  on  the  same  date  under  the  above  mentioned 
reference number. We also make reference to our request for clarification of 29/03/2019 
(our reference,  Ares(2019)2265266) to  which  you replied on 31/03/2019. We also  refer 
to  our  holding  reply  dated  26/04/2019,  our  reference  Ares(2019)2819347,  whereby  we 
informed  you  that  the  time-limit  for  handling  your  application  was  extended  by  15 
working days pursuant to Article 7(3) of Regulation 1049/2001.  
1.  SCOPE OF YOUR APPLICATION  
By means of your application you requested access to a “…list of lobby meetings held by 
the  commissioner  in  charge  of  Communication  Networks,  Content  and  Technology, 
Mariya Gabriel, the vice-president Andrus Ansip or any other member of its Cabinet with 
any  organisations  representing  churches  and/or  religious  communities  since  2014 
onwards, including all emails, minutes, reports or any other briefing papers related to all 
those meetings
.”  
2.  DOCUMENTS FALLING WITHIN THE SCOPE OF THE REQUEST 
We have identified three documents, comprising several attachments as falling within the 
scope of your application:  
(a)  Document  1:  Email  received  from  the  Representation  office  of  the  church  of 
Greece  to  the  EU  on  08/02/2019  (with  three  accompanying  attachments) 
(Ares(2019)3193565)
 
Commission européenne/Europese Commissie, 1049 Bruxelles/Brussel, BELGIQUE/BELGIË - Tel. +32 22991111 
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xx.xxxxxx.xx 

 
(b) Document  2:  Exchange  of  emails  (as  a  follow  up  to  the  email  in  Document  1) 
between the Commission and the Representation office of the church of Greece to 
the EU (latest email dated 11/02/2019) (Ares(2019)3193351)
 
(c)  Document 3:  Steering brief prepared for Commissioner Mariya  Gabriel  in  view 
of her visit to the Vatican of March 2019 (Ares(2019)3193019)
No documents were found in relation to the part of your request relating to a list of lobby 
meetings  held  by  Commissioner  Gabriel  and  Vice-President  Ansip  or  any  members  of 
their Cabinets with any organisations representing churches and/or religious communities 
since 2014 onwards.  
 
3.  ASSESSMENT UNDER REGULATION 1049/2001 
Having  examined  the  documents  falling  within  the  scope  of  your  request  under  the 
provisions  of  Regulation  1049/2001,  we  have  arrived  at  the  conclusion  that  partial 
disclosure
 can be given for attachments 2 and 3 of Document 1 and to Document 3 on 
the  basis  of  applicable  exceptions  under  Article  4 of  Regulation  1049/2001.  Disclosure  is 
refused with regard to Document 1 and attachment 2 of Document 1 and to Document 2 
in view of applicable exceptions under Article 4 of Regulation 1049/2001.  
 
(i) 
Protection of personal data  
 
The  documents  for  which  you  have  requested  access  contain  personal  data,  in  particular 
names, functions, contact details and signatures.  
Pursuant to Article 4(1)(b) of Regulation 1049/2001, access to a document has to be refused 
if  its  disclosure  would  undermine  the  protection  of  privacy  and  the  integrity  of  the 
individual, in particular in accordance with Community legislation regarding the protection 
of personal data. The applicable legislation in this field is  Regulation  (EU)  2018/1725  of 
the  European  Parliament  and  of  the  Council  of  23  October  2018  on  the  protection  of 
natural  persons  with  regard  to  the  processing  of  personal  data  by  the  Union  institutions, 
bodies,  offices  and  agencies  and  on  the  free  movement  of  such  data,  and  repealing 
Regulation  (EC)  No  45/2001  and  Decision  No  1247/2002/EC1  (hereinafter,  ‘Regulation 
2018/1725’). 
 
Indeed,  Article  3(1)  of  Regulation  2018/1725  provides  that  personal  data  “means  any 
information  relating  to  an  identified  or  identifiable  natural  person  […]
”.  The  Court  of 
Justice has specified that any information, which by reason of its content, purpose or effect, 
is  linked  to  a  particular  person  is  to  be  considered  as  personal  data.2  Please  note  in  this 
respect that the names, signatures, functions, telephone numbers and/or initials pertaining to 
staff 
numbers 
of 
an 
institution 
are 
to 
be 
considered 
personal 
data3. 
 
                                                 
1 Official Journal L 205 of 21.11.2018, p. 39. 
2 Judgment of the Court of Justice of the European Union of 20 December 2017 in Case C-434/16, Peter 
Nowak  v  Data  Protection  Commissioner
,  request  for  a  preliminary  ruling,  paragraphs  33-35, 
ECLI:EU:C:2017:994.     
3  Judgment  of  the  General  Court  of  19  September  2018  in  case  T-39/17,  Port  de Brest  v  Commission, 
paragraphs 43-44, ECLI:EU:T:2018:560. 
 


