Esta es la versión HTML de un fichero adjunto a una solicitud de acceso a la información 'Meetings between Neighbourhood and Churches'.



 
Ref. Ares(2019)4334172 - 08/07/2019
EUROPEAN COMMISSION 
 
 
 
NEIGHBOURHOOD AND ENLARGEMENT NEGOTIATIONS 
 
 
  The Director-General 
 
Brussels,  
 
 
By registered letter 
 
Subject: 
Your application for access to documents – Ref GestDem 2019/2158 
 
Dear Ms Martí, 
 
I refer to your application dated 8 April 20191 in which you make a request for access to 
documents, registered on 8 April 2019 under the above-mentioned reference number.2  
 
You request access to: 
 
‘A complete of list of all meetings held by any member of your team/staff with 
churches, religious associations or communities, as well as with philosophical and 
non-confessional  organisations,  from  1  January  2014  onwards,  specifying  the 
status  of  the  organization  (church,  religious  association  or  community, 
philosophical  association  or  non-confessional  association).  All  documents, 
including  all  emails,  minutes,  reports  or  other  documents  received  or  drawn  up 
before, during or after the meetings, and any other briefing papers related to these 
meetings.’ 
 
 
 
 
                                                 
1 Ref. Ares(2019)2457001 
2 Ref. Ares(2019)2458054 
 
 
Ms. Martí Josefina 
Calle de Juan Bravo 62  
Madrid 28006 
Spain 
 
 
Advance copy by email:  
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxx.xxx 
 
Commission européenne/Europese Commissie, 1049 Bruxelles/Brussel, BELGIQUE/BELGIË — Tel. +32 22991111 
 
 
 

 
The following meetings fall within the scope of the description provided in your request: 
 
Commission Staff Member 
Organisation / Community 
Date 
1.  Head of Unit 
Serbian Orthodox Church 
14 September 2015, Brussels 
Montenegro DG 
NEAR 
2.  Head of Unit 
Bektashi Community of  
18 November 2015, Brussels 
Kosovo*, North 
North Macedonia (Official 
Macedonia DG 
Representative) 
NEAR 
3.  Director General DG 
Archbishop Alain Paul 
18 October 2016, Brussels 
NEAR – Christian 
Lebeaupin (Apostolic nuncio 
Danielsson 
to the European Union) 
4.  Deputy Director 
Georgian Orthodox Church 
9 November 2016, Brussels 
General DG NEAR – 
Katarina Mathernova 
5.  Deputy Director 
Georgian Orthodox Church 
December 2016, Tbilisi 
General DG NEAR – 
Katarina Mathernova 
6.  Deputy Director 
Georgian Orthodox Church 
23 February 2017, Brussels 
General DG NEAR- 
Katarina Maternova 
7.  Director D Western 
Representatives of all 
9 March 2017, Lipljan 
Balkans DG NEAR – 
religious communities 
Genoveva Ruiz 
(Kosovo*) 
Calavera 
8.  Director General DG 
Serbian Patriarch Irinej 
12 October 2017, Belgrade 
NEAR – Christian 
Danielsson 
9.  Director General DG  Director of AJC Transatlantic 
24 October 2017, Brussels 
NEAR – Christian 
Institute 
Danielsson 
10. Head of Unit Western 
Serbian Catholic Church 
14 June 2018, Brussels 
Balkans Regional 
Cooperation and 
Programmes DG 
NEAR 
11. Head of Unit 
Serbian Orthodox Church 
19 March 2019, Brussels 
Montenegro DG 
NEAR 
                                                 
* This designation is without prejudice to positions on the status, and in line with UNSCR 1244/1999 and 
the ICJ Opinion on the Kosovo declaration of independence (Ares (2017)6346879).  


