Dies ist eine HTML Version eines Anhanges der Informationsfreiheitsanfrage 'Public procurement'.



 
Ref. Ares(2020)1091415 - 20/02/2020
EUROPEAN COMMISSION 
DIRECTORATE-GENERAL FOR INTERNAL MARKET, INDUSTRY, ENTREPRENEURSHIP 
AND SMES 
Single Market for Public Administrations 
  Public Procurement Strategy 
Brussels,  
GROW.G.1/
 
NOTE FOR THE FILE 
Subject: 
Mission to Berlin on 22 October 2019 – presentation of Guidance on 
the participation of third-country bidders to Federation of German 
Industries (Bundesverband der Deutschen Industrie BDI) 

 
On 22 October 2019, I travelled to Berlin to the headquarters of the Federation of 
German Industries (BDI) to give a presentation on the Guidance on third-country 
participation to the BDI’s public procurement committee. I had been invited speak before 
the committee by Mr 
 from the BDI following our joint participation in the 
panel on the “international aspects of public procurement” at the forum vergabe 
conference in Fulda in September 2019.  
As was already the case at the forum vergabe conference, the participants expressed their 
generally favourable view for the Guidance. The general view is that the Guidance has 
brought welcome clarification with regard to the interpretation of the PP Directives and 
the question of access of third-country bidders.  
Following the  presentation, the committee members asked a number of questions 
regarding the Guidance, but also more general questions regarding the IPI and the 
international aspects of public procurement. In general, there was a strong interest about 
the IPI, in particular about the current state-of-play and the time-table. I explained that an 
adoption by the end of 2019 (as announced in the China communication) was not likely.  
The questions asked related, in particular, on the relationship between the provision in 
Article 25 of Directive 2014/24/EU and the IPI. I explained that the Guidance and the IPI 
are complementary, and that the Guidance provides for the possibility to “exclude” 
economic operators, whereas the IPI  is  primarily  a market opening tool that aims at 
encouraging further market opening through GPA/FTA negotiation and goes further than 
Article 25 of Directive 2014/24/EU.  Furthermore, there were questions on whether the 
rule in Article 85 of Directive 2014/25/EU will be deleted following the adoption of the 
IPI (2016 proposal foresees this deletion). It appears that most committee members are 
against such deletion and that Article 85 should be kept as a means to impose pressure.  
 
Commission européenne/Europese Commissie, 1049 Bruxelles/Brussel, BELGIQUE/BELGIË - Tel. +32 22991111 
 
 
 


 
Another issue that was raised was whether,  in relation to the procurement of projects 
financed with EU structural funds, it was envisaged to amend the rules so that non-EU 
bidders originating in a “non-reciprocity country” could be excluded. The committee 
member asking this question expressly referred to the example of the Pelješac bridge in 
Croatia.  
Furthermore, Mr 
 stated that the clarifications in the Guidance on the rules 
regarding abnormally low tenders are welcome.  He stressed, however, that from the 
viewpoint of the BDI, these are not sufficient, and that further measures are necessary to 
address the problems arising from the participation of bidders benefiting from foreign 
subsidies.  
 
 

Electronically signed on 20/02/2020 15:55 (UTC+01) in accordance with article 4.2 (Validity of electronic documents) of Commission Decision 2004/563