Esta es la versión HTML de un fichero adjunto a una solicitud de acceso a la información 'European Parliament liaison offices'.


 
 
 
___________________________________________________________________________ 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

INFORMATION ON THE BUDGETARY AND 
THE FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT OF THE 
EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT IN 2018 
 
AND 
 
REPLIES TO THE QUESTIONNAIRE IN 
PREPARATION FOR THE  
EP DISCHARGE FOR 2018 
 
 
 
 
Page 1 of 91 
 

link to page 3 link to page 3 link to page 3 link to page 5 link to page 16 link to page 29 link to page 36 link to page 36 link to page 43 link to page 51 link to page 52 link to page 54 link to page 64 link to page 81 link to page 86 link to page 89 Table of Contents 
 
Introduction.......................................................................................................................... 3 
BUDGET OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT IN 2018 ............................................ 3 
MAIN CHARACTERISTICS AND IMPORTANT EVENTS OF 2018 ........................ 3 

GENERAL CONTEXT ......................................................................................................... 5 
COMMUNICATION ........................................................................................................... 16 
INTERPRETATION............................................................................................................ 29 
ACCREDITED 
PARLIAMENTARY 
ASSISTANTS 
(APA) 
AND 
LOCAL 
ASSISTANTS ...................................................................................................................... 36 
STAFF.................................................................................................................................. 43 
POLITICAL GROUPS, PARTIES AND FOUNDATIONS ............................................... 51 
WHISTLEBLOWING AND HARASSMENT ................................................................... 52 
INFRASTRUCTURE AND LOGISTICS ........................................................................... 54 
FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATION ............................................................................... 64 
DELEGATIONS AND MISSIONS .................................................................................... 81 
SECURITY AND SAFETY ................................................................................................ 86 
GREEN PARLIAMENT ..................................................................................................... 89 
 
 
 
Page 2 of 91 
 

Introduction 
This  document  presents  the  answers  by  the  Secretary-General  to  the  questions  tabled  by 
Members  of  the  Committee  on  Budgetary  Control  in  the  preparation  to  the  decision  on  the 
European Parliament’s discharge for budgetary and financial management of the year 2018.  
 
In this context, the following introduction gives an overview of the main characteristics  and 
important events of the year 2018 and Parliament’s use made of financial resources.  
BUDGET OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT IN 2018 
Parliament's final appropriations for 2018 totalled EUR 1 950 687 373, or 18.9% of heading 5 
of the Multiannual Financial Framework1. In 2018, 99.2% of the final budget was committed 
and only 0.8% (EUR 16 209 746) had to be cancelled. 
 
This  excellent  result  could  be  achieved  thanks  to  a  combination  of  a  very  high  degree  of 
implementation of the budget as requested by the financial authorities on the one hand and an 
end of the year transfer of EUR 29.0 Mio of unspent funds following a positive opinion by the 
Committee on Budgets, so as to help fund the construction of the new ADENAUER Building, 
which is the main construction project in Luxembourg. As a result of this an estimated EUR 
4.7 Mio in financing charges will be saved over the construction period and loan amortisation 
period. Without this end of the year transfer, 97.7% of the final budget had been committed. 
 
In  2018  four  chapters  accounted  for  67.6%  of  total  commitments.  Those  chapters  were 
Chapter 10 ‘Members of the institution’, Chapter 12 ‘Officials and temporary staff’, Chapter 
20  ‘Buildings  and  associated  costs’  and  Chapter  42  ‘Expenditure  relating  to  parliamentary 
assistance’. 
MAIN CHARACTERISTICS AND IMPORTANT EVENTS OF 2018  
In 2018, legislative activity substantially increased as Parliament was approaching the end of 
its 2014 - 2019 legislative term. Legislative work was to a high degree shaped by the dossiers 
of the Joint Declaration. The new Joint Declaration on the EU’s legislative priorities for 2018-
2019, signed in December 2017, combined unfinished files from the 2017 Joint Declaration 
and added new ones. 
Two  temporary  committees,  TERR  (Special  Committee  on  Terrorism)  and  PEST  (Special 
Committee  on  the  EU  authorisation  procedure  for  pesticides),  successfully  concluded  their 
work  during  the  year  and  a  third  one,  TAX3  (Special  Committee  on  Financial  Crimes,  Tax 
Evasion and Tax Avoidance), was started. The rapid setting-up and staffing of this temporary 
committee  was  a  considerable  challenge  due  to  the  extra  coordination  efforts  and  work  as 
regards staffing, offices and other organisational issues. 
The  Brexit  preparation  continued  to  have  a  considerable  impact  on  committee  secretariats, 
research units and horizontal services of Parliament’s political Directorates General. 
In  view  of  the  2019  elections,  the  communication  campaign  was  launched  and  the  related 
financial commitments were established in 2018. 
                                                 
1  
Council Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 1311/2013 of 2 December 2013 laying down the 
Multiannual Financial Framework for the years 2014-2020 (OJ L 347, 20.12.2013, p. 884) 
Page 3 of 91 
 

Measures  of  the  institution  to  enhance  security  continued  in  2018,  notably  in  matters  of 
physical and building security but also cyber- and communication security.  
The rationalisation and modernisation of key areas of Parliament’s Administration continued 
(building  policy  -  notably  with  the  adoption  of  the  Building  Strategy  beyond  2019  in  April 
2018; IT modernisation; environmental policy and staff policy). 
The MARTENS Building project in Brussels was completed in 2018. The building provides 
office space for about 1 000 persons and is a key element for the major renovations planned in 
Brussels in the coming years. 
The reconstruction of the MONTOYER 63 building in Brussels was also completed and put in 
use in May 2019. 
The  ADENAUER  project  constitutes  the  main  axis  of  Parliament’s  property  policy  in 
Luxembourg. The new ADENAUER building will consolidate activities in Luxembourg in one 
building  complex  with  a  view  to  rationalising  costs.  Overall  completion  of  the  works  is 
scheduled for end of June 2023. Following the Bureau decision of 6 July 2015, the decision on 
the future of the old ADENAUER building was left for the beginning of the current term. As 
in previous years, the Committee on Budgets authorised in 2018 a mopping-up transfer for the 
pre-financing of the project. This transfer amounted to EUR 29 million. 
The European Parliament uses the Eco-Management and Audit Scheme (EMAS), which is a 
management instrument of the European Union for private and public organisations to evaluate 
and  improve  their  environmental  performance  in  accordance  with  the  EMAS  Regulation 
1221/2009.  The  European  Parliament  is  EMAS-registered  at  all  three  places  of  work  since 
December  2007.  The  2018  EMAS  action  plan  was  successfully  implemented  and  several 
communication and awareness-raising activities, such as the “Plastic free event” took place. 
In  2018,  the  IT  modernisation  continued  with  the  renewal  of  obsolete  hardware  and  an 
important  number  of  strategic  projects  in  the  areas  e-Parliament,  mobile  environment  for 
Members and staff and the renewal of the Financial Management System.  
When the Staff Regulations of Officials were revised and the 2014-2020 Multiannual Financial 
Framework  (MFF)  was  adopted,  an  interinstitutional  agreement  was  concluded  in  which 
provision was made for reducing posts on each institution’s establishment plan by 1% annually 
over five  years. Due to  specific new needs arising within Parliament, measures to  cut  posts 
were  extended  for  a  further  year  until  2019.  For  2018,  60  posts  were  abolished  in  the 
establishment plan. 
 
 
 
 
Page 4 of 91 
 

REPLIES TO THE QUESTIONNAIRE IN 
PREPARATION FOR THE  
EP DISCHARGE FOR 2018 
 
 
GENERAL CONTEXT 
 
1. 
In  the  context  of  the  discharge,  there  is  a  difference  between  what  is  adopted  by  the 
plenary and what is eventually carried out by the Bureau. Can the Secretary-General give an 
overview of the points on which the Bureau did not implement what was adopted in last year´s 
discharge resolution, as well as during the 2014-2019 legislature? 
 
1. 
The 2017 discharge resolution as adopted by the Plenary on 26 March 2019 asks the 
Bureau to take action on the main following issues:  
 
provide the Committee on Budgets with all documents related to the building policy; reconsider 
the  possibility  for  APAs,  under  certain  conditions,  to  accompany  Members  on  official 
Parliament’s delegations and missions; generalise the reimbursement based on bills for visitors 
groups and to delete the possibility to appoint APAs as head of groups; swiftly adopt new rules 
for Members’ trainees which should enter into force at the beginning of the 9th legislature; 
implement  a  higher  number  of  women  in  senior  posts  of  the  Parliament’s  administration; 
immediately resume discussions about GEA, reconvene its working group and make additional 
changes  concerning  GEA;  request  the  Court  to  produce  another  opinion  on  the  (voluntary) 
pension scheme and fund in 2019 as well as establish a clear plan for the Parliament assuming 
and taking over its obligations for its Members’ voluntary pension scheme immediately after 
the 2019 elections; ensure the smooth running of parliamentary activities in the case of system 
damages or blackouts. 
 
As recalled in previous discharge replies, the Bureau and the Conference of Presidents are the 
responsible bodies for matters assigned to them under Parliament’s Rules of Procedure. Based 
on proposals submitted by the Secretary-General they already considered or are in the process 
of considering the majority of items described above. More concretely:  
 
-  Parliament’s  building  strategy  was  approved  by  the  Bureau  on  16  April  2018  and 
transmitted to the Committee on Budgets for information on 9 July 2018. Moreover, for all 
new  building  projects  likely  to  have  significant  financial  implications  for  the  budget,  the 
Parliament submits to the Committee on Budgets all relevant documentation as foreseen in 
article 266 of the Financial Regulation. 
 
-  As  indicated  in  the  reply  to  Question  5  of  the  Questionnaire  in  preparation  for  the  EP 
discharge  for  2017,  regarding  the  possibility  for  APAs,  at  certain  conditions  to  be  set,  to 
accompany Members in official Parliament delegations, the Conference of Presidents and 
the Bureau took a political decision not allowing APAs to accompany Members on official 
Parliament Delegations and Missions. It falls under the remit of these two bodies to decide 
whether to reconsider this decision. 
 
 
 
 

-  The rules for groups of visitors sponsored by Members were last revised by the Bureau in 
October  2016.  Based  on  these  rules,  the  Heads  of  groups  are  required  to  keep  all  the 
supporting financial documents for a period of three years. Ex-post controls are performed 
on a sample of groups and the Heads of groups have to present all invoices related to the 
expenditure they have declared. Moreover, the revised rules have introduced the possibility 
for  Members  to  designate  either  a  paying  agent  or  a  travel  agency  to  hold  the  financial 
responsibility for the group, as an alternative to an APA or a member of the group. Since the 
introduction of the revised rules, the percentage of groups with an APA as Head of group 
has sharply decreased compared to previous years. 
 
-  The  new  rules  concerning  Members’  trainees  have  been  adopted  by  the  Bureau  on  10 
December 2018 and entered into force on 2 July 2019. 
 
- In January 2017, the Bureau adopted the Papadimoulis Report on Gender Equality in the 
European Parliament Secretariat - State of play and the way forward 2017-2019. The report 
sets targets for women Heads of Unit (40%), women Directors (35%) and women Directors-
General  (30%).  Additionally,  it  introduces  targets  by  DGs  for  women  Heads  of  Unit  and 
women Directors (30% each). In May 2017, the High Level Group on Gender Equality and 
Diversity (HLG) adopted a Roadmap which outlined how the report shall be implemented 
between 2017 and 2019.  
The representation of women among Directors-General remained stable at two in absolute 
numbers during the period 2017 to 2018. By the end of 2018 the percentage was 18.2%.  
Specific  emphasis  was  put  on  the  appointment  of  women  Directors,  thus  with  34% 
approaching the target at the end of 2018 compared to 30% in 2017. There were several new 
appointments  in  the  first  semester  of  2019.  As  a  result,  the  number  of  women  directors 
increased to 37% in the beginning of 2019 and therefore clearly topped the overall target of 
35% for 2019.  
The ratio of women Heads of Unit appointed by the Secretary-General has increased as well 
(34% at the end of 2017 to 38% at the end of 2018). It should be noted that in October 2019, 
this ratio has reached 39%. This illustrates the efficiency of the Secretary-General’s notes 
requiring that in every Head of Unit recruitment procedure, if possible, at least one female 
candidate should be proposed. 
 
- At its meeting of 2 July 2018, the Bureau adopted a new list of expenses that contains the 
most common examples of eligible expenditure of each category referred to in Article 28 
IMMS. The list is not exhaustive. It stems from that Bureau meeting that for the Members 
who so wish, the costs relating to an audit of GEA can be covered either from GEA or the 
Parliamentary assistance allowance. The Bureau also recalled that all Members are free to 
document their use of GEA, and have this information published in their personal websites.  
Moreover, in line with the recently updated EP legal framework (Rule 11(4) of the Rules of 
Procedure, adopted by plenary on 31 January 2019) as implemented by the Bureau in  its 
decision of 11 March 2019, the administration developed a technical solution that has been 
available since the end of September 2019, for Members who so wish, to publish a voluntary 
audit or confirmation, as provided for under the applicable rules of the Statute for Members 
and its implementing rules, that their use of the General Expenditure Allowance complies 
with the applicable rules of the Statute for Members and its implementing measures.  
 
 
 
Page 6 of 91 
 

- At its meeting of 10 December 2018, the Bureau decided to modify the rules applicable to 
the  additional  voluntary  pension  scheme  (by  increasing  the  retirement  age  from  63  to  65 
years and introducing a levy of 5 % to pension payments for future pensioners) with a view 
to  improving  the  sustainability  of  the  voluntary  pension  scheme,  address  the  increasing 
liquidity  problem  and  reduce  the  actuarial  deficit.  Any  further  decision  regarding  the 
voluntary pension scheme will be taken at a later meeting. 
 
- Smooth running of parliamentary work in the case of system damages or blackouts or a 
cyber-attack is assured by the implementation of  Parliament’s Business Continuity Policy 
endorsed by the Bureau in March 2018, the Parliament Business Continuity Plan and DG 
ITEC  business  continuity  plan.  Also  taken  into  account  the  lessons  learned  from  the  IT 
outage  incident  of  October  2017,  measures  to  reinforce  the  European  Parliament’s  ICT 
infrastructure  and  application  resilience  have  been  implemented  following  a  jointly 
elaborated  Action  Plan,  agreed  between  DG  ITEC  and  the  Parliament  Risk  and  Business 
Continuity Managers. 
 
 
2. 
In the context of the discharge resolutions relating to the implementation of the general 
budget for the financial years 2014, 2015 and 2016, the Bureau was requested to take action on 
the main following points:  
 
extend  the  internal  whistleblowing  rules  to  APAs;  revise  the  list  of  expenses  which  may  be 
defrayed from the GEA, work on a definition of more precise rules regarding its accountability 
and  make  changes  to  the  GEA;  examine  the  compatibility  of  events  by  external  bodies  in 
Parliament’s premises with parliamentary work; create a technical possibility for Members who 
wish to publish their calendars on their official webpage and in particular their meetings with 
lobbyists; bring APAs allowance for missions’ expenses in line with those of other staff; take 
the necessary steps to ensure that the advisory committee on harassment includes at least two 
representatives of the APAs; make an assessment and consider options to improve the liquidity 
of the voluntary pension fund; reconsider (and delete) the possibility for APAs to be Head of 
visitors groups; publish on Parliament’s website the relevant documents submitted to it in a 
machine-readable  format;  consider  entering  into  a  dialogue  with  the  local  authorities  on  the 
financing and management of the House of European History; address the issue of employment 
period of APAs  in  the case of death  or resignation of MEPs;  ensure that  social and pension 
rights  are  guaranteed  for  APAs  that  have  worked  with  no  interruptions  for  the  last  two 
legislative parliamentary terms; study an incentive scheme for promoting more sustainable and 
efficient transport for home-work commuting; reconsider the possibility for APAs, at certain 
conditions,  to  accompany  MEPs  in  official  delegations  and  missions;  come  up  with  risk 
mitigating  measures  to  ensure  a  smooth  running  of  parliamentary  work  in  case  of  system 
damages or blackouts, including a contingency plan for long-time system blackouts. 
 
The implementation of the majority of the requests listed above are presented under point 1. As 
for the remaining actions, it is worth underlying the following: 
 
- Article 1 of the internal rules implementing Article 22c of the Staff Regulations apply to 
all Parliament staff and, mutatis mutandis, to trainees and national experts. APAs are hence 
already included in the rules on whistleblowing. 
 
 
 
Page 7 of 91 
 

- Parliament’s premises are primarily used for parliamentary business, namely for meetings 
of  parliamentary  committees,  political  groups,  interparliamentary  delegations  and  for 
plenary  sessions.  Individual  Members  may  request  authorisation  from  the  Quaestors  to 
organise cultural events and exhibitions. The criteria for holding such events are determined 
by the “Rules governing cultural events and exhibitions”. The Quaestors and Parliament’s 
responsible services ensure that these criteria are strictly respected. 
 
- The possibility for Members to publish their calendars already exists. It is also possible to 
include a link to the personal web pages on the meetings with interest representatives. 
 
-  The  Bureau  decided  on  the  new  flat  rates  for  APAs’  missions  during  its  meeting  on  2 
October 2017. The new flat rates entered into force on 1 January 2018 and provides for three 
different flat rate allowances to cover APAs missions expenses. Any revision of the flat rate 
allowances lies with the Bureau. 
 
- On 2 July 2018, the Bureau adopted a new decision on the functioning  of the Advisory 
Committee  dealing  with  harassment  complaints  concerning  Members  of  the  European 
Parliament which came into force on 1 September 2018. Through the adoption of the new 
Rules, the legal framework of the Advisory Committee has evolved and a second accredited 
parliamentary assistant (APA) was appointed as a full member of the Advisory Committee. 
 
- Following the signature of a Service Level Agreement at the end of 2016, the European 
Commission  contribute  up  to  a  maximum  of  EUR  3  million  per  year  towards  the  HEH's 
running  costs.  Moreover,  the  administration  maintains  a  constant  dialogue  with  local 
authorities on co-operation, e.g. in the domain of amenities for visitors. In this context, local 
authorities contributed, in the run-up to the HEH's opening, by executing an elaborate make-
over of its surroundings and access, including paving the pathway between the HEH and rue 
Wiertz/rue Belliard and by the embellishment of the whole area. Local authorities showed 
continuous commitment to the cooperation with Parliament and are also responsible for the 
maintenance of the Leopold Park, in which the HEH is situated. 
 
-  In the  Bureau meeting  of 18 October 2018, the President clarified that  two consecutive 
terms could not be legally assimilated to ten years of service in terms of pension rights and 
mentioned different possible solutions to this issue including the possibility that these APAs 
become assistants to other Members or groupings of Members in the next legislative term. 
Nevertheless, in the transition between the 8th and 9th legislative term, a solution was found 
for 170 cases out of 173.  
 
Overall  it  can  be  assessed  that  the  majority  of  the  requests  made  to  the  Bureau  in  previous 
discharge resolutions have been addressed or have been clarified in the written replies during 
the discharge procedures. It remains though in the autonomy of the Bureau to propose further 
revisions of its previous decisions or not.   
 
 
Page 8 of 91 
 

2. 
To  increase  the  transparency  of  lobbying,  the  Plenary  adopted  in  January  2019  a 
legislative  footprint  which  is  mandatory  for  rapporteurs,  shadow  rapporteurs  and  committee 
chairs and voluntary to all other MEPs: 
 
a)  What have been the developments in the creation of a centralised, user-friendly 
and machine-readable database where those meetings are published? Are there plans in place 
to assess the effectiveness of the systems being developed for the publication of meetings with 
lobbyists? Did the Parliament consider using the Commission’s tool developed for that same 
purpose?  Would  it  have  been  more  cost-effective  to  use  an  existing  software  rather  than 
developing a new one? Are you considering using the Commission’s tool in the future, given it 
is improved functionality? 
 
b)  What  are  the  monitoring  measures  in  place  to  check  whether  MEPs  are 
complying with their obligations? 
 
c)  Are  there  plans  for  the  EP  services  to  adopt  the  practice  of  publishing  their 
meetings with lobbyists, so as to be in line with the increased level of transparency of MEPs? 
 
a) 
Rule 11 of the European Parliament Rules of Procedure has introduced an obligation for 
rapporteurs, shadow rapporteurs and Committee Chairs to publish information on meetings held 
with  interest  representatives,  in  the  context  of  their  reports.  In  this  framework,  the  plenary 
tasked the Bureau with providing the necessary infrastructure on Parliament’s website to allow 
Members to publish scheduled meetings with interest representatives.  
 
At its meeting on 11 March 2019 the Bureau decided on the infrastructure for such a tool, which 
has been available since the start of the new legislature. 
 
Members  are  now  able  to  publish  themselves  the  details  of  their  meetings  on  the  Europarl 
website, via the MEPs Only application, using a user-friendly form. The form requires a certain 
amount of EP-specific information to be provided, i.e. report discussed, committee concerned 
and role of the Member, which meant that the tool used by the European Commission did not 
fit the Parliament’s specific requirements. 
 
At its meeting on 11 March 2019, the Bureau also tasked the Secretary-General to assess the 
efficiency of the implementation of the provisions at the next mid-term. 
 
b) 
The new tool was introduced only at the start of this legislature and some time is needed 
to  ensure  its  workability.  The  Bureau  has  provided  the  necessary  infrastructure  in  line  with 
provisions  of  Rule  11  in  order  to  enable  the  publication  foreseen  in  that  rule.  Parliament’s 
services are currently offering guidance and raising awareness of this new obligation among 
Members and their staff.  
 
The  public  profile  pages  of  Members,  which  feature  information  on  their  parliamentary 
activities, including when they are elected committee chairs, become rapporteurs, or shadow 
rapporteurs,  now  also  show  the  meetings  scheduled  with  interest  representatives,  as  soon  as 
individual Members publish such information.  
 
Indeed  rapporteurs,  shadow  rapporteurs  and  committee  chairs  shall  for  each  report,  publish 
online  all  scheduled  meetings  with  interest  representatives  falling  under  the  scope  of  the 
Transparency  register.  Monitoring  of  the  Members  concerned,  as  suggested  in  the  question, 
cannot be applied by the administration without legal basis. 
 
Other Members may voluntarily publish their scheduled meetings with interest representatives. 
Accordingly,  the  Bureau  has  provided  the  necessary  infrastructure  for  the  publication  of 
meetings on the clear understanding that Members may, if they so wish, limit themselves to the 
obligation as set out in the new provisions.  
Page 9 of 91 
 

c) 
The rules currently in  place regarding European  Parliament staff provide that “when 
dealing with the pressure groups or lobbies that keep a close watch on Parliament's activities, 
officials or other servants must behave in the manner required by the independence of their 
position and the principle of integrity
”1.  
 
The  plenary  has  called  for  all  EU  officials  to  attend  training  on  how  to  deal  with  interest 
representatives and conflicts of interest2. Appropriate training has been on offer to Parliament 
staff since 2014 and continues to be provided on a regular basis.  
 
The  current  rules  cover  the  behaviour  of  staff  vis-a-vis  interest  representatives,  but  do  not 
provide for any publication of meetings. 
 
3. 
How has the cooperation agreement signed between the European Parliament, the EESC 
and the CoR in 2014 contributed to more synergies between the services and what additional 
effectiveness gains remain to be explored/achieved? 
 
On 5 February 2014, the Presidents of the European Committee of the Regions (hereafter CoR), 
the European Economic and Social Committee (hereafter EESC) and the European Parliament 
(EP) signed a Cooperation Agreement (CA) aimed at fostering mutual relations and at creating 
a  more  effective  framework  for  cooperation  in  a  number  of  areas.  Inter  alia,  these  include 
translation, security, access to buildings, and IT services. Annex I of this CA foresees several 
measures on administrative cooperation with a view to enhancing staff support for political core 
functions.  
 
In the frame of the abovementioned CA, the synergies and results achieved are detailed hereafter 
for  the  relevant  Parliament’s  Directorates-General  where  the  agreement  could  be  applied.  It 
includes the additional gains still to be achieved/explored: 
 
DG TRAD and DG LINC 
 
In the provision of translation services, the EP has cooperation with the EESC and the CoR. 
The  main  areas  of  cooperation  are  the  following:  recruitment  and  relations  with  EPSO, 
technology  and  tools  for  translation  processes,  including  translation  memories  and  machine 
translation  where  resources  are pooled  and tools financed jointly to create synergies in  both 
development and use and to avoid overlaps, common tendering for both new translation tools 
and  external  translation  services  (see  below),  enhanced  cooperation  in  the  definition  and 
development of performance indicators to allow for relevant benchmarking and identification 
of best practices and joint training and outreach activities.  
 
In addition, the EP and the EESC/CoR translation have developed a workload balancing scheme 
to  share  work  to  cover  peaks  in  any  one  institution  (for  instance,  in  2018  the  EESC/CoR 
translated  932  pages  for  the  EP,  whereas  no  translation  was  done  by  the  EP  for  these 
institutions). In terms of future cooperation, an enhanced system of workload balancing could 
be envisaged and closer cooperation on tendering procedures for external translation services 
is taking effect. 
                                                 
1 See compendium of rules Guide to the obligations of officials and other servants of the European 
Parliament Code of Conduct (adopted by the Bureau on 7 July 2008) PE 422.596/BUR 
2 See paragraph 28 of the European Parliament resolution of 14 September 2017 on transparency, accountability 
and integrity in the EU institutions (
2015/2041(INI)) 
 
Page 10 of 91 
 

Concerning outsourcing, the EESC and the CoR were participating institutions in the 2015 call 
for tenders and have continued to use the framework contracts signed as a result. The contracts 
provide that the EESC and CoR are independent authorising authorities responsible for their own 
budgetary planning and execution, including quality control for the purposes of the validation of 
expenditure. Parliament was Contracting Authority and lead institution.  
 
As such it organised the procurement procedure. Parliament is also responsible for sending any 
penalty letters to the contractors once the participating institutions have identified issues under 
their own quality control procedures and for all communications with the contractors concerning 
the management of the contracts. 
 
In 2018, the EESC and CoR accepted to participate in Parliament's pilot procurement projects.  
 
Similarly,  in  2019  the  EESC  and  CoR  agreed  to  participate  in  the  call  for  tenders  for  the 
remaining target languages. These contracts will enter into force in 2020. 
 
With  regard  to  future  cooperation,  the  Parliament  will  explore  how  to  cooperate  more 
intensively on promoting clear language in texts, audio and video, by using and sharing skills 
of language professionals in both services. 
With respect to meeting rooms, Parliament’s buildings in Brussels are being regularly used by 
both Committees for their plenary sessions and other meetings and events. From 2014 up to 
present, the following data on bookings have been collected: 
 
European Committee of the Regions: 
 
2014 
2015 
2016 
2017 
2018 
2019** 
21 
71 
39 
67 
169 
193 
           ** data includes booking the EP’ premises till the end of 2019 – state of a play on 8/10/2019 
 
In total for 2014-2019: 407 (100 meetings were finally cancelled)   
 
European Economic and Social Committee: 
 
 2014 
2015* 
2016 
2017 
2018 
2019** 
N.A. 
20 
28 
21 
122 
84 
   
* data available as from 4/9/2015 
   
** data includes booking the EP’ premises till the end of 2019 – state of a play on 8/10/2019 
 
In total for 2015-2019: 275 (46 meetings were finally cancelled)  
 
-  
interpretation: since 2014 a service-level agreement is in force including provisions of 
interpretation services and additional technical support by Parliament during plenaries and 
events  organised  by  the  two  Committees  in  the  Parliament’s  premises.  From  2014  up  to 
present, the following data have been collected: 
 
 
 
Page 11 of 91 
 

European Committee of the Regions: 
 
 
2014 
2015 
2016 
2017 
2018 
2019** 
Interpretation provided 



42 
101 
141 
23 official languages***  




19 
11 
or more 
At least 5 languages 



16 
51 
75 
or more (up to 23) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Extra options provided  

38 
11 
10 
13 
22 
(at least one of TECH,  
PROJ, RECO, SONO) 
   
** data includes booking the EP’ premises till the end of 2019 – state of a play on 8/10/2019
 
***Irish not included 
 
European Economic and Social Committee: 
 
 
2014 
2015* 
2016 
2017 
2018 
2019** 
Interpretation provided 
N.A. 


15 
81 
64 
23 official languages*** 
N.A. 





or more 
At least 5 languages 
N.A. 



38 
28 
or more (up to 23) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Extra options provided         N.A 
18 



22 
(at least one of TECH, PROJ, 
 
 
 
 
 
 
RECO, SONO) 
 
*  data available as from 4/9/2015 
** data includes booking the EP’ premises till the end of 2019 – state of a play on 8/10/2019 
***Irish not included 
 
-  
informatics:  The  Committees’  IT  Units  participated  in  the  evaluation  of  the  bids 
received in the framework of the interinstitutional calls for tenders launched by Parliament 
(e.g. on IT users support service and on IT external services). In addition, Wi-Fi coverage is 
granted to Committees’ members and staff during plenary sessions organised in Parliament’s 
buildings.  Also,  access  to  sections  of  the  EP  intranet  is  allowed  to  Committees’  staff, 
including  to  the  e-calendar  of  the  other  EU  institutions  managed  by  the  DG  PRES 
Interinstitutional Relations Unit. 
 
-  
canteens: access to each other’s canteens is granted since May 2014. 
 
In  the  area  of  interpretation,  the  CoR  and  EESC  rely  on  services  provided  by  either  the 
European Commission (DG SCIC) or the European Parliament (DG LINC) as they do not have 
their  own  interpretation  service.  A  service  level  agreement  concerning  the  provision  of 
interpretation by the EP to the CoR has been in force since 2012. The demand for interpretation 
from the CoR has been relatively stable at around 100 meetings with interpretation a year. In 
2018, discussions on a similar service level agreement with the EESC were nearing completion, 
and the agreement was subsequently signed in April 2019.  
 
 
Page 12 of 91 
 

The  demand  for  interpretation  from  the  EESC  has  increased,  reaching  80  meetings  with 
interpretation  in  2018.  Consequently,  preparations  were  made  with  DG  ITEC  to  open  the 
possibility  for  CoR  and  EESC  services  to  introduce  their  requests  for  interpretation  directly 
through  the  MRS  booking  interface  being  deployed  in  Parliament  to  ensure  a  smoother 
processing  and  better  resource  planning.  Further  discussions  are  planned  with  the  CoR  and 
EESC on the transition to MRS and reinforcing inter-service coordination in the area of room 
bookings and conference support services. 
 
DG SAFE 
 
In  the  field  of  security  Parliament  has  always  striven  to  reinforce  cooperation  with  both 
Committees and, in this context, has managed the use of the existing “passerelle” connecting 
the  Committees  and  the  EP  buildings  in  Brussels  and  facilitated  the  security  aspects  of  the 
Committees’ general assemblies within its premises.  
 
Most  recently,  Parliament’s  security  services  have  agreed  to  manage  the  Personal  Security 
Clearance requests for Committees’ officials as well as to facilitate their participation in  all 
Parliament’s security training sessions.  
 
At the end of 2018, Parliament concluded a reciprocal security exemption agreement with the 
Commission, the EEAS and the two Committees and, since recently, with the European Court 
of  Auditors.  Officials  and  members  of  these  institutions  now  enjoy  access  without  security 
controls in all buildings.  
 
This paves the way to additional progress such as elaborating a common accreditation policy 
for all users of institutions’ premises (EU staff, journalists, lobbyists,...). Since the new Access 
Control System being implemented by EP (iPACS project) is the same as the one implemented 
by  the  other  EU  institutions  (i.e.  the  Commission,  the  Economic  and  Social  Committee,  the 
Committee of the Regions), a standardisation of the access rights policy and controls is now 
possible, both at technological and organisational levels. To that end, the Parliament chairs an 
interinstitutional working group, which intends to define and assess the possible savings that 
could be generated in terms of human and financial resources.  
 
Such  cooperation  in  the  field  of  security  between  EP  and  the  Committees  could  be  further 
strengthened in order to fully reflect the spirit of the 2014 Cooperation Agreement - in particular 
point 2 of Annex I - which provided that Parliament could ensure the physical security of the 
Committees if they so wish. 
 
DG ITEC  
 
The Printing unit of the Publishing Directorate (EDIT) started cooperation with the European 
Committee  of  the  Regions  in  September  2019.  The  first  successful  test,  performed  by  the 
Committee of Regions in the beginning of October, was the offset printing of the wall calendar 
of DG ITEC. The first test foreseen for the EP would consist in helping out the Committee of 
Regions with digital printing of documents during its plenary sessions. 
 
Access of EP Intranet and dedicated section to the Committee of Regions and EESC: the project 
of opening EP Intranet to the two institutions was given the highest priority.  
 
 
Page 13 of 91 
 

In July 2016, the Secretary-General of the EP informed his two homologues of the Committee 
of Regions and EESC that a dedicated version of EP Intranet had been set up and accessible to 
the two Committees. It allowed access to most (not all) of the content available on EP Intranet 
with the exception of the DGs websites. All DG’s of the European Parliament had been involved 
in  this  operation,  including  the  SG  Cabinet,  the  Data  Protection  Officer  and  the  Staff 
Committee.  
 
Once the redesign of the complete EP intranet was subsequently accomplished, the Committee 
of Regions and the EESC were offered access to the new, more user-friendly EP Intranet version 
dedicated to them.  
 
In late 2017, Committee of Regions and EESC requested to receive further access, through EP 
Intranet, on legislative documents. A new section called “Parliamentary documents” became 
accessible to Committee of Regions and EESC.   
Further  synergies  are  being  explored  in  the  context  of  the  efficient  printing  efforts  of 
Parliament’s administration. 
 
DG IPOL 
 
In  the  area  of  policy  making  and  legislation,  the  2014  cooperation  agreements  with  the  two 
consultative bodies work very well. Regular exchanges of views take place with the Presidents 
of the European Economic and Social Committee and the European Committee of the Regions 
at the level of the Conference of Committee Chairs and its Chair.  
 
The  CCC  Chair  is  also  regularly  invited  to  attend  the  Bureau  meetings  of  the  European 
Economic  and  Social  Committee.  At  the  level  of  the  committees,  the  cooperation  with  the 
consultative  bodies  is  mostly  organised  between  the  individual  rapporteurs  or  –  at  technical 
level – between the committee secretariats and their counterparts in the consultative bodies.  
 
DG EPRS 
 
Since the signature of the cooperation agreements with the European Committee of the Regions 
and  the  European  Economic  and  Social  Committee  in  2014,  significant  advances  have  been 
made  in  the  mutual  working  relations  between  the  Parliament  and  these  two  bodies.  The 
European  Parliamentary  Research  Service  (DG  EPRS)  has  played  an  important  part  in  this 
process  by  successfully  integrating  60  former  translators  (or  their  posts)  into  its  Members’ 
Research Service, with the new colleagues playing a crucial role in the generation and delivery 
of research, analysis and information for Members of the European Parliament. Some of the 
products and services of the Members’ Research Service are also accessible to Members of the 
European Committee of the Regions (CoR) and the European Economic and Social Committee 
(EESC), in accordance with the agreements. This has generated synergies and efficiency gains. 
 
Concretely, DG EPRS currently offers the following services to the European Committee of 
the Regions and the European Economic and Social Committee:  
-  
on-demand targeted research work for the members of those committees (around 
200 such pieces of work were generated between 2015 and 2018); 
 -  
distribution  of  EPRS  publications,  both  for  general  purposes  and  targeted  as 
appropriate to their plenary sessions, conferences, workshops and other events; 
-  
access to the e-book platform of the European Parliament, as well as to its paper 
collection (through the use of the Library reading rooms and inter-library loans); 
Page 14 of 91 
 

-  
electronic  newsletters  (based  on  those  routinely  sent  to  MEPs),  providing 
hyperlinks to all EPRS’s latest publications; 
-  
invitations to EPRS events in the main Library Reading Room in Brussels. 
 
In  addition,  there  are  regular  contacts  at  staff  and  management  level,  and  sharing  of 
planning/programming of publications with a view to maximising synergies and achieving a 
timely input into the respective institutional workflows. For example, in the areas of ex-ante 
impact assessment and ex-post evaluation, regular meetings and exchanges of information with 
the European Committee of the Regions  and the European Economic and Social Committee 
facilitate the Parliament's access to their experience, expertise and networks. DG EPRS also 
has a strong presence at the annual European Week of the Regions and Cities, co-hosted by the 
European Committee of the Regions.  
 
An important area of potentially fruitful cooperation in the future could be closer cooperation 
between  the  historical  archives  of  the  EP,  EESC  and  CoR,  where  each  of  the  Committees 
currently  maintains  its  own  separate  archiving  system.  A  significant  increase  in  resource 
efficiency  could  be  achieved  by  identifying  and  realising  inter-institutional  synergies  in  this 
field. 
 
DG EXPO 
 
In the light of the cooperation agreement with the European Economic and Social Committee 
and the European Committee of the Regions signed on 5 February 2014, DG EXPO envisages 
to  further  exploit  political  cooperation  with  the  aim  of  strengthening  the  legislative  and 
scrutinising role of Parliament and the two Committees in implementation of their respective 
mandates under the Lisbon Treaty. 
 
4. 
Does the Secretary-General intend to make a proposal to the Bureau in order to improve 
the transparency of its decisions? Has it been envisaged to communicate on Bureau decisions 
in the same manner as Quaestors do? 
 
The agendas and minutes of the Bureau meetings, to the extent the meeting was not in camera 
e.g. to discuss an individual Member’s complaint, are already publicly accessible on the EP 
register of documents.  Where appropriate to  ensure their effectiveness,  Bureau decisions are 
additionally published in the Official Journal of the European Union.  
 
5. 
In general, is badging information recorded and is it ever used for checks of any nature? 
What rules apply in terms of data protection? 
 
The context in which DG SAFE is authorised to process the data contained in the badges is 
governed by strict and clear rules, namely: 
 
-   The EU Regulation 2018/1725 of 23 October 2018 on personal data, in particular  article 
4.1b which states that "the personal data shall be (...) collected for specified, explicit and 
legitimate purposes and not further processed in a manner that is incompatible with those 
purposes"; 
-   The Rules governing security and safety in the European Parliament - Bureau Decision 
of 15 January 2018 - (2018/C 79/04), in particular articles 27 and 28 thereof; 
-   The notification of personal data processing n°20 relating to the EP access control / access 
control system (CA-TA); 
 
Page 15 of 91 
 

Badging records are recorded for security purposes and to manage physical access control to 
EP buildings and premises. The retention period for these data is limited to 4 months.  
 
Such personal data may only be used for checks in the context of investigations covered by Art. 
27 and 28 of the Rules governing security and safety in the European Parliament. 
 
6. 
On  29  April  2019  The  European  Ombudsman  formally  recommended  that:  “The 
European Parliament should grant public access to the proposal of the ad hoc Working Group 
on the revision of the list of expenses which may be defrayed from the General Expenditure 
Allowance from the agenda of the Bureau meeting of 2 July 2018 and the related letter from its 
chair.”
 What is the planned timetable to adhere to this recommendation by the Ombudsman? 
 
Both former President Tajani and, in reaction to a reply of the Ombudsman, President Sassoli 
have conveyed to the Ombudsman that Parliament’s decision, taken under the authority of the 
Bureau, to refuse access to the said documents had been taken as required by Regulation (EC) 
No 1049/2001. The Presidents also pointed out that the Ombudsman had not properly heard the 
Parliament,  as  is  required  by  the  Statute  of  the  Ombudsman,  before  issuing  her 
recommendation. It should be noted that the decision of the Bureau including the full rules as 
adopted have been public, in the minutes of the Bureau of 2 July 2018. 
COMMUNICATION 
 
7. 
In May 2019, elections for the European Parliament took place. Please provide us with 
a detailed plan of what was done and spent in 2018 for the preparation of the elections. 
 
At  its  meeting  of  13  November  2017,  the  Bureau  approved  a  proposal  for  an  institutional 
communication  strategy  for  the  2019  European  Elections.  From  this  point  onwards,  all 
responsible Parliament services worked for the implementation of the strategy.  
 
In line with the strategy, Parliament made an unprecedented effort to raise awareness about the 
elections  among  the  media  and  the  public  in  order  to  encourage  people  to  go  to  vote. 
Accordingly, the institutional campaign aimed to reach out to a public as wide and diverse as 
possible through new communication tools as well as traditional campaigning methods. As the 
European elections are regulated by national legislation, the campaign was also decentralised 
via the European Parliament Liaison Offices (EPLOs) in order to inform citizens at the national 
and local levels. 
 
The institutional communication strategy for the 2019 European Elections entailed a number of  
new features in comparison with previous campaigns. These included: 
 
  a decentralised approach;  
  a network ground-game effort aimed at reaching out voters while spreading messages in 
a cost-effective manner;  
  specific campaign phases: “one year to go”, the delivery phase, the Spitzenkandidaten 
process, the run-up to voter registration deadlines in Member States, and the “go-to-vote” 
phase;  
  “data driven targeting” through public opinion and media monitoring services to provide 
for a campaign tailored to key audiences.  
 
Page 16 of 91 
 

The main steps in the implementation of the strategy in the course of 2018 (start in March) are 
listed in annex Q7. In 2019, the Election Day completed the institutional efforts relating to the 
elections.  
 
An update on the implementation of the strategy was discussed by the Bureau in October 2018. 
At the meeting, Bureau members welcomed the progress made in the implementation of the 
strategy, including the actions relating to the ground game and the deployment of successful 
tools such as the “Leistungsbilanz” (Delivery Score Card) on the achievements of the European 
Union. The note, which was fully endorsed by the Bureau, was transmitted to the Committee 
for Budgetary Control. 
 
In  the  context  of  the  budgetary  procedure  for  the  year  2018,  the  total  amount  for  the  2019 
election communication campaign (for 28 countries and in at least 24 languages) had been set 
at EUR 33,33 million. This amount was topped up with additional EUR 3 million in order to 
extend  the  European  election  campaign  to  the  UK  following  the  decision  of  the  European 
Council  to  grant  an  extension  for  the  UK’s  withdrawal  from  the  European  Union  until  31 
October 2019.   Out of this  total  budget,  EUR 22 million  were committed in  2018 and EUR 
14,33 million in 2019. 
 
The overall turnout in the European elections 2019 increased by 8 points (50,6%), resulting in 
the  highest  participation  rate  since  1994  and  the  first  increase  ever.  Post-electoral  surveys 
clearly  show  a  notable  increase  in  the  proportion  of  ‘soft  abstainers’  (the  key  target  of 
institutional “go-to-vote” efforts) among voters in the 2019 elections compared to 2014. The 
turnout  increase  observed  at  EU  level  was  even  more  significant  within  the  target  groups 
identified by Parliament, for which specific actions were developed: turnout rose in 70 out of 
the  97  national  target  groups  (i.e.  in  72%  of  all  cases).  Moreover,  44%  of  Europeans  recall 
seeing or hearing messages from the European Parliament encouraging them to vote, i.e. such 
messages had a clear impact on citizens’ mobilisation.  
 
8. 
Could the Secretary-General provide information regarding the "This time I’m voting" 
campaign and connected activities in terms of budget and expected results (based on analytics 
if possible)? 
 
One  of  the  key  guiding  principles  identified  for  the  EE2019  institutional  communication 
strategy was the investment into a network ‘ground game’ effort to reach out and engage voters 
while 
spreading 
messages 
in 

cost-effective 
way. 
To 
this 
end, 
the 
https://www.thistimeimvoting.eu/  (TTIV)  website  was  released  in  June  2018  to  encourage 
people to take part in the European elections. On this website, volunteers and supporters could 
pledge for and register to join the campaign. 
 
The  budget  of  this  communication  action  is  part  of  the  overall  budget  for  the  institutional 
election campaign (see question  7). 
 
The Directorate-General for Communication (DG COMM) initiated digital campaigns between 
June  2018  and  May  2019  to  generate  traffic  towards  the  website.  Altogether  the  digital 
campaigns  performed  extremely  well  in  terms  of  awareness  and  traffic,  taking  advantage  of 
additional optimisations during the whole process.  
 
A considerable mobilisation effort, especially among young people to encourage their peers to 
vote and exchange about Europe, mobilised around 300,000 supporters, and engaged them in 
debating Europe in their local communities and social groups - both on and off-line. 
 
Page 17 of 91 
 

Approximately 25,000 of these young people became active volunteers. These figures may not 
seem particularly significant in terms of EU population. On the other hand, these active “ground 
gamers” have increased the EP’s human resources by thousands. They helped the campaign 
either  online  or  by  organising  events  on  the  ground  (more  than  2  000  events  across  the  EU 
under  the  "This  time  I'm  voting"  campaign).  In  this  context,  it  is  worth  recalling  that  the 
European Parliament  alone lacks  the human and financial resources for an extensive ground 
game  reaching  out  to  400  million  eligible  voters  in  the  European  Union  and  must  therefore 
make good use of its own multiplier networks. 
 
The use of the TTIV platform allowed to pursue the objective of achieving greater innovation 
as regards citizen communication.  
 
Considerable efforts to engage multipliers took place also outside the platform, in private social 
media groups and face to face. Overall, the high number of Supporters and Volunteers is a direct 
outcome of how the Parliament positioned itself towards citizens and organisations, and this 
positioning is perhaps the most noteworthy and long-term benefit of the ‘ground game’ which 
deserves further consideration. 
 
In addition, partnerships aiming to help mobilise voters were developed with a wide variety of 
European and national civil society organisations.  
 
A grants programme helped financially support events and communication projects developed 
by  civil  society  organisations  aligned  with  the  spirit  and  objectives  of  the  European 
Parliament’s own campaign. Several hundreds of organisations were contacted at the central 
level,  offering  the  opportunity  of  a  structured  partnership  in  the  context  of  the  European 
elections.  Accordingly,  organisations  willing  to  participate  could  sign  a  Memorandum  of 
Understanding (MoU), stating the objectives and actions of the partnership during the elections 
campaign. This effort was then replicated at national and local level.  
 
54 MoU’s were signed at EU level, with over 100 additional partners following the campaign 
without an official MoU. Over 430 partner organisations joined the campaign at national level. 
These partners supported the campaign in various ways, such as organising special EE19 related 
events  or  sharing  EE19  related  content.  The  span  of  organisations  involved  ranged  from 
business  organisations  to  trade  unions,  from  campaigning  non-profits  to  charitable 
organisations, from youth organisations to sports organisations, etc. All these partners shared 
one purpose: encouraging people to vote.  
 
An unexpectedly large number of private companies showed an interest in getting involved in 
the institutional election campaign in 2019. While no official partnership or financial support 
was  provided  to  them,  they  were  invited  to  name  themselves  as  “supporter  of  the  EE19 
campaign”.    Election-related  activities  by  private  companies  did  not  just  reach  out  to  their 
specific audiences, they were also subject to widespread media interest, which helped amplify 
the impact of messages.  
 
At European level, three Europe-wide business associations and 10 Europe-wide companies / 
private  corporations  engaged  actively  in  the  election  campaign.  Examples  of  their  actions 
included testimonial videos about the importance of voting (Deutsche Telekom, 3M), election 
related events or magazine editions (DHL, Butlers, Vogue Uomo) or provision of free rides to 
the polling stations on election days (Lime, Bolt, Flixbus).  
 
 
 
Page 18 of 91 
 

At national level, hundreds of companies helped organise election-related events or included 
the election message in their general communication activities. This was done by sharing the 
“Choose  your  future”  film,  by  referring  to  the  European  elections  in  their  commercials,  by 
branding their planes, train schedules or buildings with a European message (Lufthansa, DB, 
Bayern  München),  or  by  calls  to  go  to  vote  for  employees  (e.g.  Ikea,  Zara,  Rewe,  Galeria 
Kaufhof Karstadt, Douglas, Butlers, etc.). 
 
The  European  Parliament  also  received  unprecedented  support  from  almost  all  main  global 
digital  actors.  All  leaders  of  digital  services  such  as  Google,  Facebook,  Twitter,  Snapchat, 
Instagram, Tinder, Twitch, YouTube and Spotify provided excellent visibility for the European 
Elections to their own communities on their own channels free of charge.  
 
Finally,  several  private  TV  stations  and  cinema  networks  across  Europe  agreed  to  show  the 
“Choose your future” clip, accounting for millions of euros worth of free advertising space (on 
top of the space already secured on public TV and radio channels across all Member States).  
Most of the campaigning activities took place between September 2018 and May 2019. During 
this  period,  the  following  indicators  can  be  considered  to  assess    the  performance  of  the 
networked ‘ground game’ strategy:  
 
(i) Impressions and conversion rate on social media 
 
On social media, a considered channel strategy was deployed and concentrated on using high 
reach  Europe-wide  platforms  such  as  Facebook  and  Twitter.  With  200  million  impressions, 
Facebook accounted for 50% of all impressions and was a major driver of reach for TTIV to 
recruit  support  to  the  ‘ground  game’.  Twitter  brought  almost  75  million  impressions  and 
Snapchat 50 million. Overall, the conversion rate was 2.29% across all social channels which 
is very good in commercial standards.  
 
(ii) Volumes of visits to the TTIV website
 
 
Volume of visits across all election related websites1 were dominated by the TTIV campaign 
with 7.3M visits (out of 8.7M). This is a consequence of it being the only site with substantial 
paid  support.  It  also  proves  its  successful  role  as  the  hub  of  the  integrated  campaign:  it  had 
2.7M organic visits, coming from search, email, and other non-paid media.  
 
Paid search was used from ‘100 Days to Go’ in ten Member States2, achieving three million 
total impressions and an average click-through rate to the TTIV website of 7% (versus 3.17% 
Google AdWords benchmark for all industries) - which overall lead to a strong result. 
 
The ‘Because’ campaign also received a significant amount of traffic (121,000 visits over the 
course of the campaign). 
 
(iii) Volume of visits to the Election website 
 
The website of the elections attracted 10 million visitors in 6 months (4,5 million for the  26 
May). 
 
The “How to vote” section of the website was displayed directly on the Google search engine 
result pages from 6 to 26 May thanks to a special mark-up which was compatible with Google 
technologies. This special feature (snippet) was displayed 32 million times in 21 days. 
                                                 
1 Five core sites were ‘Because’, ‘This Time I’m voting, ‘The Press Tool Kit’, ‘News’, and ‘the Results’. 
2 Belgium, Bulgaria, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Lithuania, Poland and Portugal.  
Page 19 of 91 
 

A  second  website  was  developed  for  the  purpose  of  publishing  the  elections  results.  This 
website was consulted by 6.4 million visitors between 24 and 30 May 2019.  It should be noted 
that, for the first time, the European Parliament was able to publish all the election results since 
1979 in 24 languages, and made available exclusive tools to compare the data. 
 
Election results were published in real time, not  only on this specific website, but were also 
spread to a network of partners, including newspapers (El Pais, the Guardian, Le Monde, New 
York Times, ...), TV stations (France 2, BBC, ZDF, Arte, ...), press  agencies (ANSA, DPA, 
Bloomberg,  ...).  Results  were  also  published  for  the  first  time  on  Alexa,  Amazon’s  vocal 
assistant,  and  directly  on  Google  search  result  pages  (displayed  91  million  times  during  the 
elections day).  
 
(iv) Volume of supporters and volunteers 
 
A total of 328,364 Supporters and Volunteers engaged across Member States from September 
2018 to May 2019. 
 
Volunteers leveraged their social followers and networks to bring others on board. Other and 
“Untracked” sources1 were also significant and almost certainly influenced directly or indirectly 
by activities in the European Parliament Liaison Offices. 
 
9. 
DG  COMM  has  spent  an  enormous  amount  of  money  on  its  information  and 
communication  campaigns  in  2018.  Is  this  amount  justified,  given  that  the  Parliament’s 
Facebook  attracts  1.005.171  followers,  whereas  UNICEF  attracts  7.6  million  “likes”?  Even 
Chancellor  Merkel  alone  has  2.5  million.  Why  is  the  EP  figure  so  small  and  why  is  it  not 
increasing? 
 
The  European  Parliament  main  Facebook  page  in  English  ranks  at  fourth  position  among 
international  Institutions  with  2.5  million  fans,  after  The  White  House,  Unicef  and  UN  but 
before  the  European  Commission,  the  WTO  or  any  European  government  or  national 
parliament.  
 
The European Parliament, being a multilingual Institution, has Facebook pages in all official 
EU languages with a total number of fans on all its pages corresponding to approximately 3.4 
million. 
 
The promotion strategy of the EP Facebook page aims at ensuring efficient and maximum reach 
and engagement for the proposed content, beyond the sole audiences of its fans. “EP fans” are 
long-term multipliers, serving a different purpose than institutional advertising.  
 
EP promotional  actions  and  campaigns  are  always designed  and  implemented  with  a  clear 
objective, identified for each campaign at early stage, with a view to maximise the number of 
video views,  increase  engagement  (reactions  and  shares  of  an  editorial  product),  raise  the 
number of clicks to a specific page to optimize the return on investment.  
 