 
12. Director D Western 
Grand Mufti of Bosnia and 
21 March 2019, Sarajevo 
Balkans DG NEAR – 
Herzegovina (Husein 
Genoveva Ruiz 
Kavazović) 
Calavera 
13. Deputy Director 
Melkite Greek Catholic 
3 April 2019, Brussels 
General DG NEAR – 
Archeparchy of Zahle and 
Maciej Popowski 
Forzol (Archbishop Issam 
John Darwich) 
 
The following documents were produced from the above-mentioned meetings: 
 
A.  Briefing on meeting 3; 
B.  Briefing on meeting 4; 
C.  Email exchange in relation to planning of meeting 6; 
D.  Email exchange in relation to planning of meeting 6; 
E.  Email exchange in relation to meeting 6; 
F.  List of participants to meeting 6; 
G.  Briefing on meeting 6; 
H.  Tweet on meeting 7 by EU Office / EU Special representative in Kosovo; 
I.  Report on meeting 10;  
J.  Briefing and report on meeting 8; 
K.  Briefing on meeting 9; 
L.  Meeting request in relation to meeting 11; 
M.  Short informal briefing on meeting 11; 
N.  Speech by Director D DG NEAR during meeting 12; 
O.  Internal Commission press release regarding meeting 13; 
P.  Meeting request in relation to meeting 13.  
 
Having  examined  the  documents  that  you  requested  under  the  provisions  of  Regulation 
(EC) No 1049/20013, I have come to the following conclusions: 
 

Document H is already public and you can access it at:  
https://twitter.com/eukosovo/status/839819452564795393?lang=en  

Documents N and O can be fully disclosed; 

Documents  C,  D,  E,  F,  L  and  P  can  be  disclosed  subject  to  redaction  of  personal 
data  based  on  Article  4(1)(b)  (protection  of  the  privacy  and  integrity  of  the 
individual), redaction of data whose disclosure could undermine the public interest 
as regards international relations based on Article 4(1)(a) third indent (international 
relations), and Article 4(6) (partial access) of the Regulation; 

Access must be fully refused to documents A, B, G, I, J, K and M based on Article 
4(1)(a), third indent (protection of international relations) of the Regulation. Unlike 
the  documents  mentioned  previously,  no  meaningful  partial  access  is  possible 
herein without undermining the interests in question. 
 
The justifications are as follows. 
 
1.  Protection of the public interest as regards international relations  
 
                                                 
3 Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 30 May 2001 regarding 
public access to European Parliament, Council and Commission documents, Official Journal L 145 of 31 
May 2001, p. 43. 


 
Article 4(1)(a), third indent, of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 provides that the ‘institutions 
shall refuse access to a document where disclosure would undermine the protection of […] 
the public interest as regards […] international relations […]’.  
 
As per settled case-law, disclosure of European Union positions in international negotiations 
can  damage  the  protection  of  the  public  interest  as  regards  international  relations.4  The 
above-mentioned  exception  can  be  invoked  if  the  disclosure  might  entail  negative 
repercussions for the European Union’s relations with third countries.5  
 
Furthermore, the Court of Justice stressed in the In ‘t Veld ruling that the institutions ‘must 
be  recognised  as  enjoying  a  wide  discretion  for  the  purpose  of  determining  whether  the 
disclosure  of  documents  relating  to  the  fields  covered  by  [the  exceptions  provided  for  in 
Article 4(1)(a) of Regulation 1049/2001] could undermine the public interest’.6 
 
Consequently,  ‘the  Court’s  review  of  the  legality  of  the  institutions’  decisions  refusing 
access  to  documents  on  the  basis  of  the  mandatory  exception  […]  relating  to  the  public 
interest  must  be  limited  to  verifying  whether  the  procedural  rules  and  the  duty  to  state 
reasons have been complied with, the facts have been accurately stated, and whether there 
has been a manifest error of assessment of the facts or a misuse of powers’.7  
 
The documents identified under the scope of your request have been examined in light of 
the  above-mentioned  case-law.  These  documents  concern  matters  of  international 
negotiations  between  the  European  Union  and  partner,  EU  candidate,  or  potential  EU 
candidate countries  on a broad range of topics, such as enlargement process, security and 
economics.  
 