 
Pursuant  to  Article  9(1)(b)  of  Regulation  2018/1725,  ‘personal  data  shall  only  be 
transmitted to recipients established in the Union other than Union institutions and bodies if  
“[t]he recipient establishes that it is necessary to have the data transmitted for a specific 
purpose in the public interest and the controller, where there is any reason to assume that 
the  data  subject’s  legitimate  interests  might  be  prejudiced,  establishes  that  it  is 
proportionate  to  transmit  the  personal  data  for  that  specific  purpose  after  having 
demonstrably  weighed  the  various  competing  interests
”.  Only  if  these  conditions  are 
fulfilled  and  the  processing  constitutes  lawful  processing  in  accordance  with  the 
requirements  of  Article  5  of  Regulation  2018/1725,  can  the  transmission  of  personal  data 
occur. 
 
According  to  Article  9(1)(b)  of  Regulation  2018/1725,  the  European  Commission  has  to 
examine  the  further  conditions  for  a  lawful  processing  of  personal  data  only  if  the  first 
condition is fulfilled, namely if the recipient has established that it is necessary to have the 
data transmitted for a specific purpose in the public interest. It is only in this case that the 
European  Commission  has  to  examine  whether  there  is  a  reason  to  assume  that  the  data 
subject’s  legitimate  interests  might  be  prejudiced  and,  in  the  affirmative,  establish  the 
proportionality of the transmission of the personal data for that specific purpose after having 
demonstrably weighed the various competing interests. 
 
In your request, you do not put forward any arguments to establish the necessity to have the 
data  transmitted  for  a  specific  purpose  in  the  public  interest.  Therefore,  the  European 
Commission  does  not  have  to  examine  whether  there  is  a  reason  to  assume  that  the  data 
subject’s legitimate interests might be prejudiced. 
 
Notwithstanding the above, please note that there are reasons to assume that the legitimate 
interests of the data subjects concerned would be prejudiced by disclosure of the personal 
data reflected in the document, as there is a real and non-hypothetical risk that such public 
disclosure would harm their privacy and subject them to unsolicited external contacts.  
 
Consequently,  we  conclude  that,  pursuant  to  Article  4(1)(b)  of  Regulation  (EC)  No 
1049/2001,  access  cannot  be  granted  to  the  personal  data,  as  the  need  to  obtain  access 
thereto for a purpose in the public interest has not been substantiated and there is no reason 
to think that the legitimate interests of the individuals concerned would not be prejudiced by 
disclosure of  the  personal  data  concerned.  As  to the  signatures,  which  are biometric data, 
there  is  a  risk  that  their  disclosure  would  prejudice  the  legitimate  interests  of  the  persons 
concerned. In light of the foregoing, we are disclosing a version of the document requested 
in which this data has been redacted and marked as personal data.  
In light of this exception we are disclosing a version of attachments 2 and 3 to Document 
1
 and Document 3 in which this data has been redacted and marked as personal data. With 
regard to Document 3, further redactions are made in view of other applicable exceptions 
which  will  be  explained  hereunder.  Personal  data  is  also  contained  in  Document  1
attachment  1  to  the  same  document  and  Document  2.  However,  disclosure  of  these 
documents is being refused entirely also on the basis of other applicable exceptions, as will 
be explained hereunder.  
Please note that attachments 2 and 3 to Document 1 originate from a third party. They are 
disclosed  for  information  only  and  cannot  be  re-used  without  the  agreement  of  the 
originator,  who  holds  a  copyright  on  them.  They  do  not  reflect  the  position  of  the 
Commission and cannot be quoted as such.  
 


 
Document  3  is  a  document  produced  by  the  Commission.  You  may  reuse  the  document 
requested  free  of  charge  for  non-commercial  and  commercial  purposes  provided  that  the 
source  is  acknowledged,  that  you  do  not  distort  the  original  meaning  or  message  of  the 
document.  Please  note  that  the  Commission  does  not  assume  liability  stemming  from  the 
reuse.  
(ii) 
Protection of commercial interests  
 
Article  4(2),  first  indent  of  Regulation  1049/2001  stipulates  that  “[t]he  institutions  shall 
refuse  access  to  a  document  where  disclosure  would  undermine  the  protection  of 
commercial  interests  of  a  natural  or  legal  person,  including  intellectual  property
,  […] 
unless there is an overriding public interest in disclosure.”  
 
Following an examination of Document 1 and attachment 1 to the same document, we 
have come to the conclusion that these contains commercially sensitive information of the 
Representation of the Church of Greece to the European Union which are protected by the 
aforementioned  exception  under  Article  4(2),  first  indent  of  Regulation  1049/2001. 
Disclosure  of  this  information  could  seriously  affect  the  commercial  interests  of  the  third 
party involved. We consider that there is a real and non-hypothetical risk that public access 
to the above-mentioned documents would undermine the commercial interests of the third 
party concerned.  
 