The European Parliament is considered one of the most advanced international institutions in 
the  field  of  digital  communication  by  third  parties,  including  by  Facebook  itself,  which 
regularly mentions Parliament as a best practice or inspiring example for others to follow.  
 
 
 
                                                 
1 Those which cannot be attributed to any single source due to a lack of tracking consent. 
Page 20 of 91 
 

In  addition,  in  2018,  the  European  Parliament  broadcasted  33  live  streamings  and  38  live 
interviews on Facebook which gathered respectively 15,389,854 and 17,279,486 views. 
 
10. 
Notes  the  constant  changes  made  to  the  Parliament’s  public  website  over  the  years, 
particularly with regard to search engine optimization. Can the Secretary-General explain why, 
given  the  amount  of  money  spent  on  IT  services,  the  EP  website  would  still  appear  to  be 
excessively complex, difficult to navigate and lacking in visibility? 
 
Over the last two years, various improvements on the Parliament’s public websites have been 
implemented. 
 
    First of all, the multimedia platforms have been simplified: from three websites (audiovisual, 
EP Live and EuroparlTV) a new platform has been created, which by end of 2019 will replace 
the three websites. 
 
In  order  to  simplify  the  websites,  a  fully  accessible  and  user-friendly  election  website  was 
created:  8  pages  with  “how  to  vote”,  “previous  results”,  “news”  and  information  about  the 
election process.  
 
Work is ongoing to simplify the websites and make them accessible to everyone. By end of 
2019, most of the large public websites (more than 90% of the pages) will be in responsive web 
design (except for SmartCMS and EPLOs website, which are planned for 2020), allowing all 
users to access them on an easy-to-browse website from smartphones to  desktop computers. 
Non-migrated websites related to EP activities will also become responsive in 2020. 
 
The European Parliament is furthermore already highly visible in results of search engines for 
queries  concerning  the  Institution  itself  and  its  functioning.  If  a  query  contains  the  words 
“European Parliament” the Institution will be among the top results of the search result. 
 
The “Search engine optimisation” (SEO) content strategy, which is being implemented since 
summer  2017,  seeks  to  introduce  a  thematic  organisation  of  the  EP  website  (which  has  an 
organisational structure) without undertaking a long-lasting and complex reshuffle.  The SEO 
improvements are already showing a clear positive impact. On the news section of Europarl, 
the  number  of  page  views  coming  from  search  engines  to  citizen-oriented  content  almost 
doubled between 2016 and 2017 and increased by 66% between 2017 and 2018.  
 
The share of citizens-oriented content reached via search engines is also constantly growing. It 
corresponded to 43% in the second quarter of 2017 and rose to 50% in the second quarter of 
2018. 
 
The SEO strategy has also proven effective during the election campaign, when people were 
actively searching for Parliament content. In the first quarter of 2019, search traffic grew by 
37%  compared  to  the  second  quarter  of  2018  and  59%  of  the  citizen-oriented  content  was 
reached via search engines. The SEO and open data work on the election also led to the creation 
by  Google  of  two  components  (“how  to  vote”:  32  millions  of  views;  “election  results”:  91 
millions of views  during  the  election day) and a special feature in  Amazon’s vocal  assistant 
Alexa. 
 
The SEO content strategy also allows Parliament to be visible in search engines on a certain 
number of queries around a political topic but not mentioning the EU. This enables the EP to 
attract citizens that are especially interested in specific issues.  
 
Page 21 of 91 
 

The strategy has been applied so far to the following topics: migration, climate change, circular 
economy,  plastics,  terrorism,  globalisation/international  trade,  social  Europe  and  Brexit. 
Additional topics will be added to this list on the basis of the incoming legislative priorities of 
the newly elected Parliament. 
 
The  European  Parliament  website  has  an  organisational  structure,  whereas  a  clear  thematic 
structure  is  key  to  help  search  engines  to  determine  on  which  issues  an  organisation  is  an 
“expert” and to display its content higher in search results. 
 
11. 
How many visitors’ groups were asked to return money to Parliament? What was the 
amount recovered by Parliament following ex-post controls  in 2018? What  was the smallest 
and  what  was  the  largest  amount?  To  what  budgetary  line  was  the  recovered  amount 
transferred? 
 
Pursuant  to  the  revised    rules  adopted  by  the  Bureau  governing  the  reception  of  groups  of 
visitors which entered into force on 1 January 2017, heads of group have the obligation to return 
any  unused  financial  contribution  after  verification  by  EP  services  of  a  final  financial 
declaration (so-called “Annex II”), to be submitted at the latest 30 days after the visit has taken 
place.  
 
Since  2017  and  until  the  end  of  2018,  781  visitors  groups  were  asked  to  return  funds.  The 
corresponding amount which was recovered by the Parliament in 2018 is EUR 972.504. 
 
In  2018,  the  highest  individual  amount  was  EUR  10.478,  and  the  smallest  was  EUR  2011. 
Recovered  amounts  are  transferred  to  budgetary  post  9-0-03244-01-01  and  re-used  for 
payments to MEP sponsored groups. 
 
12. 
The amount the Parliament provides per visitor remained the same over the years, while 
the costs (for example the visitor’s canteen prices) have increased significantly, is there a plan 
to change the financing? 
 
In accordance with Article 13 of the revised Bureau rules governing the reception of groups of 
visitors, the financial contribution is intended to cover part of the eligible expenditure incurred 
by the sponsored group.  
 
The revised rules offer Members more flexibility to adapt to the different needs of the groups, 
by allowing the interchangeability of the use of funds resulting from  the calculation method 
based on the following factors: travel, accommodation, meals and minor local expenses. This 
means that groups can use the available budget according to their specific needs, including, for 
example, in order to cater for increasing meal prices while continuing to apply the ceiling of 
EUR 40 per person per meal. 
 
The Bureau rules governing the reception of groups of visitors provide that: 
 
  On a proposal from the Secretary-General, the Quaestors may adjust the kilometric rate 
in line with changes in the costs to be covered (Article 17); 
  On a proposal from the Secretary-General, the Quaestors may adjust the ceilings for the 
accommodation factor and the meals and local minor expenses factor in line with changes 
in the costs to be covered (Article 18). 
                                                 
1 For recoveries, a minumum threshold of EUR 200 has been established in order to take account 
of the administrative costs related to the procedure. 
Page 22 of 91 
 

In light of the amounts returned to the European Parliament since the entry into force of the 
revised  Bureau  rules  (see  answer  to  question  11  concerning  the  recovery  procedures)  the 
ceilings mentioned above were not adjusted. 
 
13. 
On  the  House  of  European  History  in  Brussels,  please  provide  us  with  the  visitors’ 
numbers  per  month  from  its  opening  up  to  and  including  31.12.2018,  building  maintenance 
costs,  costs  for  the  permanent  and  the  non-permanent  exhibitions  (respectively),  staff 
remuneration (i.e.: security), other/external contractors (tour guides and catering). 
 
Since its inauguration in May 2017 up to 31.12.2018, the House of European History (HEH) 
welcomed 263.592 visitors, with the following breakdown: 
 
House of European History : Number of visitors 
  
2017 
2018 
Total 
January 
  
8.551 
8.551 
February 
  
11.711 
11.711 
March 
  
17.754 
17.754 
April 
  
14.356 
14.356 
May 
14.262 
14.566 
28.828 
June 
12.800 
15.144 
27.944 
July 
10.563 
11.719 
22.282 
August 
9.993 
10.623 
20.616 
September 
10.957 
12.716 
23.673 
October 
15.360 
18.036 
33.396 
November 
14.687 
17.928 
32.615 
December 
10.722 
11.144 
21.866 
Total 
99.344 
164.248 
263.592 
 
Building maintenance costs 
 
The House of European History building costs for maintenance, operating and cleaning totalled 
EUR 601.540 in 2017 and EUR 781.672 in 2018. 
 
Costs for the permanent and the non-permanent exhibition (respectively) 
 
The following costs (in EUR) were incurred in the years 2017 and 2018 in respect of the 
permanent exhibition:  
 
 
2017 
2018 
 
Production 
688.253 
276.485 
 
Maintenance 
144.603 
382.643 
 
Floor staff1 
1.759.517 
3.411.679 
 
Family discovery spaces 
375.000 

 
Other expenses: mainly external fire security staff 
 514.496 
496.993 
 
                                                 
1 for permanent and temporary exhibitions 
Page 23 of 91 
 

Since the opening, the running and maintenance costs represent the larger share of the overall 
annual  budget  related  to  the  permanent  exhibition.  A  substantial  renewal  of  the  permanent 
exhibition is only scheduled after 7 years. 
 
As shown above, the costs for the permanent exhibition include: 
 
  the last part of the production cost of the permanent exhibition; 
  floor staff services provided by an external contractor during opening hours (welcoming 
and helping visitors, distribution of tablet  devices, cloakroom  services, involvement in 
administration of guided tours); 
  integrating so-called family spaces in the HEH in order to increase its attractiveness for 
families with children; 
  hiring  external  fire  security  guards  until  October  2018  in  order  to  comply  with  fire 
security requirements; 
  other expenses include external contractors tour guides following a framework contract 
with an external company started in September 2018 and catering which is provided via 
a  so-called  “convention  de  concession”,  signed  on  1  July  2016  between  the  European 
Parliament (DG INLO) and the contractor and valid for a maximum duration of 7 years.   
 
The expenditure incurred in 2017 for the temporary exhibitions was relatively small, since the 
first  temporary  exhibition  was  mainly  financed  in  2016.  The  cost  for  the  second  temporary 
exhibition was incurred in 2018 as the contract was signed in February 2018 (in EUR): 
 
 
 
2017 
2018 
 
first temporary exhibition “Interactions” 
21.245 

 
second temporary exhibition “Restless Youth” 
26.950 
913.520 
 
third temporary exhibition “Fake ..” 
 
72.000 
 
A collection of objects is acquired for both permanent and temporary exhibitions. Part of the 
collection  is  purchased  through  a  specialised  broker.    The  HEH  exhibitions  heavily  rely  on 
artefacts acquired on loan from other museums.  These objects need to be replaced regularly, 
e.g. after expiry of the loan contract. Transport costs are incurred for the objects under loan. 
 
 
2017 
2018 
 
Purchase objects 
264.156 
342.565 
 
Transport, conservation, etc. 
723.771  
681.613 
 
Staff remuneration   
 
Total costs incurred in 2017 for EP staff working for the House of European History, including 
permanent staff and contract agents is EUR 4.4 million in 2017 and EUR 4.5 million in 2018 
(including the cost of the security agents). 
 
A  co-financing  agreement  was  signed  with  the  European  Commission  in  September  2016 
ensuring a yearly contribution to the exploitation costs of EUR 3 million. 
 
The  European  Parliament  has  no  costs  relating  to  the  external  catering  contractor  for  Cafe 
Europa  at  the  House  of  European  History.  The  contractual  arrangement  of  May  2017  is 
concession-based and without subsidies. 
 
 
 
Page 24 of 91 
 

14. 
Can you provide more information on the tender procedure for the European House of 
History, whose documents were not available in January 2019 of this year? 
 
The public call for tenders for the “Provision of Service Staff for the European Parliament’s 
Visitor Facilities” was published in the Official Journal (2019/S 107-260339) on 05 June 2019. 
 
The deadline for the submission of offers expired on 18 August 2019. 
 
The offers received are currently being evaluated and a new framework contract is expected to 
be  signed  in  November  2019.    The  current  framework  contracts  runs  until  the  beginning  of 
January 2020. 
 
15. 
On  the  Parlamentarium  in  Brussels  and  in  Strasbourg,  please  provide  us  with  their 
visitors’ numbers per month from their opening up to and including 31.12.2018. 
 
The  visitor  figures  for  the  Parlamentarium  in  Brussels  and  in  Strasbourg  are  provided  per 
calendar year in the table below. Additional tables with figures per month are included in the 
annex Q15. 
 
The Parlamentarium in Brussels opened in October 2011. There has been a steady increase in 
visitor numbers in the first years.  In 2016, the Brussels terror attacks and the airport closure 
impacted  very  negatively  on  the  tourism  market  in  Brussels.  As  a  consequence,  the 
Parlamentarium welcomed 31% less visitors compared to 2015, in line with the average figures 
of all Brussels museums. It was only as of the last trimester of 2016 that visitor figures gradually 
approached the levels prior to the terrorist attacks.  In 2017, there was an increase of 27%, in 
line  with  the  overall  tourist  market  in  Brussels.  This  trend  continued  in  2018  with  figures 
gradually  resuming  to  pre-2016  levels.  Overall,  since  its  opening,  the  Parlamentarium 
registered 2.140.796 visitors. 
 
The Parlamentarium in Strasbourg opened in June 2017. Activities followed an upward trend 
with increasing visits during and outside plenaries and an increased participation in the role-
play game. A decline was noted in the last month of 2018 due to cancellation of bookings after 
the December terrorist attack in the city. 
 
 
Year 
Parlamentarium: No. of visitors by year 
Brussels 
Strasbourg 
   (opening 10/2011) 
(opening 06/2017) 
Opening 14/10/2011 
56 014 
 
2012 
268 174 
 
2013 
337 153 
 
2014 
340 500 
 
2015 
326 080 
 
2016 
224 239 
 
2017 
285 894 
61 168 
2018 
302 247 
184 172 
 
Page 25 of 91 
 

16. 
How  many  people  are  employed  in  the  Parlamentarium  in  Strasbourg  and  Brussels? 
How many people are employed in the House of European History in Brussels? 
 
The Parlamentarium unit in Brussels employs 24 staff members (20 are officials and 4 contract 
agents).  The  unit  is  in  charge  of  the  management  of  both  the  Parlamentarium  and  the 
development of Europa Experiences centres in the Member States. 
 
The  management  of  the  Simon  VEIL  Parlamentarium  in  Strasbourg  is  shared  between  the 
Conference  and  Visitors  service  unit,  which  has  assigned  3  of  its  staff  members  to  work 
exclusively as guides. On top, the EPLO in Strasbourg which has assigned 1 staff member for 
the management of budgetary and financial files. 
 
The House of European History employs 39 staff (25 officials and 15 contract agents). 
 
17. 
Concerning Stakeholders’ dialogue events, could you specify in which Member States 
each of the events took place, and which Reports were selected? 
 
In 2018, 18 stakeholder dialogue events took place in the following Member States: Ireland, 
France,  Sweden,  Germany,  Italy,  Austria,  Hungary,  Latvia,  Spain  and  Poland  with  the 
participation and attendance of 13 Rapporteurs. 
 
The following list of topics for the “dialogues” was approved by the Conference of Committee 
Chairs and endorsed by the Bureau Working Party for Information and Communication:   
 
  Common consolidated corporate tax base (CCTB); 
  Pursuing the occupation of road transport operator and access to the international road 
haulage market; 
  European Solidarity Corps; 
  The Future of Food and Farming; 
  Screening of foreign direct investments into the European Union; 
  Transparent and predictable working conditions in the EU; 
  Posting drivers in the road transport sector; 
  Transparent and predictable working conditions in the EU; 
  The reform of the European Union’s system of own resources; 
  European Electronic Communications Code; 
 
Further details on the stakeholder dialogue events are available in annex Q17. 
 
18. 
With regard to the Information Offices, please provide the details of the expenditure in 
each Member State between 2014 and 2018. 
 
It is important to recall that a new mission statement for the Information Offices, now called 
European Parliament Liaison Offices (EPLOs), was adopted by the Bureau in November 2017. 
It  spells  out  clear  priorities  for  the  Offices  in  the  fields  of  media,  stakeholder  and  citizen 
engagement. The Directorate-General for Communication (DG COMM) is, since the approval 
of  the  new  mission  statement,  in  the  process  of  upgrading  the  impact  of  EPLOs  as  a  strong 
decentralised asset for Parliament and its Members. 
 
Page 26 of 91 
 

As for the details of the expenditure in each Member State between 2014 and 2018, please refer 
to annex Q18. 
 
19. 
How  much  was  spent  in  2018  on  mission  expenses  for  the  Information  Offices?  (i.e 
between the office and Brussels, between the office and Strasbourg, between the office and all 
other locations outside the Member State where it is based). 
 
In 2018, the mission expenses of the European Parliament Liaison Offices (EPLOs) amounted 
to EUR 1.6 million (thereof approx. EUR 0.1 million for the Washington Liaison Office). For 
a detailed overview please refer to annex Q19. 
 
20. 
With regard to the Information Offices, please provide the budgetary details for 2018: 
 
a)  breakdown of EPLO´s per Member State and respective expenditure; 
 
b)  number of staff and official grade; 
 
c)  highest and lowest grade (in which MS are the highest grades and in which MS 
are the lowest ones); 
 
d)  a total overview of the costs of the offices and cost of the staff employed. 
 
a)  
breakdown of EPLO´s per Member State and respective expenditure; 
 
The  European  Commission  Representations  and  the  European  Parliament  Liaison  Offices 
(EPLOs) share premises in so called “Europe Houses” in the 28 capital cities of the Member 
States (with the exception of Athens and Brussels where they are located in separate premises; 
in Brussels, the EPLO has its offices in the “Station Europe” building).  
 
The European Parliament has a second, smaller representation office (“regional antenna”) in 
the six  largest  Member  States.  These offices are located in  the cities of Munich, Edinburgh, 
Marseille, Milan,  Barcelona and Wroclaw.  In these cities, premises are also shared with  the 
Commission  (with the  exception  of  Edinburgh  where  the  institutions  are  located  in  separate 
premises).  
 
Operational  expenditures  can  be  split  into  those  linked  to  general  communication  activities, 
addressed to stakeholders, media and the general public and those linked to specific activities 
(Euroscola, Europa Experiences, Open Door Days). A breakdown for both types of activities, 
by EPLOs is available in annex Q20 (a).  
 
1. 
Operational expenditures linked to the EPLOs’ general communication activities 
aimed at reaching different target groups (in particular stakeholders, media, youth):  
 
Please refer to annex Q20 (a).  
 
2. 
Operational  expenditures  linked  to  specific  activities  (Euroscola,  Europa 
Experiences, Open Door Days):  
 
Please refer to annex Q20 (a).  
 
3. 
Running costs 
 
Please refer to annex Q20 (a). 
 
An overview of the EPLOs expenditure from 2014 until 2018 is available in annex Q18. 
 
 
 
Page 27 of 91 
 

b)  
number of staff and official grade; 
 
The employment modalities for EU statutory staff (officials, temporary and contract agents) are 
set  out  in  the  Staff  Regulations  and  in  the  ‘General  implementing  provisions  governing 
competitions  and  selection  procedures,  recruitment  and  the  grading  of  officials  and  other 
servants of the European Parliament’. Remuneration for EU statutory staff is based on the Staff 
Regulations. There are no national employees in EPLO's.  
Please refer to annex Q20, point (b) (c). 
 
c)  
highest and lowest grade (in which MS are the highest grades and in which MS are the 
lowest ones); 
 
Please refer to annex Q20, point (b) (c). 
 
d)  
a total overview of the costs of the offices and cost of the staff employed. 
 
Please refer to annex Q18. 
 
It is important to stress that, contrary to the past, with today’s new communication platforms 
(mostly  digital),  the  vast  majority  of  communication  efforts  are  invested  in  communication 
professionals  who  conceive  and  implement  communication  actions.  Therefore,  staff  costs 
represent a real major share in communication. Staff in the EPLOs dedicate themselves fully to 
brief  the  media  on  Parliament  activities  and  priorities,  activating  one-to-one  contacts  with 
journalists,  offering  tailor-made  opportunities  for  media  coverage,  promoting  Parliament's 
messages  and  services  available  to  media  to  national,  regional,  multimedia  and  audio-visual 
media.  
 
1.  Staff in  the EPLOs participate in  the conception and implementation  of news-related 
events, press briefings and press conferences with Members. They organise interviews 
and press seminars in Strasbourg, Brussels and in their own country. They identify and 
target relevant media representatives to invite them to plenary sessions and seminars in 
Brussels  or  Strasbourg.  In  addition,  they  ensure  community  management  and  digital 
activation.  
 
Concerning salary costs of the staff employed in the Liaison Offices, the data originate from 
the  "Average  Salary  Cost  Report"  extracted  from  NAP  (IT  tool  for  salaries)  for  2018  and 
include all the elements  which constitute a cost  for the institution.  They  reflect  the status  as 
presented in the Organisation Chart as of 31/12/2018. 
 
21. 
What  were  the  full  costs  of  the  Washington  Office  in  2018  (i.e.  staff  salary  costs 
including all allowances and mission expenses, office and overhead costs, mission costs within 
the  United  States,  mission  costs  between  the  United  States  and  the  European  Union,  costs 
relating to the office's programme of activities)? Were there changes in posts in 2018? 
 
In total, 12 staff members are employed in the Washington office. The overall level of the staff 
did not change in 2018, but there are variations in the ratio AD/AST depending on the staff 
seconded by the DGs to the Washington office. 
 
The  overall  costs  of  salaries  and  allowances,  mission  costs  and  the  office’s  programme  of 
activities  amount  to  EUR  1.800.361  (salary  costs  amount  to  EUR  1.641.823,  mission  costs 
amount to EUR 121.338 and communication activities amount to EUR 38.200). 
Page 28 of 91 
 

For detailed salary costs, mission costs, and staff evolution of the Washington Liaison Office 
in 2018: Please refer to Annex Q21. 
 
In terms of infrastructure, in 2018, the rent for the offices amounted to EUR 411 057 while the 
utility and service charges totalled EUR 235 266. 
 
22. 
What is the cost of rent that Parliament supports for each representative offices in the 
Member States? 
 
The cost of rent in 2018 is detailed in Annex Q22.  
 
Empty fields indicate that the building is not subject to a rental agreement but owned by the 
European  Parliament.  It  is  to  be  noted  that  the  amounts  indicated  for  the  EPLOs  in  Athens, 
Copenhagen, Lisbon, The Hague and  La Valletta relate to parking facilities which are rented 
(whereas offices are owned by Parliament).  
 
23. 
Were there any legal or financial consequences following the decision to step back from 
the initially foreseen location for the Paris Liaison office? 
 
There are so far neither financial nor legal consequences. The cancellation of the Haussmann 
project  for  the  Paris  EPLO,  following  Council's  refusal  to  approve  the  building  project  as 
presented  by  the  Commission,  carries  limited  financial  risk  for  Parliament  since  no  lease 
contract had been signed yet. 
 
INTERPRETATION 
 
24. 
How  many  hours  per  week  did  interpreters  spend  in  their  booths  in  2018  delivering 
interpretation services per language? 
 
The data provided concern staff interpreters only. The data have been calculated using the hours 
of  booked  interpretation  time  in  PERICLES  (the  database  used  by  DG  LINC  for  managing 
meetings and interpretation) divided by the Full Time Equivalent (FTE) staffing numbers.  
 
The methodology, refined after comments in the resolution for the Discharge for 2014, corrects 
for all types of absences (annual leaves, part-times, parental and family leaves, maternity leaves 
and sick leaves).  
 
The reference period that  has  been used is  2018, excluding white weeks (i.e. weeks without 
parliamentary activity).  
 
The  table  below  provides  an  overview  of  the  average  number  of  interpretation  hours/weeks 
provided in 2018, per language. 
 
 
Page 29 of 91 
 

2018 
Average 



MS 
for 
(Mixed) 
(STR) 
(Committee) 
(Mini 
the full 
weeks 
weeks 
weeks 
session) 
year 
weeks 
BG 
13:46 
14:50 
13:28 
16:45 
13:43 
CS 
14:05 
15:29 
12:53 
17:38 
12:55 
DA 
13:29 
14:48 
12:30 
19:09 
14:17 
DE 
14:30 
15:02 
12:22 
17:11 
16:20 
EL 
13:26 
15:44 
10:59 
18:02 
13:58 
EN 
15:04 
16:09 
13:36 
17:12 
16:32 
ES 
14:39 
15:16 
12:44 
17:24 
16:17 
ET 
13:52 
15:39 
12:44 
17:46 
14:21 
FI 
12:04 
12:35 
11:24 
17:13 
11:50 
FR 
14:13 
15:39 
12:14 
17:11 
15:09 
HR 
12:36 
14:42 
12:01 
16:41 
13:03 
HU 
13:10 
13:31 
12:13 
17:52 
13:03 
IT 
14:54 
14:50 
13:07 
17:35 
14:53 
LT 
13:27 
14:35 
11:32 
18:42 
12:54 
LV 
12:45 
14:02 
11:11 
16:43 
14:55 
NL 
13:11 
14:49 
12:06 
16:56 
14:13 
PL 
13:22 
13:41 
12:15 
18:17 
13:05 
PT 
13:48 
15:56 
11:58 
17:09 
14:13 
RO 
13:26 
15:33 
13:01 
17:08 
14:08 
SK 
13:16 
14:41 
12:23 
17:11 
13:10 
SL 
13:17 
14:33 
12:37 
17:56 
13:03 
SV 
14:03 
15:29 
12:23 
18:12 
13:15 
 
For  the  period  between  2014  and  2018,  the  overall  averages  for  the  service  as  a  whole  are 
provided in the graph below. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 30 of 91 
 


 
 
The methodology used for the collection of these data was introduced in 2015, in the context 
of the discharge for 2014. In 2015 a modernisation process of the interpretation service was 
launched.  This  process  included  inter  alia  the  introduction  of  new  rules  regarding  the 
management of interpreter annual leave in order to increase the availability of staff interpreters 
during  parliamentary  activity  periods,  the  avoidance  of  non-interpreting  activities  for  staff 
interpreters during periods of parliamentary activity and the introduction of benchmarks for the 
assignment of staff interpreters. These benchmarks were used to increase the total volume of 
interpretation provided by staff interpreters and to achieve more balanced workloads between 
interpreters.  In  addition,  in  September  2018,  new  working  conditions  for  interpreters  were 
introduced. As a result of the above, the average number of hours per week interpreters spend 
on interpreting activities increased from 11:54 in 2014 to 13:47 in 2018.  
 
It is important to underline that, apart from interpretation duties, interpreters have a number of 
other  tasks  and  carry  out  a  number  of  other  activities.  These  comprise  notably  meeting 
preparation, language learning and maintenance, subject-based and specialized training, virtual 
classes with universities teaching interpretation, speech preparation and recording for training, 
tests and competitions, participation in tests and competitions as speakers, assessors or board 
members.  As  indicated  above,  most  of  these  activities,  with  the  exception  of  meeting 
preparation, are organised outside the parliamentary activity periods, in order not to affect the 
available capacity to deliver interpretation services.  
 
25. 
What was the lowest service delivery per hour/-week per language in 2018? What was 
the highest service delivery per hour/-week per language in 2018? The questions are focused 
on parliamentary working weeks (group weeks, committee weeks and plenary weeks). 
 
Increasing fairness  and achieving more balance in the staff interpreters’  workloads has been 
one of the over-riding objectives of modernisation process in DG LINC. In order to achieve this 
objective, new assignment benchmarks were introduced in relation to the highest and lowest 
average  delivery  per  week  in  2015.  An  average  of  11  hours  per  week  was  set  as  the  lowest 
delivery and 17 hours as the highest average delivery. 
 
As  the  graph  below  shows,  since  the  start  of  the  modernisation  process  in  2015,  through 
increased attention to this dimension, considerable progress has been achieved in ensuring more 
balanced workloads. 
Page 31 of 91 
 


Notably, as the graph below shows, the number of interpreters with a weekly average of less 
than 11 hours/week has decreased from 86 in 2014 to 11 in 2018 while only 3 interpreters (+/-
1%) exceeded an average of over 17 hours/week. 
 
 
 
The details on the lowest and the highest service delivery in 2018 per type of week are provided 
overleaf. 
 
2018 
Group weeks 
S weeks 
C weeks 
  
MIN 
MAX 
MIN 
MAX 
MIN 
MAX 
BG 
11:48 
16:38 
12:23 
14:58 
15:27 
17:34 
CS 
14:21 
16:30 
11:57 
13:18 
15:29 
18:15 
DA 
13:45 
15:39 
10:52 
13:02 
17:05 
21:32 
DE 
12:12 
17:40 
10:59 
16:32 
14:31 
20:22 
EL 
14:53 
16:30 
10:28 
13:18 
08:45 
20:15 
EN 
14:16 
19:13 
09:45 
14:39 
13:23 
20:02 
ES 
12:24 
17:27 
10:29 
14:25 
13:48 
19:44 
ET 
14:14 
16:52 
11:52 
13:47 
16:45 
18:24 
FI 
10:21 
14:49 
09:12 
12:20 
16:20 
19:43 
FR 
13:16 
17:41 
09:46 
15:06 
13:23 
21:45 
HR 
09:37 
16:03 
09:00 
13:42 
11:45 
18:44 
HU 
11:53 
14:45 
12:06 
14:35 
16:54 
18:57 
IT 
13:21 
16:40 
11:17 
15:24 
15:56 
20:32 
LT 
11:23 
16:43 
09:36 
13:28 
17:14 
22:27 
LV 
11:34 
15:29 
10:39 
13:08 
15:29 
17:49 
NL 
09:29 
18:24 
10:41 
13:02 
13:50 
20:53 
PL 
10:56 
16:58 
09:54 
14:09 
16:30 
20:40 
Page 32 of 91 
 

PT 
12:51 
17:59 
11:31 
14:01 
15:37 
19:01 
RO 
13:41 
17:03 
12:30 
15:25 
16:16 
18:06 
SK 
12:10 
17:58 
12:02 
13:57 
15:56 
19:11 
SL 
12:23 
16:37 
11:06 
13:36 
16:58 
18:56 
SV 
12:45 
16:14 
10:00 
13:41 
17:05 
20:16 
 
 
26. 
What  were  the  average  costs  for  interpreters  per  language  a)  staff  interpreters  b) 
freelance interpreters c) compared to SCIC interpreters? 
 
Salary costs for interpreters per language: Please refer to annex Q26. 
 
The data come from the Average Salary Cost Report extracted from NAP (IT tool for salaries) 
for 2018 and include all the elements representing a cost for the institution. They reflect the 
status as presented in the Organisation Chart of DG LINC as of 31/12/2018. The annex Q26 
table does not include the cost of freelance interpreters. 
 
The average cost/hour for staff interpreters was calculated as follows: 
 
Average 

  
((Salary costs + Pension provision - Community Tax) + Mission costs + Overhead costs + Annual 
  
cost 
leaves costs) - Assigned revenue 
per hour 
  
Total number of EP working hours  
  
 
The average cost/hour for freelance interpreters was calculated as follows: 
 
Average 

  
((Remunerations - Community Tax) + Overhead costs + Cost of freelance-specific DG LINC Units)     
cost 
- Assigned revenue 
per hour 
  
Total number of EP working hours  
  
 
The resulting costs/hour for each language and each category are as follows: 
 
Language 
Staff 
Freelance 
BG 
245 
282 
CS 
302 
295 
DA 
339 
314 
DE 
317 
268 
EL 
430 
267 
EN 
259 
274 
ES 
489 
240 
ET 
299 
361 
FI 
416 
325 
FR 
378 
238 
HR 
253 
348 
HU 
332 
277 
IT 
344 
263 
LT 
281 
283 
LV 
246 
298 
Page 33 of 91 
 

MT 

346 
NL 
328 
244 
PL 
316 
251 
PT 
406 
222 
RO 
250 
271 
SK 
293 
303 
SL 
245 
300 
SV 
322 
289 
 
It  is  important  to  emphasise  that  the  total  number  of  hours  worked  for  each  category  of 
interpreters, which is the basis for the cost calculations - is contingent on assignment choices 
that are not based on the status of the interpreters (whether an interpreter belongs to the staff or 
is an ACI) but on other factors such as interpreters’ effective availability, assignment rules set 
in the interpreters working conditions, the language combinations of the available interpreters 
matching the language needs in meetings, etc. 
 
In addition, for non-local freelance interpreters, arrangements for travel to and from the meeting 
place  impact  the  number  of  hours  available  for  interpretation  assignments.  As  a  result  the 
number  of  hours  delivered  by  either  category  of  interpreters  in  any  given  period  of  time  is 
variable, which also induces variations in the hourly cost. 
 
It should also be noted that the difference in average costs per hour of interpretation between 
the units is not only dependent on the number of hours worked but also on the age and grade 
structure  of  each  unit.  Cost  per  hour  differences  for  ACI  depend  largely  on  the  degree  of 
availability of local ACI, as well as on difference in distances and transport costs for non-local 
ACI. 
 
Parliament’s  services  do  not  have  access  to  comparable  data  for  DG  SCIC  (European 
Commission). 
 
27. 
Which  measures  of  simplification  and  streamlining  have  resulted  from  the 
implementation of the Bureau Strategy for the modernisation of conference management? 
 
In 2018, the implementation of the Bureau Strategy was the main task of the new Conference 
Organisation Directorate, created within DG LINC in February 2018. Within the framework of 
the 'One Stop Conference Organisation' project, the following measures were implemented: 
 
a) 
Further  improvements  to  the  booking  and  management  of  meetings,  with  the 
progressive  extension  of  the  MRS  (Meeting  Request  System)  booking  system  to  all  EP 
committees and Delegations, as well as to 8 Directorate-Generals; the remaining DGs and the 
political groups should be integrated in 2019. With MRS, requesters have a full overview of the 
status  of  their  bookings  via  dedicated  dashboards,  and  can  access  a  communication  module 
which is simpler and more efficient than email exchanges. See also question 28. 
 
 
Page 34 of 91 
 

b) 
Improved assistance to organisers, in particular for complex events such as High Level 
Conferences, with a dedicated unique interlocutor in charge of coordinating the contributions 
of all the services involved, organising task forces, advising on specific logistical and technical 
aspects  etc.  thus  saving  a  lot  of  work  and  time  that  can  be  refocused  on  the  political  and 
communication aspects of the event. 6 High Level Conferences and 37 other events received 
this type of assistance in 2018. Additionally, 124 cultural events sponsored by MEPs received 
administrative  and  logistical  support  following  the  transfer  of  the  service  to  the  Conference 
Organisation Directorate in July 2018. 
 
c) 
Improved  assistance  in  meetings  through  a  pilot  Meeting  Officer  function  to  be 
progressively  deployed  in  meetings  as  from  2019,  and  increased  cooperation  between 
conference technicians and conference ushers. 
 
  Progressive deployment of automated functions (e.g. switching to 'in camera' mode, audio 
recordings)  which  are  accessible  to  the  meeting  secretariat  via  touchpad,  notably  to 
facilitate the implementation of meetings run without the constant presence of an operator 
on the spot.  
  In agreement  with DG  ITEC, a streamlined OSCO set-up was deployed in a selected 
number of conference rooms through 2018. In the rooms concerned, DG LINC provides 
all  in-room  equipment  (cameras,  screens,  microphones,  loudspeakers  and  automation) 
and end-user support in the meeting room for ‘simple’ EP-internal connections, while DG 
ITEC provides Videoconferencing (VC) and intervenes for "complex" VC connections 
with  the  outside  world.  The  objective  is  to  make  EP  internal  VCs  in  these  conference 
rooms as simple as possible and available in self-service. 6 conference rooms have been 
equipped in this manner (4 in Strasbourg – LOW S4.4, LOW S4.5, SDM S1 & SDM 640 
and  2  in  Brussels  –  PHS  03C050  &  ASP  1G1)  and  are  operated  according  to  these 
principles. The pilot was successful and an agreement has been reached with DG ITEC 
to  extend  the  project  with  5  additional  meeting  rooms  in  2019,  all  in  Strasbourg  to 
facilitate  the  use  of  VC  connections  during  part-session  weeks.  More  rooms  in  both 
Brussels and Strasbourg will be added in 2019 and 2020. 
 
 
28. 
What measures have been taken since the 2016 Discharge Resolution to achieve more 
resource  efficiency  and  effectiveness  in  the  organisation  of  meeting  and  conference 
management in the Parliament? In particular, what efficiency gains have been achieved through 
the digitisation of processes/the deployment of IT tools? 
 
In addition to the measures described in the reply to question 27, the following measures were 
implemented to increase resource efficiency and organisational effectiveness through improved 
IT tools: 
 
Progressive  deployment  of  a  simplified  booking  interface  (MRS  -  Meeting  Request 
System)  for  meeting  requesters.
  The  interface  aims  at  simplifying  the  booking  process  by 
allowing the requesters to provide a precise description of their needs using an online form and 
to  monitor  the  booking  process  via  a  dedicated  dashboard  replacing  email  and  telephone 
queries. Service coordinators and service providers are quickly and reliably informed of any 
changes and updates via their own dashboards. In 2018, the MRS interface was rolled out to all 
EP committees and Delegations, as well as to 8 Directorate-Generals; the remaining DGs and 
the political groups are scheduled to be integrated in 2019. Out of 23 530 meetings recorded in 
the Pericles meetings database in 2018, 4 528 were booked using this new interface. 
 
Page 35 of 91 
 

The  next  steps  for  enriching  the  interface  include  digitising  administrative  workflows  for 
derogations and authorisations, as well as the tighter integration of additional workflows and 
services  such  as  audio  recording,  videoconferencing,  webstreaming  catering  and  risk 
assessments. 
 
Preparatory work for the deployment of an event and participant management platform 
(REGIS).
 REGIS will become an EP-wide platform for the registration of event participants, 
connected to the Pericles system and to the tools used or the accreditation of external guests. 
The  deployment  of  this  tool  is  expected  to  result  in  notable  efficiency  gains  as  the  current 
processes  for  managing  the  invitations  and  registrations  are  reported  by  Parliament  event 
organisers to be very time-consuming and unreliable for lack of adequate tools. The services 
carried  out  the  preparatory  work  for  a  software  selection  procedure  in  2018.  Subject  to  the 
evaluation results and the technical validation  a decision on software procurement is expected 
in 2019.  
 
 
ACCREDITED  PARLIAMENTARY  ASSISTANTS  (APA)  AND  LOCAL 
ASSISTANTS 
 
29. 
How many APAs were employed and on which salary scale in 2018 respectively? 
 
2 001 APAs  were  employed by the Parliament on 31 December 2018. Their distribution by 
grade is the following: 
 
Grade 
Count of NUP 
AP01 
65 
AP02 
36 
AP03 
54 
AP04 
56 
AP05 
113 
AP06 
100 
AP07 
164 
AP08 
166 
AP09 
187 
AP10 
204 
AP11 
213 
AP12 
140 
AP13 
164 
AP14 
91 
AP15 
86 
AP16 
57 
AP17 
31 
AP18 
26 
AP19 
48 
TOTAL 
2 001 
Page 36 of 91 
 

The data come from the "Average Salary Cost Report" extracted from NUP (IT tool for salaries) 
on 31 December 2018. 
 
30. 
Since  the  beginning  of  the  term,  how  many  APAs  have  applied  for  occasional 
teleworking?  Has  the  administration  officially  informed  the  MEPs  and  APAs  about  the 
existence of this possibility? 
 
From 31 October 2016, when the occasional teleworking entered into force, until 31 December 
2018 a total of 526.5 days of occasional teleworking were used by 55 APAs. 
 
Wide  ranging  information  activities  accompanied  the  launch  of  the  occasional  teleworking 
scheme, notably: 
 
1.  e-mail campaign to all staff members presenting the occasional teleworking scheme (31 
October 2016); 
2.  three different articles in Newshound, the EP’s internal newsletter sent by e-mail to all 
staff members (including APAs and staff working in the political groups) (9 November 
2016, 28 June 2017 and 27 September 2017); 
3.  comprehensive Intranet pages, accessible to MEPs and APAs, on occasional teleworking 
in order to provide all necessary information and related decisions/regulations; 
4.  a survey on occasional teleworking in September 2017 evaluating user satisfaction with 
the new scheme; with the survey and its result communicated to all staff members via e-
mail, as well as via Intranet and Newshound articles published in the same period. 
 
New APAs are invited by DG PERS to an induction course and to information sessions about 
their  obligations  and  administrative  procedures  including  information  about  occasional 
teleworking. 
 
Information is provided on demand to APAs by the APA Desk (APA Front Office Unit) and 
the Infodesk (Staff Front Office Unit). 
 
The  one-to-one  course  "How  to  manage  your  office"  available  for  MEPs  by  the 
Learning&Development Unit includes references to occasional teleworking. 
 
31. 
Considering repeated requests in previous discharge reports, does the Secretary-General 
intend to submit to the Bureau a proposal in order to fully align allowances between officials, 
other servants and APAs for Strasbourg missions? If yes, when? If not, why not? 
 
As indicated in previous years, according to Article 132 of the Conditions of employment of 
other  servants  (CEOS),  for  APAs  the  arrangements  for  reimbursement  of  mission  expenses 
shall be laid down in the implementing measures governing the statute of APAs. 
 
The new allowance rates for APAs decided by the Bureau on 2 October 2017 entered into force 
on 1 January 2018 and are the following: EUR 137, EUR 160 and EUR 183. 
 
Any  change  to  this  situation  would  require  a  revision  of  the  applicable  Rules,  which  is  a 
responsibility of the Bureau. 
 
 
 
Page 37 of 91 
 

32. 
Concerning  alleged  cases  of  APAs  going  to  Strasbourg  without  mission  orders,  for 
which the administration has no information, would controls based on cross checks between 
mission-orders and badging be foreseeable? 
 
Theoretically, controls based on cross checks between mission-orders and badging are possible 
but they might give raise to data protection concerns. See reply to Question 5. 
 
In the light of applicable data protection provisions, under current rules, badging records may 
only be used for checks in the context of investigations covered by Art. 27 and 28 of the Rules 
governing security and safety in the European Parliament (Bureau Decision of 15 January 2018 
- 2018/C 79/04).  
 
33. 
Considering that the costs estimated for APAs’ participation in official  missions and 
delegations  would  be  mostly  covered  by  the  parliamentary  assistance  allowance  (i.e.  travel 
costs and daily allowance), thus significantly reducing the additional budgetary burden for the 
European Parliament, and imagining specific conditions under which APAs would be allowed 
to attend (i.e. one per office, if accompanying the chair, a rapporteur or shadow, etc.), can the 
Secretary-General provide updated financial scenarios as per the different budgetary lines that 
would be impacted according also to the conditions mentioned above? 
 
The Missions unit estimated the financial scenario for APAs’ participation in official mission 
delegations based on the following elements: 
 
  travel cost (flight in business class for missions outside Europe as defined by IATA); 
  accommodation cost applying the hotel cost ceiling defined by the rules; 
  daily allowance applying the official rate defined by the rules; 
  the 2018 average mission cost reimbursed for one mission delegation was equal to 2 
691 EUR (1 226 EUR inside the EU and 2 993 EUR outside the EU); 
  99 mission delegations in 2018 (14 within the EU; 85 outside the EU); 
  a maximum of three APAs can go on a mission delegation, but only when the chair, the 
rapporteur and the shadow attend the delegation meetings. 
 
Based on the above stated 2018 average mission costs, the 2018 number of mission delegations 
and three APAs per mission, the total estimated cost for APAs’ mission delegations amount to 
EUR 814 715 (EUR 51 500 inside the EU and EUR 763 215 outside the EU). 
 
Budget item 422 - Expenditure relating to parliamentary assistance would be impacted in case 
of change of rules to allow APAs to participate in official missions and delegations. 
 
34. 
On  average,  how  many  assistants  (accredited  and  local),  paying  agents,  service 
providers and trainees have MEPs employed in 2018? What was the highest and lowest number 
of assistants (accredited and local), paying agents, service providers and trainees employed by 
single MEPs? 
 
On  average  members  had  11  assistants  (accredited  and  local),  1  paying  agents,  1  service 
providers and 3 trainees.  
 
 
 
Page 38 of 91 
 

The highest and lowest number of accredited assistants by single MEP were 4 (highest) and 0 
(lowest), local assistants 20 and 0, paying agents 3 and 0, service providers 29 and 0, trainees 
31 and 0. 
 
Pursuant to article 34 of the Implementing measures for the statute of Members, the maximum 
number of contracts for accredited parliamentary assistants is three for each MEP. This limit 
may be increased to four if an exemption is explicitly granted by the President. 
 
35. 
How  many  EP  Staff  (Officials,  Contract  Agents,  Temporary  Agents)  deal  with  the 
processing  of  contracts  for  accredited  assistants,  local  assistants,  invoices  of  the  service 
providers and what is the yearly cost of the Parliament for their salary (what is the income of 
all the EP staff dealing with contracts, invoices of the service providers)? 
 
By  October  2019,  30  persons  were  allocated  to  the  Parliamentary  Assistance  and  Members' 
General  Expenditure  Unit.  The  unit  receives  an  average  of  2  500  requests  per  month  (e.g. 
contracts,  invoices,  contract  modifications).    With  the  change  of  parliamentary  term,  the 
workload increased significantly (around 1 500 new contract-request received during the first 
two months of the new term).  
  
There are currently two ongoing recruitments on vacant AST-posts, and one person has a 50%-
working-time. 
  
 
2018 
2019 
Officials 
19 
19 
-AD 


-AST 
16 
16 
Temporary Agents 


Contractual Agents 


External Agents 


TOTAL 
30 
30 
  
The remuneration for EU statutory staff (officials, temporary and contract agents) are set out in 
the Staff Regulations. 
 
36. 
With  regards  to  visitor  groups’  rules,  and  considering  repeated  requests  in  previous 
discharge reports, do you intend to suppress the possibility to appoint APAs as head of a visitor 
groups? How many APAs were appointed head of a visitor group in 2018? 
 
The role of the head of a visitor group is laid out in the Rules governing the reception of groups 
of  visitors,  approved  by  the  Bureau  as  part  of  the  Compendium  of  rules  of  the  European 
Parliament.  
 
The appointment of a Parliamentary assistant (APA) is only one of several possibilities at the 
disposal  of  Members  for  the  designation  of  the  head  of  group,  to  whom  the  financial 
contribution will be paid.  
 
 
 
Page 39 of 91 
 

In fact, the revised rules have introduced the possibility for Members to designate: 
 
a.  A paying agent, under contract with the Member, who takes the financial responsibility 
for the sponsored group of visitors, using a standard contract provided by Parliament’s 
services. The financial contribution is paid to the bank account of the paying agent. A 
participant or staff member of the Member’s office should be designated as head of group, 
taking the organisational responsibility for the visit.  
 
b.  A  travel  agent,  bearing  the  organisational  and  financial  responsibility  for  the  group  of 
visitors. The head of group - present during the visit - is a person with the legal authority 
or delegation to represent the travel agency. The financial contribution will be transferred 
to the account of the travel agency.  
 
c.  An individual, either a participant or Member’s staff, who takes the organisational and 
financial  responsibility  for  the  group.  The  head  of  group  may  choose  to  receive  the 
financial  contribution  on  his/her  personal  bank  account  or  ask  for  the  financial 
contribution  to  be  transferred  to  a  bank  account  held  by  the  group.  This  includes  the 
possibility to execute payments to the bank accounts of “moral entities” such as schools, 
institutions or associations.  
 
In April 2018, the Bureau Working Group on Information and Communication endorsed a note 
from  DG  COMM  on  the  evaluation  of  the  implementation  of  the  revised  rules.  The  Bureau 
Working Group acknowledged that the main objectives of the revision had been met, namely: 
cash payments have been almost eradicated and Members make use of the possibility offered 
by the revised rules to give the financial responsibility of sponsored visits to professionals (i.e. 
paying agents or travel agencies) instead of to accredited parliamentary assistants (APAs). 
 
Since the introduction of the revised rules, the percentage of groups with an APA as head of 
group has sharply decreased compared to previous years: from 42% of groups in 2016 to 26% 
in 2018. 
 
Any  change  to  this  situation  would  require  a  revision  of  the  applicable  Rules,  which  is  a 
responsibility of the Bureau. 
 
37. 
Can  you  please  detail  the  different  services  which  remain  available  to  APAs  after 
termination of their contracts? When were the first transfers of unemployment benefits to APAs 
performed?  When  were  the  first  transfers  of  untaken  leave  to  APAs  performed?  Has  the 
situation of all APAs  that  are currently  redundant  been  regularised?  If so, when did the last 
regularisation take place? 
 
After the termination of their contract, APAs have access to all the services that are provided 
to former staff, such as:  
 
  information about unemployment and pension rights 
  employment certificates 
  access to documents in personal file 
  resettlement  allowance  to  be  paid  if  the  MEP  makes  the  request  and  there  is  enough 
budget available.  
 
 
 
Page 40 of 91 
 

The DG PERS Infodesk  in the Staff Front Office Unit and the APA Desk in the APA Front 
Office  Unit  are  available  to  former  APAs  and  regularly  receive  requests.  Both  units  are 
available to APAs after their contracts have finished for any administrative questions such as 
providing certificates, statements, etc. 
 
The DG PERS Payroll Unit is involved in the delivery of employment certificates and in the 
payment of the compensation for contract termination (if applicable). 
 
Unemployment benefits are paid by the Commission’s PMO if all the conditions are fulfilled. 
The time to process the request depends on the internal functioning of PMO, but usually takes 
about one to two months. 
 
In  2018,  a  total  of  463  APA  contracts  were  terminated  or  expired.  In  85  cases  the  person 
continued with a contract in the EP (different status or different MEP).  
 
The EP does not have information about how many APAs requested unemployment benefits or 
when  they  started  receiving  them  as  this  is  handled  by  the  Paymaster’s  Office  of  the 
Commission. 
 
The regularisation of the untaken leave balance of APAs who had their contract ended or were 
recruited to assist a different MEP after the change of term in 2019 was finished by mid-August 
2019 with some exceptions where additional information was necessary. The regularisation is 
therefore completed with the exception of 9 cases which remain open (no answer at all or not 
satisfactory or waiting for former MEP confirmation). 
 
38. 
What  are  the  efforts  of  the  different  services  to  reduce  the  delay  of  the  transfer  of 
unemployment benefits? Could you detail why it is necessary for former APAs to go in front 
of  the  Belgium  national  authority  regarding  their  unemployment  coming  only  from  the 
European system? Would it not be more efficient to make the system work with only one office 
desk? Why does the Health insurance scheme from the European institutions intervene only at 
the complementary stage while the benefit of unemployment is proven? 
 
Unemployment  benefits  are  managed  by  the  European  Commission,  the  legal  basis  is 
Commission  Regulation  (EC)  nº  780/2009  of  27  August,  applicable  by  analogy  to  APAs 
pursuant to Article 135 of the CEOS. 
 
Legal basis: 
Article 1.2.b of Commission Regulation 780/2009: 
"if unemployment benefit is payable under national legislation, he [a former APA] shall apply 
for it to the appropriate authorities in his place of residence, as soon as possible, and no later 
than 30 days following the termination of his service with a Community institution"

 
The JSIS health insurance scheme provides primary cover only for staff in active service (and 
their family members if they are not covered by another scheme). Therefore, if the former staff 
member on unemployment benefit can obtain cover elsewhere, he or she must do so first. This 
rule applies not only to APAs benefiting from unemployment benefits, but also, for example, 
to retired staff members and to family members of officials in active service. If an APA decides 
to  remain  in  Belgium,  he  or  she  must  first  contact  the  Belgian  national  authorities  for  the 
primary unemployment benefit. The EU unemployment benefit is supplementary to the national 
unemployment  benefit.  The  APAs  benefit  from  the  supplementary  cover  without  paying 
contributions. 
 
Page 41 of 91 
 

DG PERS organised in  2018 an information  session on the end of contracts  which included 
speakers from the relevant services in the Commission (several such information sessions were 
organised in 2019). The objective was to provide APAs with all the available information to 
prepare in advance and proceed swiftly after the end of their contract.  
 
The DG PERS Staff Front Office Unit has been in regular contact with representatives of the 
Commission’s PMO in order to ensure that clear information has been conveyed to staff facing 
unemployment. The PMO gave presentations at conferences organised by DG PERS about end 
of contract situations (including question and answer sessions). The PMO was also present at 
the departure  desks,  and was  providing support to DG PERS to  provide  detailed answers to 
questions regarding unemployment rights.  
 
Information regarding unemployment is also provided during conferences (available on Intranet 
and webstreaming), at the departure desk, on the intranet, by email, telephone, etc. 
 
39. 
How many individual Members had more than 10 local assistants in 2018? 
 
128  Members  had  more  than  10  local  assistants  in  2018  (local  assistants  as  well  as  service 
providers, who may or may not have been employed simultaneously). 
 
40. 
Why does DG FINS not accept two separate contracts for local assistants, amounting to 
40 hours on the one hand and 20 hours a week on the other hand, in the Member States where 
the Directive 2003/88/CE applies to each contract separately? We must bear in mind that the 
legislation  of  the  State  in  which  the  Member  was  elected  is  respected.  The  Working  Time 
Directive establishes minimum requirements for ‘workers’. However, it does not explicitly state 
whether  its  provisions  set  absolute  limits  in  case  of  concurrent  contracts  with  one  or  more 
employer(s) or if they apply to each employment relationship separately. Conversely, the Czech 
Republic, Denmark, Spain, Latvia, Hungary, Malta, Poland, Portugal, Romania, and Slovakia 
apply the Directive per contract. 
 