In  particular,  documents  A,  B,  G,  I,  J,  K  and  M  contain  ‘briefing’  notes  and  reports 
reflecting  preliminary  views  of  Commission  staff  members  regarding  these  matters.  They 
also contain sensitive comments regarding the current state of play in the relevant countries.  
 
Public  access  to  the  documents  concerned  would  reveal,  even  indirectly,  the  Union’s 
opinions  on  ongoing  discussion  topics  with  the  relevant  countries.  This  would,  in  turn, 
undermine the position of the European Union in the context of negotiations and discussions 
with these countries, which are not finalised.  
 
Furthermore,  the  disclosure  of  the  above-referred  information  would  negatively  affect  the 
relations with the countries in question, as it would undermine the climate of mutual trust in 
the  context  of  ongoing  discussions  and  negotiations,  which  is  necessary  to  ensure  the 
smooth implementation of the provisions of the different agreements signed with them. 
 
Against  this  background,  there  is  a  risk  that  disclosure  of  the  documents  would  have  an 
adverse impact on ongoing negotiation procedures and would compromise the position of 
the European Union in these discussions. I consider this risk as reasonably foreseeable and 
non-hypothetical, given the sensitivity of the issue and the relevance of the above-referred 
information in the ongoing negotiations.  
 
                                                 
4 Judgment of 19 March 2013, In ‘t Veld v European Commission, T-301/10, paragraph 123. 
5 Judgment of 7 February 2002, Aldo Kuijer v Council of the European Union, T-211/00, paragraph 65. 
6 Judgment of 3 July 2014, Council v In ‘t Veld, C-350/12, paragraph 63. 
7 Judgment of 25 April 2007, WWF European Policy Programme v Council, T-264/04, paragraph 40. 


 
Consequently,  I  must  conclude  that  the  documents  are  protected  against  public disclosure 
pursuant to the exception provided for in Article 4(1)(a), third indent, of Regulation (EC) 
No 1049/2001.  
 
2.  Protection of the privacy and the integrity of the individual 
 
Pursuant to Article 4(1)(b) of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001, access to a document has to 
be refused if its disclosure would undermine the protection of privacy and the integrity of 
the  individual,  in  particular  in  accordance  with  European  Union  legislation  regarding  the 
protection of personal data. 
 
The  applicable  legislation  in  this  field  is  Regulation  (EU)  2018/1725  of  the  European 
Parliament and of the Council of 23 October 2018 on the protection of natural persons with 
regard  to  the  processing  of  personal  data  by  the  Union  institutions,  bodies,  offices  and 
agencies and on the free movement of such data, and repealing Regulation (EC) No 45/2001 
and Decision No 1247/2002/EC8 (‘Regulation 2018/1725’). 
 
The documents to which you request access contain personal data, in particular names and 
surnames, and email addresses.  
 
Indeed,  Article  3(1)  of  Regulation  2018/1725  provides  that  personal  data  ‘means  any 
information relating to an identified or identifiable natural person […]’. The Court of Justice 
has  specified  that  any  information,  which  by  reason  of  its  content,  purpose  or  effect,  is 
linked to a particular person is to be considered as personal data.9  
 
In this respect, names, signatures, functions, telephone numbers and/or initials pertaining to 
staff members of the Commission below the level of Director are to be considered personal 
data.10 By analogy, and to the extent that concerns your request, names of persons who are 
not public figures, such as lower church officials, are also to be considered personal data.  
 