In  accordance  with  Article  4(6)  of  Regulation  1049/2001,  we  have  considered  whether 
partial access could be granted for Document 1 and attachment 1 to the same document
However,  no  meaningful  partial  access  is  possible  without  undermining  the  interests 
described above. Disclosure of the document cannot therefore be granted.  
 
The exceptions laid down under Article 4(2) of Regulation 1049/2001 apply unless there is 
an overriding public interest in disclosure of the documents. Such an interest must, firstly, 
be  a  public  interest  and,  secondly  outweigh  the  harm  caused  by  disclosure.  We  have 
examined whether there could be an overriding public interest in disclosure but we have not 
been able to identify such an interest.  
 
(iii) 
Protection of international relations  
 
Article  4(1)(a),  third  indent  of  Regulation  1049/2001  stipulates that  access to  a  document 
shall be refused “…where disclosure would undermine the protection of the public interests 
as regards international relations
”.  
 
According  to  settled  case-law,  "the  particularly  sensitive  and  essential  nature  of  the 
interests protected by Article 4(1)(a) of Regulation No 1049/2001, combined with the fact 
that  access  must  be  refused  by  the  institution,  under  that  provision,  if  disclosure  of  a 
document  to  the  public  would  undermine  those  interests,  confers  on  the decision  which 
must thus be adopted by the institution a complex and delicate nature which calls for the 
exercise  of  particular  care.  Such  a  decision  therefore  requires  a  margin  of 
appreciation".4  
In  this  context,  the  Court  of  Justice  has  acknowledged  that  the 
institutions  enjoy  "a  wide  discretion  for  the  purpose  of  determining  whether  the 
disclosure of documents relating to the fields covered by [the] exceptions [under Article 
4(1)(a)] could undermine the public interest"5. 

                                                 
4 Judgment in Sison v Council, C-266/05 P, EU:C:2007:75, paragraph 36. 
5 Judgment in Council v Sophie in’t Veld, C-350/12 P, EU:C:2014:2039, paragraph 63.  
 



 
 
Document 3 is a briefing prepared for Commissioner Mariya Gabriel in view of a visit to 
the  Vatican  on  27/03/2019.  Following  an  examination  of  this  document  we  consider  that 
partial access can be given in view of the fact that parts of this briefing are covered by the 
aforementioned exception under Article 4(1)(a), third indent of Regulation 1049/2001.  
 
More  specifically,  parts  of  this  briefing  contain  background  information  concerning  the 
Church’s  views  on  various  policy  areas,  divergences  in  the  positions  of  the  EU  and  the 
Church in this regard, background information concerning the relationship of the EU with 
the  Vatican  along  the  years  etc.  The  information  included  in  this  briefing  was  in  general 
meant  for  internal  use  as  a  basis  to  prepare  for  the  Commissioner’s  visit  to  the  Vatican. 
There is a concrete risk that the public disclosure of some parts of this briefing would affect 
the mutual trust between the EU and the Vatican and thus undermine their relations. As the 
Court  recognised  in  Case  T-301/10  in’t  Veld  v  Commission,  “[…]  establishing  and 
protecting a sphere of mutual trust in the context of international relations is a very delicate 
exercise
”6. 
 
We  are  therefore  disclosing  a  version  of  this  document  with  redacted  parts  marked  as 
protected on the basis of the protection of international relations under Article 4(1)(a), third 
indent of Regulation 1049/2001.  
You may reuse the document requested free of charge for non-commercial and commercial 
purposes  provided  that  the  source  is  acknowledged,  that  you  do  not  distort  the  original 
meaning  or  message  of  the  document.  Please  note  that  the  Commission  does  not  assume 
liability stemming from the reuse.  
4.  POSSIBILITY OF CONFIRMATORY APPLICATION 
 
In  accordance  with  Article  7(2)  of  Regulation  1049/2001,  you  are  entitled  to  make  a 
confirmatory application requesting the Commission to review the above positions.  
 
Such a confirmatory application should be addressed within 15 working days upon receipt 
of this letter to the Secretary-General of the Commission at the following address: 
 
European Commission 
Secretariat-General 
Unit C.1. ‘Transparency, Document Management and Access to Documents’  
BERL 7/076 
1049 Bruxelles    
or by email to: xxxxxxxxxx@xx.xxxxxx.xx 
Yours sincerely, 
  (e-Signed) 
Roberto Viola  
Enclosures: 3   
                                                 
6 Judgment in Sophie in’t Veld v Commission, T-301/10, EU:T:2013:135, paragraph 126. 
 

Electronically signed on 07/06/2019 15:16 (UTC+02) in accordance with article 4.2 (Validity of electronic documents) of Commission Decision 2004/563