DG Finance is aware and acknowledges that there are differences in the implementation of the 
Working Time Directive among Member States. 
 
Refusal of defrayal of a contract of a local assistant is justified on several grounds based on 
common criteria, in light of the rules in place at EU and national level, the Financial Regulation 
(FR) and the implementing measures for the Statute for Members of the European Parliament 
(IMMS).  
 
In  particular,  the  IMMS  require  that  local  assistants  only  carry  out  activities  linked  to  the 
exercise of the parliamentary mandate and that the Members ensure that outside activities do 
not interfere with the performance by the assistant of their duties or run counter to the financial 
interests of the European Union. 
 
To this end a risks analysis is made, which may include an assessment of the total working time 
or the exercise by the assistant of outside activities when there is a risk of interference with the 
performance by the local assistant of his or her assistant duties.  
 
 
Page 42 of 91 
 

STAFF 
 
41. 
In  2018  there  was  a  considerable  increase  of  expenditure  on  officials  and  temporary 
staff amounting to EUR 652 349 114, as the largest spending category (accounting to 34% of 
total commitments for 2018). What is the current status and the future of the temporary recruited 
staff in the EPLO offices for the European elections (51 contract agents)? 
 
Part of the election budget was used for the recruitment of 51 contract agents to reinforce the 
team of Press officers and Public Relations officers of the EP in the Member States.  
 
The  staff  reinforcement  in  the  EP  Liaison  Offices  (EPLOs)  affected  all  communication 
activities, resulting in a positive impact on the output, outcome and outreach of these activities. 
The benefit of the reinforced capacity all over the legislative term should be seen in a longer-
term perspective as a trigger to build sustained relations with all media actors, civil society and 
citizens  concerned,  and  as  the  best  way  to  contribute  to  the  visibility  of  the  work  of  the 
Institution and its Members.  
 
As requested in the resolution of 28 March 2019 on Parliament’s estimates for the financial 
year  2020,  an  assessment  by  DG  COMM  of  the  impact  of  the  reinforcement  of  the  Liaison 
Offices with press officers and press relation officers to support the 2019 election campaign has 
been transmitted to the Committee on Budgets on 10 September 2019. 
 
As a result, it is planned to extend the duration of the contracts of the reinforcement staff in the 
EPLOs, subject to the availability of the corresponding funds in the 2020 budget. 
 
A corresponding number of AST posts would be progressively redeployed over the next two 
years from the EPLOs, half inside DG COMM and half to other DGs. 
 
42. 
Please  provide  the  information  concerning  recent  changes  in  target  levels  for  senior 
female management staff (heads of unit and directors). Please indicate the concrete steps that 
have  been  undertaken  and/or  planned  to  address  problems  of  gender  imbalance.  How  many 
women were employed in senior management positions in the Parliament in 2018? How many 
men? Please also provide corresponding figures in 2017. 
 
In  January  2017,  the  Bureau  adopted  the  Papadimoulis  Report  on  Gender  Equality  in  the 
European Parliament Secretariat - State of play and the way forward 2017-2019. The report sets 
targets for women Heads of Unit (40%), women Directors (35%) and women Directors-General 
(30%).  Additionally,  it  introduces  targets  by  DGs  for  women  Heads  of  Unit  and  women 
Directors (30% each).  
 
The  representation  of  women  among  Directors-General  remained  stable  at  two  in  absolute 
numbers during the period 2017 to 2018. By the end of 2018 the percentage was 18.2%.  
 
Specific emphasis was put on the appointment of women Directors, thus with 34% approaching 
the target at the end of 2018 compared to 30% in 2017. There were several new appointments 
in the first semester of 2019. As a result, the number of women directors increased to 37% in 
the beginning of 2019 and therefore clearly topped the overall target of 35% for 2019.  
 
In 2017, there were 10 male Directors-General and 32 male Directors. In 2018, these figures 
changed respectively as follows: 9 male Directors-General and 31 male Directors. 
 
Page 43 of 91 
 

The ratio of women Heads of Unit appointed by the Secretary-General has increased as well 
(34% at the end of 2017 to 38% at the end of 2018). It should be noted that in October 2019, 
this  ratio  has  reached  39%.  This  illustrates  the  efficiency  of  the  Secretary-General’s  notes 
requiring  that  in  every  Head  of  Unit  recruitment  procedure,  if  possible,  at  least  one  female 
candidate should be proposed. 
 
In  May  2017,  the  High  Level  Group  on  Gender  Equality  and  Diversity  (HLG)  adopted  a 
Roadmap which outlined how the report shall be implemented between 2017 and 2019. It listed 
concrete actions and a clear timeline for specific measures regarding management, professional 
training,  awareness  raising  on  gender  equality,  work-life  balance  measures  and  the  regular 
monitoring  of  gender  balance  through  statistics.  The  implementation  of  these  measures  is 
closely followed. 
 
43. 
New  Member  States  are  disproportionally  underrepresented  at  senior  level  in  the 
administration: the number of Heads of Units, Directors and Director Generals is dramatically 
small.  Could  you  provide  a  table  by  nationality  for  Heads  of  Unit,  Directors  and  Directors-
General at the end of 2018 and could you compare it with 2009, 2014 and 2018/19? 
 
Management by nationality: What appears to be an underrepresentation of New Member State 
nationals  is  the  direct  consequence  of  the  2004  Staff  Regulations  reform  leading  to  the 
recruitment of the officials from these states mainly at grade AD5 while for the appointment as 
a Head of Unit the grade AD9 is required. For exact figures please refer to Annex Q43. Acting 
(faisant  fonction)  managers  are  not  counted  in  these  statistics,  only  the  formally  appointed 
managers. 
 
44. 
How  many  of  the  new  posts  in  2018  were  occupied  by  staff  who  successfully 
participated in an official EPSO competition? How many posts, and which ones, were occupied 
by  staff  who  did  not  successfully  participate  in  an  official  EPSO  competition,  or  did  not 
participate in any EPSO competition, and what is the reason for this in each case? 
 
According  to  Article  29(1)  of  the  Staff  Regulations,  the  Appointing  Authority  (AA)  has  the 
obligation, before filling a post, to consider first the applications from EP established officials 
(in-house  transfer),  then  those  from  established  officials  of  other  EU  institutions  (inter-
institutional transfer). Only if no suitable internal or inter-institutional candidate is found, can 
the AA consider to appoint as an official a successful laureate of an EPSO competition or an 
EP internal or “passerelle” competition. ). 
 
In 2018, 93 laureates from EPSO competition reserve lists and 51 laureates from EP internal or 
“passerelle” competitions were recruited to vacant posts. 
 
45. 
Could  the  Secretary-General  provide  the  number  and  type  of  internal  competitions 
during 2014-2018/19? How many people passed the competition, by gender, nationality and for 
which grades? 
 
Internal competitions: Please refer to Annex Q45. 
 
 
Page 44 of 91 
 

46. 
How many staff of the Parliament were promoted in 2018 by more than one grade? If 
there are cases of fast-track promotions, which grades in the respective DGs are concerned? 
What were the reasons? Could you classify the promoted staff by grade and nationality? 
 
No staff were promoted by more than one grade in the EP in 2018. In any event, this possibility 
does not exist because, according to Article 45 of the Staff Regulations, “promotion shall be 
exclusively by selection from among officials who have completed a minimum of two years in 
their grade”

 
47. 
How many staff of the Parliament in function group AD 12 or higher were promoted in 
2018  without  being  assigned  to  the  following  types  of  posts:  Heads  of  Unit,  Directors  or 
Directors-General? What were the reasons? 
 
In 2018, there were no promotions beyond grade AD12 without managerial responsibility. 
 
48. 
Could the Secretary-General provide a detailed overview of all posts in Parliament in 
the years 2014-2019, including distribution of posts by service, gender, nationality, category 
and type of contract? 
 
Posts in the EP (2014-2018): Please refer to Annex Q48. 
 
49. 
Can  you  please  explain  the  system  used  for  the  reassignment  of  former  members  of 
Presidents’ Cabinets to new posts in the EP administration? Are you aware of any reassignment 
in positions where a post was not published? 
 
Officials assigned to the Cabinets of EP Presidents are seconded in the interests of the service. 
As per Article 38 of Staff Regulations (SR), at the end of the secondment, they are reinstated 
in the posts formerly occupied, unless they are recruited on another post following a selection 
procedure or a published vacancy notice. 
 
Temporary  servants  from  Political  Groups  assigned  to  the  Cabinets  of  EP  Presidents  are 
reassigned in the position formerly occupied in the Group.  
 
As regards temporary servants directly recruited by the Cabinets of EP Presidents they cease 
their duties following the notice period provided by the rules. 
 
Contract  agents  in  the  Cabinets  of  EP  Presidents  have  fixed-term  contracts  that  cannot  go 
beyond the end date of the Cabinet's mandate. 
 
50. 
The President's Cabinet: how many staff were employed in the President's Cabinet on 
31/12/2018  (and  on  31/12/2017  by  way  of  comparison)?  How  many  were  previously  EP 
officials,  political  group  staff, APAs,  secondments  from  other institutions (which ones),  and 
other categories (which ones)? 
 
Please refer to Annex Q50. 
 
 
Page 45 of 91 
 

51. 
How many staff worked in the President’s private office and Protocol service in 2018 
(including  any  seconded  or  lent  posts)?  Please  compare  this  situation  with  the  previous  six 
cabinets. 
 
Please refer to Annex Q51. Streamline data available only for staff employed in the Cabinet of 
the 5 previous Presidents. As a general rule, there is 1 protocol officer in each Cabinet. 
 
52. 
Could  the  Secretary-General  elaborate  on  the  Campaign  for  Fair  Internships  and 
improvement  on  situation  of  unpaid  traineeships?  What  was  the  total  amount  paid  for 
internships in 2018 and how has this amount evolved in the past 5 years? 
 
Traineeships within the Secretariat of the European Parliament are all paid, and this has been 
the case for many years already.  The two new sets of rules that entered into force in 2019 for 
traineeships in the Secretariat and traineeships for Members foresee only paid traineeships. 
 
Cost of 2018 traineeships: EUR 1.1 Million for traineeships in the field of translation and EUR 
4.9 Million for Schuman traineeships. 
 
In 2014, the Schuman traineeships budget was EUR 3.34 Million and the budget for traineeships 
in the field of translation of EUR 1.1 Million. 
 
Over the last 5 years (2014-2018), the overall trainee budget has grown by 35%. 
 
As indicated in the follow-up replies to par. 31 and 32 of the resolution on discharge in respect 
of the implementation of the general budget of the European Parliament for 2017, the new rules 
concerning Members’ trainees were adopted by the Bureau on 10 December 2018 and entered 
into force on 2 July 2019.  
 
The reform of the rules focused on the main objective of ensuring a better protection for both 
trainees and Members. More precisely, the reform aimed at overcoming shortfalls of the former 
system while aligning, to  the extent possible, to the system applicable to  trainees within the 
Secretariat of the European Parliament. 
 
Article  10  of  the  new  rules  foresees  that  all  Members’  trainees  who  have  concluded  an 
agreement with the European Parliament are entitled to a monthly allowance ranging between 
EUR 800 and EUR 1 313 for a full-time contract. Any allowance or scholarship coming from 
another source will be deducted. 
 
53. 
Is it possible to have more detailed information about the line 1404 in the EP budget? 
How much is spent for seconded national experts? 
 
In  2018,  budget  line  1404  was  mainly  devoted  to  the  payment  of  allowances  for  Schuman 
trainees and allowances for Seconded National Experts (hereafter SNEs). 
 
The cost of the SNEs was approximately EUR 1.8 Million, in line with previous years. 
 
The overall occupancy rate (FTE or full time equivalent) – in other words, the number of SNEs 
working in the EP at any one time - tends to stay between 35 and 40. 
 
 
Page 46 of 91 
 

54. 
In relation to the budget heading other staff, which has seen an increase from 2017, is it 
possible  to  have  a  detailed  description  of  the  amounts  that  are  being  used  for  the  seconded 
national experts to the European Parliament and their number? 
 
The budget allocated to SNEs follows a growth based on (or close to) indexation. In fact, the 
average number of SNEs has consistently remained between 35 and 40 agents. 
 
In 2018, there were no remarkable changes in terms of the SNE workforce: the total SNE cost 
was about EUR 1.8 Million, which is in line with that of previous years. 
 
This cost has remained stable over time as the quotas allocated to DGs were gradually reduced 
(53 authorised in 2015, 43 in 2016, 42 in 2017 and 40 in 2018). 
 
55. 
To  what  extent  do  Member  States  contribute  to  their  remuneration  and  what  is  the 
average unit cost of the Parliament's economical supports for each seconded national expert? 
Furthermore,  what  is  the  average  length  of  contract  of  a  national  expert  seconded  to  the 
European Parliament? 
 
Allowances are granted to SNEs as a compensation to cover secondment costs. The maximum 
amount  of  the  allowances  received  by  SNEs  from  the  Parliament  is  fixed  on  the  basis  of 
geographical factors determined at the time of entry into service. 
 
From this amount, any secondment allowances paid to the experts by their home institutions 
are deducted so that the total amount of the allowance does not exceed the maximum amount 
set by the European Parliament. In 2018, no SNE declared any allowances paid by their home 
institutions. 
 
SNEs receive, on top of the above-mentioned allowances, a salary from their home institution. 
The Parliament does not have access to figures related to the salaries SNEs receive from their 
home institutions. 
 
In 2018, the average amount of allowances paid to SNEs was EUR 4 250 per month, or EUR 
51 000 per year. 
 
The average length of contract of a national expert is approximately 3 years. 
 
56. 
How many Members have left office in 2018 (in comparison to 2017)? How many of 
those have notified the Parliament of their new employment after leaving office? Have these 
notifications been checked? If yes, how and by whom? In how many cases were the notified 
activities found to influence, or enable others to influence, EU policy or decision-making? 
 
Twenty-three Members ended their mandates in the course of 2018, as opposed to 31 Members 
in  2017.  There  is  no  requirement  for  former  Members  to  notify  Parliament  of  their  new 
employment after leaving office. In cases of Members who leave as a result of incompatibility, 
if it is based on European Law (the 1976 Act concerning the election of the members of the 
European Parliament by universal suffrage) the election or appointment of the Member to an 
incompatible post may be ascertained from reliable public sources, and if it is based on national 
law  the  relevant  Member  State  authorities  are  required  to  inform  Parliament.  In  cases  of 
Members who leave Parliament by  resignation, there is  no  requirement  for Parliament to  be 
informed of their subsequent employment or occupation. 
 
Page 47 of 91 
 

The  Code  of  Conduct  for  Members  of  the  European  Parliament  with  respect  to  financial 
interests and conflict of interests (Annex I of the Rules of Procedure) states in its Article 6: 
 
-  Former  Members  of  the  European  Parliament  who  engage  in  professional  lobbying  or 
representational activities directly linked to the European Union decision-making process 
should  inform  the  European  Parliament  thereof  and  may  not,  throughout  the  period  in 
which  they  engage  in  those  activities,  benefit  from  the  facilities  granted  to  former 
Members under the rules laid down by the Bureau to that effect1.   
 
57. 
How many civil servants have left the service and in how many cases was permission 
for  another  job  requested,  were  there  any  cases  of  conflicts  of  interest  in  taking  up  a  new 
position? 
 
In 2018, 138 civil servants left the service (2 resignations and 136 retirements), out of which 
21 people submitted a declaration for exercising a professional activity after leaving the service, 
in  line  with  Article  16  of  the  Staff  Regulations.  Authorisation  was  granted  for  all  activities 
declared. For 2 of them restrictions were imposed due to the link of the proposed activity with 
those agents’ jobs when they worked for the European Parliament. 
 
58. 
How  many  temporary  and  contract  staff  are  concerned  by  Brexit?  How  many  APAs 
with UK nationality but working for non-British members are concerned? 
 
Currently, there are 32 contract agents and 54 temporary agents with UK nationality working 
in the European Parliament. 
 
Out of the 32 contract agents, 22 are staff members of the Secretariat while the remaining 10 
work for the political groups. Out of the 22 contract agents working in the Secretariat, 12 have 
a second EU nationality while out of the 10 working for the political groups, 1 has another EU 
nationality.  
 
Out of the 54 temporary agents, 13 are staff members of the Secretariat while 41 work for the 
political groups. Out of the 13 working in the Secretariat, 7 have another EU nationality while 
out of the 41 working for the political groups, 8 have another EU nationality.  
 
Thus,  there  are  19  contract  agents  of  exclusive  UK  nationality  and  33  temporary  agents  of 
exclusive UK nationality working in the European Parliament. For all of these staff members, 
a case-by-case evaluation has taken place as requested by the Bureau in its decision of 2 May 
2018. These colleagues have been subject to a case-by-case assessment in accordance with the 
decision  of  the  Bureau  of  2  May  2018  and  were  all  granted  an  exception  to  the  nationality 
requirement in the event that the UK leaves the European Union. Thus, their employment in 
Parliament will not end due to nationality.  
 
76 accredited parliamentary assistants (APAs) with UK nationality are currently working for 
Members of the European Parliament. Out of the 76 APAs, 15 work for non-UK MEPs. 9 of 
them  have  a  further  EU  nationality.  For  the  remaining  6,  a  derogation  to  the  nationality 
requirement can be issued on the request of the Member concerned. 
 
                                                 
1 Bureau Decision of 12 April 1999 on facilities granted to former Members of the European 
Parliament. 
Page 48 of 91 
 

59. 
How many burnout cases were there in the administration in 2018? Can you specify by 
type of contract and function? As a minimum, please provide aggregated data in the way it is 
provided by all other Institutions undergoing discharge. 
 
Medical  leave  certificates  generally  do  not  allow  to  distinguish  between  different  medical 
pathologies. Therefore, no exact data exists on the incidence of burnout in the EP. Due to the 
nature  of  burnout  and  its  diagnosis,  its  statistics  would  only  be  showing  a  limited  scope  of 
prevalence,  for  following  reasons:  1)  the  cases  known  by  the  medical  services  would  only 
represent a certain percentage of the cases (of those absent or not, and those whose diagnosis is 
known and confirmed or not) 2) other diagnosis are often concomitant to burnout which makes 
burnout more problematic to identify.  
 
60. 
The  purpose  of  the  certification  procedure  is  to  facilitate  the  selection  of  officials  in 
function group AST, in grade 5 and above, who are suitable for appointment to a post in function 
group AD. How many EP officials have been chosen for the certification procedure in the last 
five years and how many have successfully passed? How many of them have, in the meantime, 
been recruited to AD posts? 
 
During the last five certification procedures (2014-2018) 35 officials were selected to take the 
certification training programme. Out of this number 24 succeeded the certification exams and 
17 were appointed to AD posts in the EP. Four other successful officials have been transferred 
to the European Commission. Currently in the European Parliament there are three certification 
laureates from the last five procedures still in the AST function group. 
 
61. 
What is the total number of certified officials (not only in the last five years) who are 
still working in an AST grade? In which DGs are they currently employed? 
 
In total there are 12 certification laureates still in the AST function group. The breakdown is as 
follows: INLO: 4, COMM: 2, EXPO: 1, ITEC: 1, FINS: 1, LINC: 1. 
 
Two certified officials are currently seconded to political groups. Nine certified officials out of 
remaining ten were certified before the modification of the internal rules in 2016 when the DGs 
were not involved in the selection procedure of the candidates for the certification procedure. 
 
62. 
In  the  answers  to  the  questionnaire  on  the  2014  EP  discharge  it  was  indicated:  "DG 
PERS is currently  exploring ways  of how to  increase the uptake of certified officials  to  AD 
positions  taking  into  account  the  example  of  the  European  Commission  and  other  EU 
institutions." What has been undertaken and achieved since then? 
 
In 2016, modifications were made to Parliament's procedure for the selection of candidates. The 
introduction  of  the  interview  stage  was  aimed  at  ensuring  that  the  selected  candidates  have 
sufficient motivation and language skills to pass the certification training programme organised 
by  the  European  School  of  Administration  (EUSA).  Closer  involvement  of  the  DGs  in  the 
selection procedure, by giving them a possibility to award priority points to a limited number 
of high-scoring candidates in their services, was designed to encourage the appointment of AST 
officials who have passed the certification exams to AD posts. 
 
These  modifications  were  positively  received  by  the  Joint  Committee  for  Certification 
(COPAC),  by  DGs  and  by  candidates  for  certification.  Closer  involvement  of  DGs  in  the 
selection procedure has  led to  noticeably faster appointment of certification laureates to  AD 
posts since introduction of modifications.  
Page 49 of 91 
 

To illustrate the beneficial effect of the said modifications, only one certified official (out of 8 
after the reform) still works in the AST function group. 
 
63. 
With the 2014 Staff Regulation a new category of "AST/SC" officials was introduced 
with  lower  salaries  and  slow  career  progression.  Does  the  Appointing  Authority  consider 
introducing  a  certification  procedure  from  AST/SC  to  AST  in  analogy  to  the  certification 
procedure AST to AD? 
 
The Staff Regulations do not provide for the possibility for AST/SC officials to take part in a 
certification procedure to become AST officials. Article 45a of the Staff Regulations clearly 
offers  this  opportunity  only  to  AST  officials  to  become  AD  officials.  Thus,  the  Appointing 
authority  cannot  introduce  a  similar  procedure  for  AST/SC  colleagues.  However,  AST/SC 
colleagues have the possibility of taking part in internal and open AST competitions. 
 
64. 
In the 2017 discharge resolution for the Parliament, the Parliament itself stressed that 
the  EXPO  crew  members  in  the  House  of  European  History  must  be  treated  better  in  the 
following  areas:  their  working  hours  must  be  predictable,  there  must  be  a  decent  leave 
arrangement, proper attire must be provided. Can you please give more information on how this 
has been achieved? 
 
The management of the House of European History has continued the strict follow-up of the 
performance of the contract, which has resulted in measurable improvements.  
 
Planning schedules are now established and communicated to the crew one month in advance 
of the execution of the services thus enabling the crew to properly plan their working hours and 
their leave. Moreover, lunch break durations have been extended from the legally required 30 
minutes (on a full working day) to at least 45 minutes and, when possible, one hour.  
 
On top of the provision of uniforms, the company has offered the possibility for the crew to buy 
parts  of  their  attire  (trousers,  shoes)  and  be  reimbursed.  This  possibility  allows  for  quick 
interventions when the condition of the uniforms requires it. 
 
The House provided chairs and stools for all positions occupied by the floor staff. The House 
also provided an additional dressing room for women.    
 
65. 
It seems that one of the staff involved in the OLAF investigations on EASO is currently 
working in the European Parliament. Can you please provide more information on this? 
 
OLAF’s  investigation  also  related  to  one  staff  member  who  is  currently  working  in  the 
Parliament, and Parliament’s Secretariat is conducting appropriate procedural steps in the light 
of this.  
 
66. 
Trainees  currently  have  a  fixed  reduction  in  the  canteens.  Considering  the  constant 
increase  in  prices,  would  the  Parliament  services  consider  negotiating  a  reduced  percentage 
instead? 
 
All  holders  of  a  ‘Trainee’  badge  are  entitled  to  a  set  price  reduction  in  the  self-service 
restaurants in all three places of work on all hot meals offered, including the ‘dish of the day’ 
already  offered  at  a  low  price  of  EUR  5.50.  In  Luxembourg,  the  reduction  is  EUR  0.50,  in 
Strasbourg it is EUR 0.80 and in Brussels until July 2019 it was EUR 0.50.  
 
Page 50 of 91 
 

Parliament’s services negotiated that, with the entry into force of the new catering contracts in 
Brussels in August 2019, the discount for trainees was increased to EUR 0.60 in all catering 
outlets. 
 
POLITICAL GROUPS, PARTIES AND FOUNDATIONS 
 
67. 
Please outline the number of posts, by group, grade, gender and nationality, of the staff 
working for the political groups in 2018. 
 
Please refer to Annex Q67. 
 
68. 
Could  you  also  provide  the  average  time  it  takes  to  be  promoted,  by  gender  and 
nationality, in each political group for the period 2014-2018/19? 
 
Please refer to Annex Q68. 
 
69. 
Pursuant to Article 6(10) of Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 114l/2014 of the European 
Parliament  and  of  the  Council  of  22  October  2014  on  the  statute  and  funding  of  European 
political parties and European political foundations, the Director of the Authority for European 
Political  Parties  and  European  Political  Foundations  shall  submit  annually  a  report  to  the 
European Parliament, the Council and the Commission on the activities of the Authority. At 
this stage the report has not yet been published for 2018. Last year, this report was published 
for the first time, but was not made public to either Members or to citizens; it was only to the 
President and the Secretary-General. Can you please explain why this report is not made public 
to MEPs and to other citizens? 
 
In  line  with  Article  6(10)  of  Regulation  (EU,  Euratom)  No  114l/2014  of  the  European 
Parliament  and  of  the  Council  of  22  October  2014  on  the  statute  and  funding  of  European 
political parties and European political foundations, the Authority for European political parties 
and  European  political  foundations  prepares  in  each  year  a  report  on  the  activities  of  the 
Authority and submits that report to the European Parliament, the Council and the Commission. 
 
The Authority was consulted as the originator of the report and expressed reservations against 
publication of the report for the following reason: the report sets out, amongst other things, the 
Authority’s administrative infrastructure, the current limits of its enforcement powers as well 
as its enforcement priorities for the near future. According to the Authority, it would negatively 
affect compliance by European political parties and European political foundations with that 
Regulation if documents setting out such elements were divulged.  
 
 
Page 51 of 91 
 

WHISTLEBLOWING AND HARASSMENT 
 
70. 
How  many  cases  of  harassment  were  reported  in  2018?  How  many  of  these  cases 
concerned sexual harassment? In how many cases were sanctions decided? How will you make 
sure that a gender balanced composition of the committee will be respected after the election 
of new staff committee? How many of the cases concerned relations between staff members 
and how many concerned relations between MEPs and Staff members? What actions have been 
carried out to discourage harassment in the working environment? 
 
In the European Parliament, allegations of harassment at work were reported in a total of 13 
cases  in  2018.  These  were  reported  as  follows  to  the  bodies  and  services  in  charge  of  anti-
harassment procedures in the Parliament: 
 
- 7 to the Advisory Committee on Harassment and its Prevention in the Workplace;  
-  3  to  the  Committee  dealing  with  harassment  complaints  concerning  Members  of  the 
European Parliament; and 
- 3 further to DG Personnel.  
 
Four of these cases concerned alleged sexual harassment. 
 
Sanctions were adopted in two cases in 2018. Harassment was found to be established by the 
Advisory Committee on Harassment and its Prevention in the Workplace in two further cases 
lodged, in respect of which disciplinary proceedings are currently still ongoing.  
 
The administration will do its share to continue ensuring a gender-balanced composition of the 
Advisory Committee on Harassment and its Prevention in the Workplace. 
  
Actions to discourage harassment in the workplace 
 
Following the adoption in the plenary of the resolution on combatting harassment on 26 October 
2017, an “Updated Roadmap for the adaptation of preventive and early support measures to 
deal  with  conflict  and  harassment  between  Members  of  the  Parliament  and  Accredited 
Parliamentary Assistants (APAs), trainees and other staff” was adopted by the Bureau on 12 
March 2018. The following measures emerged, in particular, from this process: 
 
- Awareness raising campaign to promote a zero-tolerance policy on harassment; 
- A brochure named “Zero harassment in the workplace” which was made available to MEPs 
with  guidance  on  how  to  prevent  it  from  occurring  in  their  teams.  A  corresponding 
brochure named “Practical tips and advice for Accredited Parliamentary Assistants on 
preventing conflict and harassment in the workplace” was published for APAs in October 
2018;  
- A pilot project providing harassment prevention training for Members, on a voluntary basis, 
was launched in 2018. Also, training sessions on harassment prevention are an integral 
part of the induction courses for APAs and are also a long-standing part of the training 
catalogue for staff of the European Parliament;  
 
 
 
Page 52 of 91 
 

- New rules were adopted on 2 July 2018 in order to extend the competence of the Advisory 
Committee  dealing  with  harassment  complaints  concerning  Members  of  the  European 
Parliament  (established  in  2014)  to  cover  complaints  lodged  against  MEPs  by  any 
member of staff, including accredited parliamentary assistants, staff members, trainees, 
political groups staff, and seconded national experts;   
- A Code of appropriate behaviour for Members of the European Parliament was adopted in 
2018 and incorporated in Parliament’s Rules of Procedure in January 2019;  
- The rules on Members’ expenses (the Implementing Measures for the Statute of Members) 
have  been  modified  so  that  in  cases  of  proven  harassment,  the  salary  of  the  APA 
concerned can be covered by the Member's parliamentary assistance budget;  
- By decision of the Secretary-General, a network of confidential counsellors was established 
with a mandate to provide advice and counselling to staff in cases of perceived harassment 
or conflict involving MEPs.  The decision sets out that the mission of the confidential 
counsellors will be carried out  in  independence,  voluntarily, preserving confidentiality 
and with the highest discretion, while taking due account when certain situations give rise 
to possible conflict of interest.  
 
71. 
How many whistleblowing cases were recorded in 2018? 
 
There were no whistleblowing cases recorded in 2018. 
 
72. 
There were three whistle-blower cases reported in 2016. All three were APAs and all 
were dismissed. There were no whistle-blower cases in 2017. Furthermore, in the Replies to the 
discharge questionnaire for 2017, the Secretary-General stated that “Whistleblowing rules are 
applicable to APAs but the EP cannot provide employment protection
”. As APAs are employed 
by  the  Parliament,  does  the  Secretary-General  believe  the  institution  is  adhering  to  its  legal 
obligations  in  the  Staff  Regulation  to  provide  protection?  Does  the  fact  that  all  the  whistle-
blowers  in  2016  were  dismissed  provide  the  necessary  work  environment  where  staff  feel 
confident that they will be protected if they report serious irregularities? 
 
Parliament  adheres  to  its  legal  obligations  in  the  Staff  Regulations  to  provide  protection  to 
whistle-blowers. Whistleblowing rules are applicable to all staff including APAs but Parliament 
cannot offer posts in its administration to APAs dismissed by Members.  
 
73. 
The  whistle-blower  Directive,  adopted  in  2019  by  the  Parliament,  affords  better 
protection  than  the  internal  rules  currently  applicable  to  parliamentary  staff.  When  will  the 
Parliament  revise  its  internal  rules  to  bring  them  in  line  with  the  protections  and  standards 
contained in the EU directive? 
 
Parliament  adheres  to  its  legal  obligations  in  the  Staff  Regulations  to  provide  protection  to 
whistle-blowers.  
 
 
Page 53 of 91 
 

INFRASTRUCTURE AND LOGISTICS 
 
74. 
Concerning  the  PHS  building  and  the  architectural  competition,  are  candidates 
requested to mention the life expectancy of their proposed project? Would this be a criterion if 
the decision was made to re-build the building from scratch? 
 
The  life  expectancy  is  not  determined  for  a  building  as  a  whole,  but  for  its  main  parts.  The 
lifespan of buildings  varies according to  the nature of their constructive  elements  (structure, 
envelope, installations, finishes, all these have different life spans).  
 
During  the  Architectural  Competition  stage,  the  candidates  are  not  requested  to  provide  life 
expectancy  figures,  as  the  level  of  detail  of  the  submitted  proposals  will  not  allow  such 
assessment with precision at this stage of development.  
 
Life expectancy will be part of the specifications which will follow the decision of the Bureau. 
It is only during that stage of the procedure that the choice of the materials to be used will be 
made and that life expectancy can be properly assessed. 
 
75. 
Concerning the KAD building, can the Secretary-General confirm that the works started 
without  studies  being  completed  and  that  the  majority  of  the  specifications  have  proven 
incomplete  and/or  to  contain  quantities  that  do  not  correspond  to  reality?  Concerning  the 
payments of fees, can you confirm that the overall package of “Batch B - architect” and “Batch 
D - technical design office” was exhausted in September 2018 ? Have contractors submitted 
any  claims  for  compensation  for  delays  on  the  construction  site?  Is  it  correct  that  to  date, 
compensation has been set at between 5% and 15% of the market for each batch, depending on 
the arguments and justifications provided? 
 
The  largest  building  project  of  the  European  Parliament,  the  enlargement  of  the  Konrad 
ADENAUER building in Luxembourg, is at the point of finalisation of its first phase (East site 
which  represents  approximately  70%  of  the  entire  project).  Currently,  Parliament  staff  in 
Luxembourg are located in  four buildings. The Konrad ADENAUER  building will bring all 
services under one roof and, as such, allow for economies of scale in the fields of energy, water, 
security  and  facilities  management  of  the  building.  It  uses  the  most  modern  environmental 
techniques, such as rainwater recuperation, geothermal and solar energy, full use of daylight 
and natural materials for the fitting out. Parliament’s staff will start moving into the building as 
of  December  2019.  All  DGs  moving  into  the  building  were  consulted,  in  order  to  adapt  the 
layout of their future offices to meet with their specific needs. 
 
The Bureau approved the project and the Committee on Budgets was consulted in line with the 
relevant provisions of the Financial Regulation and confirmed their respective budgets.  
 
Although certain costs relating to construction delays have been higher than originally foreseen, 
the considerably lower expenses for the financial costs of the credits has allowed Parliament to 
compensate  additional  financial  needs.  Parliament’s  administration  and  the  Bureau  have 
constantly  followed  the  project  closely  and  taken  several  corrective  decisions  over  the 
construction  time,  avoiding  overall  budgetary  overruns  which  are  very  common  in  building 
projects of this size (e.g. Berlin airport, Hamburg Philharmonic Hall, European Central Bank, 
the  Channel  Tunnel).  In  June  2019  the  latest,  the  Bureau  has  had  an  exchange  of  views  on 
lessons learned and experience gained from Parliament’s recent large building projects, noting 
that the total cost of ADENAUER project remains EUR 32,5 million under the approved overall 
budget. 
Page 54 of 91 
 

It  is  correct  that the works  for the enlargement of the  Konrad ADENAUER  building  started 
after having encountered several delays. The first considerable delay was due to the cancelling 
of the first tender procedure because of overpriced offers. Following this experience, Parliament 
decided to split the construction into six contracts of “maîtrise d’oeuvre” and 23 contracts for 
building companies. In parallel, Parliament revised the project several times (i. a. in 2012 and 
2015) in order to comply with the EUR 432.8 Mio initial budget for construction costs (value 
year: 2012). The consequences of these two changes resulted in longer delays and subsequently 
changes  in  the  design.  Furthermore  in  a  construction  site  of  this  size,  certain  technical 
specifications naturally change during the construction time, including technical plans. It is also 
correct that the works started without all technical plans having been concluded. This does not 
mean however that studies would not have been advanced to an appropriate level and that the 
majority of the specifications would have proven to be incomplete.  
 
As a result of the delays, the amount of the contract for Lot B (Architect) and Lot D (Technical 
installations engineers) was not sufficient by September 2018 and an amendment to the contract 
was  then  necessary.  In  addition,  transactions  with  the  construction  companies  (linked  to  the 
delay with the project) have been necessary in order to avoid further delays and costs. After 
negotiation, 10 transactions have been signed consequently (after having consulted the Legal 
Service for each one of them). The result of all negotiations is situated between 5% and 15% of 
the contract amount, depending on the justifications provided for each case. Those payments 
for transactions can be covered in the margins available for unforeseen. 
 
76. 
Which buildings’ projects were finished in 2018? What are the ongoing construction 
projects for the Parliament in 2019? When are these planned to be completed? Are there any 
new building projects prepared or planned? 
 
Which buildings’ projects were finished in 2018? 
 
In Strasbourg: 
  New entrance pavilion in the CHURCHILL building; 
  New nursery in the CHURCHILL building  
  Security measures for the footbridge between buildings; 
  Visitors’ circuit in the WEISS building 
 
In Brussels:  
  MARTENS building; 
  Footbridge connecting the SPINELLI and WIERTZ buildings; 
  Lulling Lounge in the SPINELLI building; 
  New entrance security in the KOHL building; 
  New entrance security in the Montoyer Sciences building; 
  New entrance security in the WIERTZ building;  
  Security for the Visitors' circuit in the SPAAK building; 
  Peripheral security measures for the Brussels site; 
  Works in the kitchen of the SPINELLI building; 
  Nodal point for ITEC;  
  Security measures (facades) of the SPINELLI building. 
Page 55 of 91 
 

What are the ongoing construction projects for the Parliament in 2019 and 2020 and when are 
these projects planned to be completed? 
 
In Strasbourg:  
 
2019 
  Transformation of the former printing shop in the CHURCHILL building into offices and 
a  crisis  management  area  respecting  French  legal  requirements  -  To  be  completed  in 
December 2019; 
  Refurbishment of the official car counter in the WEISS building - Handover foreseen for 
November 2019; 
  Glass elevation security in the WEISS building - Handover first part made in October 
2019; 
 
2020 
  Replacement of the heat pumps of the WEISS building - Handover foreseen for April 
2020;  
  Refurbishment of the Members’ bar in the WEISS building - Handover foreseen for April 
2020; 
  Glass  elevation  security  in  the  WEISS  building  -  Handover  second  part  foreseen  for 
March 2020; 
  Renovation of restrooms for the needs of persons with reduced mobility in the PFLIMLIN 
building - Handover foreseen for September 2020; 
 
In Brussels: 
 
2019 
  Creation of sanitary rooms for disabled persons in the Montoyer 75 building - Handover 
foreseen for 15 November 2019;  
  Enlargement  of  the  conference  room  in  the  Montoyer  30  building  for  the  EDPS  - 
Handover foreseen for 5 December 2019;  
 
2020 
  Major upgrade of electrical installations in the ZWEIG building (1st phase) - ongoing still 
in 2020;  
  Extension of the Wayenberg nursery - Handover expected in April 2020; 
  Major upgrade of electrical installations in the SPINELLI building - ongoing still in 2020;  
  Charger stations for electric vehicles (2nd phase) - ongoing still in 2020;  
  Water fountains in all buildings - ongoing following requests;  
 
In Luxembourg: 
 
 
ADENAUER II – East phase - Handover foreseen for March 2020 
  
Are there any new building projects prepared or planned? 
 

Page 56 of 91 
 

In Strasbourg: 
  Replacement of the fire safety system for all buildings; 
  Renovation of the waterproofing of the roof of WEISS Building; 
  Entrance and accreditation pavilion in the WEISS building; 
  Renovation  of  restrooms  for  persons  with  reduced  mobility  (2020-2024)  in  the  DE 
MADARIAGA and CHURCHILL buildings; 
  Restaurant and kitchens renovation (2021- 2024) in the CHURCHILL building; 
  Works  in  the  context  of  new  requirements  under  the  French  legislation  for  needs  of 
persons with reduced mobility (2020-2025). 
 
In Brussels: 
  Major upgrade of electrical installations in ZWEIG building (2nd phase); 
  Energy savings actions following energy audits (1st phase); 
  Power supplies for hybrid vehicles (2nd phase); 
  Modernization of lifts; 
  Renovation  of  the  building  management  and  fire  detection  systems  in  the  ZWEIG 
building; 
  Renovation of the building management in the Remard building; 
  Compliance works for fire safety doors in the SPAAK building; 
  Compliance works for fire regulation in the WIERTZ building; 
  Improvement works for disabled access in all buildings; 
  Safety works for parking facilities in the ZWEIG and BRANDT buildings;  
  Creation of kitchenettes in the BRANDT building; 
  Renewal of the SPAAK building; 
  Preparatory and side projects to the renewal of the SPAAK building; 
  Visitors' Seminar Centre in the ZWEIG building;  
  Multifunctional space in the SPINELLI building; 
  House of Citizens; 
  Interlink of Conference technical facilities; 
  Webstreaming technical room; 
  Terrace in the House of European History 
  Peripheral security of the MARTENS building; 
  Cycle-pedestrian link  (feasibility study only); 
  Refurbishment of the Members' Restaurant in the SPINELLI building; 
 
 
 
Page 57 of 91 
 

Studies or works ongoing, for building projects to be delivered in the future: 
 
In Luxembourg : 
  Adenauer II – West phase 
  Adenauer II – Europa Experience 
 
77. 
What  was  the  total  amount  dedicated  to  furniture  and  refurbishing  MEP  offices  and 
corridors in 2018? What was the amount in 2017 and in 2016? 
 
There has not been any expense related to furniture for the MEP offices in 2016 and 2017.  
 
In  2018,  as  part  of  the  final  phase  of  the  procurement  procedure  (competitive  dialogue)  to 
refurnish MEP’s areas, the 5 participating consortia were invited to take part in a pilot project 
that consisted of furnishing 5 similar zones in the SPINELLI building, including the offices of 
one  Vice-President  or  Quaestor,  the  offices  of  one  Member,  a  welcoming  area  and  a  small 
meeting room. Each consortium was allocated in 2018 a lump sum payment of EUR 15 000 to 
cover part of the costs of participation in the dialogue for the conception, design, production 
and  fitting  of  the  mock-up  in  the  demonstration  offices  and  areas,  in  compliance  with  the 
financial regulation. 
 
No additional expenses for furniture incurred in 2018. 
 
In Strasbourg, amounts for refreshment of painting and carpets in MEP offices and corridors:  
  2018: EUR 835 000  
  2017: EUR 981 000  
  2016: EUR 840 000  
 
In Brussels, amounts for the maintenance refurbishment of Members’ spaces: 
  2016: EUR 0  
  2017: EUR 0  
  2018: EUR 1 678 000  
 
78. 
By which company was the renovation of the Member’s offices planned and carried 
out? 
 
The  refreshment  works  in  Strasbourg  were  carried  out  by  the  group  of  companies 
LPR/STRASOL, which is the laureate of a framework contract of works for the paintings and 
the coatings of grounds. 
 
In Brussels, the following companies were contracted: 
 
  Association Momentanée CIT BLATON – Entreprises JACQUES DELENS (80%) ; 
  Association Momentanée ENDECO – TDGI – RINALDI (10%) ; 
  Association Momentanée CEGELEC PUTMAN (10%) ; 
  NEW ACTUAL SIGN (new signage). 
 
 
Page 58 of 91 
 

79. 
How was the decision regarding the new MEP office furniture made? Is the leasing of 
furniture  a  more  cost  effective  way  of  having  the  offices  furnished?  For  how  long  has  the 
contract been signed with the company who provides the leased furniture? 
 
As  the  previous  working  environment  and  furniture  dated  back  to  the  1999  change  of 
legislature,  it  no  longer  corresponded  to  the  needs,  expectations  and  standards  of  a  modern 
office world. In particular, Members’ offices lacked flexibility, functionality and ergonomic 
solutions. Apart from urgent repair works on request, no systematic refurbishment or updating 
was carried out during the last 20 years. Therefore, at its meeting of 13 December 2017, the 
Bureau decided to offer Members and their staff an improved working environment in Brussels 
to be available for the beginning of the next legislature (in effect for autumn 2019). 
 
In  order  to  be  able  to  fulfil  the  above-mentioned  ambition,  a  procurement  procedure  called 
competitive dialogue with five competitors was carried out by DG INLO. The aim of this type 
of  procedure  is  to  take  on  board  the  latest  technological  developments  on  the  market  and 
expertise of market operators, in order to determine which solutions fulfil best the Institution's 
needs and requirements. Ecological and health aspects at the workplace as well as sustainable 
sourcing  and production regarding the new furniture  were  duly taken into consideration and 
were part of the contract awarding criteria. 
 
Following discussions during the dialogue, it was decided to acquire the new furniture through 
an  operational  leasing  rather  than  buying  the  items  as  in  the  past.  The  operational  leasing 
scheme  has  many  advantages.  It  will  lead  to  a  better  service  for  Members,  a  lower 
administrative  burden  and  management  costs  due  to  shared  economies  of  scale,  easier 
replacement of furniture both in daily use and at the shift of legislatures, faster adaptability to 
environmental,  ergonomic  and  health  aspects  in  the  workplace  as  well  as  to  technological 
progress.  To  sum  up,  it  will  lead  to  considerable  savings  for  Parliament  in  terms  of 
redeployment of Parliament staff for other important services and freeing up storage space by 
outsourcing  these  activities  which  are  not  core  activities  of  a  modern  administration.  The 
operational lease contract was signed under advantageous financial and operational terms for 
the Parliament thanks to strong and effective competition between the participating companies 
during the procurement procedure until the final tender, leading to a better value for money in 
comparison with the ‘traditional’ way of acquiring and managing furniture assets. 
 
The contract was signed for an initial period of 10 years (which is the standard amortisation 
period of furniture) with the option for Parliament to extend the contract's total duration up to 
15 years, based on the fitness for purpose of the furniture assets at that time. It should be noted 
that the contract has decreasing rental rates, ensuring an economic balance of the contract in 
case the option to extend is used. 
 
80. 
Concerning  new  Members’  offices,  at  what  date  was  the  installation  of  Members 
complete,  meaning  that  all  Members  had  access  to  their  offices  and  had  all  IT  equipment 
installed? Why is there no printer in the Members’ third office? 
 
The office installations were available for the constituent session of July 2019 in Strasbourg. 
 
In Brussels,  all Members of the 9th legislature had access to temporary offices just after the 
constituent session of July 2019. Access to their final offices was granted as from 26 August 
2019, in line with the planning foreseen in the notice of the Quaestors of June 2019. Apart from 
offices in the WIERTZ building, where the final furniture were installed in October 2019, the 
furniture and IT equipment have been available from 2 September for all Members. 
 
Page 59 of 91 
 

According to the Rules on the provision of IT and telecommunications equipment adopted by 
the Bureau, Members automatically receive one multi-functional printer for their Brussels and 
one for their Strasbourg offices and, upon request, one further printer in each of the places of 
work.  Upon  derogation  by  the  competent  Quaestor,  162  additional  third  printers  have  been 
installed in Members’ offices since July 2019.  
 
81. 
Can  the  Secretary-General  specify  what  became  of  the  old  furniture  and  equipment 
(including televisions) after the MEPs’ offices were refurbished? 
 
Approximately  75%  of  the  old  furniture  was  moved  to  Strasbourg,  to  equip  the  additional 
offices that were put at the disposal of Members as from the new legislative term following the 
Bureau decision of 11 September 2017.  
 
The remaining furniture was taken over by the leasing company for various small-scale reuse 
projects  with  a  social  or  charitable  dimension,  ensured  by  a  specialised  NGO  (Hahebo),  the 
unusable  part  was  recycled.  Per  contract  requirements,  a  detailed  report  on  the  responsible 
disposal of these items will be provided by the contractor to DG INLO as soon as available.  
 
Having reached the end of their life cycle, the MEPs television replacement has been planned 
in accordance with the obsolescence program and in line with Parliament’s asset management 
principles  and  rules.  Moreover,  the  new  television  supports  IPTV  (Television  over  IP) 
deployment. As for all  Parliament’s  IT equipment,  all the end-of-life TVs and screens  (with 
low  market  residual  value)  were  decommissioned  through  the  Oxfam  inter-institutional 
framework contract. 
 
82. 
The floors on which MEPs’ offices are located have gone through several renovation 
phases.  Kitchens  have  been  installed,  but  the  doors  of  these  kitchens  are  not  accessible  for 
people with disabilities (e.g. the kitchen door in the G sector, 15th floor). Can you please explain 
why such large restructuring projects did not include accessibility for everyone as one of the 
conditions? 
 
Over the years, a great number of measures have greatly improved accessibility for Members, 
staff and visitors with disabilities. All new projects to extend, renovate or fit out Parliament’s 
buildings are aimed to ensure accessibility for people with disabilities as a priority. 
According to the regulations in force, 85 cm wide doors are to be considered for inner access 
doors. The current standard doors in the kitchen areas on the Members’ floors have indeed a 83 
cm width. As a matter of priority, it is foreseen that one standard doors in kitchen areas will be 
replaced  with  larger  models  having  93  cm  width  as  from  December  2019,  starting  with  the 
doors in areas where people with disabilities are directly concerned. 
 
83. 
Please provide a detailed list of the precise use of the fleet of EP vehicles (percentage 
of trips between airport/EP premises in Brussels/Strasbourg, between train station/EP premises, 
and so on). 
 
Percentage of journeys between airports and stations/EP premises in Brussels:  
 
First priority: 39.84%:  
Airports (including Charleroi): 31.75%;  
Railway Station (Central, South, and North): 8.09%;  
 
Second priority < = 20 km: 56.28%; 
Third priority > 20 km with authorisation: 0.06% 
Page 60 of 91 
 

Percentage of journeys between airports and stations/EP premises in Strasbourg:  
 
First priority: 16.38%:  
Airports (including Frankfurt-Hahn): 9.75%  
Railway Station (Strasbourg, Offenburg, Kehl): 6.63%  
 
Second priority < = 20 km: 66,48%  
 
Third priority > 20 km with authorisation: 0.06%  
 
The total number of car reservations registered in CARMEP, the official reservation system, 
for the year 2018 amounted to 115.166.  
 
In connection with the above numbers, it is important to take into account that not all journeys 
executed  can  be  registered  in  the  CARMEP  application.  Mainly  at  peak  times  during  the 
‘Caroussel’ departure on Thursdays at noon in Strasbourg, as well as for mass arrivals at the 
airports in Strasbourg and Brussels, Members do not need to reserve their transport in advance. 
In the sense of a quick and time-efficient service, the drivers’ service provides a transport upon 
arrival of the Member. 
 
A small fleet of goods vehicles is used for office moves at the three Parliament’s sites, plenary 
sessions, political group meetings outside the three working places and the transport of official 
mail: 
 
-  Transport  from  Brussels/Luxembourg  to  Strasbourg  in  the  framework  of  the 
Parliamentary sessions (15%); 
-  Transport in the framework of meetings and conferences within Europe (outside of the 3 
EP working places) (15%); 
-  Mail shuttles between Luxembourg - Brussels and Luxembourg – Strasbourg (40%); 
-  Occasional use for office moves between buildings (15%); 
-  Transport of furniture between EP premises (15%). 
 
84. 
Has there been an evaluation on the internalisation of the driver’s service? Has it been 
successful and cost effective? 
 
At its meeting of 12 November 2018, the Bureau positively evaluated the internalisation of the 
car service and supported the progress achieved so far. 
 
A permanent evaluation of the performance of the drivers’ service aims to maintain the high 
level of performance expected in the daily work by Members and other clients. 
 
The number of official complaints filed by Members has dropped significantly following the 
internalisation  of  the  drivers’  service  in  spring  2017  (from  17  complaints  in  2017  to  2 
complaints in 2018). 
 
The  numbers  registered  in  the  CARMEP  reservation  application  for  2018  in  relation  to  the 
number of official complaints results in an average satisfaction rate of 99.99%. 
 
 
 
Page 61 of 91 
 

The internalisation of the drivers’ service has brought a significant increase in flexibility and 
efficiency of the provided service as direct access to the resources (drivers and vehicles) allows 
for  a  quick  adaptation  on  changing  requirements,  such  as  sudden  unforeseeable  traffic  or 
security situations, or sudden increases in workload without going through an intermediary. It 
also allowed taking up a number of additional transport tasks on top of the daily transport tasks 
for MEPs. With the necessary resources at hand, it is no longer necessary to rent vehicles and 
personnel from outside contractors. Only during peak hours in Strasbourg, the drivers’ service 
resorts to temporary and very limited support from outside contractors. 
 
In  order  to  maintain  highest  standards  in  service  and  quality,  all  drivers  follow  continuous 
training courses during less busy periods in the year. The training programs consist of language 
classes, eco- and safety driving, communication and well-being and protocol. 
 
85. 
The 5 minutes’ maximum waiting time for Members’ pickup proved to be inefficient, 
as often the Member has to order a new car if the car has already left, is there any way to change 
this rule? 
 
The Bureau decision dated 30 November 2011 stipulates that during peak hours in the morning 
and in the evening, drivers will not wait for Members longer than five minutes after the agreed 
pick-up time. 
 
This provision aims to avoid extensive waiting time of service cars especially during the busiest 
periods of the day, as this would hence significantly increase waiting times for other Members 
and consequently cause important delays for them. 
 
As it is essential to provide an effective and timely service to the Members with the available 
number  of  service  vehicles,  the  drivers’  service  also  relies  on  the  cooperation  of  Members, 
especially during peak hours. Drivers are however instructed to apply the rule in a flexible way 
concerning  meetings  and  events  for  example  with  other  Institutions,  Embassies  or  similar, 
important for the exercise of the Members’ mandates. The service is currently studying more 
efficient ways for Members to inform directly the driver they are expecting to drive them so as 
to build in flexibility to the procedure.  
 
86. 
In Strasbourg, more often than in Brussels, there are minibuses available for Members 
to travel but Members are often traveling on their own, which is not very efficient. Is there a 
reason why there are more minibuses available in Strasbourg? Is the Parliament undertaking an 
evaluation of the efficiency of the car service for Members? What are the plans to improve the 
efficiency of the service? 
 