In its judgment in Case C-28/08 P (Bavarian Lager)11, the Court of Justice ruled that when a 
request  is  made  for  access  to  documents  containing  personal  data,  the  Data  Protection 
Regulation becomes fully applicable.12 
 
Pursuant  to  Article  9(1)(b)  of  Regulation  2018/1725,  ‘personal  data  shall  only  be 
transmitted to recipients established in the Union other than Union institutions and bodies if 
‘[t]he  recipient  establishes  that  it  is  necessary  to  have  the  data  transmitted  for  a  specific 
purpose in the public interest and the controller, where there is any reason to assume that the 
data subject’s legitimate interests might be prejudiced, establishes that it is proportionate to 
                                                 
8 Official Journal L 205 of 21.11.2018, p. 39. 
9 Judgment of the Court of Justice of the European Union of 20 December 2017 in Case  C-434/16, Peter 
Nowak  v  Data  Protection  Commissioner,  request  for  a  preliminary  ruling,  paragraphs  33-35, 
ECLI:EU:C:2017:994.     
10  Judgment  of  the  General  Court  of  19  September  2018  in  case  T-39/17,  Port  de  Brest  v  Commission, 
paragraphs 43-44, ECLI:EU:T:2018:560. 
11 Judgment of 29 June  2010 in Case  C 28/08 P, European Commission  v The  Bavarian  Lager Co. Ltd, 
EU:C:2010:378, paragraph 59. 
12 Whereas this judgment specifically related to Regulation (EC) No 45/2001 of the European Parliament 
and of the Council of 18 December 2000 on the protection of individuals with regard to the processing 
of personal data by the Community institutions and bodies and on the free movement of such data, the 
principles  set  out  therein  are  also  applicable  under  the  new  data  protection  regime  established  by 
Regulation 2018/1725. 



 
transmit the personal data for that specific purpose after having demonstrably weighed the 
various competing interests’.  
 
Only  if  these  conditions  are  fulfilled  and  the  processing  constitutes  lawful  processing  in 
accordance  with  the  requirements  of  Article  5  of  Regulation  2018/1725,  can  the 
transmission of personal data occur.  
 
According  to  Article  9(1)(b)  of  Regulation  2018/1725,  the  European  Commission  has  to 
examine  the  further  conditions  for  a  lawful  processing  of  personal  data  only  if  the  first 
condition is fulfilled, namely if the recipient has established that it is necessary to have the 
data transmitted for a specific purpose in the public interest. It is only in this case that the 
European  Commission  has  to  examine  whether  there  is  a  reason  to  assume  that  the  data 
subject’s  legitimate  interests  might  be  prejudiced  and,  in  the  affirmative,  establish  the 
proportionality of the transmission of the personal data for that specific purpose after having 
demonstrably weighed the various competing interests.  
 
In your request, you do not put forward any arguments to establish the necessity to have the 
data  transmitted  for  a  specific  purpose  in  the  public  interest.  Therefore,  the  European 
Commission  does  not  have  to  examine  whether  there  is  a  reason  to  assume  that  the  data 
subject’s legitimate interests might be prejudiced. 
 
Notwithstanding the above, please note that there are reasons to assume that the legitimate 
interests of the data subjects concerned would be prejudiced by disclosure of the personal 
data reflected in the documents, as there is a real and non-hypothetical risk that such public 
disclosure would harm their privacy.  
 
Consequently,  I  conclude  that,  pursuant  to  Article  4(1)(b)  of  Regulation  (EC)  No 
1049/2001,  access  cannot  be  granted  to  the  personal  data,  as  the  need  to  obtain  access 
thereto for a purpose in the public interest has not been substantiated and there is no reason 
to think that the legitimate interests of the individuals concerned would not be prejudiced by 
disclosure of the personal data concerned. 
 
3.  Means of redress 
In  accordance  with  Article  7(2)  of  Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001,  you  are  entitled  to 
make a confirmatory application requesting the Commission to review its position. Such 
a confirmatory application should be addressed within 15 working days upon receipt of this 
letter to the Secretary-General of the Commission at the following address: 
European Commission 
Secretary-General 
Transparency unit SG-C-1 
BERL 7/076 
B-1049 Bruxelles/Brussel 
 
or by email to: xxxxxxxxxx@xx.xxxxxx.xx 
 
Yours sincerely, 
[e-signed] 
Christian Danielsson 

Electronically signed on 05/07/2019 23:10 (UTC+02) in accordance with article 4.2 (Validity of electronic documents) of Commission Decision 2004/563