The service fleet of the European Parliament is the same in Brussels and in Strasbourg, with the 
vehicles  commuting  between  the  places  of  work  according  to  the  Parliament’s  working 
schedule. This fleet consists of different models and categories. Cars and minivans provide for 
a balanced composition, reflecting the essential needs of the service for the execution of the 
transport tasks as stipulated in the rules in force. 
 
Only during peak hours in Strasbourg, it is still necessary to seek temporary and very limited 
support  from  an  external  service  provider  to  help  covering  the  high  number  of  transport 
requests. In line with contractual arrangements, this transport company is required to provide a 
given  number  of  vehicles  (minibuses  and  cars)  of  a  certain  standard.  Strasbourg  transport 
requests  are  considerably  higher  than  during  standard  Brussels  weeks  as  Members  are 
frequently accompanied  by their staff or guests, on average doubling the number of persons 
transported. 
Page 62 of 91 
 

Within its remit, the drivers’ service strives towards an efficient use of resources, namely its 
vehicles.  Where  possible,  transport  requests  are  grouped  in  order  to  limit  the  number  of 
individual journeys. 
 
In order to further improve the efficiency of the drivers’ service, the establishment of central 
pick-up points and times could be envisaged; e.g. to collect at the Strasbourg train station or in 
Kehl a larger number of Members booked in the nearby hotels. 
 
87. 
Concerning canteens, the technical specifications of the new call for tender included “a 
variety of offers”. How did the service provider for the ASP canteen perform on this point? 
 
Following the comprehensive call for tender procedure, the new catering contracts that entered 
into  force  as  of  5  August  2019,  clearly  request  a  further  diversification  of  the  offer.  This 
includes  new  menus  with  healthy,  fresh  and  quality  ingredients,  enlarged  nutrition  choices, 
single use material reduction and a waste-free approach. In addition, a new design together with 
a  more  modern  communication  is  presented  and  is  further  developing,  allowing  better 
information to Members and staff. Opening hours are equally extended.  
 
The  above-mentioned  catering  contracts  preserve  a  very  strong  environmental  and  social 
dimension  and  accentuate  the  use  of  fair  trade  initiatives  and  coherent  consumer  protection 
policies. They also introduce new nutritional concepts, including a wider vegetarian/vegan as 
well as food for all options, in view of a healthier lifestyle. 
 
More  precisely,  the  technical  specifications  of  the  new  call  for  tender  clearly  state  (see  the 
following extract from the document): 
 
“... Restaurants in all Parliament Buildings promote sustainable, organic food offerings that 
are appropriate for healthier, food-for-all nutrition and offer a variety of experiences, in line 
with Parliament's catering policies.  The concessionaire will have to propose new, creative and 
modern concepts, which convey the image of the Parliament by being part of the culture, the 
new  culinary  tendencies  of  the  Europeans  and  by  meeting  the  expectations  of  the  different 
groups of guests.  
 
In  order  to  adapt  to  the  specificities  and  the  needs  of  the  Parliament,  concepts  bringing 
innovation and creativity are sought for the exploitation of the various activities and points of 
sale of collective catering. The catering provider must assure the variety of meals through the 
creation of attractive and diverse menus while emphasizing the tradition, originality and spirit 
of multicultural cuisine...” 
 
Since  the  start  of  the  new  catering  contracts,  the  providers  are  regularly  adapting  their  food 
offers so competition is gradually ensuring higher quality and more variety.  
 
Particularly referring to the main ASP self-service restaurant, the catering contractor in charge 
is  Compass Belgilux. On the criteria of quality that  also  included other sub-criteria (such as 
variety of offer) and covered all the outlets in the lot, the awardee (Compass Group) obtained 
17 points out of 25.  
 
The company committed – in summary – to the following improvements: 
 
  upgrade of the quality of services in the self-service restaurant; 
  a variety of food offers, with diverse thematic such as the world cuisine, show-cooking, 
innovation kitchen, wellbeing etc.; 
Page 63 of 91 
 

  a specific corner named ‘Salad Pharmacy’ with a Mediterranean touch, which will offer 
a wide choice of vegetarian mezes and a choice of proteins.  
In general, the new food offer is richer and emphasises the use of fresh and seasonal vegetables. 
In addition, a new fusion stand (serving ramen, woks) has been introduced in this canteen and 
the ‘barista’ cafe with its variety of choices made its appearance in the bars.  
 
Finally, it is important to highlight the fact that new catering contracts entered into force as of 
5 August 2019 and thus a period of establishment, organisation and adaptation is necessary. In 
order to be fully objective on the evaluation of the catering offers, the variety and quality, it is 
of utmost importance to have a longer period of implementation and control. 
 
FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATION 
 
88. 
How did the Parliament plan the changes from the 8th to the 9th legislative terms? How 
do you explain: 
 
a)  substantial delays in the completion of contracts for APAs? 
 
b)  substantial delays in the completion of office renovations in the ASP building? 
 
c)  substantial shortcomings in the functioning of IT in the MEPs’ new offices? 
 
Parliament’s Administration took the following comprehensive steps to prepare for the 2019 
Elections and the transition to the new legislative period: 
 
A  taskforce  “Welcome  &  Departure  of  Members  in  the  framework  of  the  2019  European 
elections” was created from July 2018 by decision of the Secretary-General. This taskforce put 
in place specific actions, procedures and tools to ensure a smooth transition between the two 
terms and improve Parliament’s offer and services for its Members. 
 
In particular, the following actions and facilities were put in place: 
 
 
For outgoing Members: 
 
-   Publication of the booklet “FAQ on Members’ end of term”, covering topics on 
the financial and social entitlements and different logistic questions; 
-   Organisation  of  several  Info-sessions  on  Members’  end  of  mandate  in 
collaboration  with  the  Former  EP  Members’  Association,  including  specific 
info-sessions for British Members;  
-   Organisation of individual session for Members about their financial and social 
rights as Former Members; 
-   Creation of an e-mail address domain for Former Members. 
 
 
For new/ re-elected Members: 
 
-   Welcome  Village:    approximately  200  multilingual  specialised  staff  were 
mobilized  at  various  stands  and  desks  where  Members  obtained  information 
covering the essential administrative and financial aspects of their parliamentary 
life  and received assistance in filling in some mandatory forms concerning, for 
example, personal information, bank accounts, IT matters, and accreditation. 
 
 
Page 64 of 91 
 

 -   Members’  guides:  experienced  Parliament  colleagues  offered  on-demand 
weekly tailor-made assistance to Members between June and September; 
-   Updated  catalogue  of  learning  and  development  opportunities  for  Members, 
provided by experienced Parliament officials; 
-   On-line facilities to orient Members towards Parliament’s services and essential 
information  for  a  smooth  start  of  their  mandate:  Europarl  welcome  pages;  
Parliament’s intranet dedicated sections; Members’ Welcome Application; Info 
sessions on EU policies. 
 
In the framework of the abovementioned task-force, DG PERS launched an action plan on the 
recruitment  of  APAs  including  information  conferences  for  APAs  and  other  staff  leaving 
Parliament in 2018 and 2019. In 2019, a Departure and Welcome Desk was made available to 
all staff including APAs. The APA Desk was part of the Welcome Village for MEPs dedicated 
to the reception of recruitment requests.  
 
In  view  of  the  preparation  of  the  refurbishment  of  Member's  offices  in  Brussels,  the 
administration  constituted  a  task  force  including  participants  from  all  relevant  services.  The 
mandate  of  this  task  force  was  to  prepare  the  planning  for  works  and  coordinate  all 
interventions.  The  different  phases  of  the  works  were  planned  according  to  the  maximum 
operational  capacities.  Every  week  an  average  of  140  working  stations  were  moved  to 
temporary offices, in order to free the areas to be renovated. The same moves, back to final 
offices, were organised at the end of each phase (6 weeks). 
 
DG ITEC and DG INLO worked in close cooperation to ensure the closest possible coordination 
between  the  interventions  of  the  different  teams  involved  in  the  project  (infrastructure 
renovations  and  fitting  out  of  the  offices  by  DG  INLO  and  DG  ITEC  teams,  installing  and 
connecting IT equipment). DG SAFE supported this process and was also largely impacted by 
the  transition  to  a  new  parliamentary  term  as  its  services  managed  the  deactivation  and 
activation/distribution of all new and former Members and APAs’ access badges.  
 
DG EPRS, along with other DGs, played in an important part in welcoming Members in person 
as they took up their new duties, providing tailor-made information about DG EPRS’ products 
and services, and by undertaking individual visits to their offices.  
Concretely,  DG  EPRS  contributed  to  the  intra-DG  task  force  for  leaving  and  incoming 
Members by: 
 
-   providing tailored in-person  briefings on demand to  new Members on policy issues  of 
their choice, as well as eight other training courses run by EPRS for new Members; 
-   making the EP Library in Brussels available as a quiet place for work for new Members; 
-   organising,  from  October  onwards,  'Understanding...'  high-level  conferences,  such  as 
'Understanding EU Common Security and Defence Policy' in the Library Reading Room 
for Members and their staff; 
-   participating  actively  in  the  European  Parliament’s  welcome  guides  network:  10 
colleagues from EPRS were trained to be welcome guides for new Members; 
 
Furthermore, DG EPRS is, on an on-going basis:  
 
-   participating in the presentation of EP services at EP committee and delegation meetings; 
-   answering  incoming  questions  related  to  parliamentary  work  through  its  'Members' 
Hotline'; 
Page 65 of 91 
 

-   actively  visiting  Members  and  their  staff  to  brief  them  about  research,  analysis  and 
information available to them from EPRS, in order to facilitate their parliamentary work 
and empower Members through knowledge; 
-   providing  briefings  and  other  material,  including  infographics,  about  the  European 
Parliament  and  other  institutions,  including  recently  briefings  related  to  each 
Commissioner-designate for the parliamentary hearings; 
-   offering a cycle of 18 info-sessions in the Library Reading Room in Brussels designed to 
inform Members and their staff about knowledge sources on EU policies and issues ; 
-   offering  Members  the  opportunity  to  organise  their  office  records  with  special  advice 
from EPRS’ Historical Archives Unit. 
 
DG IPOL contributed to a smooth handover from the 8th to the 9th legislative term by planning, 
organising  and adapting  their work to  the particular challenges of an  election  year. Many of 
these  efforts  concentrated  in  areas  such  as  legislative  affairs  and  committee  coordination, 
aiming at ensuring a smooth transition to a new legislative term. Among these activities focused 
on the ongoing legislative files, IPOL’s Legislative Affairs Unit: 
 
  Monitored  the  progress  of  the  legislative  files,  and  communicated  it  monthly  to  the 
Conference of Committee Chairs and the Conference of Presidents 
  Participated in inter-service, inter-DGs and inter-institutional coordination to ensure swift 
finalisation of the legislative files 
  Ensured the flow of information through several meetings of the administrative networks 
on trilogue negotiations, on the Multiannual Financial Framework and on Delegated and 
Implementing Acts 
  Coordinated the screening of the ongoing legislative procedures at the end of the 8th term 
in preparation of the political decision on the resumption of business at the beginning of 
the 9th term 
  Elaborated and endorsed the Activity Report -2014 -2019, which provides an overview 
of  the  trends  and  evolution  of  the  ordinary  legislative  procedure  during  the  8th 
parliamentary term 
  Updated the Handbook on the ordinary legislative procedure at the beginning of the 9th 
term 
  Updated the Guide on Delegated and Implementing Acts at the beginning of the 9th term. 
 
From March to July 2019, the preparation and organisation of constitutive committee 
meetings was overseen by the Legislative Coordination Unit. These activities involved among 
others: 
 
  Setting the date and format of constitutive meetings 
  Training provided to committee secretariats and political groups 
  Coordinating logistical aspects (reservation of meeting rooms, interpretation, ushers) 
  Assistance to committee secretariats. 
 
 
 
Page 66 of 91 
 

On request of the Secretary-General to strengthen the initiative capacity of the Parliament, 
DG IPOL did a comprehensive analysis of political demands which Parliament had addressed 
to the European Commission or the Council during the 8th term and for which little or no 
reaction had been registered. This work also took into account the recent Cost of non-Europe 
analysis prepared by DG EPRS. It resulted in a series of concept notes identifying 
opportunities for possible legislative initiatives which were provided to the newly constituted 
parliamentary committees for consideration as an input to their work. 
 
Furthermore,  DG  IPOL  contributed  to  various  in-house  trainings  as  part  of  the  Learn  MEP 
catalogue such as the training for new parliamentary assistants.  
 
In order to provide for an efficient transition from the 8th to the 9th legislature and allow the 
Members to get fully involved in the works of their committees from the very outset, DG IPOL 
and DG EXPO prepared extensive information products that provided guidance for Members. 
Notably, a committee Welcome Pack was prepared for all MEPs. Its purpose is to serve as an 
introduction on how the decision-making process works and how legislation is adopted, also 
focusing  in  more  detail  on  the  procedures  of  each  standing  committee  and  subcommittee.  It 
explains the supporting roles  of the respective secretariats,  the policy departments  and other 
units at the disposal of committees and MEPs. Furthermore, it also offers a general overview 
of the key responsibilities of the various parliamentary bodies, including a focus on upcoming 
challenges. This Welcome Pack was delivered in July 2019 in print, to each committee, and in 
all 23 languages as well as in digital format as an intranet website. 
 
In this election year, the Editorial Unit and the Policy departments of DG IPOL and DG EXPO 
also  issued  two  editions  of  the  EU  Fact  Sheets.  These  Fact  Sheets  are  concise  documents 
designed  to  provide  a  straightforward  and  accurate  overview  of  the  European  Union’s 
institutions and policies, and the role that the European Parliament plays in their development. 
All 180 individual Fact Sheets were thoroughly reviewed and updated online to reflect the state 
of play of the legislative process as at the end of the eighth legislative term. Additionally, a 
printed edition of the Fact Sheets compilation was delivered to the outgoing Members in March 
and the updated, second edition will be distributed in October 2019. 
 
DG  EXPO  is  at  the  direct  service  of  committees  and  delegations  and  provides  tailor-made 
services  to  committee  and  delegations  Chairs  and  Coordinators,  committee  Members  and 
Rapporteurs.  In  addition,  it  also  provides  a  high  quality  assistance  and  expertise  to  the 
Democracy Support and Election Coordination Group’s (DEG) Members, and lead-Members 
for priority countries, in the implementation of its Annual Work Programme. Most procedures, 
especially  legislative  files  and  own-initiative  reports,  were  completed  by  the  end  of  the  8th 
legislature  by  committees  and  subcommittees.  A  number  of  legislative  files  that  were  not 
concluded  were  submitted  to  the  Conference  of  Presidents  with  recommendation  to  resume, 
continue, or not, the unfinished business. 
 
Furthermore, the DG EXPO was involved in the preparation of the Welcome pack for Members, 
for  Committee  and  for  Delegations.  The  handbook  with  dedicated  information  for  each 
committee and sub-committee includes a general outlook on the key areas addressed by each 
of these parliamentary bodies and an overview of their upcoming challenges.  DG EXPO was 
also closely following and participating in the organisation of welcome activities and stands for 
the new Members, and the finalisation of exhaustive compilations of information material for 
the new Members of parliamentary committees. 
 
Committee  secretariats  prepared  to  assist  the  Chairs  and  Members  in  legislative  and  non-
legislative work notably for the hearings for Commissioners-designate. 
 
Page 67 of 91 
 


DG  LINC  facilitated  the  transition  by  making  conference  ushers'  services  available  for 
welcoming  and  guiding  new  MEPs  on  their  arrival  as  well  as  providing  interpretation  for 
information  sessions  for  outgoing  MEPs  and  contributing  to  the  information  package  put 
together  for  the  new  MEPs.  In  addition,  a  training  offer  for  MEPs  about  best  practices  in 
multilingual  meetings  (on-demand  individual  interpreter  coaching)  was  included  in  the 
Learn.MEP catalogue.  
 
DG  TRAD’s  contribution  to  the  transition  from  the  8th  to  the  9th  legislative  period  can  be 
summed  up  through  three  categories  of  translation  requests:  Firstly,  the  translations  of  all 
documents  that  concern  the  welcoming  of  the  new  MEPs  and  the  future  legislative  term. 
Secondly, the translations of all documents that concern the past legislative period. 
Thirdly, the necessary updates of all documents in view of the new legislative term. 
 
How do you explain: 
 
a) 
Substantial delays in the completion of contracts for APAs? 
 
The following table provides an overview of the APA contracts concluded in 2019 
 
 
Taking into account the large number of APAs contracts concluded for the first few weeks of 
the new legislature, the administration does not consider that there were substantial delays in 
the completion of APAs contracts. 
 
b)  
Substantial delays in the completion of office renovations in the ASP building? 
 
In Brussels, all Members of the new legislature had access to temporary offices just after the 
constituent session of July 2019. As foreseen in the initial planning, access to their final offices 
was possible from 26 August 2019. Thanks to the close co-operation by the participating DGs, 
the works were concluded a week ahead of schedule and the total cost of the works stayed under 
the  foreseen  budget.  Overall  approval  for  the  conduction  of  this  operation  was  expressed, 
despite  individual  issues  might  have  been  addressed  due  to  the  unprecedented  scale  of  the 
works. 
 
It is worth underlining that the upgrading works were conducted within a strictly limited and 
complex timeline (20 weeks) on the two sites, in between the end of the 8th legislature and the 
beginning  of  the  9th  legislature.  As  it  has  been  pointed  out  in  different  meetings  of  the 
Quaestors, the Bureau and the Bureau Working Group on “Buildings, Transport and a Green 
Parliament”, this challenging operation has required active cooperation from all Members and 
their staff during the different working phases as well as from the political group secretariats. 
The  planning  involved  emptying  an  average  of  140  offices  each  week,  with  the  subsequent 
moves to be organized prior to the works. Each of the phases then comprised the removal of 
the  old  furniture  and  old  IT  equipment,  the  refurbishment  of  the  offices  and  corresponding 
corridors/welcoming areas, the installation of new furniture and new IT equipment. 
 
Page 68 of 91 
 

c)  
Substantial shortcomings in the functioning of IT in the MEPs’ new offices?  
 
Parliament’s services worked in close cooperation to ensure the closest possible coordination 
between  the  interventions  of  the  different  teams  involved  in  the  project  (infrastructure 
renovations  and  fitting  out  of  the  offices  by  DG  INLO  and  DG  ITEC  teams,  installing  and 
connecting IT equipment by ITEC).  
 
In most offices, the furniture and the IT equipment were available from 2 September 2019.  
 
In view of the unprecedented scale of the operations and the limited time and human resources 
available  and  despite  intensive  cooperation  and  significant  preparations  by  the  responsible 
services to mitigate all the risks related to such a large scale project, some shortcomings could 
not be avoided.   
 
89. 
The quality and the price setting of the EP's travel agency are subject to criticism, even 
after  the  contract  was  awarded  to  another  travel  agency.  What  are  the  criteria  for  the  travel 
agency's price setting scheme, in particular for flight tickets? How is the new travel agency, 
CWT, selecting flight offers for Members? How is it ensured that the most cost effective tickets 
within one booking class are sold? 
 
The travel agency contracted by the European Parliament is instructed in line with the regulated 
Parliament’s travel policy. The travel agency has to follow the guidelines given by the various 
authorising officers’ services responsible for the reimbursement of travel expenses (Members’ 
travel expenses Unit, Missions Unit, etc.) in line with applicable rules. Given that especially 
Members' agendas are very often subject to changes, Members may choose fares offering the 
possibility  of  changing  or  cancelling  tickets  without  considerable  fees.  Consequently,  in 
addition to a flexible business class rate, the travel agency offers compliant proposals for the 
same itinerary, i.e. the maximum refundable amount, the lowest business class rate, the lowest 
flexible economy class rate, and the cheapest fare available. Members choose the best of those 
options according to their professional commitments and needs. 
 
Parliament’  Travel  Management  Unit  carries  out  random  ex-post  controls  on  reservations 
(mainly air tickets) made by the contracted travel agency to confirm the compliance with the 
rules in force.  
 
The Travel Management Unit is working intensively with the travel agency to ensure the proper 
implementation of the travel policies of the EP and to improve the travel agency's perception 
by Parliament’s traveller clients.  
 
90. 
The new travel agency seems to be more expensive than the previous one. Has there 
been  any  check  or  evaluation  on  the  travel  costs  after  and  before  the  change  of  the  travel 
agency? Does the administration intend to send out a survey to all MEPs on the service and 
booking quality of the EP travel agency? 
 
The travel agency is paid by a monthly management fee of EUR 157 082 consisting mainly of 
staff costs. The monthly fee has decreased compared to the previous contract in 2018 (EUR 184 
358)  with  the  same  number  of  37  staff  employed  by  CWT  for  the  Parliament.  The  Travel 
Management Unit monitors the proper implementation of the contract obligations by the travel 
agency and makes regular ex-post controls on bookings. The guidelines given by the various 
authorising officer services responsible for the reimbursement of travel expenses (e.g. whether 
economy or business  class  tickets  have to  be booked, with  restrictive or flexible conditions) 
have not changed. 
Page 69 of 91 
 

When  Members  or  other  travellers  have  the  impression  that  the  travel  agency  made  an 
inappropriate  or  a  too  expensive  offer,  they  are  invited  to  contact  the  staff  of  the  Travel 
Management Unit that will undergo checks. 
 
91. 
What consequences did the administration draw from the complaints about the travel 
agency with regard to over-inflated flight ticket and hotel prices? 
 
Travellers  may  report  their  observations  and  feedback  on  the  travel  agency  and  the  service 
provided either directly to the travel agency or to Parliament’s Travel Management Unit, at any 
time. Every complaint is logged in the travel agency’s complaint register. In 2018, there were 
19 complaints registered regarding the quality of the services rendered by the travel agency. 
Out of those, none was related to issues of over-inflated flight ticket and hotel prices. 
 
Nevertheless, the services of the European Parliament are always alerted and monitor closely 
the  trends  in  the  travel  market  that  could  have  a  positive/negative  impact  in  the  travel 
management  policy  of  Parliament,  including  the  budget  appropriations.  This  entails  close 
communication  with  the  transport  suppliers  (airline  and  railway  companies,  distribution 
channels,  etc.) regarding the introduction of new pricing strategies (e.g. fare  categories) and 
hotels,  and  then  constructive  cooperation  with  the  authorising  officer’s  services  in  order  to 
ensure that the best fares are booked according to the travel policy defined for their passengers. 
 
92. 
How many people work for the CWT agency in the Parliament and how many used to 
work for BCD Travel? 
 
The current contract between CWT Global and the European Parliament (EP/FINS 2017-103) 
provides that 37 Full-Time Equivalent (FTE) should work for the European Parliament. It had 
been  the  same  figure  with  the  previous  contract  between  BCD  Travel  and  the  European 
Parliament (EP/FINS 2012-201). 
 
93. 
Notes that the travel agency was brought in-house approximately 10 years ago with 
more responsible travel spending as the main objective. Are there any statistics covering these 
years on the spending for MEPs travel allowances and external travels; what was the overall 
costs to the Parliament for the travel allowance before the travel agency and after? How many 
employees work for the travel agency in the EP and what is the cost for the EP? 
 
For the statistics of travel allowance: the Parliament has had a travel agency since 2001, i.e. for 
the last 18 years. The amount of budget appropriations and spending on travel allowance has 
evolved  over  time  to  reflect  the  combined  changes  in  Parliament’s  own  travel  policy  and 
perimeter (changes of regulation, new number of MEP and travel habits, choice of delegations 
‘sizes  and  destinations,  revision  of  allowance  rates,  new  admissible  airlines  fare  categories, 
etc.). The perimeters before and after 2009 are in particular  less comparable, due to the fact 
that before the introduction of the Members’ Statute in 2009, only lump-sums were paid under 
the previous applicable regulation. In this context, the introduction of the travel agency cannot 
consistently explain the evolution of overall costs of travel allowance in Parliament. 
 
For the parts concerning the travel agency, please see the replies to questions 90 and 92. 
 
 
Page 70 of 91 
 

94. 
DG  FINS  recently  introduced  an  automatic  reimbursement  of  airfares  for  Members 
who book their flight with the EP’s travel agency as part of the transition to a paperless and 
sustainable environment. Taking into account that the travel agency does not book tickets with 
some airlines, what does the Parliament intend to do to enable the travel agency to book tickets 
from all airline companies, including low-cost airlines? 
 
The travel agency can book for the travellers of the European Parliament any airline that is not 
“blacklisted”  in  the  EU  Air  Safety  List.  In  case  the  airline  or  routing  is  not  offered  via  the 
traditional booking system, the travel agency books via the website of the (low cost) airline. In 
some  cases,  the  low  cost  airline  does  not  accept  the  credit  card  of  the  travel  agency,  which 
means the travel agency has to use the one of the traveller. 
 
95. 
Despite  the  new  system  of  automatic  reimbursement  of  airfares,  Members  still 
regularly experience waiting times of three months for travel costs to be reimbursed. Besides 
the new system of automatic reimbursement for Members, does DG FINS have any other plans 
to  increase  the  efficiency  of  the  new  system  of  automatic  reimbursement  of  travel  costs  for 
Members, including airfares? 
 
The  new  system  of  automatic  reimbursement  of  airfares  is  only  the  second  step  within  DG 
Finance’s strategy of automatic reimbursement. Daily allowances for all meetings inside the 
EU and most airfares, time, distance and approach allowances are already paid automatically. 
This accounts for more than EUR 55 million expenses without any administrative declaration 
by Members, out of a budget of approx. EUR 70 million. 
 
The Members’ Travel and Subsistence Expenses Unit, on instruction of the Secretary-General, 
is working on several other priority projects in order to cover as much as possible, the remaining 
EUR 15 Million with today’s technology standard: 
 
-   Facilitated attendance registration for Members through biometric machines (test phase 
2nd quarter 2020) and facilitated attendance in outside meetings (study 2021); 
-   Facilitated declaration of car trips in the Member State of election through standard Excel 
file via MEP’s e-Portal (implementation 1st quarter 2020); 
-   Study of viability of automatic reimbursement of train fares trough EP’s travel agency 
(possible implementation before end 2020); 
-   Study  of  viability  of  car  trip  applications  for  the  automatic  (GPS  tracking)  or  semi-
automatic (manual declaration through the application) expenses declaration (study runs 
in 2020 for possible implementation 2021). 
 
The progressive implementation of these projects allows for the rationalization of resources, 
which  can  be  deployed  for  the  reimbursement  of  expenses  that  cannot  be  automatically 
reimbursed (paper declarations, airfares bought directly by MEPs etc.). 
 
96. 
If a Member finds a cheaper offer and books the ticket himself, then his reimbursement 
will take much longer than of those tickets booked by the CWT. Is there a plan to speed up the 
reimbursement of tickets booked directly by Members? 
 
Due to: 
 
-   the disparity of travel documents from multiple sources (from external travel agencies, 
travel websites, airlines websites or call centres, etc.);  
 
 
Page 71 of 91 
 

-   and the manual encoding and verification necessary for each document; 
 
The reimbursement time of tickets booked directly by Members is naturally higher than those 
tickets booked by Parliament’s travel agency. The service’s strategy (see also reply to Question 
95) is to significantly reduce the workload through the automation of processes, especially those 
linked to Parliament’s travel agency, in order to increase the capacity of the teams dedicated to 
controls of manual payments, therefore reducing this reimbursement time as well. 
 
For information, the average reimbursement time of travel expenses is  currently 25 working 
days. 
 
97. 
What was the Members’ satisfaction rate with the travel office in 2018? Did Members 
of staff working in the travel office receive any training when starting with the new provider? 
 
There has not been a client satisfaction survey conducted regarding the services rendered by 
the travel agency contracted by the European Parliament.  
 
Nevertheless, the number of complaints received versus the number of transactions processed 
by the travel agency gives an indication of the level of satisfaction. For 2018, 63 complaints 
were received (including the complaints against transport companies and hotels) out of a total 
of 167 288 transactions, that gives a ratio of 0.037%. 
 
The  new  travel  agency  provided  training  on  its  tools  and  procedures  to  the  staff  in  order  to 
ensure  a  smooth  transition.  Training  also  includes  soft  skills  (e.g.  communication,  client 
service, etc.) and is provided whenever there is a need. The Travel Management Unit monitors 
the  contract  implementation  and  ensures  that  the  staff  working  in  the  travel  agency  receive 
adequate training. 
 
98. 
What was the minimum and maximum amount of travel expenses reimbursed to an MEP 
in 2018? 
 
In 2018, the minimum amount reimbursed to a Member in terms of travel costs is EUR 257. 
The maximum reimbursed is EUR 154 566. The calculation is based on requests reimbursed up 
to the 14 October 2019. The deadline to submit claims for reimbursement is the 30 October 
2019. 
 
99. 
Can  the  Secretary-General  explain  the  outrageously  high  prices  for  the  hotels  in 
Strasbourg during the plenary sessions? How is it possible that the same hotels can be up to 
three times cheaper outside parliamentary session weeks? 
 
The high demand for hotel rooms during Strasbourg plenary session weeks results in relatively 
high hotel prices. Parliament’s services are in regular contact with hotels as well as with the 
City  of  Strasbourg  and  negotiate  allotments  for  a  certain  number  of  rooms  below  the  price 
ceiling  for  staff  in  order  to  assure  availability  (especially  during  busy  periods  in  Strasbourg 
coinciding  with  the  plenary  session).  However,  experience  shows  that  possibilities  for  price 
negotiations are very limited, as the majority of Members as well as staff are free to make their 
reservations  in  any hotel  of  their choice. Consequently,  an assurance of a certain  volume of 
room nights per property can neither be predicted nor guaranteed. 
 
The issue of hotel prices in Strasbourg has repeatedly been discussed in different meetings of 
the High level contact group between the European Parliament and the City of Strasbourg.  
 
 
Page 72 of 91 
 

As  a  result,  the  city  of  Strasbourg  is  currently  conducting  a  feasibility  study  to  assess  the 
deployment of a reservation tool  to organise the purchase of hotel rooms on a large scale in 
order to have better conditions and lower prices. 
 
100. 
How many MEPs returned the part of their General Expenditure Allowance that they 
had received in or before 2018 but were unable to spend? How much did they pay back? How 
many MEPs left their posts in 2018 and how many of these MEPs repaid the unspent GEA to 
the EP? What did the Parliament, in 2018, recommend Members do with the unspent part of 
their GEA? How many MEPs refrained from having the GEA transferred on a monthly basis? 
What was the total percentage of the budget reserved for the GEA that was not used in 2018? 
 
The following figures  represent the information in the hands of DG Finances on cases GEA 
return in 2018: 
 
-   15 Members returned part of their GEA; 
-   The total amount of this returned GEA was EUR 224 031.99; 
-   In 2018, 23 Members left Parliament. For reasons of data protection, reference is made 
to the above aggregated figures; 
-   When Members asked advice regarding their unspent GEA, DG Finance recommended it 
to be paid back to Parliament; 
-   None  of  the  Members  refrained  from  having  the  GEA  transferred  to  him  or  her  on  a 
monthly basis; 
-   A portion of 2,4% of the budget reserved for the GEA was not used. 
 
101. 
In the last revision of the Rules of Procedure, the plenary adopted the creation of the 
necessary infrastructure  on Members’ online EP  webpages for those Members who wish to 
publish a voluntary audit or confirmation that their use of the General Expenditure Allowance 
complies with the applicable rules of the Statute for Members and its implementing measures. 
Has  the  development  of  this  infrastructure  been  completed?  If  not,  what  is  the  envisioned 
timeline for operational completion? 
 
In line with the recently updated EP legal framework (Rule 11(4) of the Rules of Procedure, adopted 
by plenary on 31 January 2019) as implemented by the Bureau in its decision of 11 March 2019, 
the administration developed a technical solution that has been available since the end of September 
2019, for Members who so wish, to publish a voluntary audit or confirmation that their use of the 
General Expenditure Allowance complies with the applicable rules of the Statute for Members and 
its implementing measures.  
 
102. 
The  discharge  reports  2016  and  2017  called  for  interns  to  be  eligible  for  advance 
payments for missions. What progress has been made on this issue? 
 
For trainees  in  the General  Secretariat,  Article 15.5 of  Internal  Rules governing traineeships 
and study visits in the Secretariat of the European Parliament provides that trainees can receive 
an  advance  of  up  to  70%  on  the  amount  payable  for  the  mission  in  question  (excluding 
transport).  
 
Members’ trainees follow the same rules as for APAs and are entitled to request an advance 
payment equal to 80% of the amount of the daily allowance estimated for each specific mission. 
 
 
Page 73 of 91 
 

103. 
How many cases involving Parliament were investigated by OLAF in 2018? On what 
issues? What is the current status of those investigations? 
 
In  2018,  OLAF  investigated  43  cases  involving  Parliament  on  the  issues  related  to  staff 
allowances  and  staff  conduct;  parliamentary  allowances;  financing  of  European  political 
parties, foundations and Parliament’s political groups; irregular activities of MEPs entourage; 
Members’  code  of  conduct;  tax  evasion;  irregularities  carried  out  by  Parliament’s  external 
contractors. 
Out  of  these  43  cases  OLAF  closed  17;  9  with  recommendations  and  8  without 
recommendations.  
 
104. 
Please provide us with up-to-date information regarding possible misuse of allowances 
paid to Members’, local and accredited assistants as well as EP officials respectively: 
 
a)  How many investigations were carried out in 2018? 
 
b)  Which allowances were involved? 
 
c)  What amounts were at risk? 
 
d)  What amounts were retracted? 
 
e)  What were the results of these internal investigations? 
 
f)  How many cases were referred to OLAF?  
 
g)  Can you divide the cases into occurrences per political group? 
 
As a preliminary remark, the uniform and consistent definition of the notion of “investigation”, 
which  was  adopted  in  the  framework  of  the  2017  discharge,  should  be  recalled.  This  has 
allowed the various units involved to provide reliable and harmonised data. As a result, the data 
below should be compared with those provided for the last discharge questionnaire but not for 
the previous ones.  
 
As  required  by  the  principle  of  sound  financial  management,  provided  for  in  the  Financial 
Regulation, the services in charge of managing the Members’ allowances carry out regular daily 
internal control activities aimed at safeguarding the legality and regularity of transactions and 
compliance  with  the  Statute  for  Members  and  its  Implementing  Measures.  These  types  of 
controls were not considered for the purpose of identifying the cases of “misuse” of allowances 
by Members.  
 
For the purpose of this analysis, investigation is the in-depth analysis carried out by the services 
when information comes to their knowledge that would indicate potential irregularities in the 
use of Members’ allowances. This type of investigation relates to past transactions based on 
new  information  or  on  horizontal  controls  of  travel  patterns,  and  may  also  be  triggered  by 
requests for information received from OLAF or national judiciary authorities.  
 
The figures below do not include investigations started in 2018 but not concluded at year-end.  
 
a-e) Number of investigations in 2018 
 
In  the  area  of  parliamentary  assistance  allowances,  4  cases  were  identified  in  which 
investigations, outside the daily control activities, were carried out in 2018. The same year, 3 
debit notes were issued for the recovery of EUR 146 814.  
 
With regard to Members’ travel and subsistence allowances, a total of 6 investigations were 
carried  out,  of  which  all  had  financial  implications,  i.e.  they  resulted  in  either  a  non-
reimbursement of the expenses or in a partial or full recovery through debit note or offsetting 
of the expenses reimbursed, corresponding to an amount of EUR 173 546. 
Page 74 of 91 
 

f) No case was referred to OLAF.  
 
g) As a general principle, Members’ allowances and entitlements are granted on an individual 
basis  in  strict  compliance  with  the  Statute  for  Members  and  its  Implementing  Measures, 
irrespective of the criteria of political group or Member State. The approach for controls results 
from  the  application  of  the  Institution’s  Internal  Control  Standards  and  covers  the  entire 
population  of  Members.  The  resulting  recoveries  or  adjustments  off  amounts  paid  (through 
offsetting) are carried out in application of the relevant provisions of the Financial Regulation 
and the Implementing Measures for the Statute for Members. 
 
In relation to EP officials, in 2018 DG PERS carried out one complete procedure concerning 
possible misuse of allowances. The allegations were dismissed. Therefore, no allowances were 
either unduly received or retracted. 
 
Three further procedures against EP officials started in 2018, but have not yet been concluded. 
One of the three is suspended (because of a national criminal procedure in parallel). 
 
105. 
How many studies were conducted by the EPRS and the Policy Departments in 2018? 
How many studies were outsourced to external contractors? 
 
DG EPRS produces a wide range of publications for Members each year and these take a variety 
of forms and lengths, with a view to providing accessible, content-rich and easy-to-read analysis 
and research on policy issues relating to the European Union. 
  
Overall, in 2018, DG EPRS produced 1,072 publications, comprising over 800 publications in 
both  physical  and  digital  form,  and  over  250  items  published  exclusively  online  (mostly 
blogposts).  These  publications  included:  70  Studies  (of  between  37  and  588  pages),  14  ‘In-
depth  Analyses’ (of 13 to 36 pages), 460  ‘Briefings’  (of 3  to  12 pages),  and over 250  ‘At a 
glance’ notes providing a one to two page summary of a topic.  
 
In accordance with established practice within EPRS, as much research as possible is generated 
in-house.  In  2018,  44  of  EPRS’s  1,072  publications  were  outsourced  (4.1%).  They  had  an 
average length of 124 pages. Outsourced expertise is used either when the rules require EPRS 
to do so - as in the case of impact assessments on substantive amendments during the legislative 
process - or in specific cases where the technical nature or complexity of the research needed 
cannot easily  be met by  using in-house capacities -  as is sometimes the case in the fields of 
scientific  foresight,  European  added  value,  ex-post  evaluation  and  comparative  law.  All 
outsourced research is closely managed internally, in accordance with precise specifications.  
 
It should be noted that, in addition to the above output, EPRS answered over 3,000 requests for 
substantive research and analysis from individual Members and other parliamentary clients in 
2018, as well as  approximately 18,000 reference requests  (in the  Library),  and responded to 
over 30,000 citizens’ inquiries - all of which work was done with exclusively internal resources.   
DG  IPOL’s  Policy  Departments,  covering  twenty  committees  (including  three  special 
committees) in the fields of the internal policies of the Union, produced 489 studies and briefing 
papers in 2018. Of these, 330 studies and briefing papers were produced using internal Policy 
Department expertise alone.  159 studies and briefing papers were produced through external 
expertise, managed by in-house specialists. The departments also organised presentations and 
37 workshops, as well as making less formal contributions by in-person and written briefings 
for the President, parliamentary bodies, secretariats and political groups.  
 
Page 75 of 91 
 

The DG EXPO Policy Department provides horizontal services for three committees, two sub-
committees, all parliamentary delegations, and the cabinet of the President in the field of the 
external policies of the Union. For these clients, the DG EXPO Policy Department produced 
300  items  of  expertise  of  various  lengths  and  forms  in  2018.  While  40  of  such  items  were 
outsourced,  the  great  majority  (260)  were  produced  entirely  in-house.  Again,  all  outsourced 
work was closely managed internally. External experts contributed to committee work during 
nine workshops organised by the Policy Department during 2018.  
 
Information  regarding  all  tender  procedures  is  available  in  Parliament's  website  at 
http://www.europarl.europa.eu/tenders/invitations.htm. 
 
106. 
Public  tenders  for  contracts  for  the  purchase  of  goods  and  services  by  the  European 
Parliament:  were  there  single  bidder  tenders  in  2018?  What  were  the  reasons?  Were  there 
tenders where the same company won two or more tenders? 
 
There have been single bidder tenders in 2018 and there were cases in which the same company 
has won two or more tenders in which it had been the only bidder. 
 
The Financial regulation provides the possibility for authorising officers to limit certain types 
of procedures to a single offer: 
 
-   Point 6.3 of Annex I to the Financial Regulation (FR), if the value of the contract to be 
awarded does not exceed EUR 15 000. 
-   Point 11.1(a) to (m) of Annex I FR, if the authorising officer uses the negotiated procedure 
without prior publication of a contract notice for specific cases referred to in that point. 
-   Point 12.1 of Annex I FR, if the authorising officer uses the competitive procedure with 
negotiation or the competitive dialogue for specific cases referred to in Point 12.1(a) to 
(f) of Annex I FR. 
 
Pursuant to Article 74(10) FR, for each financial year, an ex-post report on contracts concluded 
by negotiated procedures in accordance with points (a) to (f) is sent to the CONT and BUDG 
committees (the most recent such report is contained in Chapter III of the 2018 Annual report 
on contracts and concessions awarded by Parliament). 
 
For all other types of procedures for which a contract has been awarded with only a single offer 
in  2018,  various  factors  could  explain  the  lack  of  quantity  in  offers.  General  factors  for 
procedures with only one offer could be the relatively complex EU procurement rules and a 
lack  of  attractiveness  given  the  limited  award  amounts  of  some  of  Parliament’s  public 
procurement procedures. Further potential reasons are mentioned in Special report No 17/2016 
of  the  European  Court  of  Auditors.  Parliament’s  services  have  taken  measures  (guidelines, 
awareness  raising  in  trainings,  etc.)  to  encourage  the  reception  of  more  offers  in  the  public 
procurement procedures launched by Parliament. 
 
107. 
What  steps  will  be  taken  by  the  Parliament  to  ensure  an  easy  and  transparent  search 
engine for public tenders on its website? 
 

new 
version 
of 
the 
website 
"Contracts 
and 
Grants" 
(https://www.europarl.europa.eu/contracts-and-grants/en)  has  been  released  on  7  November 
2019. This new version will be fully responsive and will present a much better user experience 
and navigation through its pages. 
 
Page 76 of 91 
 

Moreover, thanks to a close collaboration between  the services, this website offers the same 
search  engine  as  the  one  already  implemented  on  the  websites  "About  Parliament"  and  "At 
Your Service". This search engine, called "elastic search", offers much better results to the users 
than the old one. 
 
According to  recommendation 5 of the Special report No 17/2016  of the European Court of 
Auditors  “the  EU  institutions  should  create  a  common  electronic  one-stop  shop  for  their 
procurement activities allowing economic operators to find all relevant information in a single 
online  location  and  interact  with  the  EU  institutions  though  this  website.  Procurement 
procedures  including  communication  on  rules  applicable,  business  opportunities,  relevant 
procurement  documents,  submission  of  tenders  and  all  other  communication  between 
institutions  and  economic  operators  should  all  be  managed  via  such  an  one-stop  shop”.  The 
Publications Office of the European Union, has proposed to implement as a long-term target a 
common electronic one-stop shop for the procurement of all EU institutions to gradually gather 
all procurement information in one single website to facilitate the public access of and to avoid 
information  multiplication  and  discrepancies.  Parliament  in  collaboration  with  other  EU 
institutions  is  setting  up  the  common  rules  to  define  and  automatize  at  maximum  the 
implementation procedure for that one-stop shop. 
 
108. 
What is the most up to date status of the deficit of the pension fund and what was the 
deficit in 2018 compared to 2017? 
 
The most recent assessment of the actuarial deficit of the pension fund is as of 31 December 
2018. The actuarial deficits at 31 December in the years 2017 and 2018 were as follows: 
 
Year 
Actuarial deficit in million EUR 
2017 
305,4 
2018 
286,1  
 
 
109. 
Please provide us with additional information regarding the voluntary pension fund: 
 
a)  Contributions by the EP (2014 to 31.12.2018 in yearly increments); 
 
b)  Annual payments (2014 to 31.12.2018 in yearly increments); 
 
c)  Projections of the number of MEPs for the next 5 years, who will be entitled to 
an EU pension (in yearly increments). 
 
a)  
For the years 2014 to 2018, Parliament’s contributions to the voluntary pension fund 
were: 
 
Year 
Amount in EUR 
2014 
25 284.36 
2015 
3 178.74  
2016 
287.82 
2017 
0,00 
2018 
0,00 
 
Page 77 of 91 
 

b)  
Annual  pension  payments  under  the  additional  (voluntary)  pension  scheme  (2014  to 
2018) 
 
Year 
Amount in EUR 
Yearly increments 
2014 
 14 471 432.31  
 
2015 
 15 771 158.41  
1 299 726.10 
2016 
 16 616 919.88  
 845 761.47 
2017 
 17 186 610.39  
 569 690.51 
2018 
17 807 642.21 
 621 031.82 
 
 
c)  
Projections of the number of MEPs who will be entitled to an old-age pension under the 
additional  (voluntary)  pension  scheme  (2014  to  2018).  The  figures  are  based  on  three 
assumptions: 
 
1.  All present and potential future beneficiaries will remain alive throughout the 
period; 
2.  MEPs in mandate holding rights under the scheme will remain in mandate until 
the European elections in 2024. 
3.  Pensionable age under the scheme rules will remain unchanged at 65 years
 
Beneficiaries already in 
New pensioners for the 
Year 
pension (MEPs + 
Total 
year (MEPs only) 
survivors) 
2019 
790 

791 
2020 
791 

796 
2021 
796 
20 
816 
2022 
816 
18 
834 
2023 
834 

843 
2024 
843 
29 
872 
 
110. 
The Bureau presented a comprehensive proposal in March 2018 aimed at significantly 
reducing the actuarial deficit and improving the sustainability of the Fund. What decisions and 
actions have been taken since then to reduce the actuarial deficit of the voluntary pension fund? 
 
At its meeting of 10 December 2018, the Bureau decided to modify the rules applicable to the 
additional voluntary pension scheme with a view to improving the sustainability of the pension 
fund.  The  changes  included  an  increase  of  the  pension  age  from  63  to  65  years  and  the 
introduction of a 5% levy applicable to pensions established after 1 January 2019. 
 
 
Page 78 of 91 
 

111. 
What was the highest, lowest and average pension paid from the voluntary pension fund 
in 2018 and in 2019? 
 
With reservation for the fact that the annual indexation for 2019 is not yet known, the highest, 
lowest and average pensions paid monthly under the additional (voluntary) pension scheme in 
2018 and 2019 were (including survivors’ pensions): 
 
Year 
Max 
Min 
Average 
2018 
EUR 6 369.24 
 EUR 115.84 
 EUR 1 938.37 
2019 
EUR 6 369.24 
EUR 117.81 
EUR 1 951.90 
 
 
112. 
Since  the  foundation  of  the  fund,  how  many  members  left  the  fund  and  had  their 
contributions paid back in 2018? 
 
The number of Members who withdrew from the scheme each year were: 
 
Number of Members 
Year 
who left the Fund 
1995 

1996 

1997 

1998 
85 
1999 
39 
2000 

2001 

2002 

2003 

2004 
29 
2005 
30 
2006 
10 
2007 
13 
2008 

2009 
68 
2010 

2011 

2012 

2013 

2014 

Page 79 of 91 
 

Number of Members 
Year 
who left the Fund 
2015 

2016 

2017 

2018 

Total 
340 
 
 
113. 
Concerning UK pension funds, can the Secretary-General provide an overview of the 
information  gathered  so  far?  What  are  the  conditions  a  fund  should  meet  to  be  considered 
suitable for a transfer out? How many UK pension funds has the PMO identified as suitable? 
How is the PMO working on the matter? 
 
The  file  continues  to  be  discussed  at  interinstitutional  level  with  a  view  to  monitoring  the 
developments  closely,  since  it  is  not  Parliament’s  administration  but  the  Commission’s 
paymaster’s office (PMO) which implements pension rights transfers. The latest information 
available is that PMO identified at least one UK pension fund which accepts “transfer out”. 
 
114. 
It seems that when transferring in pension contributions, different conversion rates are 
applied  to  officials,  contractual  agents,  temporary  agents  and  accredited  parliamentary 
assistants. Can the Secretary-General provide an overview of the rules and provisions the PMO 
applies to each category of officials and other servants? 
 
There are no differential rates regarding transfer of pension rights from the national pension 
schemes to the pension scheme of the European Union (“transfer in”). The rates are identical 
irrespective  of  the  statutory  status  of  the  staff  member  concerned.  The  rules  applicable  to 
transfer of pension rights are essentially to be found in Articles 11 and 12 of Annex VIII of the 
Staff  Regulations  and  in  the  General  Implementing  provisions  for  the  Transfer  of  Pension 
Rights (Decision of the Bureau of 22 June 2011. 
https://epintranet.in.ep.europa.eu/home/parliamentary-life/governing-
bodies/bureau/compendium-of-rules.html). 
 
Additionally, Parliament’s Intranet contains detailed guidelines concerning the administrative 
procedure for both “transfer in” and “transfer out” of pension rights:  
https://epintranet.in.ep.europa.eu/home/browse-as/human-resources/leaving-ep/retirement-
pensions.html 
 
As to the applicable exchange rate for “transfer out”, the exact rate of the moment of the transfer 
is applied. As far as “transfer in”, the exchange rate applicable at the moment of the request of 
the transfer is applied. 
 
 
Page 80 of 91 
 

DELEGATIONS AND MISSIONS 
 
115. 
In 2018, what were the ten most expensive delegation trips, in absolute terms, and what 
were the ten delegation trips where the average cost per MEP was highest? 
 
Please refer to Annex Q115. 
 
116. 
How many  “away days” did  the whole administration and the Bureau have in  2018, 
where did they take place and how many people participated respectively? What were the costs 
incurred? 
 
Please refer to Annex Q116. 
 
117. 
Missions by the President: which missions outside the EP’s three locations (Brussels, 
Luxembourg and Strasbourg) were undertaken by the President in 2018 (and in 2017 by way 
of comparison)? In the cases where a private flight was chartered, for what costs was it chartered 
and what justification was given for not taking the regular flight operators? For missions outside 
the EU: what was the purpose of the mission and who accompanied the President and in which 
function? 
 
In 2018, 22 missions were undertaken by the President of the European Parliament outside the 
three Parliament locations (Brussels, Luxembourg and Strasbourg), out of which 4 were outside 
of the European Union.  
 
By way of comparison, in 2017, 28 missions were undertaken by the President outside the EP’s 
locations (Brussels, Luxembourg and Strasbourg), out of which 3 were outside of the EU.  
 
In three missions held respectively in:  
 
- Bucharest on 20-21 November 2018, 
- Sofia on 20-21 November 2017, 
- Tallinn on 29-30 May 2017 
 
a charter flight was hired for the Delegation of the Parliament’s Conference of Presidents in the 
framework of the meetings organised respectively by the incoming Romanian, Bulgarian and 
Estonian Presidency of the Council of the European Union. 
 
The relevant quota covering the President’s travel costs corresponded respectively to EUR 1 
225 (Bucharest), EUR 417 (Sofia) and EUR 1 075 (Tallinn). 
 
 
Page 81 of 91 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
Visits inside EU (outside the EP three locations) 
2017 
2018 
1. Paris, France, 15-16 January  
1. Sofia, Bulgaria, 11-12 January 
2. Lisbon, Portugal, 9-10 January 
2. Seville, Spain, 29 January  
3. Rome, Italy, 19-23 January 
3. Madrid/Valencia, Spain 7-8 March 
4. La Valletta, Malta, 2-3 February 
4. Madrid, Spain, 12 April  
5. Berlin, Germany, 23-24 February 
5. Bochum, Germany, 12-13 April 
6. La Valletta, Malta, 29-30 March 
6. Tallinn, Estonia, 23-24 April 
7. Bratislava, Slovakia, (via Vienna), 23-24 April 
7. Madrid, Spain, 8-9 May 
8. Madrid, Spain, 8-9 May 
8. Paris, France, 23-24 May 
9. Zagreb, Croatia, 18-19 May 
9. Sofia, Bulgaria, 16-17 May 
10. Tallinn, Estonia, 29-30 May 
10. Budapest, Hungary, 2-3 June 
(CoP incoming EE Presidency) 
11. München, Germany, 6-7 June 
11. Cardiff, United Kingdom, 3-4 June 
12. Vienna, Austria, 18-19 June 
12. Speyer, Germany, 1 July 
13. Salzburg, Austria, 19-20 September 
13. Paris, France, 5 July  
14. Lisbon, Portugal, 27-28 September 
14. Cernay-la-Ville, France, 9-10 October 
15. Helsinki, Finland, 7-8 November 
15. Osnabrück/ Münster, Germany, 10 September 
16. Paris, France, 10-11 November 
16. Paris, France, 21-22 September 
17. Bucharest, Romania, 20-21 November  
17. Tallinn, Estonia, 28-29 September 
(CoP incoming RO Presidency)  
18. Oviedo, Spain, 20-21 October  
18. Vienna, Austria, 18 December 
19. Paris, France, 26 October 
20. La Valletta, Malta, 3 November  
21. Stockholm and Gothenburg, 15-17 November 
22. Berlin, Germany, 9-10 November 
23. Sofia, Bulgaria, 20-21 November  
(CoP incoming BG Presidency)  
24. Milan, Italy, 6-7 December  
25. Nicosia, Cyprus, 7-8 December 
 
 
 
 
Page 82 of 91 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Visits outside EU 2017 
Visit 
Justification 
Delegation 
1. Abidjan, Ivory Coast,  Participation to the EP-
1.      Mr Antonio TAJANI, President of the  
28-29 November 2017 
PAP Parliamentary 
European Parliament 
Summit 5th AU-EU 
2.      Mr Diego CANGA FANO, Head of  
Summit of Heads of 
Cabinet 
State and Government 
3.      Mr Carlo CORAZZA, Deputy Head of  
Cabinet and Spokesman 
4.      Ms Chiara SALVELLI, Head of the  
Private Office of the President 
5.      Mr Guglielmo DI COLA, Member of  
Cabinet 
2. Podgorica, 
Meeting with Parliament  1.      Mr Antonio Tajani, President of the  
Montenegro 
Speaker H.E. Mr Ivan 
European Parliament 
Brajović 
2.      Mr Carlo Corazza, Deputy Head of 
Cabinet and Spokesman 
3.      Mr Guglielmo Di Cola, Member of 
Cabinet 
3. Tunis, Tunisia, 30 
Meeting with Mr 
1.      Mr Antonio TAJANI, President of the  
October -1 
Mohamed Ennaceur, 
European Parliament 
November2017 
President of the 
2.      Mr Carlo CORAZZA, Deputy Head of 
Assembly of the 
Cabinet and Spokesman 
Representatives of the 
3.      Mr Jesper HAGLUND, Member of 
People and Mr Béji Caid 
Cabinet and diplomatic advisor 
Essebsi, President of the  4.      Mr François GABRIEL, Member of 
Republic 
Cabinet 
5.      Ms. Chiara SALVELLI, Head of the 
Private Office of the President 
 
 
 
Page 83 of 91 
 

Visits Outside EU 2018 
Visit 
Justification 
Delegation 
1. Tripoli, Libya, 24 
Meeting with Prime 
1.      Mr. Antonio TAJANI, President of the  
June 2018 
Minister Faiez Serraj + 
European Parliament 
Foreign Minister 
2.      Mr. Carlo CORAZZA, Deputy Head of 
Mohamed Taha Siala 
Cabinet and Spokesperson 
3.      Mr. Michele CERCONE, Member of 
Cabinet, Diplomatic Advisor 
4.      Mrs Chiara SALVELLI, Head of the 
Private Office of the President 
5.      Mr. François GABRIEL, Member of 
Cabinet, Advisor on External Policies 
2. Tripoli, Libya, 9-10 
EUBAM travel to 
1.  Mr. Antonio TAJANI, President of the 
July 2018 
Tripoli , Meetings with 
European Parliament 
Libyan political 
2.  Mr Carlo CORAZZA, Deputy Head of 
representatives, 
Cabinet and Spokesperson 
including Prime Minster 
3.  Mr Michele CERCONE, Member of 
Faiez Serraj 
Cabinet, Diplomatic Advisor 
4.  Mrs Chiara SALVELLI, Head of the 
Private Office of the President 
5.    Mr François GABRIEL, Member of 
Cabinet, Advisor on External Policies 
3. Niamey, Niger, 17-18  Rencontre avec les 
1.  Mr Antonio TAJANI, President of the 
July 2018 
Présidents des 
European Parliament 
Assemblées Nationales 
2.  Mr Carlo CORAZZA, Deputy Head of 
des pays du G5 Sahel 
Cabinet and Spokesperson 
(Niger, Mali, Burkina 
3.  Mr Michele CERCONE, Member of 
Faso, Mauritanie, Tchad) 
Cabinet, Diplomatic Advisor 
et 
4.  Mr Guglielmo DI COLA, Member of 
Audience Président de 
Cabinet, Advisor on Africa 
l’Assemblée Nationale, 
5.  Ms Chiara SALVELLI, Head of the 
suivie d'une réunion avec 
Private Office of the President 
le Bureau de 
6.  Mr Jaume DUCH, Director-General of 
l’Assemblée Nationale 
the Directorate-General for 
 
Communication 
Audience Premier 
Ministre 
4. Beograd, Serbia, 31 
Meetings with the 
1.      Mr Antonio TAJANI, President of the  
January and 1 February 
Serbian National 
European Parliament 
2018 
Assembly Speaker HE 
2.      Mr Carlo CORAZZA, Deputy Head of 
Ms Maja Gojković, with 
Cabinet, Spokesperson 
HE Mrs Ana Brnabić, 
3.      Mr Jesper HAGLUND, Member of 
Prime Minister of the 
Cabinet, Diplomatic Advisor 
Republic of Serbia and 
4.      Mr François GABRIEL, Member of 
with HE Mr Aleksandar 
Cabinet 
Vučić, President of the 
 
Republic of Serbia 
 
Page 84 of 91 
 

118. 
Please  provide  us  with  detailed  figures  regarding  the  costs  of  the  12  missions  to 
Strasburg in the 2018 financial year: 
 
a)  Reimbursement of travel costs for Members of Parliament; 
 
b)  Reimbursement of travel costs for EP staff; 
 
c)  Reimbursement of travel costs for Accredited Parliamentary Assistants; 
 
d)  Costs of charter train Thalys; 
 
e)  Costs of transport of the “cantines”; 
 
f)  Costs of transport of the vehicle fleet; 
 
g)  Cost of external contractors (Flower Bar, Members´ Bar, Press Bar, Swan Bar, 
selfservice restaurant, etc.); 
 
h)  The total amount of all costs. 
 
a) The table below summarizes the total and average cost of MEPs’ travel expenses for the 12 
Strasbourg sessions: 
 
Cost of Strasbourg sessions for year 2018 (EUR) (1) 
 
AVERAGE PER 
Cat. 
TOTAL 
SESSION 
Travel Costs 
7 571 447.52 
630 953.96 
Daily Allowance 
10 193 940.50 
849 495.04 
Distance Allowance 
1 424 841.37 
118 736.78 
Time Allowance 
2 038 181.52 
169 848.46 
Other Costs 
38 278.59 
3 189.88 
TOTAL 
21 266 689.50 
1 772 224.12 
 
(1) Figures not final as deadline for submission of 2018 expenses is 31/10/2019 
 
b and c) Reimbursement of travel costs for EP staff and APAs 
 
N° Missions 
for Strasbourg 
Travel 
     
sessions 
cost 
       
   Agent 
              18.509  
3.631.082  
       
   APA 
              10.522  
2.097.250  
       
   Total: 
              29.031  
5.728.333  
 
d)  
Costs of charter train Thalys; 
 
At the Parliament’s request, the travel agency concluded with the Thalys railway company a 
contract  for  the  charter  of  two  high-speed  trains  covering  the  Brussels-Strasbourg-Brussels 
route with a travel time of 3 hours, one consisting of two train units and the other consisting of 
one train unit with a total of 1 113 seats.  
 
Page 85 of 91 
 

The total price for the chartered trains in 2018 resulted in a price of 140 EUR per passenger for 
a  one-way  trip,  and  280  EUR  for  a  return  trip.  That  amount  covers  the  price  for  the  trains 
operation between Brussels and Strasbourg including one stop in Paris and the access controls 
in the form of ticket and ID checks when travellers enter the trains. 
 
It  is  worth  noting  that  the  costs  for  the  Thalys  charter  are  included  in  the  figures  for 
reimbursements of travel costs for Members/staff and APAs. 
 
e)  
Costs of transport of the cantines  
 
In 2018, the total cost of this type of rental of external vehicles for the 12 missions to Strasbourg 
amounted to EUR 51 832 (due to the internalisation of the EP vehicle fleet this cost will further 
decrease in 2019). 
 
f)  
Costs of transport of the vehicle fleet  
 
In 2018, the costs of transport of the combined vehicle fleet (persons and goods) for 12 sessions 
in Strasbourg for 130 vehicles amount to +/- EUR 34 500 for road toll (péage) and +/- EUR 130 
000 for fuel. 
 
g)  
Cost of external contractors (Flower Bar, Members´ Bar, Press Bar, Swan Bar, self-service 
restaurant, etc.)  
 
The European Parliament incurs no costs from Compass Eurest France, the external catering 
contractor for Parliament’s buildings in Strasbourg. The contractual arrangement in place since 
November 2016 is concession-based and without subsidies. 
 
h)  
Total amount of all costs 
 
The above cost elements sum up to a total of approx. EUR 27 211 000. 
 
SECURITY AND SAFETY 
 
119. 
Can  the  Secretary-General  describe  in  detail  the  expenditure  on  improving  security 
measures in the EP buildings and the objective of concrete steps taken in 2014- 2018/19? 
 
The competent services presented the expenses relating to the securisation of the Parliament’s 
premises to  the Committee on Budgets  in  June 2018 and provided further clarifications in  a 
letter  addressed  to  the  Chair  of  the  Committee  on  Budgets  22  of  June  2018.  Details  were 
considered confidential and were made available in the secured reading room.  
 
The security measures in buildings, linked to anti-terrorism measures, implemented between 
2014 and 2018, can be subdivided in several natures, according to the security expert report, 
responsible for the risk analysis: 
 
1.  Entrances  -  Improve  security  level  in  entrances  by  adding  anti-bullet;  anti-riot;  anti-
intrusion and anti-blast protections and at the same time, revising the layout to organize 
circulation flows and guarantee access control and evacuation paths, without losing the 
functionalities needed for a European institution building entrance.  
 
 
Page 86 of 91 
 

2.  Facades  -  Adding  anti-blast  protection  in  all  building  facades,  using  specific  anti-
shattering films;  
3.  Peripheral  protections  -  Create  protections  against  vehicles  in  pedestrian  and  building 
entrances. 
 
These measures where implemented in Brussels and Strasbourg buildings, between 2014 and 
2018, and the respective global expenditure during this period was:    
  
 
Strasbourg – 2014-2018 (Design + Construction works) = EUR 25,9 Mio 
 
Brussels – 2014-2018 (Design + Construction works) = EUR 37,6 Mio  
 
120. 
Is the SG of the opinion that the measures taken in terms of security and safety meet the 
actual needs of the EP? 
 
See also reply to Question 122. 
 
The SG has acknowledged several times that the measures taken in terms of security and safety 
meet the actual needs of the EP.   
 
A  comparison  of    EP’s  with  French,  British,  German,  Italian  and  American  parliamentary 
services  for  Members  conducted  by  the  Secretary-General  shows  that  Parliament  has  made 
considerable progress in the field of security showing an evolution from a below average service 
in 2014 to an above average in 2019.  
 
Since  2014,  Parliament  has  taken  a  whole  series  of  measures  to  tighten  up  its  security 
arrangements  and  make  operational,  structural  and  cultural  improvements  in  this  area  while 
ensuring that it remains an open, transparent and accessible institution, which has always been 
its stated intention.  
 
Bringing  general  security  services  in-house  has  radically  altered  the  nature  of  Parliament’s 
security services and how they operate and are organised.  
 
Over the last parliamentary term, the Bureau has accordingly taken a number of major security-
related decisions that have been followed-up effectively by the Administration.  
 
The various measures taken can be categorised as follows: 
 

political  measures  concerning  relations  with  the  national  authorities  of  the  host 
countries and the other institutions; 

measures to upgrade Parliament’s buildings;  

internal measures to step up internal security arrangements. 
 
It  should  be  pointed  out  that  thanks  to  all  these  measures,  taken  as  a  whole,  security  in 
Parliament  at  the  three  sites  has  been  markedly  stepped  up  while  ensuring  parliamentary 
business continuity and retaining the openness and accessibility that are Parliament hallmarks.  
 
The  details  of  all  the  measures  taken  during  the  last  parliamentary  term,  together  with  the 
infrastructure investment made, were presented to the Bureau in July 2019. 
 
Page 87 of 91 
 

121. 
How many security staff were employed within the three places of work in 2018? What 
are the total costs? How many security staff became officials, in which grade and nationality in 
2018? 
 
553 security staff (security and prevention officers in Function Group I) were employed by the 
Parliament in 2018. The total salary costs for the staff concerned were around EUR 25 million.  
 
Only one  security and prevention officer  became official  in  2018 as  a laureate of the EPSO 
competition for Accreditation officers / Receptionists (EPSO/AST-SC/05/16 - SC 1). He is of 
Belgian nationality and was recruited in the grade AST-SC 1. 
 
122. 
Has  the  change  from  an  external  company  to  internal  security  services  proved  to  be 
successful? Has an evaluation taken place on this change? 
 
The Bureau adopted the decision to bring security services in house in 2012, in line with the 
strategy laid down in the ‘New global security concept’, the cornerstones of which included 
professionalisation  and  specialisation  in  view  of  the  specific  nature  of  Parliament  and 
parliamentary activities. 
 
Having brought its security services in house, Parliament is now able to manage all aspects of 
security  within  its  buildings  in  Brussels  and  Strasbourg  using  its  own  staff,  whose  level  of 
professionalism,  motivation,  commitment,  dedication  and  loyalty  to  the  institution  and  its 
Members  is  far  greater  than  would  be  the  case  with  the  employees  of  an  external  service 
provider. 
 
Internal management allowed for: 
 
-  A  specific  and  tailor-made  recruitment  policy  leading  to  the  recruitment  of  a  highly 
specialised management and mid-management with academic training at various levels 
in  the  area  of  security  and  solid  professional  background  either  in  the  national  police 
forces of the Member States or the security services of the other institutions; 
-  A high level of specialisation among coordinators and administrators. Assistants (AST) 
responsible for coordination tasks (recruited through specific EPSO competitions tailored 
to Parliament’s needs) and administrators also benefiting from solid security academic 
trainings and professional experience either in the national police forces of the Member 
States or the security services of the other institutions; 
-  A  very  selective  recruitment  procedure  as  regards  security  staff  (Function  Group  I 
contract staff) who were all recruited via an EPSO selection applying exactly the same 
criteria as those for the recruitment of permanent staff performing other functions. The 
staff  recruited  have  substantial  knowledge  and  experience,  coming  mostly  from  the 
national law enforcement agencies of the various Member States; 
-  The professionalisation of all security staff, based on training provided to all staff in order 
to  familiarise  them  with  the  specific  characteristics  and  demands  of  Parliament’s 
activities and the procedures, practices and working methods specific to the institution.  
-  The maintenance of staff know-how with regard to the specific nature and activities of 
Parliament,  which  is  now  able  to  develop  and  strengthen  itself  over  time  to  ensure 
increasingly effective security tailored to the specific needs of the institution; 
-  Flexible management providing for tailored security  able to  safeguard  the activities of 
Parliament, its bodies and Members while ensuring an appropriate level of security. 
 
Page 88 of 91 
 

The  fact  that  this  internal  transformation  of  the  security  services  has  coincided  with  an 
extremely sensitive time in terms of security must not be overlooked.  
 
The  complex  context  has  direct  consequences  for  the  internal  organisation  of  Parliament’s 
security  and  brought  the  Bureau  to  take  a  series  of  measures  to  tighten  up  its  security 
arrangements and make operational and structural improvements in this area, while ensuring 
that Parliament remains an open, transparent and accessible institution, which has always been 
its stated intention (see reply to Question 120).  
 
Such a far-reaching transformation of the Parliament’ security arrangements could never have 
been achieved with an external company managing its internal security.  
 
A comparison of  Parliament with French, British, German, Italian and American parliamentary 
services for Members shows that EP has made considerable progress  in  the field  of security 
showing an evolution from a below average service in 2014 to an above average in 2019.  
 
Moreover, DG SAFE has organised various visits and meetings with his counterparts in the 
national Parliaments - notably the European Parliamentary Security Service Conference held 
in the European Parliament in October 2018 with the aim of fostering enhanced cooperation 
with colleagues responsible for security in national parliaments and jointly identifying best 
practices.   
 
The  results  of  these  exchanges  indicate  that  EP's  current  security  standards  are  on  the  same 
level with those of national parliaments, and even higher in some areas. 
 
123. 
Concerning Cybersecurity and the increased and generalised use of WhatsApp, have the 
EP services considered creating an App internal to the institution? Would there be barriers to 
doing so? 
 
DG ITEC, will analyse all possible communication solutions in the context of its Digital Work 
Place (DWP) strategy and has already involved ICT security services in the process. 
 
GREEN PARLIAMENT 
 
124. 
With  regard  to  the  Environmental  Management  System  (EMAS),  what  results  were 
achieved in 2018 in terms of reducing carbon dioxide emissions and reducing waste, especially 
plastic? 
 
The European Parliament’s objective is to reduce CO2 emissions per full-time equivalent (FTE) 
by 40% between 2006 and 2030. Between 2006 and 2018, Parliament has already reduced its 
emissions  by  approximately  37.7%,  nearly  reaching  its  2030  target.  In  2018,  Parliament’s 
emissions were slightly lower than in 2017 in both absolute terms and per FTE. Emissions per 
FTE  were  2.2%  lower  in  2018  when  compared  to  2017.  Parliament’s  carbon  footprint 
calculation is based on the most ambitious scope possible, encompassing direct, semi-direct and 
indirect emissions resulting from Parliament’s activities. 
 
In 2018, European Parliament reduced the total amount of waste it produced by 3.2% compared 
to 2017. In 2018, Parliament’s average recycling rate stood at 69.1%, nearly reaching the target 
(70% for the period 2016-2025), while the amount of non-recycled waste was reduced by 17.6% 
and the amount of food waste by 23.1%.  
Page 89 of 91 
 

When  it  comes  to  plastic  waste,  due  to  the  procedures  for  its  removal  and  treatment  by 
authorised entities at the three places of work, it is weighed together with metal cans and drink 
cartons.  Taken  together,  the  amount  of  waste  in  this  category  was  reduced  by  19%  in  2018 
when compared to 2017 (128 325 kg in 2018 compared to 158 720 kg in 2017). 
 
125. 
How much electricity, water and heat was consumed in 2018 in the EP’s three locations 
(Brussels, Luxembourg and Strasbourg) respectively (and, for comparison, in 2017)? 
 
In 2018, 122 315 983 kWh of electricity were used at the European Parliament’s three main 
places of work (71 558 342 kWh in Brussels, 15 531 168 kWh in Luxembourg and 35 226 473 
kWh in Strasbourg). This is slightly more than in 2017, when 120 580 240 kWh of electricity 
were used at the three main places of work (69 627 371 kWh in Brussels, 15 834 120 kWh in 
Luxembourg and 35 118 749 kWh in Strasbourg). 
 
When it comes to water, 222 237 m³ were used at the European Parliament’s three main places 
of  work  in  2018  (146  709  m³  in  Brussels,  24  877  m³  in  Luxembourg  and  50  651  m³  in 
Strasbourg). This is slightly more than in 2017, when 220.028 m³ of water were used at the 
three main places of work (142 552 m³ in Brussels, 25 866 m³ in Luxembourg and 51 610 m³ 
in Strasbourg). 
 
It should be noted that relative to the number of FTEs, there was a reduction in both electricity 
and water consumption in  2018 when compared  to  2017 (for electricity,  8 390 kWh/FTE in 
2018 compared to  8 430.4 kWh/FTE in  2017; for water, 15.2 m3/FTE in  2018 compared to 
15.4 m³/FTE in 2017). 
 
Concerning energy used for heating, 67 183 096 kWh were used at the European Parliament’s 
three  main  places  of  work  in  2018  (54  214  773  kWh  in  Brussels,  10  828  217  kWh  in 
Luxembourg and 2 140 106 kWh in Strasbourg). This is less than in 2017, when 68 985 262 
kWh were used at the three main places of work (54 645 934 kWh in Brussels, 10 873 700 kWh 
in Luxembourg and 3 465 628 kWh in Strasbourg). 
 
126. 
How many single-use plastic bottles were discarded by the Parliament in 2018? What 
initiatives is the Parliament pursuing to further reduce the use of single-use plastic bottles? 
 
In 2018, roughly 1 million plastic bottles were consumed in the European Parliament, down by 
11% (103 000) compared to 2017, 600 000 of which were consumed at Parliament’s official 
meetings,  the  other  400  000  by  political  groups  and  other  events  organised  by  Parliament’s 
services. 
 
The  Bureau  Working  Group  on  ‘Buildings,  Transport  and  a  Green  Parliament’  invited  the 
administration to propose immediate and long-term measures for a complete abolition of single-
use plastic bottles distributed or sold on Parliament’s premises (at official meetings, vending 
machines, catering sale outlets and large scale events) for the new legislature 2019.  
 
The following decisions and measures were taken by the Quaestors and the Bureau: 
 
At their meeting on 17 April 2018, the Quaestors decided that 
 
-  plastic bottles for water and soft drinks in vending machines should be phased-out as soon 
as possible; 
Page 90 of 91 
 

-   freely  accessible  water  tap  fountains  (providing  still  and  sparkling  water)  shall  be 
installed universally in Parliament’s meeting rooms and busy corridors to ensure water 
provision at all times without having to resort to the distribution of plastic bottles. 
 
At their meeting on 11 June 2018, the Bureau 
 
-   welcomed  this  innovative  water  provision  policy  at  Parliament’s  premises  through  a 
widespread  system  of  water  fountains  located  near  all  the  meeting  rooms  and  in  all 
buildings housing Members and staff, including visitors’ areas, to enable the reduction 
and  gradual  elimination  of  single-use  plastic  bottles,  and  noted  that  Parliament  should 
become the leading EU institution in this area; 
 
On 18 June 2019, the Quaestors adopted the following measures: 
 
-  As of 1 July 2019, bottled mineral water is  no longer provided at Parliament’s official 
meetings. Members and staff attending Parliament’s official meetings are invited to use 
one of the newly installed 300 water fountains equipped with anti-bacteriological devices 
providing  cooled  still  and  sparkling  water.  The  remaining  fountains  that  still  dispense 
cups for single-use will be equipped with recyclable or biodegradable material. 
-   As of September 2019, plastic bottles in all vending machines, catering outlets and sales 
points should be eliminated. 
-  Vending  machines  providing  reusable  drinks  containers  (functioning  with  a  deposit 
system) should be installed gradually as of January 2020 in the main passageways and 
visitors’ areas, in order to eliminate the distribution of all single-use material, whether 
recyclable or not. 
 
Following these decisions, these implementing measures have been taken: 
 
-  At the three places of work, as of 1 July 2019, bottled mineral water is no longer provided 
at Parliament’s official meetings. Existing stocks of plastic water bottles were returned to 
the supplier or, if not possible, will be used up and phased out as soon as possible. 
-  Members and staff were informed of this measure and were encouraged to use the newly 
installed water fountains instead. 
-  In Brussels, as of 5 August 2019, the new restaurant and catering service providers will 
be gradually offering a plastic-free service. 
-  In Luxembourg, as of 1 July 2019, single-use plastic bottles are no longer available at the 
catering outlets, sales points and in the Staff Shop. Single-use plastic bottles are replaced 
by  more  environmentally  friendly  reusable  bottles  or  by  cans,  which  are  collected  at 
identified collecting points. 
-  In Strasbourg, as of 1 July 2019, plastic bottles have been replaced by a deposit/voucher 
system for glass bottles applicable to all catering sales points, restaurants and bars. 
-  The  ‘Use  Your  Own  Mug’  financial  incentive,  where  vending  machines  as  well  as 
cafeterias offer a reduction of 10 cents, is under implementation. In addition, all catering 
providers operating on Parliament’s premises on the three sites committed themselves to 
reduce, with a view to total elimination, plastics, such as cutlery, packaging and wrapping 
material. 
 
Page 91 of 91 
 







Annex Q7 - Implementation of the election strategy in 2018
March 2018
Creation of governance structures for EE19 campaign in DG COMM
March 2018
EU-wide research to refine understanding of priority “soft abstainer” target
audiences for all EPLOs and central teams: Phase 2 (media habits)
Mar-June 2018
Creation and progressive activation of inter-institutional cooperation
structures relating to the EE19 campaign.
Mar-June 2018
Recruitment of specialist contractual staff for EE19 (mainly press officers
and community managers in the EPLOs, plus technical experts for digital
ground game)
Mar-June 2018
Development of eight “EE19 core narratives”, relating important policy
areas (identified by Eurobarometer research as being citizens’ major
concerns) to EP legislative activities and action. For use in messaging to all
audiences.
Mar-June 2018
Set up of “thistimeimvoting.eu” (TTIV) website, technical infrastructure
and organisational structures/workflows.
Mar-June 2018
Development of graphic guidelines and designs for EE19 communication
products, distribution to internal and external partners (e.g. via “download
centre”)
Mar-June 2018
Preparation of ‘action plans’ by DG COMM central units and ‘national
action plans’ by EPLOs (aligned with general strategy) Attribution of
budget to EPLOs to support national action plans.
May 2018
Launch of press/media campaign with President Tajani of “One Year to
Go” press briefing. Publication of Eurobarometer survey on awareness of
and attitudes to European elections. Promotional campaign on social media.
June 2018
Launch of TTIV website v.1 and first recruitments of ground game at EYE.
July 2018
First promotional campaign to attract recruits to TTIV community
July-Aug 2018
EU-wide research to refine understanding of priority “soft abstainer” target
audiences for all EPLOs and central teams: Phase 3 (voting behaviour and
political/campaign priorities)
Sept. 2018
First “welcome meetings” in EPLOs for TTIV volunteers, first activation of
volunteers (online/offline).
Sept. 2018
State of the Union speech: major media activation based on upcoming
elections; parallel launch of first pre-election Eurobarometer; promotional
campaign via social media.
Sept-Dec 2018
Integration of EE19 messaging and information in visitor briefings and
content. Special EE19 stand for visitors, “sharing box” (photo booth with
EE19 content), election postcards...
Sept-Dec 2018
Supporter and volunteer newsletters through TTIV platform: shareable
content, competitions, tips and tricks, testimonials, campaign milestones in
accordance with an editorial schedule.
Sept-Dec 2018
Ongoing social media posting (and re-posting) of EE19 related content
(central and local platforms), engagement with social media networks,
online competitions to develop content, etc. “Always-on” promotion of
election related content.

Sept-Dec 2018
“Delivery phase” development of campaign visuals based on policies of EU
and actions of EP --> physical installations (e.g. Brussels Skywalk), social
media imagery and messaging, “Because” website (Nov.) Promotional
campaign (Dec).
Sept-Dec 2018
Networking with and mobilisation of partner organisations: briefings,
presentations, participation in events with information stands, series of
training seminars, memoranda of understanding...
Sept-Dec 2018
Mobilisation of online influencers, including through invitations to EP
sessions and events
Sept-Dec 2018
Series of seminars for journalists and media to brief them on EE19 and
related services (Brussels/Strasbourg)
Sept-Dec 2018
Workshops and briefings organised by media/press teams in EPLOs at
national level to brief journalists on EE19 and related services
Sept-Dec 2018
“Media Tour”: senior management meetings with leading media directors
(newspaper editors, heads of TV & radio news, etc.) to boost
awareness/interest in and offer EP support services for EE19 coverage.
Oct. 2018
Publication and media launch of Eurobarometer survey concerning public
opinion on EE19, attitudes to the European Parliament and EU
policies/values of greatest interest in this context.
Oct. 2018
Organisation of Europe Direct Information Centres (EDICs) annual general
meeting in the European Parliament, themed EE19
Oct-Dec 2018
Pre-production conceptual work for “Choose Your Future” movie and
family of products: moodboarding, storyboarding, development and
validation of narrative...
Oct-Dec 2018
Development and design work for “How to” elections website (for launch
January 2019)
Oct-Dec 2018
Pre-award phase of grants programme (media & events) relating to EE19:
publication, evaluations (awards in 2019)
Oct-Dec 2018
Preparatory discussions with European Broadcasting Union and European
Political parties on organisation of lead candidate debate.
Nov. 2018
Launch of “Because” website, with promotional campaign.
Nov. 2018
Launch of the “What Europe Does For Me” website, developed by DG
EPRS providing details of EU action in geographical locations and for
social/interest groups. Promotional campaign
Nov. 2018
“28/28” meeting of EC Representations and EP Liaison Offices, themed
EE19
Nov. 2018
Second promotional campaign to attract recruits to TTIV community
Dec. 2018
Publication of “pre-election” website on Europarl.
Dec. 2018
Launch of Citizens’ App
Dec. 2018
EE19 promo items available for visitor services
Dec. 2018
Preparation of social media short video campaign promoting voter
registration for the largest EU diasporas within the EU (publication 2019)

Annex Q15 - Visitor numbers per month for the Brussels and Strasbourg Parlamentarium
Parlamentarium Brussels
Parlamentarium
Strasbourg
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2017
2018
Jan
-
12.280
18.065
19.738
17.744
13.379
16.748
19.199
-
6.818
Feb
-
16.537
22.595
25.911
22.275
21.214
23.518
23.147
-
9.444
Mar
-
24.463
35.324
33.708
35.885
21.374
30.351
33.567
-
16.203
Apr
-
24.374
35.615
37.214
35.939
17.884
30.547
29.708
-
16.823
May
-
25.333
35.291
31.957
35.413
19.035
27.075
27.000
-
15.003
Jun
-
20.398
28.523
23.367
30.075
17.511
21.859
23.592
3.212
32.899
Jul
-
18.275
25.651
24.817
28.337
15.645
19.455
22.624
9.978
16.850
Aug
-
20.581
27.024
31.927
30.103
14.816
20.288
27.304
8.814
12.611
Sep
-
23.504
22.593
25.393
25.691
17.908
21.163
22.252
10.220
14.013
Oct
16.752
29.798
32.817
36.039
34.075
23.626
27.841
28.268
11.666
17.984
Nov
22.650
30.064
31.574
26.371
17.508
22.291
26.115
25.865
10.176
13.351
Dec
16.612
22.567
22.081
24.058
13.035
20.051
20.934
19.721
7.102
12.173
TOTAL
56.014
268.174
337.153
340.500
326.080
224.734
285.894
302.247
61.168
184.172
% Variation
-
26%
1%
-4%
-31%
27%
6%
-

Annex Q17 - Stakeholder dialogue events in 2018
Legislative
Date
City
Committee
Rapporteur(s)
proposals
25/01/2018
Dublin
Common
ECON
Alain
consolidated
LAMASSOURE
corporate tax base
(EPP) & Paul
(CCCTB) and
TANG (S&D)
Common corporate
tax base (CCTB)
01/02/2018
Paris
Common corporate
ECON
Paul TANG (S&D)
tax base (CCTB)
16/02/2018
Stockholm
Pursuing the
TRAN
Jens NILSSON
occupation of road
(S&D)
transport operator
and access to the
international road
haulage market
26/02/2018
Berlin
European Solidarity
CULT
Helga TRÜPEL
Corps
(Verts/ALE)
23/03/2018
Rome
The Future of Food
AGRI
Herbert
and Farming
DORFMANN
(EPP)
25/04/2018
Paris
Screening of foreign
INTA
Franck PROUST
direct investments
(EPP)
into the European
Union
26&27/04/2018
Vienna
The Future of Food
AGRI
Herbert
and Farming
DORFMANN
(EPP)
08/05/2018
Budapest
Transparent and
EMPL
Enrique CALVET
predictable working
CHAMBON
conditions in the EU
(ALDE)
14/05/2018
Berlin
Common
ECON
Alain
consolidated
LAMASSOURE
corporate tax base
(EPP) & Paul
(CCCTB) and
TANG (S&D)
Common corporate
tax base (CCTB)
15/05/2018
Vienna
Common
ECON
Alain
consolidated
LAMASSOURE
corporate tax base
(EPP) & Paul
(CCCTB) and
TANG (S&D)
Common corporate
tax base (CCTB)

17/05/2018
Paris
Transparent and
EMPL
Enrique CALVET
predictable working
CHAMBON
conditions in the EU
(ALDE)
23/05/2018
Riga
Posting drivers in the
TRAN
Merja KYLLONEN
road transport sector
(GUE/NGL)
01/06/2018
Madrid
Transparent and
EMPL
Enrique CALVET
predictable working
CHAMBON
conditions in the EU
(ALDE)
08/06/2018
Stockholm
Transparent and
EMPL
Enrique CALVET
predictable working
CHAMBON
conditions in the EU
(ALDE)
08/06/2018
Warsaw
The reform of the
BUDG
Janusz
European Union’s
LEWANDOWSKI
system of own
(EPP)
resources
15/06/2018
Berlin
Transparent and
EMPL
Enrique CALVET
predictable working
CHAMBON
conditions in the EU
(ALDE)
18/06/2018
Madrid
European Electronic
ITRE
Pilar DEL
Communications
CASTILLO (EPP)
Code
14/09/2018
Vienna
Transparent and
EMPL
Enrique CALVET
predictable working
CHAMBON
conditions in the EU
(ALDE)

Q18 and Q20 - European Liaison Offices
Breakdown of total expenditure 2014

Staff Cost
Buildings
Security
Communication
Liaison office
Salaries
Missions
Sub-total
cost
cost
cost
Total cost
ATHENS OFFICE
853.017
45.503
898.520
396.998
44.824
153.941
1.494.282
BARCELONA REG OFFICE
321.555
18.910
340.465
156.062
50.715
97.579
644.821
BERLIN OFFICE
1.149.649
64.610
1.214.259
710.250
104.959
516.894
2.546.362
BRATISLAVA OFFICE
391.855
46.780
438.635
144.451
0
176.799
759.885
BRUSSELS OFFICE
874.673
26.569
901.242
0
0
359.826
1.261.068
BUCHAREST OFFICE
173.321
25.402
198.723
302.944
13.753
84.152
599.572
BUDAPEST OFFICE
298.909
38.958
337.868
97.163
37.283
172.684
644.997
COPENHAGEN OFFICE
764.936
53.704
818.640
264.210
132.991
169.918
1.385.758
DUBLIN OFFICE
737.667
37.087
774.754
360.890
68.903
136.741
1.341.289
EDINBURGH REG OFFICE
190.687
23.558
214.245
148.294
38.124
87.181
487.844
HELSINKI OFFICE
695.607
46.930
742.537
355.762
54.775
215.691
1.368.766
LISBON OFFICE
560.227
48.446
608.673
118.017
36.102
160.713
923.505
LJUBLJANA OFFICE
261.019
55.678
316.696
119.952
41.253
144.125
622.026
LONDON OFFICE
1.523.854
72.366
1.596.221
127.927
87.296
570.140
2.381.584
LUXEMBOURG OFFICE
331.266
14.530
345.796
243.762
0
122.154
711.712
MADRID OFFICE
1.384.909
56.048
1.440.957
607.668
103.581
296.436
2.448.641
MARSEILLE REG OFFICE
334.392
18.750
353.142
58.933
24.844
83.873
520.791
MILAN REG  OFFICE
219.552
30.147
249.699
151.887
48.238
85.432
535.256
MUNICH REG  OFFICE
290.888
15.246
306.133
50.104
36.484
60.815
453.537
NICOSIA OFFICE
201.466
33.984
235.450
378.897
52.836
170.904
838.086
PARIS OFFICE
1.000.776
53.767
1.054.543
1.182.942
97.027
237.520
2.572.032
PRAGUE OFFICE
323.689
43.679
367.368
220.053
818
250.303
838.542
RIGA OFFICE
266.356
30.688
297.045
157.596
56.035
97.291
607.967
ROME OFFICE
743.517
66.050
809.567
722.587
106.140
240.066
1.878.360
SOFIA OFFICE
95.086
35.001
130.088
98.674
15.503
133.388
377.653
STOCKHOLM OFFICE
818.782
54.140
872.923
409.235
94.083
202.154
1.578.395
STRASBOURG OFFICE
1.766.467
21.124
1.787.592
0
0
3.608.417
5.396.009
TALLINN OFFICE
276.061
25.700
301.761
155.028
19.352
90.551
566.692
THE HAGUE OFFICE
607.819
36.745
644.564
78.108
83.378
236.316
1.042.366
VALLETTA OFFICE
267.611
19.226
286.837
79.725
14.792
113.893
495.247
VIENNA OFFICE
537.779
46.270
584.049
104.018
60.924
216.841
965.832
VILNIUS OFFICE
223.464
37.215
260.678
201.321
16.409
209.091
687.499
WARSAW OFFICE
354.543
44.653
399.196
193.042
16.211
266.174
874.624
WROCLAW REG OFFICE
169.128
20.240
189.368
326.197
7.440
62.228
585.232
ZAGREB OFFICE
143.580
24.344
167.924
221.144
28.722
113.475
531.265
Sub TOTAL
19.154.108
1.332.048 20.486.156
8.943.841
1.593.794
9.943.706 40.967.497
WASHINGTON DC OFFICE
1.722.687
37.021
1.759.707
259.145
17.180
41.345
2.077.377
TOTAL
20.876.795
1.369.069 22.245.863
9.202.986
1.610.974
9.985.051 43.044.874
Communication costs:
Berlin: It includes Europe Experience expenses since 2017
Brussels:  It includes Open Days management expenses until 2016. Afterwards it was managed by the HQ
Ljubliana: It includes Europe Experience expenses since 2017
Strasbourg: It includes Europe Experience expenses since 2017 and Euroscola management carried out by the Office

Q18 and Q20 - European Liaison Offices
Breakdown of total expenditure 2015

Staff Cost
Buildings
Security
Communication
Liaison office
Salaries
Missions
Sub-total
cost
cost
cost
Total cost
ATHENS OFFICE
746.819
55.468
802.287
221.204
41.752
150.544
1.215.787
BARCELONA REG OFFICE
324.091
14.868
338.959
156.820
53.483
88.440
637.702
BERLIN OFFICE
1.197.399
65.191
1.262.590
1.579.610
139.332
601.886
3.583.418
BRATISLAVA OFFICE
394.961
48.143
443.104
139.146
7.872
128.600
718.722
BRUSSELS OFFICE
875.262
26.279
901.541
0
0
460.107
1.361.648
BUCHAREST OFFICE
180.028
32.626
212.654
264.347
23.904
103.564
604.469
BUDAPEST OFFICE
310.002
35.600
345.603
117.305
37.803
146.582
647.292
COPENHAGEN OFFICE
640.378
55.122
695.500
788.105
128.777
133.444
1.745.825
DUBLIN OFFICE
734.769
38.278
773.047
852.245
67.740
169.250
1.862.282
EDINBURGH REG OFFICE
361.894
33.325
395.220
162.601
37.396
75.850
671.066
HELSINKI OFFICE
527.282
47.540
574.822
360.561
56.215
143.668
1.135.266
LISBON OFFICE
591.788
52.074
643.862
106.709
36.332
176.820
963.723
LJUBLJANA OFFICE
286.174
53.350
339.524
98.296
41.543
118.371
597.734
LONDON OFFICE
1.454.996
81.604
1.536.601
113.938
116.409
558.603
2.325.551
LUXEMBOURG OFFICE
346.035
13.961
359.997
254.323
0
93.730
708.050
MADRID OFFICE
1.135.933
57.063
1.192.997
617.810
104.447
233.952
2.149.205
MARSEILLE REG OFFICE
335.947
22.602
358.549
29.707
23.011
56.385
467.652
MILAN REG  OFFICE
243.993
19.509
263.502
149.079
48.306
99.897
560.784
MUNICH REG  OFFICE
159.334
15.549
174.883
50.104
32.387
65.006
322.380
NICOSIA OFFICE
202.180
41.557
243.737
158.727
52.366
90.140
544.969
PARIS OFFICE
1.205.934
59.010
1.264.945
1.195.335
95.998
261.893
2.818.171
PRAGUE OFFICE
345.605
52.610
398.215
169.795
1.182
182.417
751.609
RIGA OFFICE
231.293
40.724
272.018
160.033
46.612
70.007
548.669
ROME OFFICE
913.634
74.657
988.291
702.917
105.074
240.477
2.036.759
SOFIA OFFICE
129.541
27.822
157.364
88.027
12.165
138.157
395.712
STOCKHOLM OFFICE
649.292
49.471
698.763
386.468
91.354
181.628
1.358.212
STRASBOURG OFFICE
1.756.832
21.692
1.778.524
0
0
3.757.268
5.535.792
TALLINN OFFICE
278.049
28.214
306.263
158.585
20.934
122.044
607.826
THE HAGUE OFFICE
662.572
42.213
704.785
78.861
83.865
261.196
1.128.708
VALLETTA OFFICE
269.576
29.049
298.625
78.855
13.625
178.014
569.120
VIENNA OFFICE
601.401
51.399
652.800
112.507
67.190
184.027
1.016.524
VILNIUS OFFICE
269.060
38.152
307.212
194.020
16.839
119.010
637.081
WARSAW OFFICE
348.939
45.635
394.574
192.072
16.551
302.161
905.359
WROCLAW REG OFFICE
184.681
21.167
205.849
270.826
8.062
71.116
555.852
ZAGREB OFFICE
218.683
31.282
249.965
238.388
28.508
111.081
627.942
Sub TOTAL
19.114.359
1.422.809 20.537.168 10.247.326
1.657.031
9.875.335 42.316.860
WASHINGTON DC OFFICE
1.651.855
60.838
1.712.694
428.505
23.709
40.266
2.205.174
TOTAL
20.766.214
1.483.648 22.249.862 10.675.831
1.680.740
9.915.601 44.522.034
Communication costs:
Berlin: It includes Europe Experience expenses since 2017
Brussels:  It includes Open Days management expenses until 2016. Afterwards it was managed by the HQ
Ljubliana: It includes Europe Experience expenses since 2017
Strasbourg: It includes Europe Experience expenses since 2017 and Euroscola management carried out by the Office

Q18 and Q20 - European Liaison Offices
Breakdown of total expenditure 2016

Staff Cost
Buildings
Security
Communication
Liaison office
Salaries
Missions
Sub-total
cost
cost
cost
Total cost
ATHENS OFFICE
665.182
51.700
716.882
191.540
38.900
180.900
1.128.222
BARCELONA REG OFFICE
333.990
17.588
351.578
136.344
56.079
94.320
638.320
BERLIN OFFICE
1.167.524
57.174
1.224.698
1.761.441
121.060
870.603
3.977.802
BRATISLAVA OFFICE
378.313
57.698
436.012
137.751
0
144.005
717.768
BRUSSELS OFFICE
679.543
20.199
699.741
0
0
482.717
1.182.458
BUCHAREST OFFICE
219.393
41.541
260.934
244.136
25.874
147.800
678.743
BUDAPEST OFFICE
306.228
32.764
338.993
105.917
36.411
150.906
632.227
COPENHAGEN OFFICE
654.250
51.724
705.974
176.049
131.718
151.906
1.165.647
DUBLIN OFFICE
668.042
32.660
700.701
478.518
67.153
232.477
1.478.849
EDINBURGH REG OFFICE
378.294
33.579
411.873
152.177
35.894
58.549
658.492
HELSINKI OFFICE
503.658
38.936
542.595
359.006
54.425
142.800
1.098.826
LISBON OFFICE
621.285
38.268
659.553
108.682
35.857
231.030
1.035.122
LJUBLJANA OFFICE
276.833
43.224
320.056
1.059.953
45.424
209.293
1.634.726
LONDON OFFICE
1.622.447
66.799
1.689.246
107.911
95.373
439.675
2.332.205
LUXEMBOURG OFFICE
292.852
16.459
309.312
207.135
90.862
89.101
696.410
MADRID OFFICE
1.195.456
49.405
1.244.862
590.671
100.913
349.700
2.286.146
MARSEILLE REG OFFICE
357.585
22.553
380.138
81.697
23.379
100.760
585.974
MILAN REG  OFFICE
251.821
18.868
270.690
154.065
50.177
103.581
578.513
MUNICH REG  OFFICE
190.927
12.402
203.329
54.287
33.239
73.868
364.723
NICOSIA OFFICE
273.591
60.245
333.837
146.559
53.201
100.931
634.528
PARIS OFFICE
1.261.163
48.890
1.310.053
1.212.206
92.301
332.621
2.947.181
PRAGUE OFFICE
371.122
48.366
419.489
170.580
944
185.935
776.948
RIGA OFFICE
240.734
42.469
283.202
162.825
48.008
72.801
566.836
ROME OFFICE
793.430
56.970
850.400
743.569
104.685
260.917
1.959.571
SOFIA OFFICE
151.607
38.132
189.739
92.602
14.270
136.160
432.771
STOCKHOLM OFFICE
762.825
50.445
813.270
394.504
119.994
199.074
1.526.842
STRASBOURG OFFICE
2.147.835
12.246
2.160.081
0
0
4.055.439
6.215.520
TALLINN OFFICE
297.011
38.122
335.134
160.733
24.404
137.210
657.481
THE HAGUE OFFICE
695.170
61.381
756.550
90.267
101.126
282.700
1.230.643
VALLETTA OFFICE
293.668
30.340
324.008
50.295
56.569
173.294
604.166
VIENNA OFFICE
608.870
44.718
653.588
105.137
80.235
155.992
994.952
VILNIUS OFFICE
255.449
34.036
289.486
196.807
16.508
122.700
625.501
WARSAW OFFICE
397.059
49.135
446.194
201.740
19.014
201.311
868.258
WROCLAW REG OFFICE
143.830
21.435
165.264
377.303
7.795
61.967
612.329
ZAGREB OFFICE
220.968
42.795
263.763
234.810
17.658
134.348
650.578
Sub TOTAL
19.677.956
1.383.265 21.061.221 10.447.217
1.799.450
10.867.391 44.175.279
WASHINGTON DC OFFICE
1.593.780
104.843
1.698.623
570.175
33.321
56.218
2.358.337
TOTAL
21.271.736
1.488.108 22.759.844 11.017.392
1.832.771
10.923.609 46.533.616
Communication costs:
Berlin: It includes Europe Experience expenses since 2017
Brussels:  It includes Open Days management expenses until 2016. Afterwards it was managed by the HQ
Ljubliana: It includes Europe Experience expenses since 2017
Strasbourg: It includes Europe Experience expenses since 2017 and Euroscola management carried out by the Office

Q18 and Q20 - European Liaison Offices
Breakdown of total expenditure 2017

Staff Cost
Buildings
Security
Communication
Liaison office
Salaries
Missions
Sub-total
cost
cost
cost
Total cost
ATHENS OFFICE
583.389
53.823
637.212
201.020
41.227
234.700
1.114.159
BARCELONA REG OFFICE
263.460
12.698
276.159
126.161
57.664
70.466
530.449
BERLIN OFFICE
1.277.502
68.995
1.346.498
1.002.550
141.098
907.270
3.397.416
BRATISLAVA OFFICE
433.551
37.843
471.394
138.012
0
146.200
755.606
BRUSSELS OFFICE
509.755
21.210
530.965
0
0
185.944
716.909
BUCHAREST OFFICE
215.460
32.680
248.140
233.155
24.252
142.876
648.423
BUDAPEST OFFICE
313.016
27.539
340.555
105.257
35.486
159.824
641.122
COPENHAGEN OFFICE
636.899
47.954
684.853
155.661
128.912
177.360
1.146.786
DUBLIN OFFICE
743.288
36.866
780.154
456.458
67.617
187.142
1.491.371
EDINBURGH REG OFFICE
182.637
24.014
206.651
144.877
43.520
36.000
431.048
HELSINKI OFFICE
659.582
43.302
702.884
359.666
51.535
151.000
1.265.085
LISBON OFFICE
637.348
41.091
678.439
127.266
35.658
183.765
1.025.127
LJUBLJANA OFFICE
302.386
39.968
342.354
168.664
44.194
283.971
839.183
LONDON OFFICE
1.601.092
52.722
1.653.814
97.011
90.094
420.691
2.261.611
LUXEMBOURG OFFICE
358.334
17.082
375.417
198.186
79.794
124.031
777.428
MADRID OFFICE
1.218.906
58.797
1.277.704
622.206
99.951
286.571
2.286.432
MARSEILLE REG OFFICE
314.380
18.529
332.908
53.225
23.259
75.020
484.413
MILAN REG  OFFICE
267.985
15.826
283.811
162.102
48.647
97.000
591.560
MUNICH REG  OFFICE
221.014
16.845
237.859
50.104
33.158
75.100
396.221
NICOSIA OFFICE
277.619
38.515
316.134
156.250
63.127
93.896
629.407
PARIS OFFICE
1.337.093
33.659
1.370.752
1.305.578
92.938
342.901
3.112.169
PRAGUE OFFICE
377.994
43.818
421.812
171.591
4.306
187.000
784.709
RIGA OFFICE
243.359
34.917
278.276
160.604
49.069
83.365
571.314
ROME OFFICE
713.358
75.449
788.807
749.192
105.802
253.920
1.897.721
SOFIA OFFICE
200.894
30.544
231.438
148.607
15.546
164.600
560.191
STOCKHOLM OFFICE
793.785
41.077
834.862
381.010
89.947
186.197
1.492.016
STRASBOURG OFFICE
1.227.864
11.820
1.239.684
0
0
4.252.221
5.491.905
TALLINN OFFICE
311.792
38.609
350.401
163.414
23.663
126.280
663.758
THE HAGUE OFFICE
642.626
35.742
678.368
121.498
83.968
232.336
1.116.170
VALLETTA OFFICE
181.616
22.442
204.058
98.764
20.916
51.500
375.237
VIENNA OFFICE
677.480
44.413
721.894
84.739
78.190
187.670
1.072.492
VILNIUS OFFICE
280.471
37.838
318.309
194.738
16.314
135.242
664.603
WARSAW OFFICE
447.167
46.233
493.400
200.922
17.322
235.190
946.835
WROCLAW REG OFFICE
408.022
17.938
425.961
309.925
8.996
66.499
811.380
ZAGREB OFFICE
60.784
30.942
91.726
226.118
16.901
143.643
478.388
Sub TOTAL
18.921.910
1.251.743 20.173.652
8.874.531
1.733.071
10.687.391 41.468.646
WASHINGTON DC OFFICE
1.551.265
132.512
1.683.777
643.368
34.802
55.800
2.417.747
TOTAL
20.473.175
1.384.255 21.857.430
9.517.899
1.767.873
10.743.191 43.886.393
Communication costs:
Berlin: It includes Europe Experience expenses since 2017
Brussels:  It includes Open Days management expenses until 2016. Afterwards it was managed by the HQ
Ljubliana: It includes Europe Experience expenses since 2017
Strasbourg: It includes Europe Experience expenses since 2017 and Euroscola management carried out by the Office

Q18 and Q20 - European Liaison Offices
Breakdown of total expenditure 2018

Staff Cost
Buildings
Security
Communication
Liaison office
Salaries
Missions
Sub-total
cost
cost
cost
Total cost
ATHENS OFFICE
611.690
52.152
663.842
170.903
44.114
240.001
1.118.860
BARCELONA REG OFFICE
193.783
13.168
206.951
120.492
53.425
81.000
461.868
BERLIN OFFICE
1.471.069
81.517
1.552.586
1.012.444
132.169
1.227.726
3.924.925
BRATISLAVA OFFICE
492.493
52.248
544.741
137.332
0
166.200
848.273
BRUSSELS OFFICE
531.850
20.270
552.120
0
0
193.000
745.120
BUCHAREST OFFICE
299.278
42.674
341.952
204.461
25.012
145.000
716.425
BUDAPEST OFFICE
398.466
36.899
435.365
369.271
36.742
162.000
1.003.379
COPENHAGEN OFFICE
607.510
53.915
661.425
286.846
140.454
239.200
1.327.925
DUBLIN OFFICE
776.115
53.234
829.349
470.587
68.578
184.800
1.553.313
EDINBURGH REG OFFICE
268.015
23.404
291.419
142.342
40.372
38.000
512.133
HELSINKI OFFICE
652.838
49.485
702.323
471.021
52.808
227.000
1.453.153
LISBON OFFICE
706.866
44.256
751.122
105.776
35.614
180.000
1.072.512
LJUBLJANA OFFICE
240.508
33.505
274.013
392.747
45.280
372.500
1.084.540
LONDON OFFICE
1.054.383
57.969
1.112.352
142.208
89.376
264.060
1.607.996
LUXEMBOURG OFFICE
309.149
18.384
327.533
215.395
92.663
111.227
746.817
MADRID OFFICE
1.108.158
65.048
1.173.206
655.545
120.443
373.930
2.323.124
MARSEILLE REG OFFICE
391.113
23.087
414.200
49.390
25.419
90.800
579.809
MILAN REG  OFFICE
270.075
30.730
300.805
145.889
73.156
81.000
600.851
MUNICH REG  OFFICE
250.469
23.689
274.158
50.104
34.348
77.000
435.610
NICOSIA OFFICE
299.586
57.359
356.945
118.478
52.852
84.000
612.275
PARIS OFFICE
1.464.158
44.705
1.508.863
1.027.475
97.108
356.918
2.990.364
PRAGUE OFFICE
466.788
57.806
524.594
156.548
545
242.000
923.687
RIGA OFFICE
279.815
43.223
323.038
161.488
50.585
98.933
634.043
ROME OFFICE
915.613
90.823
1.006.436
754.245
104.564
256.000
2.121.245
SOFIA OFFICE
259.728
56.495
316.223
101.062
15.780
187.000
620.065
STOCKHOLM OFFICE
1.034.493
48.899
1.083.392
489.861
111.966
200.000
1.885.219
STRASBOURG OFFICE
1.349.449
16.290
1.365.739
0
0
4.418.375
5.784.114
TALLINN OFFICE
169.078
32.901
201.979
1.428.577
21.560
116.610
1.768.726
THE HAGUE OFFICE
508.768
38.674
547.442
77.951
83.627
241.500
950.520
VALLETTA OFFICE
116.906
20.718
137.624
62.665
21.310
72.800
294.399
VIENNA OFFICE
742.118
69.647
811.765
112.849
79.172
206.352
1.210.138
VILNIUS OFFICE
323.273
48.840
372.113
174.477
18.186
178.100
742.875
WARSAW OFFICE
444.210
46.775
490.985
198.005
17.142
253.523
959.655
WROCLAW REG OFFICE
248.674
28.970
277.644
308.019
14.295
67.000
666.958
ZAGREB OFFICE
279.447
38.522
317.969
209.305
12.227
167.333
706.834
Sub TOTAL
19.535.932
1.516.278 21.052.210 10.523.758
1.810.893
11.600.888
43.407.021
WASHINGTON DC OFFICE
1.640.824
121.338
1.762.162
646.324
32.446
38.200
2.479.131
TOTAL
21.176.756
1.637.616 22.814.372 11.170.082
1.843.339
11.639.088
45.886.152
Communication costs:
Berlin: It includes Europe Experience expenses since 2017
Brussels:  It includes Open Days management expenses until 2016. Afterwards it was managed by the HQ
Ljubliana: It includes Europe Experience expenses since 2017
Strasbourg: It includes Europe Experience expenses since 2017 and Euroscola management carried out by the Office

Annex Q19 - EPLO missions 2018
Other locactions
BRUSSELS
Inside IO
country
outside IO
STRASBOURG
Sum:
Country
ATHENS OFFICE
10.543
13.331
765
27.513
52.152
BARCELONA REG OFFICE
4.027
1.092
8.049
13.168
BERLIN OFFICE
20.919
25.915
640
34.043
81.517
BRATISLAVA OFFICE
13.043
10.977
28.228
52.248
BRUSSELS OFFICE
3.906
153
16.212
20.270
BUCHAREST OFFICE
8.972
3.679
30.022
42.674
BUDAPEST OFFICE
8.039
1.472
226
27.162
36.899
COPENHAGEN OFFICE
13.808
8.837
1.179
30.091
53.915
DUBLIN OFFICE
12.338
11.905
28.991
53.234
EDINBURGH REG OFFICE
5.198
6.758
1.089
10.359
23.404
HELSINKI OFFICE
11.582
8.567
1.473
27.863
49.485
LISBON OFFICE
6.317
16.172
21.767
44.256
LJUBLJANA OFFICE
10.506
3.171
4.408
15.421
33.505
LONDON OFFICE
9.122
13.160
2.585
33.102
57.969
LUXEMBOURG OFFICE
4.367
318
62
13.637
18.384
MADRID OFFICE
9.162
15.228
2.791
37.868
65.048
MARSEILLE REG OFFICE
2.526
8.342
12.219
23.087
MILAN REG  OFFICE
5.821
10.192
298
14.419
30.730
MUNICH REG  OFFICE
6.481
5.745
1.011
10.452
23.689
NICOSIA OFFICE
20.074
7.041
30.244
57.359
PARIS OFFICE
11.939
7.748
25.018
44.705
PRAGUE OFFICE
9.954
25.177
269
22.406
57.806
RIGA OFFICE
13.047
2.332
27.843
43.223
ROME OFFICE
13.710
28.791
48.322
90.823
SOFIA OFFICE
7.595
7.444
14.169
27.286
56.495
STOCKHOLM OFFICE
17.249
7.817
212
23.621
48.899
STRASBOURG OFFICE
12.443
2.519
1.327
16.290
TALLINN OFFICE
7.825
4.388
20.689
32.901
THE HAGUE OFFICE
4.239
4.149
1.380
28.906
38.674
VALLETTA OFFICE
3.110
17.608
20.718
VIENNA OFFICE
15.847
7.540
19.021
27.239
69.647
VILNIUS OFFICE
12.499
5.960
30.381
48.840
WARSAW OFFICE
11.207
4.262
3.182
28.125
46.775
WASHINGTON DC OFFICE
58.907
42.602
9.746
10.082
121.338
WROCLAW REG OFFICE
10.418
1.350
1.881
15.321
28.970
ZAGREB OFFICE
6.195
7.236
964
24.127
38.522
Sum:
399.027
335.122
68.830
834.636
1.637.616

Annex Q20 (a) - European Liaison offices: breakdown of communication expenditure in 2018
European Liaison offices: breakdown of communication expenditure in 2018
Liaison
Europe
Comm
Running
General
Euroscola
Total
Office
Exp.
credits 2018
costs
Athens
240.001
0
0
240.001
36.400
276.401
Barcelona
81.000
0
0
81.000
0
81.000
Berlin
815.132
412.594
0
1.227.726
161.600
1.389.326
Bratislava
166.200
0
0
166.200
19.570
185.770
Brussels
193.000
0
0
193.000
13.800
206.800
Bucharest
145.000
0
0
145.000
15.200
160.200
Budapest
162.000
0
0
162.000
12.000
174.000
Copenhagen
191.200
48.000
0
239.200
36.900
276.100
Dublin
184.800
0
0
184.800
28.000
212.800
Edinburg
38.000
0
0
38.000
0
38.000
Helsinki
152.000
75.000
0
227.000
20.000
247.000
Lisbon
180.000
0
0
180.000
21.200
201.200
Ljubliana
219.005
153.495
0
372.500
16.000
388.500
London
264.060
0
0
264.060
50.000
314.060
Luxembourg
111.227
0
0
111.227
5.600
116.827
Madrid
373.930
0
0
373.930
71.000
444.930
Marseille
90.800
0
0
90.800
9.200
100.000
Milan
81.000
0
0
81.000
0
81.000
Munich
77.000
0
0
77.000
0
77.000
Nicosia
84.000
0
0
84.000
15.200
99.200
Paris
356.918
0
0
356.918
63.300
420.218
Prague
242.000
0
0
242.000
17.600
259.600
Riga
98.933
0
0
98.933
13.520
112.453
Rome
256.000
0
0
256.000
43.400
299.400
Sofia
187.000
0
0
187.000
17.600
204.600
Stockholm
200.000
0
0
200.000
26.000
226.000
Strasbourg
33.000
385.375
4.000.000
4.418.375
5.900
4.424.275
Tallinn
116.610
0
0
116.610
16.510
133.120
The Hague
241.500
0
0
241.500
24.000
265.500
Valletta
72.800
0
0
72.800
14.400
87.200
Vienna
206.352
0
0
206.352
28.300
234.652
Vilnius
178.100
0
0
178.100
9.000
187.100
Warsaw
253.523
0
0
253.523
18.000
271.523
Wroclaw
67.000
0
0
67.000
0
67.000
Zagreb
167.333
0
0
167.333
11.200
178.533
Totals
6.526.424
1.074.464
4.000.000
11.600.888
840.400
12.441.288

Annex Q20 (b) + (c) - EPLO: staff and grades
Annex Q20 (b)
Number of staff and grades of staff in EPLOs on 31/12/2018
EPLO by GRADE
AD05 AD06 AD07 AD08 AD09 AD10 AD11 AD12 AD13 AD14 AST01 AST02 AST03 AST04 AST05 AST06 AST07 AST08 AST09 AST11 I01
I03
II04
II06
III08
III09
III10
III11
III12
IV13 IV14 IV15 IV16 IV17 IV18
TOTAL
ATHENS OFFICE
1
1
1
1
2
6
BARCELONA REG OFFICE
1
1
1
1
1
5
BERLIN OFFICE
2
1
1
1
1
1
4
2
2
1
16
BRATISLAVA OFFICE
1
1
2
1
1
6
BRUSSELS OFFICE
1
3
2
1
1
8
BUCHAREST OFFICE
1
1
1
2
1
1
7
BUDAPEST OFFICE
1
1
2
2
1
7
COPENHAGEN OFFICE
1
1
1
1
2
1
7
DUBLIN OFFICE
2
1
2
1
6
EDINBURGH REG OFFICE
1
1
1
3
HELSINKI OFFICE
1
1
1
3
1
1
8
LISBON OFFICE
2
1
2
1
1
7
LJUBLJANA OFFICE
3
1
1
5
LONDON OFFICE
2
1
1
2
1
1
8
LUXEMBOURG OFFICE
1
1
1
1
4
MADRID OFFICE
2
1
2
5
1
11
MARSEILLE REG OFFICE
1
1
1
3
MILAN REG  OFFICE
1
1
1
3
MUNICH REG  OFFICE
1
1
1
1
4
NICOSIA OFFICE
1
1
1
2
5
PARIS OFFICE
1
2
1
4
2
1
1
2
14
PRAGUE OFFICE
1
1
1
3
1
1
8
RIGA OFFICE
1
3
1
5
ROME OFFICE
1
1
1
2
1
2
2
1
1
12
SOFIA OFFICE
1
1
1
2
1
6
STOCKHOLM OFFICE
1
2
1
1
1
1
7
STRASBOURG OFFICE
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
12
TALLINN OFFICE
1
2
1
4
THE HAGUE OFFICE
1
1
1
2
1
6
VALLETTA OFFICE
1
1
1
3
VIENNA OFFICE
2
1
2
1
2
8
VILNIUS OFFICE
1
2
1
1
5
WARSAW OFFICE
1
1
4
1
7
WROCLAW REG OFFICE
1
1
1
1
4
ZAGREB OFFICE
1
1
1
1
1
5
TOTAL
3
6
3
4
8
4
6
18
3
5
2
3
3
12
37
11
22
15
21
3
2
2
1
1
3
1
2
1
1
12
14
2
1
1
2
235

Annex Q20 (b) + (c) - EPLO: highest and lowest grade
Annex Q20 (c)
Highest and lowest grade in EPLOs
HIGHEST GRADE
AD14
Athens
Stockholm Strasbourg Berlin
AST11
Lisbon
Paris
Strasbourg
LOWEST GRADE
AD05
Paris
Rome
Strasbourg
AST01
Valletta
Zagreb

Annex Q021 - Washington Office salaries, mission costs and staff evolution
SALARY  COSTS 2018
AD
AST
Total:
Number of staff:
11
1
12
Total average salary costs:
1.563.616,57
77.207,03
1.640.823,60
MISSION  COSTS 2018
To EU
Country
Within USA
CANADA
Total:
Washington DC Office
75.172,98
42.602,23
3.562,76
121.337,97
EVOLUTION STAFF 2018
01/01/2018
01/06/2018
01/09/2018
31/12/2018
Number of staff:
13
10
12
12

Annex Q22 - Rent Costs in Liaison Offices
Liaison office
Building's rent cost
ATHENS OFFICE
38.400
BARCELONA REG OFFICE
93.188
BERLIN OFFICE
816.924
BRATISLAVA OFFICE
111.448
BRUSSELS OFFICE
BUCHAREST OFFICE
169.287
BUDAPEST OFFICE
COPENHAGEN OFFICE
5.000
DUBLIN OFFICE
287.435
EDINBURGH REG OFFICE
88.400
HELSINKI OFFICE
312.655
LISBON OFFICE
6.876
LJUBLJANA OFFICE
346.296
LONDON OFFICE
LUXEMBOURG OFFICE
168.352
MADRID OFFICE
496.355
MARSEILLE REG OFFICE
18.089
MILAN REG  OFFICE
115.889
MUNICH REG  OFFICE
44.570
NICOSIA OFFICE
PARIS OFFICE
847.266
PRAGUE OFFICE
132.410
RIGA OFFICE
140.591
ROME OFFICE
594.995
SOFIA OFFICE
STOCKHOLM OFFICE
410.151
STRASBOURG OFFICE
TALLINN OFFICE
131.854
THE HAGUE OFFICE
12.323
VALLETTA OFFICE
8.025
VIENNA OFFICE
VILNIUS OFFICE
153.864
WARSAW OFFICE
138.953
WROCLAW REG OFFICE
201.801
ZAGREB OFFICE
180.187
TOTAL
6.071.583

Annex Q26 - Interpretation costs
Interpretation salary calculation costs for 2018 with Heads of Unit
Sum of Avrg sal cost 2018
INTERPRETATION
34.327.245,37
BG INTERPRETATION
1.036.285,77
CS INTERPRETATION
782.081,63
DA INTERPRETATION
745.769,80
DE INTERPRETATION
2.601.997,91
DIR  INTERPRETATION
563.271,85
EL INTERPRETATION
2.189.981,72
EN INTERPRETATION
2.065.852,01
ES INTERPRETATION
2.882.734,00
ET INTERPRETATION
654.324,00
FI INTERPRETATION
1.998.598,43
FR INTERPRETATION
3.145.747,25
HR INTERPRETATION
497.903,98
HU INTERPRETATION
1.431.525,37
IT INTERPRETATION
2.391.341,39
LT INTERPRETATION
1.172.110,83
LV INTERPRETATION
986.958,67
NL INTERPRETATION
1.379.317,74
PL INTERPRETATION
1.969.302,78
PT INTERPRETATION
1.940.485,49
RO INTERPRETATION
1.109.504,19
SK INTERPRETATION
924.508,24
SL INTERPRETATION
496.252,44
SV INTERPRETATION
1.361.389,88

Annex Q43 - Management by nationality
HoU
DIR
DIRGEN
NAT
2009
2014
2018
2009
2014
2018
2009
2014
2018
AT
4
8
6
1
2
1
BE
18
24
21
3
5
6
1
1
BG
1
3
4
CY
1
2
CZ
1
4
4
DE
16
29
27
5
9
11
1
1
DK
5
9
9
3
2
2
EE
2
2
4
EL
7
13
12
1
2
1
ES
18
36
33
4
5
5
1
2
2
FI
2
10
13
1
1
1
FR
20
35
35
4
7
5
2
2
2
HR
1
1
HU
1
2
3
1
1
IE
3
5
4
IT
17
25
34
3
4
5
2
2
2
LT
1
3
4
LU
2
3
LV
2
3
3
MT
1
2
1
NL
5
9
7
3
3
2
PL
2
4
6
1
2
1
1
1
PT
11
11
9
2
3
1
RO
1
3
7
SE
4
6
6
SI
1
2
4
1
2
1
1
SK
1
4
6
UK
16
16
14
2
1
3
1
1
TOTAL
145
271
268
32
45
42
10
11
10

Annex Q45 - Competitions
Internal competitions 2014-2019
Internal
Function group
Laureates
Nationality
F
M
 competition
and grade
AD/1/16
AD5
30
8 IT, 3 BE, 3 DE, 3 FR, 3 PL, 2 ES, 2 EL, 2 HU, 1 HR, 1 RO, 1 SK, 1 SV
18
12
AD/1/17
AD9
30
10 DE, 6 IT, 3 FR, 2 RO, 1 AT, 1 BE, 1 BG, 1 ES, 1 HR, 1 HU, 1 SK, 1 PL, 1 LV
18
12
AD/1/18
AD6
2
2 UK (in the field of interpretation)
2
0
AD/2/18
AD6
4
4 HR (in the field of interpretation)
3
1
AST/1/16
AST1
30
7 IT, 5 HR, 3 HU, 3 PL, 2 SV, 2 BE, 2 DE, 1 DK, 1 ES, 1 FR, 1 EL, 1 RO, 1 SL
21
9
AST/1/17
AST4
30
6 IT, 5 BE, 5 DE, 4 FR, 3 PL, 2 EL, 2 HU, 1 ES, 1 BG, 1 RO
26
4
126
88
38
Internal competitions for the political groups ("passerelle"), 2014-2019
Internal
Function group
Laureates
Nationality
F
M
 competition
and grade
AD/2/16
AD9
20
4 IT, 4 FR, 2 BE, 2 EL, 2 SK, 2 SL, 1 DE, 1 HU, 1 PL, 1 PT
13
7
AD/3/16
AD10
4
1 DK, 1 HU, 1 PL, 1 SK
3
1
AD/4/16
AD11
3
1 DK, 1 DE, 1 FR
0
3
AST/2/16
AST6
19
8 BE, 2 CZ, 1 DE, 1 ES, 1 FR, 1 EL, 1 PL, 1 IT, 1 PT, 1 SK, 1 SL
17
2
AST/3/16
AST7
4
2 IT, 1 BE, 1 PL
1
3
AST/4/16
AST8
2
1 MT, 1 UK
1
1
AST/5/16
AST9
2
2 BE
1
1
54
36
18

Annex Q48 - Overview of posts 2014-2018
2014

Postes organigramme par entités organisationnel es01/01/2014(sous réserve des modifications en cours)
Direction générale / Direction / Unité / Service
AD
AST
AST/SC
Total
Direction générale de la Présidence
5
4
0
9
Direction géné
U rnailte
é  d
P e
r  l
o a
t  
oP
c roéls
e idence
5
12
0
17
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n adle
e  ldae  sla
é  aP
nré
c s
e  id
pl e
é nc
i e
ère
2
1
0
3
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ldae  sl
s a
é   a
p P
nrr
o é
cc s
e è id
psl- e
év n
e c
ir e
èr
b e
aux et des comptes rendus de la séance plénière
6
7
0
13
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  lda
Ae c stlia
év aiP
ntr
é é
cs s
e  i
dd
ple e
és n
  c
id e
èr
é e
putés
3
14
0
17
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ldae 
u  sla
éd  aéP
nrr

cus
e l ied
pl e
é
m n
e c
in e
ètr et du suivi de la séance plénière
6
7
0
13
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ldae 
u  sla
éd  aéP
npré
côts
e  idd
plee
ésn
  c
id e
èr
o e
cuments
3
6
0
9
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ldae 
u  sla
éc  aoP
nuré
cris
e eid
plr  e
éo n
ffc
i e
èr
c e
i l
2
28
0
30
Total Direction de la séance plénière
22
63
0
85
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n adle
e  sde
A  l
c a
t  eP
s r é
L s
é id
gi e
slnactiefs
2
2
0
4
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sde
A  l
c a
t  eP
sc r 

Los
ér id
gi
d e
sl
nnactiefs
on et du planning législatif
3
12
0
15
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
Qe
A  
u l
c a
ta  eiP
stér é
Ll s
é igd
gi e
slnactiefs
ve A - Politique économique et scientifique
1
1
0
2
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
Qe
AS  
u l
ce a
tac  eitP
sté
i r 
o é
Lln s
é  igd
gir e
selna
c ct
qief
us
ve A - Politique économique et scientifique
3
2
0
5
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
Qe
AS  
u l
ce a
tac  eitP
sté
i r 
o é
Lln s
é  ig
a d
gin e
sl
gna
l ct
a iefs
vse A - Politique économique et scientifique
8
4
0
12
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
Qe
AS  
u l
ce a
tac  eitP
sté
i r 
o é
Lln s
é i igrd
gil e
salna
n ct
dief
as
ve
i  
s A
e  - Politique économique et scientifique
2
2
0
4
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
Qe
AS  
u l
ce a
tac  eitP
sté
i r 
o é
Lln s
é i igtd
gia e
sllina
e cti
n efs
ve
n  
e A - Politique économique et scientifique
3
1
0
4
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
Qe
A  
u l
c a
ta  eiP
stér é
Ll s
é igd
gi e
slnactiefs
ve B - Politique structurel e et de cohésion
1
1
0
2
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
Qe
AS  
u l
ce a
tac  eitP
sté
i r 
o é
Lln s
é  ig
bd
giue
sllna
g ct
airefs
ve
e  B - Politique structurel e et de cohésion
3
2
0
5
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
Qe
AS  
u l
ce a
tac  eitP
sté
i r 
o é
Lln s
é  igd
gi
m e
salna
t ct
aiefs
vse B - Politique structurel e et de cohésion
3
2
0
5
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
Qe
AS  
u l
ce a
tac  eitP
sté
i r 
o é
Lln s
é  ig
s d
gil e
s
o lna
v ct
è ief
n s
ve
e  B - Politique structurel e et de cohésion
3
2
0
5
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
Qe
AS  
u l
ce a
tac  eitP
sté
i r 
o é
Lln s
é  ig
s d
gil e
s
o lna
v ct
a ief
q s
ve
u  B
e  - Politique structurel e et de cohésion
3
2
0
5
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
Qe
AS  
u l
ce a
tac  eitP
sté
i r 
o é
Lln s
é  ig
c d
gir e
solna
atctieefs
ve B - Politique structurel e et de cohésion
4
3
0
7
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
Qe
A  
u l
c a
ta  eiP
stér é
Ll s
é igd
gi e
slnactiefs
ve C - Droits des citoyens
1
1
0
2
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
Qe
AS  
u l
ce a
tac  eitP
sté
i r 
o é
Lln s
é  ig
a d
gil e
slnact
m ief
a s
ve
n  C
de  - Droits des citoyens
4
3
0
7
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
Qe
AS  
u l
ce a
tac  eitP
sté
i r 
o é
Lln s
é l igd
git e
s
ulna
a ct
niefs
ve
e  
n C
n  e- Droits des citoyens
3
2
0
5
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
Qe
AS  
u l
ce a
tac  eitP
sté
i r 
o é
Lln s
é  ig
nd
gié e
slna
rl ctiaefs
ve
n  
d C
ai -s D
e roits des citoyens
2
2
0
4
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
Qe
AS  
u l
ce a
tac  eitP
sté
i r 
o é
Lln s
é  ig
pd
gioe
sllna
o ct
nief
as
ve
i  
s C
e  - Droits des citoyens
4
2
0
6
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
Qe
AS  
u l
ce a
tac  eitP
sté
i r 
o é
Lln s
é rigd
gio e
sl
u na
mctief
ais
ven C
e  - Droits des citoyens
3
2
0
5
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
Qe
A  
u l
c a
ta  eiP
stér é
Ll s
é igd
gi e
slnactiefs
ve D - Affaires budgétaires
1
1
0
2
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
Qe
AS  
u l
ce a
tac  eitP
sté
i r 
o é
Lln s
é  ig
dd
gia e
sl
nna
octiief
s s
ve D - Affaires budgétaires
3
2
0
5
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
Qe
AS  
u l
ce a
tac  eitP
sté
i r 
o é
Lln s
é  ig
e d
gis e
sl
p nacti
g efs
ve
n  
o D
le - Affaires budgétaires
3
2
0
5
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
Qe
AS  
u l
ce a
tac  eitP
sté
i r 
o é
Lln s
é figd
gine
slnnaoctiief
ss
ve D - Affaires budgétaires
3
2
0
5
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
Qe
AS  
u l
ce a
tac  eitP
sté
i r 
o é
Lln s
é figrd
giae
slnnaçctiaefis
ve D
e  - Affaires budgétaires
4
2
0
6
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
Qe
AS  
u l
ce a
tac  eitP
sté
i r 
o é
Lln s
é  ig
pd
gioe
slrna
t ct
u ief
g s
ve
ai D
s  
e - Affaires budgétaires
3
2
0
5
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
Qe
A  
u l
c a
ta  eiP
stér é
Ll s
é igd
gi e
slnactiefs
ve E - Politiques externes
1
0
0
1
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
Qe
AS  
u l
ce a
tac  eitP
sté
i r 
o é
Lln s
é tigd
gi
c e
s
hlna
è ct
qief
us
ve E - Politiques externes
3
2
0
5
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
Qe
AS  
u l
ce a
tac  eitP
sté
i r 
o é
Lln s
é  ig
e d
gis e
stlna
o ct
niefs
ve
e  
n E
n  -
e  Politiques externes
3
2
0
5
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
Qe
AS  
u l
ce a
tac  eitP
sté
i r 
o é
Lln s
é  ig
hd
gioe
slnnagctirefs
voei sEe - Politiques externes
3
2
0
5
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
Qe
AS  
u l
ce a
tac  eitP
sté
i r 
o é
Lln s
é l igd
gi
et e
stlna
o ct
nief
es
ve E - Politiques externes
3
2
0
5
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
Qe
AS  
u l
ce a
tac  eitP
sté
i r 
o é
Lln s
é  ig
s d
giu e
sl
é na
d cti
oefis
ve E
e  - Politiques externes
3
2
0
5
Total Direction des Actes Législatifs
89
69
0
158
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n adle
e  sde
r  
e la tP
i r
o é
n si d
a e
v n
e c
c el s parlements nationaux
1
2
0
3
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sde
r  
e la tP
ic r
o é
nosi 
p d
aé e
vr n
eat c
ci el
o s
n   ip
n a
s rtlie
t m
uti eonts
n  enlaetionaux
6
4
0
10
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sde
ru  
e la
di tP
ial r
o é
n
o s
g i 
ud
ae e
v l n
eé c
c gel
issl aptiafrlements nationaux
5
5
0
10
Total Direction des relations avec les parlements nationaux
12
11
0
23
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n adle
e  sde
s  ela
r  
v P
icré
e s
s  id
d e
e  n
l c
a  e
présidence
2
1
0
3
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
P e
sl  e
a la
rn  
vnP
icr
n é
egs
s  id
d e
e  n
l c
a  e
présidence
6
4
0
10
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sde
s  ela
r  
v P
ic
r r
é é
ec s
s e id
d
pt e
ei  n
lo c

n e
prté s
d id
u  e
r n
e c
n e
voi des documents officiels
3
15
0
18
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
Ae
sd ela
rm  
vi P
ic
niré
ests
s r id
dat e
ei  n
lo c

n e
pr
d é
e s
s id
d e
é n
p c
u e
tés
3
5
0
8
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sde
s  el
s a
r   
vRP
icerlé
ea s
st i id
do e

n n
ls  c
a i e
p
n rté
e s
ri id
n e
stnitcuetionnel es
4
4
0
8
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
I e
s
nf  eloa
r  
v P
ic
m raé
etis
s  i
o d
dn e
e s n
l cc
a l e
paré
s s
si ifde
é n
esce
3
3
0
6
Total Direction des services de la présidence
21
32
0
53
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n adle
e  sde
r  
e la
s  
s P
o ruérs
c id
esence
0
0
0
0
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
P e
r  
erla
s  
s P
o
onruér
n s
celid
esence
4
8
0
12
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
F e
ri  
en la
sa  
snP
oc rueérss
c id
esence
1
4
0
5
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
P e
r  
e l
o a
sg  
srP
oa ruér
m s
c i
m d
es
a e
tin
ocne, gestion budgétaire et contrats
0
0
0
0
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
I e
rnf  
e loa
sr  
s P
o
m ruaértis
c i
q d
es
u en
 ecte
 Communication interne
0
0
0
0
Total Direction des ressources
5
12
0
17
Total Direction générale de la Présidence
159
203
0
362

Annex Q48 - Overview of posts 2014-2018
2014

Direction générale / Direction / Unité / Service
AD
AST
AST/SC
Total
Direction générale des Politiques internes de l'Union
4
4
0
8
Direction géné
U rnailte
é  des
   
p P
r o
o lgitriaqu
m e
ms 
a itnt
o e
n r n
sters
a  td
é e
g il'qU
un
e ion
3
1
0
4
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n adle
e  sde
p s
o  lP
it o
iqlit
u iq
esu e
é s
c  oin
n toer
mnie
q s
u  edse  elt'U
 s n
c io
e n
ntifiques
1
2
0
3
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
S r
n eadclre
eé sd
tae
pr s
oi  l
a P
it  o
iq
d li
e t
u liq
es
a u ce
éos
c  o
min
nmtoiesr
mni
s e
qo s
un edse  elt'U
 se n
cmio
ep n
nltoif iq
etu e
d s
e  affaires sociales
10
9
0
19
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
S r
n eadclre
eé sd
tae
pr s
oi  l
a P
it  o
iq
d li
e t
u liq
es
a u ce
éos
c  o
min
nmtoiesr
mni
s e
qo s
un edse  elts' U
 sa n
cff io
e
ai n
nrti
e fsi qéuceosnomiques et monétaires
15
11
0
26
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
S r
n eadclre
eé sd
tae
pr s
oi  l
a P
it  o
iq
d li
e t
u liq
es
a u ce
éos
c  o
min
nmtoiesr
mni
s e
qo s
un edse u elt'U
 s
m n
c
ario
ec n
nhtiéf iq
n u
t e
érsieur et de la protection des consommateurs
14
9
0
23
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
S r
n eadclre
eé sd
tae
pr s
oi  l
a P
it  o
iq
d li
e t
u liq
es
a u ce
éos
c  o
min
nmtoiesr
mni
s e
qo s
un edse  elt'U
 si n
c
n i
d o
eu n
nt
s itfriq
e,u e
d s
e la recherche et de l'énergie
14
13
0
27
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
S r
n eadclre
eé sd
tae
pr s
oi  l
a P
it  o
iq
d li
e t
u liq
es
a u ce
éos
c  o
min
nmtoiesr
mni
s e
qo s
un edse  elt'U
 se n
c io
e
v n
nrti
o fi
n q
n u
e es
ment, de la santé publique et de la sécurité alimentaire
13
10
0
23
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
D r
n éadple
ea  srd
t e
pe s
o
m lP
it
e o
iq
ntl itt
u ihq
eséu e
é
m s
cat oiin
nq touer
m ni
d e
q s
u  eds
p e o ellti'U
 tsi n
c
q iuo
e n
nt
s i féiq
c u
o e
n s
omiques, scientifiques et de la qualité de la vie
16
10
0
26
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sde
p' s
o
a  l
s P
itsio
iq
s ltit
ua iq
es
n u 
c e
ée  s
cà  oiln
na toe
g r
moniue
qvs
ue eds
r e 
n  e
a lt'
nU
 sc n
ce io
eé n
n
c ti
o fi
n q
o ue
mi s
que
7
4
0
11
Total Direction des politiques économiques et scientifiques
90
68
0
158
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n adle
e  sde
p s
o  lP
it o
iqlit
u iq
esu e
stsr i
u n
c te
u rn
e e
l s
e  d
s  e
e  tl'U
den iconhésion
1
1
0
2
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
S r
n eadclre
eé sd
tae
pr s
oi  l
a P
it  o
iq
d li
e t
u liq
es
a u ce
stosr 
mi
u n
cmtie
usrn
e
si e
lo s
en d
s  e
e  tl'U
de
a n 
g icronh
c é
ul stiuorn
e et du développement rural
12
8
0
20
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
S r
n eadclre
eé sd
tae
pr s
oi  l
a P
it  o
iq
d li
e t
u liq
es
a u ce
stosr 
mi
u n
cmtie
usrn
e
si e
lo s
en d
s  e
e  tl'U
de
a  n 
p ico
êcnhé
h s
e ion
7
8
0
15
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
S r
n eadclre
eé sd
tae
pr s
oi  l
a P
it  o
iq
d li
e t
u liq
es
a u ce
stosr 
mi
u n
cmtie
usrn
e
si e
lo s
en d
s  e
eu tl'U
deén 
v ico
el nh
oépsi
p o
e n
ment régional
12
9
0
21
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
S r
n eadclre
eé sd
tae
pr s
oi  l
a P
it  o
iq
d li
e t
u liq
es
a u ce
stosr 
mi
u n
cmtie
usrn
e
si e
lo s
en d
s  e
e  tls' U
de
trn aico
n nh
s é
p s
o iro
t n
s et du tourisme
14
9
0
23
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
S r
n eadclre
eé sd
tae
pr s
oi  l
a P
it  o
iq
d li
e t
u liq
es
a u ce
stosr 
mi
u n
cmtie
usrn
e
si e
lo s
en d
s  e
e  tl'U
de
a  n 
c ico
ul nh
t é
ursei oent de l'éducation
8
7
0
15
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
D r
n éadple
ea  srd
t e
pe s
o
m lP
it
e o
iq
ntl itt
u ihq
eséu e
st
m sr
at ii
u n
cq tue
u r n
ed e
l s
e  d
s p e
eo tlli'U
dtein 
q icuoenh
sé s
stio
r n
ucturel es et de cohésion
12
8
0
20
Total Direction des politiques structurel es et de cohésion
66
50
0
116
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n adle
e  sde
d s
r  
oP
it o
s l it
d iq
esu e
cist i
o n
y teenrn
s  es
t  d
d e
e  sl'U
af n
f i
a orn
es constitutionnel es
1
2
0
3
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
S r
n eadclre
eé sd
tae
dr s
ri  
oaP
itt  o
sd l i
e t
d liq
es
a u ce
ciost 
mi
o n
ymteiensrn
s i e
o s
t n d
d e
e  sls' U
afli n
fb i
a o
er n
ets
é  c
s  o
cinvsiltietu
s, tidoen ln
a e
 j lu esstice et des affaires intérieures
17
12
0
29
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
S r
n eadclre
eé sd
tae
dr s
ri  
oaP
itt  o
sd l i
e t
d liq
es
a u ce
ciost 
mi
o n
ymteiensrn
s i e
o s
t n d
d e
e  sls' U
afa n
ff i
a or
ai n
ers
e  c
s  o
j n
ur s
i t
d itu
q t
u io
esnnel es
10
7
0
17
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
S r
n eadclre
eé sd
tae
dr s
ri  
oaP
itt  o
sd l i
e t
d liq
es
a u ce
ciost 
mi
o n
ymteiensrn
s i e
o s
t n d
d e
e  sls' U
afa n
ff i
a or
ai n
ers
e  c
s  o
c n
o s
n tsittiuttuio
ti n
o n
n e
n le e
l s
es
7
6
0
13
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
S r
n eadclre
eé sd
tae
dr s
ri  
oaP
itt  o
sd l i
e t
d liq
es
a u ce
ciost 
mi
o n
ymteiensrn
s i e
o s
t n d
d e
e  sls' U
afd n
fr i
aooritn
es
s   c
d o
e  n
l s
a  tfit
e u
mtio
m n
e n
e e
t ldes l'égalité des genres
8
7
0
15
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
S r
n eadclre
eé sd
tae
dr s
ri  
oaP
itt  o
sd l i
e t
d liq
es
a u ce
ciost 
mi
o n
ymteiensrn
s i e
o s
t n d
d e
e  sls' U
afp n
fé i
at or
it n
eis
o  c
n o
s nstitutionnel es
9
9
0
18
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
D r
n éadple
ea  srd
t e
de s
rm 
oP
it
e o
s
ntl itt
d ihq
eséu e
c
mist
a  ii
o n
yq teuenr n
s d es
t  d
d e
er  sl
o 'iU
atfsn
f  i
adoren
es
s   c
ci o
t n
o s
y t
e it
n u
s tieo
t  n
d n
e e
s l  e
af sfaires constitutionnel es
13
8
0
21
Total Direction des droits des citoyens et des affaires constitutionnel es
65
51
0
116
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n adle
e  sde
afsf P
ai o
relist iq
b u
u e
d s
g  i
é n
t t
aierrenses de l'Union
1
2
0
3
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
S r
n eadclre
eé sd
tae
afrsf
i  
a P
ait  o
re
d lis
e t liq
ba u
uc e
dos
g  
mi
é n
tmt
aiersrens
si e
o s
n de ls' U
b n
u io
d n
gets
12
10
0
22
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
S r
n eadclre
eé sd
tae
afrsf
i  
a P
ait  o
re
d lis
e t liq
ba u
uc e
dos
g  
mi
é n
tmt
aiersrens
si e
o s
n deu l'U
conitorn
ôle budgétaire
7
8
0
15
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
D r
n éadple
ea  srd
t e
aefsf
m P
aie o
re
ntl istt ihq
béu
u e
d
m s
gat ii
é n
tq t
aiuerre ns
d es d
Aef fl'aU
ir n
e io
s  n
budgétaires
8
5
0
13
Total Direction des affaires budgétaires
28
25
0
53
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n adle
e  ldae s
c  oPoorli
d tiq
nauties
o  
n in
l t
é e
g rin
sleasti d
v e
e  le'tU n
d i
e o
s n
 conciliations
1
1
0
2
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ldae s
c  oPo
c or
o li
dn tciq
naliuti
a e
tis
oo 
n in
l
nst
é e
g ritn
s lea
d st
ei  ld
va e
e   
c le't
oU 
d n
dé i
eco
s n
 c
sionciliations
7
6
0
13
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ldae s
c l  oPo
a  or
c loi
d toiq
na
r ut
d ie
n s
oa  
nt in
lo t
é e
g
n  riln
sl
é ea
g st
i i 
s d
vlae
e t ile't
v U 
e n
de i
eto
s  n
 c
d o
e  n
l c
a  il
p iraotigorn
a s
mmation
10
7
0
17
Direction générale de
S s
e  rPvo
i l
c it
e iq
C u
a e
l s
e  
n in
drtiern
  e
d s
e  sdreé lu'U
ninoio
n n
s
0
7
0
7
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  lda
p e 
o s
cu oPo
r loral i
d t
c iq
na
o ut
o ireds
oi  
n i
n n
la t
étie
g ri
o n
sl
n eadstie d
vs e
e a lec'tU
 ti n
dvi i
eto
sé n
 c
s o
 éndciitli
o aritiaoln
e s
s et de communication
6
5
0
11
Total Direction de la coordination législative et des conciliations
24
26
0
50
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n adle
e  sde
r s
e  
s P
s o
o luitriq
ceuses internes de l'Union
1
1
0
2
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
P e
r s
er  
s P
soo
onluintrieq
celuses internes de l'Union
4
15
0
19
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
I e
rnf s
eo 
s P
sr o
o
m luaittriq
ce
q us
u e
e s internes de l'Union
2
13
0
15
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
F e
ri s
en  
sa P
sn o
oc lui
e trsiq
ceuses internes de l'Union
2
7
0
9
Total Direction des ressources
9
36
0
45
Total Direction générale des Politiques internes de l'Union
289
261
0
550
Direction générale des Politiques externes de l'Union
3
3
0
6
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n adle
e  sde
c s
o  P
m o
mliitsiq
si u
o ens externes de l'Union
1
1
0
2
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
S r
n eadclre
eé sd
tae
cr s
oi  
a P
mt  o
m
d lii
e ts liq
si
a u
oc en
os 
mex
m tie
s rsnie
o s
n  d
d e
e  sl'U
afnfiaornes étrangères
12
9
0
21
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n adle
e  sde
cS s
oe  P
m
cr o
m
é litits
a irq
si u
o
at en
  s
d  eelxat e
s rn
o e
u s
s-  d
c e
o  l
m'U
mn
i i
s o
s n
ion de la sécurité et de la défense
7
5
0
12
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n adle
e  sde
cS s
oe  P
m
cr o
m
é litits
a irq
si u
o
at en
  s
d  eelxat e
s rn
o e
u s
s-  d
c e
o  l
m'U
mn
i i
s o
s n
ion des droits de l'homme / Unité des droits de l'homme
7
6
0
13
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
S r
n eadclre
eé sd
tae
cr s
oi  
a P
mt  o
m
d lii
e ts liq
si
a u
oc en
os 
mex
m tie
s rsnie
o s
n  d
d e
u  l'
dU
é n
v ieoln
oppement
8
7
0
15
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
S r
n eadclre
eé sd
tae
cr s
oi  
a P
mt  o
m
d lii
e ts liq
si
a u
oc en
os 
mex
m tie
s rsnie
o s
n  d
d e
u  l'
c U
o n
mio
mnerce international
14
10
0
24
Total Direction des commissions
49
38
0
87
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n adle
e  sde
r s
é  
g P
i o
o l
n it
s iques externes de l'Union
1
1
0
2
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
E e
rus
ér  
g P
io o
opel
n it
s: iq
Eluaers
g  ie
s x
s te
e r
mnees
nt  d
e e
t   l
E'U
s n
p i
a o
c n
e économique européen
4
4
0
8
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
Ae
rss
éi  
geP
i,  o
oAl
n iut
s isq
truaelise ext te
N rn
o e
u s
v  
e d
l e
e  -l'
ZU
élnaio
n n
de
6
7
0
13
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
D r
n éadple
ea  srd
t e
re s
ém 
g P
ie o
ontl
n itt
s ihqéue
m s
at iex
q t
u er n
d e
e s
s  d
reel al'tU
ionio
s nextérieures
14
9
0
23
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
E e
rus
ér  
g P
io o
om l
neit
sdi qeut es
M  e
o x
y t
e e
n r-n
O erise d
n e
t  l'Union
7
6
0
13
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
Ae
r s
ém  
géP
irio
oql
n it
su ieq lu
a e
tisn e
e xternes de l'Union
4
5
0
9
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
E e
rus
ér  
g P
io o
opel
n it
s: iq
P u
a e
rt s
e  e
n x
a trieartn e
o s
ri  d
e e
nt  l
a 'U
 ent io
R n
ussie
4
5
0
9
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
Ae
rf s
éri  
g P
iq o
ou l
ne i,t
s  iq
C u
ar e
a s
ï  bexst ertn
  e
P s
a  cd
if e
i  ql'U
ue nion
4
4
0
8
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
Re
r s
él  
gaP
iti o
o l
n int
s isq
 t u
r e
a s
n  seaxttle
a rnntieqs 
u d
e e
s  le'U
t  n
G io
8 n
4
3
0
7
Total Direction des régions
48
44
0
92
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n adle
e  sde
r s
e  
s P
s o
o luitriq
ceuses externes de l'Union
1
2
0
3
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
P e
r s
er  
s P
soo
onluintrieq
celuses externes de l'Union
1
7
0
8
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
F e
ri s
en  
sa P
sn o
oc lui
e trsiq
ceuses externes de l'Union
2
9
0
11
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
I e
rnf s
eo 
s P
sr o
o
m luaittriq
ce
q us
u e
e s externes de l'Union
1
3
0
4
Total Direction des ressources
5
21
0
26
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n agle
é  d
néers
a  lP
e odlietisq u
P e
olsi te
i x
q t
u ersn e
e s
xt d
e e
r  
n l'eU
s ndio
e nl'Union - Direction du Soutien à la démocratie
1
1
0
2
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n agle
é  d
néer
S s
ae  lrP
e vod
i l
c iet
e isq 
d u
Pe e
olssio te
iu x
qti t
u e
e rs
n n àe
e ls
xta d
e e
rm  
nél'eU
s
di nd
atio
e n
l'U
n  n
d io
u  n
P  a- rD
leire
m c
e t
n ito n
e  
u d
r u
o  pSéo
e u
n tien à la démocratie
0
1
0
1
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
B r
n uagrle
ée  
a d

u er
  s
a
d  leP
e od
prlieotisq 
m u
Pote
olisi
o  te
in  x
qdt
u e
e  rsln 
a e
e s
x
d t 
é d
e e
r
m  
no l'ecU
sr nd
at io
e en
l 'U
p n
ar ilo
e n 
m -e D
ntirae
ircetion du Soutien à la démocratie
4
3
0
7
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nagilte
é  d

Aercs
ati lP
eo od
n lsie tispq ru
Pé e
oalsi
d  te
ih x
qé t
usiers
o n 
n e
e s
xt d
e e
r  
n l'eU
s ndio
e n
l'Union - Direction du Soutien à la démocratie
3
1
0
4
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
O r
n ag
b l
s e
é  rd

v er
a s
ati lP
e
o od
n  liedt'isq 
él u
Pe e
oclsi
t  te
io x
qn t
us ersn e
e s
xt d
e e
r  
n l'eU
s ndio
e n
l'Union - Direction du Soutien à la démocratie
3
2
0
5
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nagilte
é  d

Aercs
ati lP
eo od
n lsie tisdq ru
Poie
oltsi te
id x
qe t
u  e
l' rshn oe
e s
xt
m  d
e
m e
r  
n l'eU
s ndio
e n
l'Union - Direction du Soutien à la démocratie
3
2
0
5
Total Direction générale des Politiques externes de l'Union - Direction du Soutien à la démocratie
14
10
0
24
Total Direction générale des Politiques externes de l'Union
119
116
0
235

Annex Q48 - Overview of posts 2014-2018
2014

Direction générale / Direction / Unité / Service
AD
AST
AST/SC
Total
Direction générale des services de recherche parlementaire
1
2
0
3
Direction générale de
Rs 
E s
SeErv
R ic
V e
E s 
Cde
O  r
MIec
T h
E e
S rche parlementaire
60
20
0
80
Direction géné
U rnailte
é  d
Res s
s e
o ruvric
c e
e s
s  de recherche parlementaire
3
11
0
14
Direction géné
U rnailte
é  des
 l  s
a  e
Srtvriacte
é s
g  id
e e
   
e rt ecch
o e
orrc
di h
n e
a  tpia
o r
n lementaire
7
7
0
14
Directi o
Dnir g
e é
ctnié
o rna le
S  
e d
r e
vi s
c  s
e  e
drv
e  irceecsh d
erec rhec h
p e
o rucrh
 l e p
s a
d réle
p m
ut e
é n
s taire
1
0
0
1
Directi o
Dnir g
e é
ctnié
oU rna ilte
Sé  
e d
rP e
vios
cli ts
e i e
d
q ruv
e eirce
s ecéshc d
er
o ec
n  rh
o ec 
mi h
pq e
ourucr
e h
 sl  e
e  tp
ssa
dcréile
pe m
u
ntie
éfin
sqta
u iere
s
12
6
0
18
Directi o
Dnir g
e é
ctnié
oU rna ilte
Sé  
e d
rP e
vios
cli ts
e i e
d
q ruv
e eirce
s ecssht rd
er
uec trhe
u c 
r h
p
el e
o rucr
s  h
 le e
t   p
sd a
d
e  récle
po m
ut
h e
é n
si toai
n re
11
6
0
17
Directi o
Dnir g
e é
ctnié
oU rna ilte
Sé  
e d
rAe
viffs
c  
a s
ei r e
drv
es iirce
n ec
s sh
ti  td
eruecti rhoenc h
p
n e
o
el rulcr
e h
 l
s, e
 j  p
sura
di ré
dlie
pqm
utu e
ée n
s ta
et i re
budgétaires
10
7
0
17
Directi o
Dnir g
e é
ctnié
oU rna ilte
Sé  
e d
rP e
vios
cli ts
e i e
d
q ruv
e eirce
s ecshx d
etreecr rh
n ec 
s h
p e
o rucrh
 l e p
s a
d réle
p m
ut e
é n
s taire
13
7
0
20
Total Direction Service de recherche pour les députés
47
26
0
73
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n adle
e  ldae s
bi s
b e
li rovtic
h e
è s
q  udee recherche parlementaire
4
4
0
8
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ldae s
b il s
b
a  e
liBroivtbilc
h e
èo s
qt  u
h de
è e
q  r
u ec
  h
s e
urr c
s h
it e p
e a
t  rele
n m
 li e
g n
n teaire
11
21
0
32
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  lda
Ae rs
bi
c  s
b
hi e
liv roevtsi c
h e
è
hi s
q  utde
o e
ri r
qeucehserche parlementaire
3
18
0
21
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  lda
De s
bi 
ms
bae
li ro
n vt
d iec
hse
è  s
qd  u'de
i e
nf  r
o e
r c
mhaetirc
o h
n e
s  p
d a
e r
s l e
c m
it e
o n
y t
e a
n ir
s e
8
13
0
21
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  lda
T e 
r s
bai ns
b e
li ro
p vt
a irc
he e
èn s
qc  ude
e e recherche parlementaire
3
4
0
7
Total Direction de la bibliothèque
29
60
0
89
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n adle
e  ld'e
E s
v  s
al e
u ravtic
o e
ns  ddee l 'riec
m h
p e
a r
c c
t  h
e e
t   p
d a
e  rllae m
Vaeln
e t
u ar iraejouté européenne
1
1
0
2
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ld'
E e
Ev s
va ls
alue
uaratvtiioc
one
n s 
d  dde
e le l'i 'rie
m c
mp h
pa e
actr
c c
t  h
e e
t   p
d a
e  rllae m
Vaeln
e t
u ar iraejouté européenne
5
1
0
6
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ld'
V e
Ea s
vl  
e s
alue
ur ra vt
ajic
o e
n
u s 
t  d
é dee l '
e riuerc
moh
ppe
aér
c c

e h
e
n e

n  
e p
d a
e  rllae m
Vaeln
e t
u ar iraejouté européenne
6
1
0
7
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ld'
E e
Ev s
va ls
alue
uaratvtiioc
one
n s 
d  dde
ese l 'crie
h c
mo h
pixe
a  r
cs c
t  h
ei e

e  
n p
dti a
e firlla
q e um
Va
e el
s  n
e t
u ar
   tira
e ejo
c u
h t
n é
o  leougrio
q p
u é
e e
s n
  n
( e
STOA)
4
4
0
8
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ld'
E e
Ev s
va ls
alue
uaratvtiioc
one
n s 
d  dde
e le l'i 'rie
m c
mp h
pa e
actr
c c
t  h
e e
t   p
d a
e  rllae m
Vaeln
e t
u ar iraejouté européenne
4
1
0
5
Total Direction de l'Evaluation de l'impact et de la Valeur ajouté européenne
20
8
0
28
Total Direction générale des services de recherche parlementaire
167
134
0
301
Direction générale de la Communication
2
3
0
5
Direction géné
U rnailte
é  de
u  la
p  rC
o o
g m
ra m
m u
mnei cdaet io
vi n
sites de l'Union européenne (EUVP)
1
4
0
5
Direction géné
U rnailte
é  d
P e
r  l
o a
g  rC
a om
m m
ma u
ti n
o ic
n  a
e ti o
g n
estion stratégique
1
4
0
5
Direction géné
U rnailte
é  d
Oer ila
e  
n C
t o
at m
io m
n  u
stnric
at a
é ti
g on
que
5
3
0
8
Direction géné
U rnailte
é  de
u  la
s  uC
i o
vi m
d m
e l u
' n
o i
p ca
niti
oo
nn
 publique
1
3
0
4
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n adle
e  sde
m la
é  
d C
iaosmmunication
4
5
0
9
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
P e
mr ela
és  
dsC
iaeo
s mmunication
12
4
0
16
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
P e
mr
S  elea
ésr  
dsvC
iaeo
s
c m
e  m
Poluitniiqca
u t
e iso n
économiques et scientifiques
8
5
0
13
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
P e
mr
S  elea
ésr  
dsvC
iaeo
s
c m
e  m
Poluitniiqca
u t
e iso n
structurel es et de cohésion
2
1
0
3
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
P e
mr
S  elea
ésr  
dsvC
iaeo
s
c m
e  m
Aff u
a n
ir ic
e a
s  ti
c onstitutionnel es et droits des citoyens
1
2
0
3
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
P e
mr
S  elea
ésr  
dsvC
iaeo
s
c m
e  m
Aff u
a n
ir ic
e a
s  ti
b o
u n
dgétaires
2
1
0
3
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
P e
mr
S  elea
ésr  
dsvC
iaeo
s
c m
e  m
Poluitniiqca
u t
e iso n
externes
4
2
0
6
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
S e
m rla
évi 
d C
ia
c os
e m
 em
t  u
s n
ui ic
vi a
  t
d io
e n
s médias
35
10
0
45
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sde
m la
é'  
da C
ia
u os
dim
o m
vi u
s n
u i
e c
l ation
11
49
0
60
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sde
m la
é  
d C
ia
c os
o m
m m
m u
u n
niic
c a
attiio
o n
n internet
21
8
0
29
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sde
m la
é  
d C
ia
g os
e m
sti m
o u
n  n
d ic
u astiitoen
 Europarl
4
9
0
13
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
E e
mu lra
éo  
d C
ia
p osrm
l Tm
V unication
3
4
0
7
Total Direction des médias
107
100
0
207
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n adle
e  sde
b  l
u a
r  eC
a o
u m
x  m
d'i u
n n
f i
ocrat
m io
at n
ion
2
2
0
4
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
B r
n uadrle
e  s
a d
u e
b   
dl
u a
re  elC
ai o
ui m
xs om
d'i
n u
nPn
fEi
ocr
- a
C t
moio
atn n
io
g n
rès américain à Washington
8
3
0
11
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sde
b   l
u a
rc  e
o C
ao o
ur m
x
d i m
d
n'ia u
nti n
fo i
ocr
n  a
e t
m i o
atd n
io
e nprogrammation 
5
8
0
13
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sde
b   l
u a
rs  e
u C
aivo
ui m
x h m
do'ir u
n n
f
zo i
ocr
ntat
mli o
ate n
io
t  n
thématique 
5
5
0
10
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
B r
n uadrle
e  s
a d
u e
b   
dl
u'a
ri  enC
af o
u
orm
x  m
d'i
atu
ni n
fo i
oncr a
d t
mui o
at n
iPoanrlement européen en Grèce
2
7
0
9
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
B r
n uadrle
e  s
a d
u e
b   
dl
u'a
ri  enC
af o
u
orm
x  m
d'i
atu
ni n
fo i
oncr a
d t
mui o
at n
iPoanrlement européen en Al emagne
5
9
0
14
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
B r
n uadrle
e  s
a d
u e
b A 
dl
u'na
rit  enC
af
eno
u
ornm
x e m
dr'i
atéu
nig n
foi i
oncr 
na
d t
muli o
at
e  n
iPoa
d nr
el em
Muen
ni tc e
h uropéen en Al emagne - Antenne régionale de Munich
1
2
0
3
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
B r
n uadrle
e  s
a d
u e
b   
dl
u'a
ri  enC
af o
u
orm
x  m
d'i
atu
ni n
fo i
oncr a
d t
mui o
at n
iPoanrlement européen en Belgique
2
7
0
9
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
B r
n uadrle
e  s
a d
u e
b   
dl
u'a
ri  enC
af o
u
orm
x  m
d'i
atu
ni n
fo i
oncr a
d t
mui o
at n
iPoanrlement européen au Danemark
2
4
0
6
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
B r
n uadrle
e  s
a d
u e
b   
dl
u'a
ri  enC
af o
u
orm
x  m
d'i
atu
ni n
fo i
oncr a
d t
mui o
at n
iPoanrlement européen en Irlande
2
3
0
5
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
B r
n uadrle
e  s
a d
u e
b   
dl
u'a
ri  enC
af o
u
orm
x  m
d'i
atu
ni n
fo i
oncr a
d t
mui o
at n
iPoanrlement européen en Finlande
2
4
0
6
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
B r
n uadrle
e  s
a d
u e
b   
dl
u'a
ri  enC
af o
u
orm
x  m
d'i
atu
ni n
fo i
oncr a
d t
mui o
at n
iPoanrlement européen aux Pays-Bas
2
5
0
7
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
B r
n uadrle
e  s
a d
u e
b   
dl
u'a
ri  enC
af o
u
orm
x  m
d'i
atu
ni n
fo i
oncr a
d t
mui o
at n
iPoanrlement européen au Portugal
2
4
0
6
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
B r
n uadrle
e  s
a d
u e
b   
dl
u'a
ri  enC
af o
u
orm
x  m
d'i
atu
ni n
fo i
oncr a
d t
mui o
at n
iPoanrlement européen au Royaume-Uni
2
9
0
11
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
B r
n uadrle
e  s
a d
u e
b A 
dl
u'na
rit  enC
af
eno
u
ornm
x e m
dr'i
atéu
nig n
foi i
oncr 
na
d t
muli o
at
e  n
iPoa
d'nrle
E m
di e
m n
b t 
o euurrgopéen au Royaume-Uni -
1
2
0
3
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
B r
n uadrle
e  s
a d
u e
b   
dl
u'a
ri  enC
af o
u
orm
x  m
d'i
atu
ni n
fo i
oncr a
d t
mui o
at n
iPoanrlement européen au Luxembourg
1
2
0
3
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
B r
n uadrle
e  s
a d
u e
b   
dl
u'a
ri  enC
af o
u
orm
x  m
d'i
atu
ni n
fo i
oncr a
d t
mui o
at n
iPoanrlement européen en Espagne
4
7
0
11
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
B r
n uadrle
e  s
a d
u e
b A 
dl
u'na
rit  enC
af
eno
u
ornm
x e m
dr'i
atéu
nig n
foi i
oncr 
na
d t
muli o
at
e  n
iPoa
d nr
el em
Ba e
r n
c t
e  le
o u
n ro
e péen en Espagne -
1
2
0
3
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
B r
n uadrle
e  s
a d
u e
b   
dl
u'a
ri  enC
af o
u
orm
x  m
d'i
atu
ni n
fo i
oncr a
d t
mui o
at n
iPoanrlement européen en France
3
7
0
10
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
B r
n uadrle
e  s
a d
u e
b A 
dl
u'na
rit  enC
af
eno
u
ornm
x e m
dr'i
atéu
nig n
foi i
oncr 
na
d t
muli o
at
e  n
iPoa
d nr
el em
Maern
s te ielueropéen en France -
1
2
0
3
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
B r
n uadrle
e  s
a d
u e
b   
dl
u'a
ri  enC
af o
u
orm
x  m
d'i
atu
ni n
fo i
oncr a
d t
mui o
at n
iPoanrlement européen en Italie
3
6
0
9
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
B r
n uadrle
e  s
a d
u e
b A 
dl
u'na
rit  enC
af
eno
u
ornm
x e m
dr'i
atéu
nig n
foi i
oncr 
na
d t
muli o
at
e  n
iPoa
d nr
el em
Mileant européen en Italie -
1
2
0
3
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
B r
n uadrle
e  s
a d
u e
b   
dl
u'a
ri  enC
af o
u
orm
x  m
d'i
atu
ni n
fo i
oncr a
d t
mui o
at n
iPoanrlement européen en Suède
2
4
0
6
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
B r
n uadrle
e  s
a d
u e
b   
dl
u'a
ri  enC
af o
u
orm
x  m
d'i
atu
ni n
fo i
oncr a
d t
mui o
at n
iPoanrlement européen à Strasbourg
2
8
0
10
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
B r
n uadrle
e  s
a d
u e
b   
dl
u'a
ri  enC
af o
u
orm
x  m
d'i
atu
ni n
fo i
oncr a
d t
mui o
at n
iPoanrlement européen en Autriche
2
4
0
6
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
B r
n uadrle
e  s
a d
u e
b   
dl
u'a
ri  enC
af o
u
orm
x  m
d'i
atu
ni n
fo i
oncr a
d t
mui o
at n
iPoanrlement européen à Chypre
1
3
0
4
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
B r
n uadrle
e  s
a d
u e
b   
dl
u'a
ri  enC
af o
u
orm
x  m
d'i
atu
ni n
fo i
oncr a
d t
mui o
at n
iPoanrlement européen en Estonie
1
3
0
4
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
B r
n uadrle
e  s
a d
u e
b   
dl
u'a
ri  enC
af o
u
orm
x  m
d'i
atu
ni n
fo i
oncr a
d t
mui o
at n
iPoanrlement européen en Hongrie
2
4
0
6
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
B r
n uadrle
e  s
a d
u e
b   
dl
u'a
ri  enC
af o
u
orm
x  m
d'i
atu
ni n
fo i
oncr a
d t
mui o
at n
iPoanrlement européen en Lettonie
1
3
0
4
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
B r
n uadrle
e  s
a d
u e
b   
dl
u'a
ri  enC
af o
u
orm
x  m
d'i
atu
ni n
fo i
oncr a
d t
mui o
at n
iPoanrlement européen en Lituanie
1
3
0
4
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
B r
n uadrle
e  s
a d
u e
b   
dl
u'a
ri  enC
af o
u
orm
x  m
d'i
atu
ni n
fo i
oncr a
d t
mui o
at n
iPoanrlement européen à Malte
1
3
0
4
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
B r
n uadrle
e  s
a d
u e
b   
dl
u'a
ri  enC
af o
u
orm
x  m
d'i
atu
ni n
fo i
oncr a
d t
mui o
at n
iPoanrlement européen en Pologne
3
4
0
7
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
B r
n uadrle
e  s
a d
u e
b A 
dl
u'na
rit  enC
af
eno
u
ornm
x e m
dr'i
atéu
nig n
foi i
oncr 
na
d t
muli o
at
e  n
iPoa
d nr
el em
Wreonctl e
a u
w ropéen en Pologne -
1
2
0
3
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
B r
n uadrle
e  s
a d
u e
b   
dl
u'a
ri  enC
af o
u
orm
x  m
d'i
atu
ni n
fo i
oncr a
d t
mui o
at n
iPoanrlement européen en République tchèque
2
4
0
6
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
B r
n uadrle
e  s
a d
u e
b   
dl
u'a
ri  enC
af o
u
orm
x  m
d'i
atu
ni n
fo i
oncr a
d t
mui o
at n
iPoanrlement européen en Slovaquie
2
3
0
5
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
B r
n uadrle
e  s
a d
u e
b   
dl
u'a
ri  enC
af o
u
orm
x  m
d'i
atu
ni n
fo i
oncr a
d t
mui o
at n
iPoanrlement européen en Slovénie
1
3
0
4
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
B r
n uadrle
e  s
a d
u e
b   
dl
u'a
ri  enC
af o
u
orm
x  m
d'i
atu
ni n
fo i
oncr a
d t
mui o
at n
iPoanrlement européen en Bulgarie
2
3
0
5
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
B r
n uadrle
e  s
a d
u e
b   
dl
u'a
ri  enC
af o
u
orm
x  m
d'i
atu
ni n
fo i
oncr a
d t
mui o
at n
iPoanrlement européen en Roumanie
2
3
0
5
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
B r
n uadrle
e  s
a d
u e
b   
dl
u'a
ri  enC
af o
u
orm
x  m
d'i
atu
ni n
fo i
oncr a
d t
mui o
at n
iPoanrlement européen en Croatie
2
1
0
3
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
e  sde
b  l
u a
rs  e
o C
au o
uti m

enm
d' idu
nen
fs i
o cr
baut
m iro
ate n
io
a n
ux d'information
1
1
0
2
Total Direction des bureaux d'information
86
161
0
247
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n adle
e  sde
r  
e la tC
ioonm
s m
a u
v n
eci cla
e tsi ocn
itoyens
2
4
0
6
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
P r
n aadrlle
ea  sd
m e
re  
e l
n a
t  taC
io
ri on
u m

m m
a u
v n
eci cla
e tsi o
c n
itoyens
5
15
0
20
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sde
r  
e l
s a
   t
v C
ioson
itm
se m
a
s eu
vt n
ecsi cl
é a
emtsii o
c
n n
it
a o
ir y
e e
s ns
28
21
0
49
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
É e
rv  
e léan tC
io
e on
m m
s
e  m
a
ntsu
v  n
ec
eti clea
extsi po
c n
ito
si y
ti e
o ns
4
6
0
10
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
Ce
ra 
e la
m  tC
ipoaon
gm
sn m
a
es u
v  n
ec
d'ii cl
n a
ef ts
o i rocn
it
m o
a y
ti e
o ns
6
5
0
11
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
Mr
n ad
ai le
e
s  s
o d
n e
r   
edla
e  tlC
io
' on
hi m
s
s  tm
a
oi u
vren
ec i eclua
er tsi 
o oc
p n
itéo
e y
nennes
18
7
0
25
Total Direction des relations avec les citoyens
63
58
0
121
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n adle
e  sde
r  
e la
s  
s C
o o
u m
rc m
es unication
1
4
0
5
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
P e
r  
erla
s  
s C
o
ono
unm
rcel m
es unication
2
8
0
10
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
F e
ri  
en la
sa  
snC
oc o
ue m
rc
s m
es unication
4
11
0
15
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
I e
rnf  
e loa
sr  
s C
o
m o
uatm
rciqm
es
u u
e nication
2
9
0
11
Total Direction des ressources
9
32
0
41
Total Direction générale de la Communication
275
368
0
643

Annex Q48 - Overview of posts 2014-2018
2014

Direction générale / Direction / Unité / Service
AD
AST
AST/SC
Total
Direction générale du Personnel
2
3
0
5
Direction géné
U rnailte
é  du
e  P
c e
o rs
m o
mnuneilcation interne
1
3
0
4
Direction géné
U rnailte
é  d
E u
g  P
alietrés o
etn n
dievlersité
3
5
0
8
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n al
D e
é  d
v u
el  P
o e
p r
p s
e o
mnenet ldes ressources humaines
3
2
0
5
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nail
Dt e
é  d
vOu
elr  P
ogae
p r
pnis
e o
mane
ti n
o et 
nld ienst eres
n s
e  o
e u
t  rpcre
o sg h
raum
m a
m ianties
on des ressources humaines
5
8
0
13
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nail
Dt e
é  d
vCu
elo P
on e
pc r
po s
euo
mrne
s  n
e et ld
pers
o  r
c e
é s
d s
u o
r u
e r
s cdes
e   h
séulm
ec a
ti in
o e
n s
4
13
0
17
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nail
Dt e
é  d
vRu
ele  P
ocr e
pur
pt s
e o
mne
m n
e et
n  tld e
ets  r
m eusts
a o
ti u
o rnc e
d s
u  h
p u
e m
rs a
o in
n e
n s
el
4
30
0
34
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nail
Dt e
é  d
vGu
ele P
ost e
pi r
po s
en o
m
  ne
d n
u  et 
p ld
e e
r s
s  ore
n s
n s
e o
l  u
etr c
des hcu
a m
rriaèin
reess
3
18
0
21
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nail
Dt e
é  d
v u
ele  lP
oae
p fr
p s
eo o
m
r ne
m n
ateti ld
o e
n s
   
p reosfs
e o
s u
si rc
o e
n s
n  ehlu
e maines
10
26
0
36
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n al
D e
é  d
v u
elS  P
oer e
pv r
pi s
ec o
m
e ne
dn
uet  ld
b e
u s
d  r
g e
e s
t  s
d o
e u
 l rac fes
or  h
m u
a m
ti a
o innes
1
2
0
3
Total Direction Développement des ressources humaines
30
99
0
129
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n al
Ge d
stu
i  
oP
n e
  r
d s
e o
 l n
a nveile administrative
3
1
0
4
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nail
Gte
é  d
stDu
ir  
oP
n
oite
 sr
d  s
ei o
 l
n n
ad inveile
d a
u d
e m
ls in
eti srtéra
mtiuvneérations
2
2
0
4
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nail
Gte
é  d
stDu
irS  
oP
n
oi
e tre
 s
v r
d i s
eic o
 l
ne n
ad iPnvaeile
d a
ued
et m
lsc ion
eti sr
t tér
ô a
mlt
e iuvneérations
1
10
0
11
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nail
Gte
é  d
stDu
irS  
oP
n
oi
e tre
 s
v r
d i s
eic o
 l
ne n
ad iDnvrei
o le
di a
ut d
e
s im
ls 
n in
e
d tii vsrtédra
m
u teiulvnseérations
1
15
0
16
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nail
Gte
é  d
stDu
irS  
oP
n
oi
e tre
 s
v r
d i s
eic o
 l
ne n
ad iPnvrieivle
d ia
ul d
e
è m
ls
g  ein
est i esrtté rda
motiucvnueér
maetinotn
atsion
1
10
0
11
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nail
Gte
é  d
stu
ie  
osP
n e
 mr
di s
e o
 ls n
ai nv
o ei
n le
s administrative
2
14
0
16
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nail
Gte
é  d
stu
ie  
osP
n e
 p r
de s
eno
 ls n
ai nv
o ei
n le
s aedt m
a isn
s is
urtr
a a
nti
c v
e e
s sociales
2
19
0
21
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nail
Gte
é  d
stu
ie  
osP
nre
  r
dls
eao
 ltin
a onveisle ad
v m
eci n
l i
e s
  t
p rearti
s v
o e
nnel
3
19
0
22
Total Direction Gestion de la vie administrative
15
90
0
105
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n al
Ge d
stu
i  
oP
n e
  r
d s
e o
s nsneerlvices de soutien et sociaux
2
2
0
4
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n al
Ge d
stu
iS  
oP
n
er e
 v r
di s
ec o
se ns
dneer
 l lviac
  e
g s
e  sdtieo s
n o
  u
detise n
a  best es
nocc
e ia
s  ux
médicales
2
3
0
5
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
C r
n aabl
Gie 
n d
steu
it   
oP
n
m e
 é r
d s
ei o
sc ns
al ne
  er
L lv
uic
x e
e s
m d
b e
o  s
urogutien et sociaux
3
14
0
17
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
C r
n aabl
Gie 
n d
steu
it   
oP
n
m e
 é r
d s
ei o
sc ns
al ne
  er
B lvric
u e
x s
el  ld
e e
s  soutien et sociaux
6
19
0
25
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nail
Gte
é  d
stu
ie  
osP
n e
 a r
dc s
eti o

o nsne
s er
  lv
s ic
o e
ci sa ld
e e
s  soutien et sociaux
2
10
0
12
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nail
Gte
é  d
stu
ieS  
osP
n
er e
 av r
dci s
etic o
se 
o ns
dne
s er
 s lv
s  ic
ocre
ciès
ac ld
e
h e
se  sso
à u
Lti
uexn
e  e
mt bsooucria
g ux
0
3
0
3
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nail
Gte
é  d
stu
ieS  
osP
n
er e
 av r
dci s
etic o
se 
o ns
dne
s er
 s lv
s  ic
ocre
ciès
ac ld
e
h e
se  sso
à u
Btire
u n
x  e
el tl esociaux
1
3
0
4
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nail
Gte
é  d
stu
ie  
olP
nae
  r
dp s
er o
sé ns
v ne
e er
ntlviic
o e
n s
   
e d
t  e
d  s
u obuit
e ie
n-nê terte saouc ita
r u
a x
vail
4
6
0
10
Total Direction Gestion des services de soutien et sociaux
20
60
0
80
Directi o
Dnir g
e é
ctnié
o rna lde d
s ur ePsesrs
o o
urncn
e e
s l
1
1
0
2
Directi o
Dnir g
e é
ctnié
oU rna ildte
é  d

Rure ePs
s esr
o s
ou o
urrnc
cen
ese
s  lhumaines
2
6
0
8
Directi o
Dnir g
e é
ctnié
oU rna ildte
é  d

g ur
e  esPstiesr
o s
on o
urdncen
es e
s rlessources financières et contrôles
3
14
0
17
Directi o
Dnir g
e é
ctnié
oU rna ildte
é  d
sI ur
nf  ePs
or esr
m s
oa o
urtinc
q n
eu e
s l et support TI
5
13
0
18
Total  Direction des ressources
11
34
0
45
Total Direction générale du Personnel
82
294
0
376
Direction générale des infrastructures et de la logistique
1
2
1
4
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n adle
e  sdiensf rin
a f
s rta
r s
u tcrtuc
r teu
s res et de la logistique
1
1
0
2
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sdiensf
 l  ri
a n
a cf
s rt
oa
ros
ur t
c rt
diunc
rat
e u
si r
o e
ns  det sdie
n fla
r  
a lo
st g
r iusctiq
u u
rees
7
5
0
12
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sdiensf
 l  ri
a n
a  f
sg rtea
rss
utit
c rt
o u
n c
r i t
e u
s
m re
m s
o  e
bitl id
è e
r  elae tlodgei slt
a i qu
m e
aintenance à Luxembourg
3
17
0
20
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sdiensf
 l  ri
a n
a  f
sg rtea
rss
utit
c rt
o u
n c
r i t
e u
s
m re
m s
o  e
bitl id
è e
r  elae tlodgei slt
a i qu
m e
aintenance des bureaux d'information
4
13
0
17
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sdiensf
 l  ri
a n
a  f
sg rtea
rss
utit
c rt
o u
n c
r i t
e u
s
m re
m s
o  e
bitl id
è e
r  elae tlodgei slt
a i qu
m e
aintenance à Bruxel es
6
33
0
39
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sdiensf
 l  ri
a n
a  f
sg rtea
rss
utit
c rt
o u
n c
r i t
e u
s
m re
m s
o  e
bitl id
è e
r  elae tlodgei slt
a i qu
m e
aintenance à Strasbourg
5
18
0
23
Total Direction des infrastructures
26
87
0
113
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n adle
e  ldae lso in
gi fsrtais
q turu
e ctures et de la logistique
3
5
0
8
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  lda
T e 
rlso
a  nin
gis fsprtai
ors
qt tu rdu
ee c t
p u
e re
s s
o  e
n tn d
e e
s  la logistique
3
26
0
29
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ldae lso in
gi
h fs
u rtiai
s s
qsitur
e u
er c
s  tu
d r
e ecso e
n tf d
ér e l
nac leogistique
1
48
0
49
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ldae lso in
gi
acfsrt
qaius
qi tusriu
eti c
o tu
n r
s,e s
g  eest idoe 
n la
d  leo
s g
  i
b st
e iq
nsu e
et inventaire
2
8
0
10
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ldae l
S so
e  rin
gi
ac
v fsrt
qcaiu
e s
qi tus
d rieu
eti l c
o'i tu
nvr
s,e 
e s
gn  etes
a ti irdo
e e 
n la
d  leo
s g
  i
b st
e iq
nsu e
et inventaire
0
5
0
5
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ldae l
S so
e  rin
gi
ac
v fsrt
qcaiu
e s
qi tus
d rieu
etis c
o  t
d u
né r
s,pe s
g
ôt  ees
s  t i
e do
t  e 
n
m la
d
a  gleo
s
a g
 si i
b s
n t
es iq
nsu e
et inventaire
0
7
0
7
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ldae l
S so
e  rin
gi
ac
v fsrt
qcaiu
e s
qi tus
d rieu
etis c
o  t
a u
nc r
s,qe us
gi  esesitti ido
o e
n  
n l
s a
d  leo
s g
  i
b st
e iq
nsu e
et inventaire
0
6
0
6
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ldae lso
 l  i
a n
gi r fsrt
e ai
sts
qatur
uu
er c
attiuore
n se tetd d
e el alac leo
ng
tris
altieq u
d' e
achats
3
1
0
4
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ldae l
S so
 le  ri
a n
gi r
v fsrt
ec ai
st
e s
qatu
d r
ueu
er l c
at
a ti uo
r r
e e

s se
t  t
a e
u tdr d
ea teli aolac
n  leo
ng
tris
altieq u
d' e
achats
0
12
0
12
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ldae l
S so
 le  ri
a n
gi r
v fsrt
ec ai
st
e s
qatu
d r
ueu
er l c
at
a ti uo
c ree
n nset tre
a tdl d
e el
d' alaac leo
n
hag
trtiss
altieq u
d' e
achats
0
3
0
3
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  lda
T e 
rlso
a  nin
gis fsprtai
ors
qt tu rdu
ee c t
b u
i r
e e
n s et de la logistique
1
23
1
25
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ldae lso in
gi
h fs
u rtiai
s s
qsitur
e u
er c
s  tu
d' réets
a  get de la logistique
2
31
0
33
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  lda
Oe lso
n  
e in
giS fstrtai
o s
q
p  tur
S u
eh c
o tu
p  rpes
o  
u e
r tl d
e e
s   l
daé lpougtiéstique
1
4
0
5
Total Direction de la logistique
16
179
1
196
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n adle
e  sde
r s
e  
s in
s f
o ruars
c teru
s ctures et de la logistique
2
1
0
3
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sde
r s
e l  
s i
a n
s cf
o ru
oaros
cr ter
diu
sncatuir
o e
ns  geét ndéer l
a a 
e logistique
3
8
0
11
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sde
r s
e l  
s i
a n
s  f
op rurar
o s
cg terru
sa c
m tu
m raetis 
o e
n t, de
u  la
s  uliovg
i  is
ett iq
d u
u  e
contrôle budgétaire
1
1
0
2
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sde
rS s
e le  
sri
a n
s vif
op rur
c ar
oe s
cg ter
d reu
sa l c
ma t u
mp raeti
o s

ore
nat, d
m e
u  
m la
sat  uiliov
o g

n is
et
e t iq
d u

u e
co
s n
ui tvriô
  l
b e
u b
d u
g d
étg
a é
irta
e ire
1
3
0
4
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sde
rS s
e le  
sri
a n
s vif
op rur
c ar
oe s
cg ter
d ruu
sa  c
m
c t
ou
mnratet
ris
ô  
ol e
n t, i d
n e
u
t  
e lra
sn ulieovg
i  is
ett iq
d u
u  e
contrôle budgétaire
3
5
0
8
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sde
r s
e  
s in
sc f
o runarts
cr te
a rtu
s  cetu re
m s
ar e
c th d
é e
s  lpa 
u lo
bl g
icis
s tique
9
12
0
21
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
I e
rnf s
eo 
s irn
s f
o
m ruaartis
c te
q r
uu
se c
  t
e u
t  rseus 
p e
p t 
o d
rte  l
T a
I  logistique
2
7
0
9
Total Direction des ressources
21
37
0
58
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n adle
e  sde
P s
r  oijneftra
s  s
i tr
m u
mct
o u
birleis
er e
s t de la logistique
4
2
0
6
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sde
P s
r  oijne
prftr
o a
s j s
iet tr
ms u
mic
mt
o u
bi
mrlei
o s
er
bi le
si te rdse  àlaL lo
uxgeis
mtiq
b u
o e
urg
10
14
0
24
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sde
P s
r  oijne
prftr
o a
s j s
iet tr
ms u
mic
mt
o u
bi
mrlei
o s
er
bi le
si te rdse  àla 
B lrougxis
eltliq
e u
s e
6
12
0
18
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sde
P s
r  oijne
prftr
o a
s j s
iet tr
ms u
mic
mt
o u
bi
mrlei
o s
er
bi le
si te rdse  àla 
S lto
r g
a i
s s
bti
oq
uu
r e
g
2
8
0
10
Total Direction des Projets immobiliers
22
36
0
58
Total Direction générale des infrastructures et de la logistique
86
341
2
429

Annex Q48 - Overview of posts 2014-2018
2014

Direction générale / Direction / Unité / Service
AD
AST
AST/SC
Total
Direction générale de la traduction
2
2
0
4
Direction géné
U rnailte
é  de
M  
u la
ti ltira
n d
g u
ui c
s tio
men et relations externes
6
5
0
11
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n adle
u  d
s e
u  l
p ap torat deut cdtieosn
 services technologiques pour la traduction
4
6
0
10
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
ué  d
s e
ué  l
pv a
pe ltor
o at 
p de
p ut 
e cdt
m ieosnn
 st er
d' vaic
p e
plsi cte
atcih
o n
n o
s lo
etg i
dqeu
  e
s s
y  
s p
t o
è u
m re lsa i t
nrfa
odru
mcatioqnues
12
11
0
23
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
ué  d
s e
u  l
p a
p torat deut cdtieosn
 se
  r
e v
xtic
e e
r s
n  etechnologiques pour la traduction
1
1
0
2
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n adle
u  d
s e
uS  l
pe a
pr vtoirat
c  de
e  ut 
d cd
u t ieos
Pl n
 s
a e
c r
e vi
m ceenst technologiques pour la traduction
1
15
0
16
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n adle
u  d
s e
uS  l
pe a
pr vtoirat
c  de
e  ut 
E cd
x téieos
c n
 s
uteir
ovni cdes te
c c
o h
n n
tr o
a lto
s giques pour la traduction
3
6
0
9
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
ué  d
s e
u  l
p a
p
pr toér-at de
raut dcdt
u iecostin
 soenr vEic
u e
r s
a  t
meic
s hnologiques pour la traduction
7
9
0
16
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
ué  d
sCe
uo l
p a
p
or to
driat 
n de
a ut icd
o tie
n os
  n
 dsee lrv
a  itceers 
m tie
n cohln
o o
gi lo
e giques pour la traduction
7
4
0
11
Total Direction du support et des services technologiques pour la traduction
35
52
0
87
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n adle
e  ldae t lra t
d ra
u d
ct u
i c
o t
n ion
5
4
0
9
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ldae t lra t
d ra
u d
ct u
i c
o t
n ion danoise
28
12
0
40
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ldae t lra t
d ra
u d
ct u
i c
o t
n ion al emande
37
15
0
52
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ldae t lra t
d ra
u d
ct u
i c
o t
n ion grecque
30
16
0
46
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ldae t lra t
d ra
u d
ct u
i c
o t
n ion anglaise et irlandaise
23
16
0
39
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ldae t
S  lrea
r  vt
dira
uc d
ct
e  u
id c
oe t
nlio
a n
t  randgula
ctise
o  
n eitr lir
a la
n n
d d
ai a
s is
e e
5
1
0
6
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ldae t lra t
d ra
u d
ct u
i c
o t
n ion espagnole
33
19
0
52
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ldae t lra t
d ra
u d
ct u
i c
o t
n ion française
35
15
0
50
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ldae t lra t
d ra
u d
ct u
i c
o t
n ion italienne
32
14
0
46
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ldae t lra t
d ra
u d
ct u
i c
o t
n ion néerlandaise
29
12
0
41
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ldae t lra t
d ra
u d
ct u
i c
o t
n ion portugaise
28
14
0
42
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ldae t lra t
d ra
u d
ct u
i c
o t
n ion finnoise
31
13
0
44
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ldae t lra t
d ra
u d
ct u
i c
o t
n ion suédoise
29
14
0
43
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ldae t lra t
d ra
u d
ct u
i c
o t
n ion tchèque
30
11
0
41
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ldae t lra t
d ra
u d
ct u
i c
o t
n ion estonienne
28
11
0
39
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ldae t lra t
d ra
u d
ct u
i c
o t
n ion hongroise
28
10
0
38
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ldae t lra t
d ra
u d
ct u
i c
o t
n ion lituanienne
29
12
0
41
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ldae t lra t
d ra
u d
ct u
i c
o t
n ion lettone
29
12
0
41
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ldae t lra t
d ra
u d
ct u
i c
o t
n ion maltaise
28
11
0
39
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ldae t lra t
d ra
u d
ct u
i c
o t
n ion polonaise
33
12
0
45
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ldae t lra t
d ra
u d
ct u
i c
o t
n ion slovène
28
11
0
39
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ldae t lra t
d ra
u d
ct u
i c
o t
n ion slovaque
28
11
0
39
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ldae t lra t
d ra
u d
ct u
i c
o t
n ion bulgare
29
11
0
40
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ldae t lra t
d ra
u d
ct u
i c
o t
n ion roumaine
29
11
0
40
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ldae t lra t
d ra
u d
ct u
i c
o t
n ion croate
27
11
0
38
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  lda
P e 
lt 
a lra
n  nt
dira
un d
ct
g u
i c
o t
n ion
1
1
0
2
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  lda
P e 
lt
S  
a lr
e a
nr  nvt
dira
unc d
ct
ge  u
id c
oe t
n io
G n
estion de la demande
1
20
0
21
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  lda
P e 
lt
S  
a lr
e a
nr  nvt
dira
unc d
ct
ge  u
iQc
out
n iao
li n

2
5
0
7
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  lda
P e 
lt
S  
a lr
e a
nr  nvt
dira
unc d
ct
ge  u
id c
oe t
nsi on
Relations avec les clients
8
1
0
9
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  lda
V e t
é  rlriaf it
dcra
uatd
cti u
io c
on t
nrio
é n
dactionnel e
7
2
0
9
Total Direction de la traduction
710
328
0
1038
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n adle
e  sde
r  
e la
s  
s tr
o a
u d
r u
cecstion
2
1
0
3
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
Re
r  
e lsa
ss 
s tor
o a
urd
rcu
cecst io
h n
umaines
2
7
0
9
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
Ge
r  
e lsa
st  
si tr
o a
un d
r u
cecst iroen
ssources financières et contrôles
3
12
0
15
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
F e
ro  
erla
s  
s
m tar
ota
ui d
ro u
ce
n cs
s tieo
t n
stages
2
6
0
8
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
I e
rnf  
e loa
sr  
s tr
o
m a
uatd
ri u
ce
q cs
u tei oen
t support TI
2
19
0
21
Total Direction des ressources
11
45
0
56
Total Direction générale de la traduction
764
432
0
1196
Direction générale de l'interprétation et des conférences
2
2
0
4
Direction géné
U rnailte
é  de l
s ' in
p t
a e
i r
e p
mré
e t
n a
t tsi o
AnI e
C t des conférences
2
9
0
11
Direction géné
U rnailte
é  de l'i
a n
  t
c e
o rp
m ré
m tuantiio
c n
at  ieot nde
e s
xt c
e o
r n
neférences
2
1
0
3
Direction géné
U rnailte
é  de l'i
a n
  t
g ersptiré
o t
na t
dio
e  n
l  
a et
q  d
u e
al s
it  c
é onférences
3
2
0
5
Directi o
Dnir g
e é
ctnié
o rna lde dl'ei nlt'in
er te
prrp
ét raéttia
o ti
n on et des conférences
1
3
0
4
Directi o
Dnir g
e é
ctnié
oU rna ildte
é  dl'ei nlt'in
er te
prrp
ét raéttia
o ti
n on e
d t 
a d
n e
o si sceonférences
12
0
0
12
Directi o
Dnir g
e é
ctnié
oU rna ildte
é  dl'ei nlt'in
er te
prrp
ét raéttia
o ti
n on e
a tl d
e e
ms 
a c
n o
d n
e férences
28
0
0
28
Directi o
Dnir g
e é
ctnié
oU rna ildte
é  dl'ei nlt'in
er te
prrp
ét raéttia
o ti
n on e
g tr d
e e
c s
q  uceonférences
16
0
0
16
Directi o
Dnir g
e é
ctnié
oU rna ildte
é  dl'ei nlt'in
er te
prrp
ét raéttia
o ti
n on e
a t 
n d
g e
l s
ai  c
s o
e nférences
31
0
0
31
Directi o
Dnir g
e é
ctnié
oU rna ildte
é  dl'ei nlt'in
er te
prrp
ét raéttia
o ti
n on ets d
p e
a s
g  c
n o
ol n
e férences
21
0
0
21
Directi o
Dnir g
e é
ctnié
oU rna ildte
é  dl'ei nlt'in
er te
prrp
ét raéttia
o ti
n on e
fi t 
n d
n eosi sceonférences
16
0
0
16
Directi o
Dnir g
e é
ctnié
oU rna ildte
é  dl'ei nlt'in
er te
prrp
ét raéttia
o ti
n on e
frt adneçsa icsoenférences
27
0
0
27
Directi o
Dnir g
e é
ctnié
oU rna ildte
é  dl'ei nlt'in
er te
prrp
ét raéttia
o ti
n on e
it t 
a d
li e
e s
n  c
n o
e nférences
23
0
0
23
Directi o
Dnir g
e é
ctnié
oU rna ildte
é  dl'ei nlt'in
er te
prrp
ét raéttia
o ti
n on e
n t 
é d
e e
rl s
a  c
n o
d n
ai fé
s r
e ences
15
0
0
15
Directi o
Dnir g
e é
ctnié
oU rna ildte
é  dl'ei nlt'in
er te
prrp
ét raéttia
o ti
n on e
p t 
o d
rtes
u  
g c
a o
i n
seférences
16
0
0
16
Directi o
Dnir g
e é
ctnié
oU rna ildte
é  dl'ei nlt'in
er te
prrp
ét raéttia
o ti
n on e
s t 
u d
é e
d s
o  icso
e nférences
14
0
0
14
Directi o
Dnir g
e é
ctnié
oU rna ildte
é  dl'ei nlt'in
er te
prrp
ét raéttia
o ti
n on e
p t 
o d
l e
o s
n  acio
s n
e férences
20
0
0
20
Directi o
Dnir g
e é
ctnié
oU rna ildte
é  dl'ei nlt'in
er te
prrp
ét raéttia
o ti
n on e
t t
c  d
h e
è s
q  uceonférences
10
0
0
10
Directi o
Dnir g
e é
ctnié
oU rna ildte
é  dl'ei nlt'in
er te
prrp
ét raéttia
o ti
n on e
h t 
o d
n egsr c
oi o
s n
e férences
18
0
0
18
Directi o
Dnir g
e é
ctnié
oU rna ildte
é  dl'ei nlt'in
er te
prrp
ét raéttia
o ti
n on e
s tl d
oves
a  
q c
uo
e nférences
9
0
0
9
Directi o
Dnir g
e é
ctnié
oU rna ildte
é  dl'ei nlt'in
er te
prrp
ét raéttia
o ti
n on e
s tl d
oves
è  
n c
e onférences
6
0
0
6
Directi o
Dnir g
e é
ctnié
oU rna ildte
é  dl'ei nlt'in
er te
prrp
ét raéttia
o ti
n on ets d
t e
o s
ni  c
e o
n n
n f
e érences
8
0
0
8
Directi o
Dnir g
e é
ctnié
oU rna ildte
é  dl'ei nlt'in
er te
prrp
ét raéttia
o ti
n on e
li t d
u e
a s
ni  c
e o
n n
n f
e érences
10
0
0
10
Directi o
Dnir g
e é
ctnié
oU rna ildte
é  dl'ei nlt'in
er te
prrp
ét raéttia
o ti
n on e
l t
e  td
t e
o s
n  econférences
9
0
0
9
Directi o
Dnir g
e é
ctnié
oU rna ildte
é  dl'ei nlt'in
er te
prrp
ét raéttia
o ti
n on et
m  d
al e
t s
ai  c
s o
e nférences
4
0
0
4
Directi o
Dnir g
e é
ctnié
oU rna ildte
é  dl'ei nlt'in
er te
prrp
ét raéttia
o ti
n on e
b t 
u d
l e
g s
ar c
e onférences
13
0
0
13
Directi o
Dnir g
e é
ctnié
oU rna ildte
é  dl'ei nlt'in
er te
prrp
ét raéttia
o ti
n on e
r to d
u e
msa ico
nenférences
12
0
0
12
Directi o
Dnir g
e é
ctnié
oU rna ildte
é  dl'ei nlt'in
er te
prrp
ét raéttia
o ti
n on e
c tr d
o e
atse conférences
9
1
0
10
 Total Direction de l'interprétation
348
4
0
352
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n adle
e  ld'e
o  rl'
gin
a t
n e
i r
s p
atriéota
n tieo
t n
d e
e tl d
a  e
p s
r  oco
gr n
a fé
m re
m n
a c
ti e
o s
n
1
1
0
2
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ld'e
ou  rlr'
gin
aect
nre
i r
sutp
ateriéo
mta
ne t
n ieto
t  n
d
d  ee
e stl  d
a  e
p
u s
rxi  olc
i o
gr
ai n
ar f
e é
ms rie
mnn
at c
tie e
o
r s
n
prètes de conférence
5
3
0
8
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ld'e
o  rl'
gi
a n
a  t
np e
ir r
so p
at
g riéo
a ta

m tieo
t
m n
d
at  ie
e otl 
nd
a  e
p s
r  oco
gr n
a fé
m re
m n
a c
ti e
o s
n
12
10
0
22
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ld'e
o  rl
s '
g irn
aét
n e
iu r
sn p
aitri
o éo
n tsa
n teieto
t n
d
c  oe
e ntlf d
a é e
pr s
re  o
n co
gre n
as fé
m re
m n
a c
ti e
o s
n
6
12
0
18
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ld'e
o  rl
s '
g itn
ae t
n e
ic r
sh p
at
niriéo
cita
ne t
n ieo
ts n
d e
e tlc d
a o e
pn s
rf  o
é c
r o
gr
e n
a
n f
c é
me re
m n
a c
ti e
o s
n
2
48
0
50
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ld'e
ou  rl'
gsin
ao t
nue
itir
s p
aetri
n éo
  t
a a

u t ieo

m n
d
ul e
et itli d
a n e
pg s
ru  oic
s o
gr n
a
m f
e é
m re
m n
a c
ti e
o s
n
3
4
0
7
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ld'e
o  rl'
gi
a n
a f t
n e
iorr
s p
at
m riéo
at tia

o tie
n o
t  n
d
d  
e e
e stl i d
a nte
p s
r
e  oc
p o
grrèn
at feé
msre
m n
a c
ti e
o s
n
3
2
0
5
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ld'
F e
o  rl'
gin
a
m t
na e
it r
sop
atnri éoeta
n tlieo
t gn
d e
e tl d
a  e
p s
r  oco
gr n
a fé
m re
m n
a c
ti e
o s
n
3
1
0
4
Total Direction de l'organisation et de la programmation
35
81
0
116
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n adle
e  sde
r  
e l'
s in
s t
o e
u rp
c reéstation et des conférences
1
1
0
2
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
Re
r  
e ls'
s isn
sot
o e
u r
r p
c reést a
h ti
u on
ma iet
n  edses conférences
2
9
0
11
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
I e
rnf  
e lo'
s irn
s t
o
m e
ua rtip
cqreés
u tea t
e ito
  n
s  
u e
pt 
pd
oers
t   c
TI onférences
4
8
0
12
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sde
ru  
e l'
sbin
su t
ode
u r
g p
c
etreéstation et des conférences
3
3
0
6
Total Direction des ressources
10
21
0
31
Total Direction générale de l'interprétation et des conférences
402
120
0
522

Annex Q48 - Overview of posts 2014-2018
2014

Direction générale / Direction / Unité / Service
AD
AST
AST/SC
Total
Direction générale des finances
3
2
0
5
Direction générale de
Cse lflin
ul a
e n
  c
b e
u s
dgétaire et vérification
2
5
0
7
Direction géné
U rnailte
é  des
 l  f
a in
c a
o n
o c
r e
disnation générale
3
9
0
12
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n adle
u  d
b e
u sd fgin
eta n
etc e
d s
e  services financiers
1
1
0
2
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
ué  d
b e
u s
d  bfgiun
etda gn
etec te
d s
e  services financiers
6
6
0
12
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
ué  d
b e
u s
d l fg
a in
et
c a 
o n
et
mc e
d
pts
ea  bsileirtv
é ic
ete s
d  f
e ilnaa tnrc
é ie
s r
o s
rerie
3
3
0
6
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
ué  d
b e
uS s
d le rfg
a ivn
et
c a 
oc n
et
m c 
d e
d
pts
e al  basilteirrtév
é sic
et
o e 
r s
d
er if
e ilenaa tnrc
é ie
s r
o s
rerie
1
9
0
10
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
ué  d
b e
uS s
d le rfg
a ivn
et
c a 
oc n
et
m c 
d e
d
pts
e al  basilei
c rt
o v
é i
m c
etpe ts
da  f

b ilna
l a 
t tnr
é c
é ie
s r
o s
rerie
1
12
0
13
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
ué  d
bfi e
un s
da fg
n in
ectia 
è n
ertc 
e e
dc s
e  nste
r r
alveices financiers
5
2
0
7
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
ué  d
br e
u
efsdo fgnin
ettea n
et
d c 
u e
d  s
e
sy  s
st eèrv
m ic
e  e
i s
nf foin
r a
m n
a c
ti ie
q r
u s
e financier
4
1
0
5
Total Direction du budget et des services financiers
21
34
0
55
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n adle
e  sde
d s
r  
ofiitnsa
 fnic
n e
a s
nciers et sociaux des députés
1
2
0
3
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
r e
dé s
rm 
ofiuitn
s
n a
 f
é ni
rac
nt e
ai s
n
ocni erts  dert 
o s
ito
s c
  i
s a
ou
c x
i  
a d
u e
x s
   
dd
e é
s p
  u
d t
é é
p s
utés
3
1
0
4
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
r e
déS s
rme 
orfiuitvn
s
n a
 f
éc n
ira
e  c
ntp e
ai s
n
ocni sert
os n der
s t 
oes
it o
sac
 si
s a
o
s u
c
u x
ir  
a d
un e
xc s
 e  
dd
e
s é
sd p
 e u
ds t
é é
p
d s
u
é té
p s
utés
0
5
0
5
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
r e
déS s
rme 
orfiuitvn
s
n a
 f
éc n
ira
e  c
ntd e
ai s
n
ocn i ferrtas i dsertd 
o s
it
e o
s c
 
m i
saa
olu
c
a x
idi 
a d
u
e e
xds
 e 
dd
e
s é
sdp
 éu
dpt
é é
p
uts
utéé
s s
0
4
0
4
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
r e
déS s
rme 
orfiuitvn
s
n a
 f
éc n
ira
e  c
ntr e
aié s
n
ocn
m i e
u rt
n s 
é  drerat 
ois
itoo
snc
  i
s a
o
d u
c
esx
i   
a d
u
dée
x s
 p  
dud
et é
s
é p
 s u
d t
é é
p s
utés
0
3
0
3
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
a e
ds s
rsi 
ofisitn
saa
 fnn
icc
nee
a  s
nc
p i
a e
rlrs
e  e
m t
e  s
ntoaciria
e uext  d
fr e
a s
i  
s dé
g p
é u
n t
é é
r s
aux des députés
3
21
0
24
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
fre
das
ri  
osfiitn
s
d a
 f
e ni
v c
no e
ays
nc
a igers
s   e
ett  s
d o
e  csia
éj u
o xu d
r  e
d s
e  d
s  é
d p
é u
p tuéts
és
3
28
0
31
Total Direction des droits financiers et sociaux des députés
10
64
0
74
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n aFlie 
n d
a e
n s
c  f
e in
m a
e nc
t  e
dses structures politiques et autres services
1
1
0
2
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n naFilite
é  
n d
aBe
nus
cr  f
e in
m
a a
e
u  n
d c
t e e
d se
v s
o  ysatr
g u
e c
s t u
etr efs
o  rpo
m l
a ittiq
o u
n  e
psr e
of t 
e a
s u
sitr
oens 
n s
e e
l rev idceess députés
2
1
0
3
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n naFilite
é  
n d
aBe
nu
S s
cre  rf
e ivn
m
a a
e

c n
d
e  c
t eBe
d se
vurs
oe ysatur
g u
edc
set u
et
v r oefys
oa rp
g o
me l
asit tipq
oau
n rle
psr 
me
of t
e  
ena
st u
si
a tr
oren
e s
s  
n s
e e
l rev idceess députés
0
7
0
7
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n naFilite
é  
n d
aBe
nu
F s
cro  rf
e in
m
a a
e
u atn
di c
t eo e
d nse
v  s
op  yrsa
otfr
g u
e
esc
s t iu
etor ef
n s
on  replo
me l
a  itt
d iq
oe u
ns  e
p
d sr
é  e
of
p t
u  
eta
séu
si
s tr
oens 
n s
e e
l rev idceess députés
5
2
0
7
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n naFilite
é  
n d
afi e
n s
ca  f
en in
m
c a
e n
m c
t e e
dnsets
   
dsetr
s uscttrurcets
u  rp
e o
s l it
p iq
ol u
it e
i s
q  
uet 
s au
et t rie
n s
v  ese
nt rv
ai irc
e es
5
1
0
6
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n naFilite
é  
n d
afi e
nS s
cae  rf
en ivn
m
c a
e
c n
m
e  c
t ed e
dnsets
   
dse
n t
o r
s nus-icttr
n u
s rcet
ris
ut  rsp
e, o
sal ist
p i
s q
olo u
itcies
qat  
uie
o t 
sn asu
et,  t frie
n
o s
v
n  e
dsae
ntirv
ai
o irnc
ese, sgroupes et partis
0
5
0
5
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n naFilite
é  
n d
afi e
nS s
cae  rf
en ivn
m
c a
e
c n
m
e  c
ti e e
dn
n set
v s
 e  
dse
nt tr
sa iusrct
e trurcets
u  rp
e o
s l it
p iq
ol u
it e
i s
q  
uet 
s au
et t rie
n s
v  ese
nt rv
ai irc
e es
0
5
0
5
Total Direction Financement des structures politiques et autres services
13
22
0
35
Total Direction générale des finances
52
136
0
188
Direction générale de l'innovation et du support technologique
2
3
0
5
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n adle
e  sdte lc'in
h n
n o
ol v
o a
gtiio
e n
s   e
d t
e  ld'iu
n  fsourpp
maotirt
o  t
n echnologique
22
6
0
28
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sdt
S e
u lcp'in
hp n
nor o
olt  v
oa a
gutii
x o
e  n

ut  ie
dli t
e  l
s d'i
a u
n
te fso
u urp
s p
maotirt
o  t
n echnologique
2
4
0
6
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sdt
SIe

T lcp'
Ein
hpC n
no r o
olt
S  v
oa
er a
guvtii
x o
e c n

uet  ie
dli
D t
e e l
s d'
sia u
n
tke fso
u urp
s p
maotirt
o  t
n echnologique
4
24
0
28
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sdt
S e

M lcp'
Ein
hpP n
norSo
olt ev
oar a
guvtii
xco
e en

ut  ie
dl
Di t

e  l
s d'i
aku
n
te fso
u urp
s p
maotirt
o  t
n echnologique
1
7
0
8
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sdt
S e
u
A lcp'icn
hpèn
nors o
o lt I v
oaT a
gu, tii
xGo
e en

uts  ite
dli t
e o l
s d'i
a
n u
n
te
d  fso
u
e ur
s  p
se p
ma
q oti
u rit
op t
ne ec
m h
e n
ntosl o
e g
t  iq
L u
S e
U
2
15
0
17
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sdt
Ge lcs'itn
h n
no o
onl  v
od a
getisi o
e n
s nf e
dr t

a  ld'
sit u
nr  f
u socur
t p
urp
maeotisrt
o  t
n echnologique
1
1
0
2
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sdt
GIe 
n lcs'
gitn
hé n
noi o
onl e v
odria
getis i o
et n
s nf 
a e
dr t

ac  ld'
shit u
nrt  f
ue socur
t p
urp
maeot
  isr
d t
oe t
ns e
 rcéhsn
e o
a lo
u g
x iiq
n u
f e
ormatiques
3
8
0
11
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sdt
Ge
D lcsé'itn
hpl n
no io
onl ev
od a
ge
m tisei o
entn
s nf de
dr t

a  lsd'
sit u
nr  f
u socrur
ta p
ur
stp
maerotis
u rct
o  t
nu erc
e h
s nro
é lso
e g
a iq
u u
x e
6
6
0
12
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sdt
Ge
D lcsé'itn
hpl n
no io
onl ev
od a
ge
m tisei o
entn
s nf de
dr t

a  lsd'
sit u
nr  f
u socrur
ta p
ur
stp
maerotis
u rct
o  t
nu erc
e h
s ndo'l
h o
é g
b iq
er u
g ement
3
0
0
3
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sdt
Ceo lc'
n in
hc n
ne o
oplt v
oi a
g
o ti
n i o
e n
s t  e
dD t
e é ld'
vi u
n
el  fso
o ur
p p
p p
ma
e oti
m ret
o  
nt
n echnologique
1
2
0
3
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sdt
Ceo
P  llc'
nain
hcnin
nefio
opltc v
oia a
g
otiti
n i 
o o
en n
s t  
e e
dDt t
e é l
Éd'
viv u
n
ela  flso
ou ur
pa p
pti p
ma
eo oti
mn ret
o  
nt
n echnologique
1
2
0
3
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sdt
Ceo
G lce'
n in
hcstin
neoo
opltnv
oi  a
g
od ti
nei o
es n
s tp e
dDr t
e é
o  ljd'
vie u
n
etls fso
o ur
p p
p p
ma
e oti
m ret
o  
nt
n echnologique
7
4
0
11
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sdt
Ceo
T  lc
e '
n i
s n
hct n
nes  o
opltd v
oie a
g
o r ti
n i 
é o
ec n
s te  pe
dDt t
e éi ld'
voi u
n
el
n  fso
o ur
p p
p p
ma
e oti
m ret
o  
nt
n echnologique
2
2
0
4
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sdt
É e
v  lco'in
hu n
nti o
olo v
on a
g ti
e io
e  n

M  ae
di t
e n ltd'ieu
n  fso
a ur
n p
c p
ma
e otirt
o  t
n echnologique
3
2
0
5
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sdt
É e
vS  lco
e 'rin
huvin
ntico
oloe v
ons a
g ti
ep io
e ar n

Ml  a
e e
di t
e n
m  ltd'
eieu
n
nt  fso
ai ur
n p
ce p
ma
es otirt
o  t
n echnologique
2
6
0
8
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sdt
É e
vS  lco
e 'rin
huvin
ntico
oloe v
ons a
g lti
e i
é o
e gin

Ms ale
diat
e n ltid'iefu
n
s  fso
a ur
n p
c p
ma
e otirt
o  t
n echnologique
2
5
0
7
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sdt
É e
vS  lco
e 'rin
huvin
ntico
oloe v
ons a
g rti
e i
e o
e s n

Ms  ae
di
o t
e n
u  ltrd'ie
c u
ne  fso
as  ur
nh p
cu p
ma
e ot
m iarit
o  
nt
n e
e c
s hnologique
2
5
0
7
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sdt
É e
vS  lco
e 'rin
huvin
ntico
oloe v
ons a
g ti
ea io
e d n

M
m  aie
din t
e ni ltd'
sietu
nr  f
a so
atiur
nf p
cs p
ma
e otirt
o  t
n echnologique
3
6
0
9
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sdt
É e
vS  lco
e 'rin
huvin
ntico
oloe v
ons a
g ti
ewio
e  n

Mb  ae
di t
e n ltd'ieu
n  fso
a ur
n p
c p
ma
e otirt
o  t
n echnologique
1
3
0
4
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sdt
E e
q lcu'in
hp n
ne o
olmv
oea
gti
n ito
es n
s i  ne
d t

di ld'i
v u
nd fso
u ur
elpsp
ma
  ot
e itr lt
o  ot
n e
gicshtinqoulo
e gique
2
7
0
9
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sdt
E e
q
S  lcu'in
hp
p n
ne
p o
olmrv
oe
t  a
gàti
n  itl'o
es én
s iv ne
dolt

di lud'i
vt u
ndo fso
un ur
e lp
s
dep
ma
 sot
e  itr l
é t
oq ot
nue
gics
p hti
e nq
mouelo
entgsi qu
n e
dividuels
2
10
0
12
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sdt
E e
q
G lcue'in
hp
stin
neoo
olmnv
oe a
g
d ti
neit o
esl 'n
s i  ne
df t

dir lad'i
vsu
ndt frso
u ur
elcp
st p
ma
 urot
e it
e r lit
o  ont
n e
gi
d csvhtiinq
d ou
u leo
el g
e ique
2
7
0
9
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sdt
Oe 
p lc'
é irn
ha n
nti o
ol v
ona
gsti io
et n
s   
He
dét
e  lbd'ieu
nr  fgsoeurp
m p
ma
e ot
nitr t
o  
d t
n e
e c
s  h
T n
I o
C logique
1
4
0
5
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sdt
Oe
S  
p lc
u'
é irn
ha
pen
ntir o
olviv
onsa
gsiti oio
et
n n
s e 
Hte
dét
e  lb
O d'ie
p u
nré  fgrsoeaur
tip
mo p
ma
en ot
nit
s r t
o  
d t
n e
e c
s  h
T n
I o
C logique
3
11
0
14
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sdt
Oe

p lca'
é irn
ha
p n
ntico
olitv
onéa
gs ti 
e ito
et  n

C  
Hoe
dét

n  lbtd'
iieu
nr
n  fg
u soe
it ur
é p
m p
ma
e ot
nitr t
o  
d t
n e
e c
s  h
T n
I o
C logique
3
4
0
7
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sdt
Oe

p lce'
é irn
ha
stin
ntioo
olnv
on a
gs
d ti eio
et
s n
s d 
He

e t
e  lb
md'ieau
nr  fgsoe
d ur
e p
ms  p
ma
ed ot
n'itr 
H t
oé 
d t
nbe
e c
s r h
Tg n
Ie o
C l
m o
e g
n itq
 eut ede service
2
2
0
4
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
Mr
n ad
ét le
eh  sodte lcs'i,n
h sn
nt o
ola v
o
n a
g
d tiaio
er n

ds e
d t
e  ld'isu
né  fso
c ur
u pitp
maéot
  ir
d t
oe t
nse c
TIhn
C ologique
1
2
0
3
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
Mr
n ad
ét le
eh  sodte
S  lcsé'i,cn
h sun
ntrio
olat v
o
né a
g
d tiaieo
ers n

ds 
T e
dI t

C ld'isu
né  fso
c ur
u pitp
maéot
  ir
d t
oe t
nse c
TIhn
C ologique
6
3
0
9
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
Mr
n ad
ét le
eh  sodtIe 
n lcs'
gi,n
h s
é n
nt
ni o
olae v
o
nria
g
detia,i o
er n

ds
m  
é e
dt t

h  ld'
oisu

d  f
e so
c ur
u  pi
e tp
m aésot
  ior
dl t
oe 
u t
nse 
i c
ToIh
n n
Cs ologique
3
1
0
4
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
Mr
n ad
ét le
eh  sodte
C lcso'i,n
h s
nf n
nti o
ogla v
o
n
ura
g
d tiaio
er n

ds e
ds t
e  l
s d'is
t u

a  f
n so
cdur
ua pit
r p
maé
d ot
 sir
d t
oe t
nse c
TIhn
C ologique
1
6
0
7
Total Direction des technologies de l'information
94
165
0
259
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n adle
e  ld'e
é  dli'itnn
o o
n  v
e a
t  ti
d o
e nl aetd idsu
tr isu
b p
ut p
i o
o r
n t technologique
1
2
0
3
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ld'e
é  dli
s ' itn
s n
oer o
n v v
ei a
tc  t
e i
dso
e  inl atert
d i
a ds
n u
tr
et isu
b p
ut p
i o
o r
n t technologique
1
5
0
6
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ld'e
éS  dli
se ' ritn
svin
oerco
n ve v
ei  a
tc 
R t
e i
dslo
e  ianl
ti  ater
o tdn i
a d
s
n  u
tr
et
c  ils
i u
be p
ut
n p
is o
oer
nt t  t
b e
u crh
e n
a o
u  lo
prgoijqeu
t e
s
2
15
0
17
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ld'e
éS  dli
se ' ritn
svin
oerco
n ve v
ei I a
tc n t
e i
dsro
e  ianl ater
ettd i
a d
s
n u
tr
et isu
b p
ut p
i o
o r
n t technologique
3
7
0
10
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ld'
P e
ér  dli
o 'it
d n
u n
oc o
n ti v
eo a
t nt i
d o
e
d nl
o  a
c e
utd ids
m u
ter i
n stu
bai p
utr p
ie o
o r
n t technologique
2
8
0
10
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ld'
P e
érS  dli
oe 'rit
d n
u
vin
oc o
n tie v
eo  a
t n
C t hi
d o
e
da înl
o  a
c e
u
e tds ids
m u
ter
e  i
n st
p u
bair p
utr
o p
ied o
ou r
nc t ite
o c
n  h
d n
o o
c lo
u g
m iq
e u
nt e
aire
0
6
0
6
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ld'
P e
érS  dli
oe 'rit
d n
u
vin
oc o
n tie v
eo  a
t n
C t oi
d o
e
dr rnl
oe  a
c e
u
ct tdi ids
mo u
tenr  i
n st
e u
ba i p
utr
p p
ieé o
op r
n t
a  rtaetc
i h
o n
n  o
d lo
o g
c i
u qu
m e
entaire
0
27
0
27
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ld'
I e
ém  dli
p'itrn
e n
os o
n si v
eoa
t nt i
d o

mnlu aletitd- idsu
tr
u  ipsu
bp p
ut
or p
it o
o r
n t technologique
1
2
0
3
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ld'
I e
émS  dli
pe'ritrn
evin
osco
n sie v
eo a
t n
C t oi
d o

m
ulnlue aleti
u td-r ids
e u
tr
u   ips
pru
bpo p
ut
ord p
itu o
oit r
n t
s  te
m c
u h
lt n
i- o
s lo
u g
p i
p q
o u
rte
0
34
0
34
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ld'
I e
émS  dli
pe'ritrn
evin
osco
n sie v
eo Ia
t nt 
m i
d o
e
p  
mrnl
ue alet
sitd-
s  ids
o u
tr
un  ips
l u
bpé p
ut
or
gi p
itslo
oar
nt ti t
v e
e chnologique
0
13
0
13
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ld'
I e
émS  dli
pe'ritrn
evin
osco
n sie v
eo a
t n
A t di
d o

mnl
ui alnetit
d-s itd
sr u
tr
ua  ipts
i u
bpo p
ut
or
n, p
it l o
oo r
ngti t
s e
ti cqhuneo
  l
e o
t  g
i i
n q
n u
o e
vation
0
8
0
8
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ld'
De
éif dlif'it
un
s n
oi o

o v
e
n a
t  ti
d o
e nl aet
d id
s u
tr isu
b p
ut p
i o
o r
n t technologique
1
2
0
3
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ld'
De
éif
S  dlife'rit
un
svin
oico

oe v
e
n  a

G ti
du o
e cnlh ae
e tdt isdsu
tr isu
b p
ut p
i o
o r
n t technologique
0
17
0
17
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ld'
De
éif
S  dlife'rit
un
svin
oico

oe v
e
n  a

Ditfi
d o
ef nl
us aietd
o  ids
n  u
tr
m is
u u
blt p
uti- p
is o
ou r
npt pte
o c
rt hnologique
0
14
0
14
Total Direction de l'édition et de la distribution
11
160
0
171
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n adle
e  sde
r  
e l'
s in
s n
o o
ur vca
e ti
s on et du support technologique
2
2
0
4
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n adle
e  sde
rS  
e l
e '
srin
svin
oco
ure vc
  a
e
V téi
srofni ceat id
ou
n su
Exp-p
a o
ntrt
e  technologique
1
4
0
5
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
Re
r  
e ls'
s isn
son
ouo
ur vca
e tsi
s o
hnu e
mt adiu
n  esupport technologique
2
6
0
8
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
Ge
r  
e ls'
s itn
s n
o o
unr  vc
d a
e tsi
s orn
e  sest oduur s
c u
esp fpio
n r
a t 
n tceic
è h
r n
esologique
2
11
0
13
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
Ge
r  
e ls'
s itn
s n
o o
unr  vc
d a
e tsi
s on
m  aertc d
h u
é  ssu
etp p
c o
o r
n t rte
at cshnologique
2
1
0
3
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n adle
e  sde
rS  
e l
e '
srin
svin
oco
ure vc
  a
e
A tdi
s o
mni neits tdru
a  ts
i u
o p
n  p
d o
e rst  te
m c
arhcn
h o
é lo
s  g
p iq
u u
bliecs
1
5
0
6
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n adle
e  sde
rS  
e l
e '
srin
svin
oco
ure vc
  a
e
A tdi
s o
mni neits tdru
a  ts
i u
o p
n  p
d o
e rst  t
c e
o c
n h
trnao
t lsogique
1
5
0
6
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
Re
r  
ell'
sain
st n
o o
ur
n vc
s a
ectli
s o
e n test  d
et u
 c s
o up
m p
m o
u rnti tceactihonologique
2
1
0
3
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
Re
rS  
ell
e '
sarin
stvin
oco
ur
ne vc
s  a
ec
G tlei
s o
e
stni toest 
n  d
et
d u
 c
e  ss
oruep
ml p
m
at o
ui rn
o ti 
n tcsea cti
clhoin
e o
ntlo
s gique
5
8
0
13
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte
eé  sd
Re
rS  
ell
e '
sarin
stvin
oco
ur
ne vc
s  a
ec
C tloi
s o
emn t
mest 
u  d
et
ni u
 c
c  as
ot u
i p
mo p
m
n o
u rnti tceactihonologique
2
2
0
4
Total Direction des ressources
20
45
0
65
Total Direction générale de l'innovation et du support technologique
127
373
0
500

Annex Q48 - Overview of posts 2014-2018
2014

Direction générale / Direction / Unité / Service
AD
AST
AST/SC
Total
Direction générale de la sécurité
0
0
0
0
Direction géné
U rnailte
é  de la
'  
é s
v é
a c
l u
u r
atité
on des risques
4
14
0
18
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n aple
o  d
ure l laa  psré
ocxu
i ri
m té
t  et l'assistance, la sécurité et la sûreté
0
0
0
0
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n napilte
oé  d
ur
Ae lc laca r pésré
o
di cx
t u
iat rii
m t
o é
tn  et l'assistance, la sécurité et la sûreté
2
32
0
34
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n napilte
oé  d
ur
S e l
é  laca 
u psr
ri é
otcx
é  u
ie rt i
m tsé
tû e
r t
e  tl'
é a
  s
B s
r i
usxta
el n
l c
e e
s , la sécurité et la sûreté
4
36
0
40
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n napilte
oé  d
ur
S e l
é  laca 
u psr
ri é
otcx
é  u
ie rt i
m tsé
tû e
r t
e  tl'
é a
  s
Stsris
a t
s a
b n
o c
uer, 
g la sécurité et la sûreté
1
1
0
2
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n napilte
oé  d
ur
S e l
é  laca 
u psr
ri é
otcx
é  u
ie rt i
m tsé
tû e
r t
e  tl'
é a
  s
L s
u ixseta
mnbce
o ,
u  rla
g  sécurité et la sûreté
0
0
0
0
Total Direction pour la proximité et l'assistance, la sécurité et la sûreté
7
69
0
76
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n adle
e  ldae  pla
r  
é s
v éecnutiri
oté
n, des premiers secours et de la sécurité incendie
1
1
0
2
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  lda
P e 
r  péla
rv  
ées
v é
e
nt cn
i ut
oir
n i
o té
nd, edse isn p
c r
e e
n m
di ie
e r
s s 
B sre
u c
x o
elulr
e s et de la sécurité incendie
0
2
0
2
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  lda
P e 
r  péla
rv  
ées
v é
e
nt cn
i ut
oir
n i
o té
nd, edse isn p
c r
e e
n m
di ie
e r
s s 
S s
treacsobuors
u  re
g t de la sécurité incendie
0
3
0
3
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  lda
P e 
r  péla
rv  
ées
v é
e
nt cn
i ut
oir
n i
o té
nd, edse isn p
c r
e e
n m
di ie
e r
s s 
L s
u e
x c
e ou
m r
b s
o  e
urt gde la sécurité incendie
0
3
0
3
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  lda
F e 
o  prla
r  
é
m s
va é
eti c
noutinr i
ot
e é
nt,  d
s e
é s
c  uprirteém
 i inecrs
e  
nsdeic
e ours et de la sécurité incendie
1
0
0
1
Total Direction de la prévention, des premiers secours et de la sécurité incendie
2
9
0
11
Directio
Dinr egcétinoér
n adle
e  ldae  sltar s
atécguir
e i teét des ressources
1
1
0
2
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ldae 
u  sltar
D  is
até
p cg
a ui
t r
ec i te
hiét ndges ressources
2
3
0
5
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ldae 
u  sltar
p  es
atré
s cg
o ui
n r
e i 
n teétl deet sd ree s
plsaonuifriceastion
3
8
0
11
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ldae 
u  sltar
b  us
até
d cg
g ui
et r
e i teét des ressources
1
12
0
13
Directio
Dinr egcétinoé
U r
n nadilte

é  ldae  slt
s ar
 t  s
at
e é
c cg
h ui
n r
eoi lteét
o  d
gi es reets
  s
d o
e  u
lar cseéscurité des informations
5
19
0
24
Total Direction de la stratégie et des ressources
12
43
0
55
Total Direction générale de la sécurité
25
135
0
160
Service juridique
4
8
0
12
Service
D  ijrueri
c d
ti iq
o u
n  e
des Affaires institutionnel es et parlementaires
1
2
0
3
Service
S  j
e u
r r
viid
c ieq j
U u
n er
iitdéi q
Dure
o  i-t D
inirseticttuio
ti n
o  d
n e
n s
el  A
etf fa
b iure
d s
g  i
é n
t s
ai trit
e utionnel es et parlementaires
4
2
0
6
Service
S  j
e u
r r
viid
c ieq j
U u
n er
iitdéi q
Rueel a-t iD
o ir
n e
s c
  t
e ixotn
é  rd
iees
ur  A
esffaires institutionnel es et parlementaires
4
2
0
6
Service
S  j
e u
r r
viid
c ieq j
U u
n er
iitdéi q
Dure
o  i-t D
s  ipre
arclteio
mne d
nteasi rA
e ff
e a
t  irre
é s
gl iens
m teit
n u
t t
a io
r n
e nel es et parlementaires
8
6
0
14
Total Direction des Affaires institutionnel es et parlementaires
17
12
0
29
Service
D  ijrueri
c d
ti iq
o u
n  e
des Affaires législatives
4
1
0
5
Service
D  ijrueri
c d
ti iq
oU u
n n e
die
t s
é   A
P f
o fliatirqes
u  
e lé
s  g
é icsl
o a
n ti
o ve
misques et scientifiques
8
2
0
10
Service
D  ijrueri
c d
ti iq
oU u
n n e
die
t s
é   A
P f
o fliatirqes
u  
e lé
s  g
s its
r luactiv
u e
r s
el es et de cohésion
5
2
0
7
Service
D  ijrueri
c d
ti iq
oU u
n n e
die
t s
é   A
Juffsatiir
c es
   
e lté g
Liis
b leartiv
é e
s  s
Publiques
8
3
0
11
Total Direction des Affaires législatives
25
8
0
33
Service
D  ijrueri
c d
ti iq
o u
n  e
des Affaires administratives et financières
1
1
0
2
Service
D  ijrueri
c d
ti iq
oU u
n n e
die
t s
é   A
Drff
oaitir
s e
  s
et aodbm
li ignaitstora
n tsi v
s e
t s
at e
u t f
aiin
reasncières
4
2
0
6
Service
D  ijrueri
c d
ti iq
oU u
n n e
die
t s
é   A
C f
a fra
riir
è e
r s
e  sad
stm
atin
utis
aitr
r a
e tsives et financières
4
2
0
6
Service
D  ijrueri
c d
ti iq
oU u
n n e
die
t s
é   A
Drff
oaiti re
c s
o  natd
r m
ac itn
u is
el t reat tfivneas 
n e
c ti efirnancières
7
3
0
10
Service
D  ijrueri
c d
ti iq
oU u
n n e
die
t s
é   A
Drff
oaiti re
d s
e  sad
p m
rojin
etis
s tira
mtiv
m e
o s
b  ie
li te frin
s ancières
8
5
0
13
Total Direction des Affaires administratives et financières
24
13
0
37
Total Service juridique
70
41
0
111
Secrétariat général du Parlement européen
1
0
0
1
Secrétariat gén
C é
a r
b a
i l
n  d
et u
   
d P
u a
  r
S le
e m
cr e
ét n
a ti reu
  r
g o
é p
n é
é e
r n
al
14
15
0
29
Secrétariat gén
Seécraél td
a u
ri  P
at ar
d le
u  m
B e
u n
ret aeuu r
e o
t  p
d é
e e
s n
 questeurs
7
11
0
18
Secrétariat gén
U é
ni rta
é l  d
d' u
a  P
udairt lienm
teernt 
e européen
10
1
0
11
Secrétariat gén
U é
ni rta
é l  d
G u
e  sP
ti aorl
ne m
due n
ri ts e
q u
u reopéen
4
4
0
8
Secrétariat gén
Seécraél td
a u
ri  P
at ar
d lee lm
a  en
C t
o  e
nf u
é ro
e p
n é
c e
e ndes présidents
5
5
0
10
Secrétariat général du
Pr P
otaerl
c e
tim
o e
n ndt eesu
  r
d op
n é
n e
é n
es
1
1
0
2
Secrétariat gén
U é
ni rta
é l  d
c u
o  
n P
traôrlle
e  m
d e
e n
s  tc e
o u
û rto
s peé
t edne la qualité
3
1
0
4
Secrétariat gén
U é
ni rta
é l  d
S u
y  
s P
t a
è r
mle
e m
d e
e nt
m e
a u
n r
a o
g p
e ée
m n
e t environnemental et d'audit (EMAS)
4
4
0
8
Total Secrétariat général du Parlement européen
49
42
0
91
Cabinet du Président
19
23
0
42
Secrétariat des Vice-Présidents
1
17
0
18
Secrétariat des Questeurs
0
7
0
7
Direction pour les relations avec les groupes politiques
14
11
0
25
Groupe du Parti Populaire Européen (Démocrates-Chrétiens)
143
202
0
345
Groupe de l'Al iance Progressiste des Socialistes et Démocrates au Parlement européen
103
145
0
248
Groupe Al iance des démocrates et des libéraux pour l'Europe
49
70
0
119
Groupe des Verts/Al iance libre européenne
35
50
0
85
Groupe des Conservateurs et Réformistes européens
33
46
0
79
Groupe confédéral de la Gauche unitaire européenne/Gauche verte nordique
25
34
0
59
Groupe Europe Liberté et Démocratie
24
33
0
57
Non Inscrits
3
21
0
24
Comité du personnel
5
9
0
14
Total général
3120
3664
2
6786

Annex Q48 - Overview of posts 2014-2018
2014

Direction générale / Direction / Unité / Service
AD
AST
AST/SC
Total

Annex Q48 - Overview of posts 2014-2018
2015

Postes organigramme par entités organisationnel es au 01/01/2015 (Sous réserve des modifications en cours)
Direction générale / Direction / Unité / Service
AD
AST
SC
Total
Direction générale de la Présidence
4
3
7
Unité Ressources
3
12
15
Unité Protocole
5
11
16
Direction de la séance plénière
2
1
3
Direction de
U l
na
it s
é éa
d n
esce
 p  p
ro lén
cèsière
-verbaux et des comptes rendus de la séance plénière
6
6
12
Direction de
U l
na
it s
é éan
Act ce
ivi  
t p
é lé
s  n
d iè
e re
s députés
2
14
16
Direction de
U l
na
it s
é éa
d n
u  ce
dé  p
ro lé
ul n
e iè
m re
ent et du suivi de la séance plénière
6
7
13
Direction de
U l
na
it s
é éa
d n
u  ce
dé  p
p l
ô é
t  n
d iè
e re
s documents
3
6
9
Direction de
U l
na
it s
é éa
d n
u  ce
co  p
u lé
rri n
e i
r è
ore
fficiel
2
26
1
29
Direction de
U l
na
it s
é éa
d n
e lce
a   p
ré lén
ce i
p è
ti re
on et du renvoi des documents officiels
4
12
16
Direction de
U l
na
it s
é éan
Ad ce
mi  
n p
i l
s é
t n
ra itè
i re
on des députés
4
5
9
Total
29
77
1
107
Direction des Actes Législatifs
2
1
3
Direction de
Us 
niAct
té  e
d s
e  lL

  gi
cosl
o at
rd iifs
nation et du planning législatif
4
11
15
Direction de
Us 
niAct
té  e
Q s
u L
al é
it g
é i s
l l
éa
gtiif
s s
lative A - Politique économique et scientifique
1
1
2
Direction des Actes Législ
Poa
li tifs
que économique et scientifique - Section grecque
3
2
5
Direction des Actes Législ
Poa
li tifs
que économique et scientifique - Section anglaise
8
4
12
Direction des Actes Législ
Poa
li tifs
que économique et scientifique - Section irlandaise
2
2
4
Direction des Actes Législ
Poa
li tifs
que économique et scientifique - Section italienne
3
1
4
Direction de
Us 
niAct
té  e
Q s
u L
al é
it g
é i s
l l
éa
gtiif
s s
lative B - Politique structurelle et de cohésion
1
1
2
Direction des Actes Législ
Poa
li tifs
que structurelle et de cohésion - Section bulgare
3
2
5
Direction des Actes Législ
Poa
li tifs
que structurelle et de cohésion - Section maltaise
3
2
5
Direction des Actes Législ
Poa
li tifs
que structurelle et de cohésion - Section slovène
3
2
5
Direction des Actes Législ
Poa
li tifs
que structurelle et de cohésion - Section slovaque
3
2
5
Direction des Actes Législ
Poa
li tifs
que structurelle et de cohésion - Section croate
3
3
6
Direction de
Us 
niAct
té  e
Q s
u L
al é
it g
é i s
l l
éa
gtiif
s s
lative C - Droits des citoyens
1
1
2
Direction des Actes Légis
D la
roitifss
 des citoyens - Section allemande
4
3
7
Direction des Actes Légis
D la
roitifss
 des citoyens - Section lituanienne
3
2
5
Direction des Actes Légis
D la
roitifss
 des citoyens - Section néerlandaise
4
2
6
Direction des Actes Légis
D la
roitifss
 des citoyens - Section polonaise
3
2
5
Direction des Actes Légis
D la
roitifss
 des citoyens - Section roumaine
3
2
5
Direction de
Us 
niAct
té  e
Q s
u L
al é
it g
é i s
l l
éa
gtiif
s s
lative D - Affaires budgétaires
1
1
2
Direction des Actes Légis
Af lfat
aiifs
res budgétaires - Section danoise
3
2
5
Direction des Actes Légis
Af lfat
aiifs
res budgétaires - Section espagnole
3
2
5
Direction des Actes Légis
Af lfat
aiifs
res budgétaires - Section finnoise
3
2
5
Direction des Actes Légis
Af lfat
aiifs
res budgétaires - Section française
4
2
6
Direction des Actes Légis
Af lfat
aiifs
res budgétaires - Section portugaise
3
2
5
Direction de
Us 
niAct
té  e
Q s
u L
al é
it g
é i s
l l
éa
gtiif
s s
lative E - Politiques externes
1
1
Direction des Actes Législ
Poa
li tifs
ques externes - Section tchèque
3
2
5
Direction des Actes Législ
Poa
li tifs
ques externes - Section estonienne
3
2
5
Direction des Actes Législ
Poa
li tifs
ques externes - Section hongroise
3
2
5
Direction des Actes Législ
Poa
li tifs
ques externes - Section lettone
3
2
5
Direction des Actes Législ
Poa
li tifs
ques externes - Section suédoise
3
2
5
Total
90
67
0
157
Direction des relations avec les parlements nationaux
1
2
3
Direction de
Us 
nire
tél a
dti
eo
 ln
as
   a
cov
oe
pc 
é le
ra s
ti  p
o a
n  rl
i e
n m
stite
un
tits
o  n
n a
n t
elilo
enaux
5
4
9
Direction de
Us 
nire
tél a
dti
uo
  n
dis 
ala
ov
ge
uc 
e l
  e
l s
é  
g p
i a
sl rl
ate
if ments nationaux
5
4
1
10
Total
11
10
1
22
Total
142
180
2
324

Annex Q48 - Overview of posts 2014-2018
2015

Direction générale / Direction / Unité / Service
AD
AST
SC
Total
Direction générale des Politiques internes de l'Union
5
4
9
Unité de programmation stratégique
4
1
5
Direction des politiques économiques et scientifiques
1
2
3
Direction des
Se po
créltiti
a q
ri u
a e
t  s
d é
e  co
la no
co miq
mu
i e
s s
si  e
o t
n  
  s
d ci
e e
l n
'e tif
m iq
pl u
o e
i  s
et des affaires sociales
10
8
18
Direction des
Se po
créltiti
a q
ri u
a e
t  s
d é
e  co
la no
co miq
mu
i e
s s
si  e
o t
n  
  s
d ci
e e
s  n
a tfiffi
aq
i ue
ress
 économiques et monétaires
14
11
25
Direction des
Se po
créltiti
a q
ri u
a e
t  s
d é
e  co
la no
co miq
mu
i e
s s
si  e
o t
n  
  s
d ci
u en
m t
aifiqu
rch e
é is
ntérieur et de la protection des consommateurs
12
9
21
Direction des
Se po
créltiti
a q
ri u
a e
t  s
d é
e  co
la no
co miq
mu
i e
s s
si  e
o t
n  
  s
d ci
e e
l n
'i t
n if
d iq
u u
st e
ri s
e, de la recherche et de l'énergie
13
12
25
Direction des
Se po
créltiti
a q
ri u
a e
t  s
d é
e  co
la no
co miq
mu
i e
s s
si  e
o t
n  
  s
d ci
e e
l n
'e ti
n fi
v q
i u
ro e
n s
nement, de la santé publique et de la sécurité alimentaire
13
10
23
Direction de
Ds 
é p
p o
a li
rt ti
e qu
m e
e s
nt é
t co
hé no
m m
ati iq
q u
u e
e  s
d  e
e t
s  
  s
p ci
ol e
it n
i t
q if
u iq
e u
s  e
é s
conomiques, scientifiques et de la qualité de la vie
16
10
26
Direction de
Us 
nip
t o
é lit
d iq
'a u
s e
si s
s  
t é
a co
n n
ce o
  m
à l iq
a  u
g e
o s
u  e
v t
e  s
rnci
a e
n nti
ce f
  iq
é ue
co s
nomique
7
5
12
Total
86
67
0
153
Direction des politiques structurelles et de cohésion
1
1
2
Direction des
Se po
créltiti
a q
ri u
a e
t  s
d s
e tlru
a  ctu
co re
m ll
me
i s
s  
s e
i t
o  d
n  e
d  co
e l h
'a é
g s
ri ion
culture et du développement rural
11
8
19
Direction des
Se po
créltiti
a q
ri u
a e
t  s
d s
e tlru
a  ctu
co re
m ll
me
i s
s  
s e
i t
o  d
n  e
d  co
e l h
a  é
p s
ê ion
che
10
9
19
Direction des
Se po
créltiti
a q
ri u
a e
t  s
d s
e tlru
a  ctu
co re
m ll
me
i s
s  
s e
i t
o  d
n  e
d  co
u d h
é é
v s
eilon
ppement régional
11
9
20
Direction des
Se po
créltiti
a q
ri u
a e
t  s
d s
e tlru
a  ctu
co re
m ll
me
i s
s  
s e
i t
o  d
n  e
d  co
es  h
t é
ra s
nio
s n
ports et du tourisme
13
9
22
Direction des
Se po
créltiti
a q
ri u
a e
t  s
d s
e tlru
a  ctu
co re
m ll
me
i s
s  
s e
i t
o  d
n  e
d  co
e l h
a  és
cu ilo
t n
ure et de l'éducation
8
7
15
Direction de
Ds 
é p
p o
a li
rt ti
e qu
m e
e s
nt s
t tru
hé ct
m u
a re
ti l
q le
u s
e   e
d t
e  d
s  e
p  co
olitihé
q s
u i
e o
s n
 structurelles et de cohésion
12
8
20
Total
66
51
0
117
Direction des droits des citoyens et des affaires constitutionnelles
1
2
3
Direction des
Se dro
crét it
as 
ri d
a e
t  s
d  ci
e l to
a  ye
co ns
m  e
mit 
s d
s e
i s
o  
n a
  f
d fa
e i
s re
 li s
b  
eco
rt n
é s
s  tit
ci u
vitlio
e n
s, n
  e
d l
el e
l s
a justice et des affaires intérieures
16
12
28
Direction des
Se dro
crét it
as 
ri d
a e
t  s
d  ci
e l to
a  ye
co ns
m  e
mit 
s d
s e
i s
o  
n a
  f
d fa
e i
s re
 afs
f  co
ai n
re s
s  tjit
u u
ri ti
do
i n
q n
u e
e l
s les
13
6
1
20
Direction des
Se dro
crét it
as 
ri d
a e
t  s
d  ci
e l to
a  ye
co ns
m  e
mit 
s d
s e
i s
o  
n a
  f
d fa
e i
s re
 afs
f  co
ai n
re s
s  titu
co t
n io
st n
it n
u e
ti ll
o e
n s
nelles
7
6
13
Direction des
Se dro
crét it
as 
ri d
a e
t  s
d  ci
e l to
a  ye
co ns
m  e
mit 
s d
s e
i s
o  
n a
  f
d fa
e i
s re
 d s 
ro co
its n
  s
d t
e i tlu
a t ifo
enn
m e
mlle
e  s
et de l'égalité des genres
7
7
14
Direction des
Se dro
crét it
as 
ri d
a e
t  s
d  ci
e l to
a  ye
co ns
m  e
mit 
s d
s e
i s
o  
n a
  f
d fa
e i
s re
 p s
é  
tico
ti n
o s
n t
s itutionnelles
9
9
18
Direction de
Ds 
é d
p ro
artits
e  d
m e
e s
nt ci
t t
h o
é ye
m n
at s
i  
q e
u t 
e d
  e
d s
e  
s a
  f
d fa
ro ire
ts s 
d co
es n
  s
ci t
t it
o uti
ye o
n n
s n
ee
t lle
d s
e  affaires constitutionnelles
11
8
19
Total
64
50
1
115
Direction des affaires budgétaires
1
2
3
Direction des
Se aff
cré a
t i
are
ri s
at b
du
ed
 lg

  ta
coire
m s
mission des budgets
12
11
23
Direction des
Se aff
cré a
t i
are
ri s
at b
du
ed
 lg

  ta
coire
m s
mission du contrôle budgétaire
8
7
15
Direction de
Ds 
é a
p f
afa
rt ire
ems 
e b
n u
t  d
t g
h é
é ta
m i
a re
ti s
que des Affaires budgétaires
8
5
13
Total
29
25
0
54
Direction de la coordination législative et des conciliations
1
1
2
Direction de
U l
na
it co
é do
erd
s  ina
co t
n io
ci n
li  
alé
ti g
o is
n l
s a
  t
e itv
  e
d  
e e
 l t 
a d
  es
co  
d co
é n
ci ci
si l
o ia
n tions
9
6
15
Direction de
U l
na
it co
é do
erd
 l i
an
  at
co io
o n
rd ilé
n g
atisl
o a
n t
  ilv
é e
g  
i e
slt 
ad
ti e
v s
e co
et n
  ci
de l ilat io
p n
ros
grammation
9
7
16
Direction de la coordinatio
Se n 
rv liég
ce i sl
C atliv
e e
n  
d e
ri t 
e d
r e
ds
e co
s  n
ré ci
u l
n ia
o ti
n o
s ns
1
6
7
Direction de
U l
na
it co
é pord
u in
r l a
a tio
con
o lé
rd g
i i
n s
a lta
i t
o iv
n  e
d e
e t
s  d
a es
cti  co
vit n
é ci
s  l
é ia
di tio
o n
ri s
ales et de communication
4
5
9
Total
24
25
0
49
Direction des ressources
1
2
3
Direction de
Us 
nire
tés
  so
Peurce
rson s
nel
4
14
18
Direction de
Us 
nire
tés
 Iso
nf u
o rce
rm s
atique
2
13
15
Direction de
Us 
nire
tés
  s
F o
i u
n rce
an s
ces
2
7
9
Total
9
36
0
45
Total
287
259
1
547
Direction générale des Politiques externes de l'Union
3
3
6
Direction des commissions
1
1
2
Direction des
Se com
crétam
ri is
at s
  i
do
en
 l s
a commission des affaires étrangères
12
8
20
Direction des commissions
Secrétariat de la sous-commission de la sécurité et de la défense
7
5
12
Direction des commissions
Secrétariat de la sous-commission des droits de l'homme / Unité des droits de l'homme
7
6
13
Direction des
Se com
crétam
ri is
at s
  i
do
en
 l s
a commission du développement
8
7
15
Direction des
Se com
crétam
ri is
at s
  i
do
en
 l s
a commission du commerce international
15
10
25
Total
50
37
0
87
Direction des régions
1
1
2
Direction de
Us 
niré
tég
  ion
Eu s
rope : Elargissement et Espace économique européen
4
4
8
Direction de
Us 
niré
tég
  ion
Asi s
e, Australie et Nouvelle-Zélande
6
7
13
Direction de
Ds 
é ré
pag
rtio
e ns
ment thématique des relations extérieures
15
9
24
Direction de
Us 
niré
tég
  ion
Eu s
romed et Moyen-Orient
6
6
12
Direction de
Us 
niré
tég
  ion
Am s
érique latine
4
5
9
Direction de
Us 
niré
tég
  ion
Eu s
rope : Partenariat oriental et Russie
4
5
9
Direction de
Us 
niré
tég
  io
Af n
ri s
que, Caraïbes et Pacifique
4
4
8
Direction de
Us 
niré
tég
  io
R n
el s
ations transatlantiques et G8
4
3
7
Total
48
44
0
92
Direction des ressources
1
2
3
Direction de
Us 
nire
tés
  so
Peurce
rson s
nel
1
5
1
7
Direction de
Us 
nire
tés
  s
F o
i u
n rce
an s
ces
2
8
10
Direction de
Us 
nire
tés
 Iso
nf u
o rce
rm s
atique
1
4
5
Total
5
19
1
25
Direction du Soutien à la démocratie
1
1
2
Direction du Soutien à la d
Se é
rvm
i o
ce cra
 de t ie
soutien à la médiation du Parlement européen
1
1
2
Direction du
U So
nit u
é  tien
Acti  à
o  
n la
s   d
d é
é m
m o
o cra
crat t
i ie
e et élections
5
4
9
Direction du
U So
nit u
é  tien
Acti  à
o  
n la
s   d
p é
ré m
a o
d cra
hésitie
on
3
1
4
Direction du
U So
nit u
é  tien
Acti  à
o  
n la
s   d
d é
ro m
it o
s  cra
de ltie
'homme
3
2
5
Total
13
9
0
22
Total
119
112
1
232

Annex Q48 - Overview of posts 2014-2018
2015

Direction générale / Direction / Unité / Service
AD
AST
SC
Total
Direction générale des services de recherche parlementaire
2
2
4
BUDGET RESERVE COMITES
25
12
37
Unité Ressources
4
13
17
Unité de la Stratégie et coordination
10
1
1
12
Direction Service de recherche pour les députés
1
1
2
Direction Service de reche
Se rch
rvi e
ce  p
é o
d u
it r 
o le
ri s
al  d
e é
t  p
d u
e t é
g s
estion des publications
4
5
9
Direction Se
U rv
nitice
é   
d d
e e
s  
  re
poch
liti e
qrch
ue e
s   p
é ou
co r 
noles
mi  d
q é
u p
e u
s tés
20
4
24
Direction Se
U rv
nitice
é   
d d
e e
s  
  re
poch
liti e
qrch
ue e
s   p
st ou
ru r 
ct le
u s
re  ld
l é
e p
s utés
19
3
22
Direction Se
U rv
nitice
é   
d d
e e
s  
  re
poch
liti e
qrch
ue e
s   p
d o
e u
s  r 
ci lte
os d
ye é
n p
s utés
10
6
16
Direction Se
U rv
nitice
é   
d d
e e
s  
  re
poch
liti e
qrch
ue e
s   p
e o
xt u
e r l
rn es députés
17
6
23
Direction Se
U rv
nitice
é   
d d
e e
s  
  re
poch
liti e
qrch
ue e
s   p
b o
u u
d r 
g l
é e
t s
ai  d
re é
s putés
3
1
4
Total
74
26
0
100
Direction de la bibliothèque
3
4
7
Direction de
U l
na
it b
é ib
d li
e o
 l th
a  èq
Bi u
bl e
iothèque sur site et en ligne
14
30
44
Direction de
U l
na
it b
é ibliot
Arch h
i è
v q
e u
s  e
historiques
2
19
21
Direction de
U l
na
it b
é ib
D li
eot
mh

nq
du
ee
s d'informations des citoyens
9
11
20
Direction de
U l
na
it b
é ib
T lio
ra t
n h
s è
p q
a ue
rence
4
4
8
Total
32
68
0
100
Direction de l'Evaluation de l'impact et de la Valeur ajoutée européenne
1
2
3
Direction de l
Ex 'Eva
-Ant lu
e  a
Utio
nitn
é de 
Ev l'i
alm
u p
at a
i ct
on e
dt 
e d
 l e
'i  la
m  
p Va
act leur ajoutée européenne
5
1
6
Direction de
U l
n'Ev
ité  alu
Va a
l t
e io
u n
r   
a d
j e
o  
u lt'i
ém
e p
ea
uct 
ro e
p t 
é d
e e
n  l
n a
e  Valeur ajoutée européenne
4
4
Direction de
U l
n'Ev
ité  a
dlu
e a
l t
ai o
pn d
rose
p l
e'im
cti p
v a
e ct
s  e
ci t
e  d
nt e
if  ila
q  
u Va
e leur ajoutée européenne
3
3
6
Direction de l'Evaluation d
Se e 
rv li'im
ce  p
d a
e ct
 l  
a e
  t
p  d
roe
s  l
p a
e  Va
ctivle
e u
 sr a
ci j
e o
n u
ti tfé
i e
q  
u e
e uropéenne
1
1
Direction de l'Evaluation d
Se e l'i
crétm
a p
ri a
atct
   
d e
e t
 l d
a e la
ST  Va
OA leur ajoutée européenne
1
1
Direction de l
Ex 'Eva
-Posltu
  a
Uti
no
it n
é de
Ev l'i
al m
u p
at a
i ct
on  e
d t 
e d
 l e
'i  l
ma 
p Va
act leur ajoutée européenne
6
6
Direction de
U l
n'Ev
ité  a
dlu
e a
l ti
'é o
v n
a  ld
u e
a  
t li'i
om
n  p
da
ect
 l  
ae
  t
p d
e e
rf  
ola Va
rmanleu
ce r 
da
ejo
s  u
p té
ol e
it  ie
q u
u ro
espéenne
2
1
1
4
Direction de
U l
n'Ev
ité  a
dlu
e a
l t
ai o
sn
u  d
rv e il'i
l m
anpa
ce ct
 d e
u t d
C e
o  
n la
s  
eiVa
l e le
u u
ror 
p a
é jo
e u
n tée européenne
2
2
Total
25
7
1
33
Total
172
129
2
303
Direction générale de la Communication
5
6
11
Unité du suivi de l'opinion publique
1
3
4
Direction des médias
5
4
9
Direction de
Us 
nim
téé
  dia
Pre sse
7
6
13
Direction des médias Service Politiques économiques et scientifiques
8
2
10
Direction des médias Service Politiques structurelles et de cohésion
3
1
4
Direction des médias Service Affaires constitutionnelles et droits des citoyens
4
2
6
Direction des médias Service Affaires budgétaires
2
1
3
Direction des médias Service Politiques externes
4
2
6
Direction de
Us 
nim
téé
  dia
Se s
rvices et suivi des médias
34
7
41
Direction de
Us 
nim
téé
  d
d i
ea
 ls
'audiovisuel
10
48
58
Direction de
Us 
nim
téé
  d
d i
ea
 ls
a communication internet
20
8
28
Direction de
Us 
nim
téé
  d
d i
ea
 ls
a gestion du site Europarl
4
9
13
Direction de
Us 
nim
téé
  dia
Eu s
roparl TV
3
4
7
Direction de
Us 
nim
téé
  dia
Sui s
vi et analyse stratégique des médias
2
3
1
6
Total
106
97
1
204
Direction des bureaux d'information
2
2
4
Direction des
Bu bu
re re
au a
du
ex
 l id
a'i
i n
s f
o o
n rm
 
atio
PE-C n
ongrès américain à Washington
10
3
13
Direction de
Us 
nib
t u
é re
d a
e ux
co d
o 'in
rdi fo
n rm
atio a
n t io
etn
 de programmation 
5
8
13
Direction de
Us 
nib
t u
é re
d a
e u
s x
u  id
v 'i
i n
hfo
o rm
ri
a
zo t
n ito
a n
l et thématique 
5
5
10
Direction des
Bu bu
re re
au a
du
'i x
n  fd
o 'inf
rm o
a rm
tio a
n ti
do
un
 Parlement européen en Grèce
2
7
9
Direction des
Bu bu
re re
au a
du
'i x
n  fd
o 'inf
rm o
a rm
tio a
n ti
do
un
 Parlement européen en Allemagne
5
9
14
Direction des bureaux d'in
An fto
e rm
nn a
e t io
ré n
gionale de Munich
2
2
4
Direction des
Bu bu
re re
au a
du
'i x
n  fd
o 'inf
rm o
a rm
tio a
n ti
do
un
 Parlement européen en Belgique
2
7
9
Direction des
Bu bu
re re
au a
du
'i x
n  fd
o 'inf
rm o
a rm
tio a
n ti
do
un
 Parlement européen au Danemark
2
4
6
Direction des
Bu bu
re re
au a
du
'i x
n  fd
o 'inf
rm o
a rm
tio a
n ti
do
un
 Parlement européen en Irlande
2
3
5
Direction des
Bu bu
re re
au a
du
'i x
n  fd
o 'inf
rm o
a rm
tio a
n ti
do
un
 Parlement européen en Finlande
2
4
6
Direction des
Bu bu
re re
au a
du
'i x
n  fd
o 'inf
rm o
a rm
tio a
n ti
do
un
 Parlement européen aux Pays-Bas
2
5
7
Direction des
Bu bu
re re
au a
du
'i x
n  fd
o 'inf
rm o
a rm
tio a
n ti
do
un
 Parlement européen au Portugal
2
4
6
Direction des
Bu bu
re re
au a
du
'i x
n  fd
o 'inf
rm o
a rm
tio a
n ti
do
un
 Parlement européen au Royaume-Uni
2
9
11
Direction des bureaux d'in
An fto
e rm
nn a
e t io
ré n
gionale d'Edimbourg
1
2
3
Direction des
Bu bu
re re
au a
du
'i x
n  fd
o 'inf
rm o
a rm
tio a
n ti
do
un
 Parlement européen au Luxembourg
1
2
3
Direction des
Bu bu
re re
au a
du
'i x
n  fd
o 'inf
rm o
a rm
tio a
n ti
do
un
 Parlement européen en Espagne
4
8
12
Direction des bureaux d'in
An fto
e rm
nn a
e t io
ré n
gionale de Barcelone
1
2
3
Direction des
Bu bu
re re
au a
du
'i x
n  fd
o 'inf
rm o
a rm
tio a
n ti
do
un
 Parlement européen en France
3
8
11
Direction des bureaux d'in
An fto
e rm
nn a
e t io
ré n
gionale de Marseille
1
2
3
Direction des
Bu bu
re re
au a
du
'i x
n  fd
o 'inf
rm o
a rm
tio a
n ti
do
un
 Parlement européen en Italie
3
6
9
Direction des bureaux d'in
An fto
e rm
nn a
e t io
ré n
gionale de Milan
1
2
3
Direction des
Bu bu
re re
au a
du
'i x
n  fd
o 'inf
rm o
a rm
tio a
n ti
do
un
 Parlement européen en Suède
2
4
6
Direction des
Bu bu
re re
au a
du
'i x
n  fd
o 'inf
rm o
a rm
tio a
n ti
do
un
 Parlement européen à Strasbourg
2
7
9
Direction des
Bu bu
re re
au a
du
'i x
n  fd
o 'inf
rm o
a rm
tio a
n ti
do
un
 Parlement européen en Autriche
2
4
6
Direction des
Bu bu
re re
au a
du
'i x
n  fd
o 'inf
rm o
a rm
tio a
n ti
do
un
 Parlement européen à Chypre
2
3
5
Direction des
Bu bu
re re
au a
du
'i x
n  fd
o 'inf
rm o
a rm
tio a
n ti
do
un
 Parlement européen en Estonie
1
3
4
Direction des
Bu bu
re re
au a
du
'i x
n  fd
o 'inf
rm o
a rm
tio a
n ti
do
un
 Parlement européen en Hongrie
2
4
6
Direction des
Bu bu
re re
au a
du
'i x
n  fd
o 'inf
rm o
a rm
tio a
n ti
do
un
 Parlement européen en Lettonie
1
3
4
Direction des
Bu bu
re re
au a
du
'i x
n  fd
o 'inf
rm o
a rm
tio a
n ti
do
un
 Parlement européen en Lituanie
1
3
4
Direction des
Bu bu
re re
au a
du
'i x
n  fd
o 'inf
rm o
a rm
tio a
n ti
do
un
 Parlement européen à Malte
1
3
4
Direction des
Bu bu
re re
au a
du
'i x
n  fd
o 'inf
rm o
a rm
tio a
n ti
do
un
 Parlement européen en Pologne
3
4
7
Direction des bureaux d'in
An fto
e rm
nn a
e t io
ré n
gionale de Wroclaw
1
2
3
Direction des
Bu bu
re re
au a
du
'i x
n  fd
o 'inf
rm o
a rm
tio a
n ti
do
un
 Parlement européen en République tchèque
2
4
6
Direction des
Bu bu
re re
au a
du
'i x
n  fd
o 'inf
rm o
a rm
tio a
n ti
do
un
 Parlement européen en Slovaquie
2
3
5
Direction des
Bu bu
re re
au a
du
'i x
n  fd
o 'inf
rm o
a rm
tio a
n ti
do
un
 Parlement européen en Slovénie
1
3
4
Direction des
Bu bu
re re
au a
du
'i x
n  fd
o 'inf
rm o
a rm
tio a
n ti
do
un
 Parlement européen en Bulgarie
2
3
5
Direction des
Bu bu
re re
au a
du
'i x
n  fd
o 'inf
rm o
a rm
tio a
n ti
do
un
 Parlement européen en Roumanie
2
3
5
Direction des
Bu bu
re re
au a
du
'i x
n  fd
o 'inf
rm o
a rm
tio a
n ti
do
un
 Parlement européen en Croatie
2
1
3
Direction de
Us 
nib
t u
e re
d a
e u
s x
o  d
ut 'i
i n
e f
no
  rm
de a
s  ti
b o
u n
reaux d'information
1
1
2
Total
90
162
0
252
Direction des relations avec les citoyens
3
4
7
Direction des
Pa re
rlala
mtio
e n
nt s
a  a
ri v
u e
m c les citoyens
4
15
19
Direction de
Us 
nire
tél a
dti
eo
sn
  s
vi a
si v
t e
e c 
s  l
e e
t  s ci
é t
mo
i ye
nains
res
26
20
46
Direction de
Us 
nire
tél a
dti
eo
  ns
co  a
o v
rd e
i c 
na lte
i s
o  
n ci
 dto
e ye
s s n
e s
rvices aux visiteurs
1
1
2
Direction de
Us 
nire
tél atio
Év n
é s
n  
e av
m e
e c 
nt l
se
  s
e  
t ci
 e to
x ye
po n
si s
tions
4
6
10
Direction de
Us 
nire
tél at
C io
a n
m s
p a
a v
g e
n c 
esl e
ds
'i ci
nf to
o ye
rm n
at s
ion
6
5
11
Direction des 
Ma re
is l
oa
nt io
d n
e s
 l  a
'hiv
s e
t c 
oi le
re s 
e ci
u to
ro ye
pé n
e s
nne
19
7
26
Direction de
Us 
nire
tél a
dti
uo
  n
p s 
ro a
g ve
ra c 
m le
m s
e  ci
d t
eo
  ye
vis n
it s
es de l'Union européenne (EUVP)
1
4
5
Total
64
61
1
126
Direction des ressources
1
2
3
Direction de
Us 
nire
tés
  so
Peurce
rson s
nel
2
10
12
Direction de
Us 
nire
tés
  s
F o
i u
n rce
an s
ces
4
10
1
15
Direction de
Us 
nire
tés
 Iso
nf u
o rce
rm s
atique
2
11
13
Direction de
Us 
nire
tés
  sou
Pro rce
gra s
mmation et gestion stratégique
1
4
5
Total
10
37
1
48
Total
276
366
3
645

Annex Q48 - Overview of posts 2014-2018
2015

Direction générale / Direction / Unité / Service
AD
AST
SC
Total
Direction générale du Personnel
3
3
6
 Service de communication interne
1
3
4
Unité Egalité et diversité
3
5
8
Direction Développement des ressources humaines
3
2
5
Direction Dé
U v
nie
t lo
é  pp
O e
rg m
a e
ni n
s t
a td
i e
o s
n  ire
nt s
eso
rn u
e rce
 et  s
p  h
rou
gm
raain
m e
m s
ation des ressources humaines
5
8
13
Direction Dé
U v
nie
t lo
é  p
Cp
oe
nme
co n
u t 
rs d
  e
et s
   
pre
rosso
cé u
d rce
ure s
s   h
d u
e  m
séa
l i
ene
cti s
on
4
13
17
Direction Dé
U v
nie
t lo
é  p
Rp
eem
crue
t n
e t 
md
ee
ns
t  
  re
et ss
m o
u u
t rce
atio s
n h
dum
 pa
ein
rse
os
nnel
4
28
2
34
Direction Dé
U v
nie
t lo
é  pp
G e
esm
ti e
o n
n  t 
d d
u e
  s
p  
ere
rs s
oso
n u
n rce
el ets
   h
d u
e m
s  a
caine
rri s
ères
3
18
21
Direction Dé
U v
nie
t lo
é  p
d p
e e
 l m
a  e
f n
o t d
rm e
at s
i  
o re
n  s
p so
ro u
f rce
essi s
o h
n u
n m
ell a
e ines
9
21
1
31
Direction Développement 
Se de
rvi s re
ce  s
d s
u o
burce
dg s
e  
t h
  u
d m
e l a
a in
f e
o s
rmation
1
2
3
Total
29
92
3
124
Direction Gestion de la vie administrative
3
1
4
Direction Ge
U s
nitio
é n
   
Dde
roi tla
s  iv
n ie
di  a
vi dm
u i
e n
l i
s s
  t
e ra
t  ti
ré ve
munérations
2
2
4
Direction Gestion de la vie
Se  a
rvidm
ce  inis
Pai tra
e  t
e itv
  e
contrôle
1
9
1
11
Direction Gestion de la vie
Se  a
rvidm
ce  in
D is
rotira
ts t iiv
n e
dividuels
1
15
16
Direction Gestion de la vie
Se  a
rvidm
ce  inis
Pri t
v ra
il t
è iv
g e
es et documentation
2
10
12
Direction Ge
U s
nitio
é n
   
d d
e e
s  la
mi v
s i
se
i  
o a
n d
s ministrative
2
14
16
Direction Ge
U s
nitio
é n
   
d d
e e
s  la
p  
e v
n i
se
i  
oa
nd
s m
 e itn
  i
astra
su tiv
ra e
nces sociales
2
19
21
Direction Ge
U s
nitio
é n
   
d d
e e
s  la
re  
l v
a i
t e
i  
o a
n d
s m
a i
vn
eist
c lra
e ti
pv
ee
rsonnel
3
19
22
Total
16
89
1
106
Direction Gestion des services de soutien et sociaux
2
2
4
Direction Gestion des serv
Se ice
rvi s 
ce d
  e
d  
e s
 l o
a u
  t
g ie
e n
st  ie
o t 
n s
  o
d ci
es a
  u
a x
bsences médicales
1
3
4
Direction Ge
C s
a ti
b o
i n
n  
e d
t  es
m  
é s
de
i rv
ca ilce
 L s
u  
x d
e e 
m s
boutie
rg n et sociaux
4
14
18
Direction Ge
C s
a ti
b o
i n
n  
e d
t  es
m  
é s
de
i rv
ca ilce
 

Bru d
x e
e  
llso
e u
s tien et sociaux
6
19
1
26
Direction Ge
U s
nitio
é n
   
d d
e e
s s 
a se
cti rv
onice
s ss 
o d
ci e
a ls
eo
s utien et sociaux
2
10
12
Direction Gestion des serv
Se ice
rvi s 
ce d
  e
d  
e s
s o
  uti
crè en
ch  e
e t
s  s
à o
  ci
Lu a
x u
e x
mbourg
3
3
Direction Gestion des serv
Se ice
rvi s 
ce d
  e
d  
e s
s o
  uti
crè en
ch  e
e t
s  s
à o
  cia
Bru u
x x
elles
1
3
4
Direction Ge
U s
nitio
é n
   
d d
e e
 l s
a  
  s
p erv
rév ice
ents
i  d
o e
n   s
et o
  u
d t
u i e
b n
i  
e e
n t s
-êtoci
re  a
a u
u x
 travail
4
6
10
Total
20
60
1
81
Direction des ressources
2
1
3
Direction de
Us 
nire
tés
  s
Ro
eu
s rce
so s
urces humaines
2
6
8
Direction de
Us 
nire
tés
  s
g o
e u
strce
ions
 des ressources financières et contrôles
4
11
15
Direction de
Us 
nire
tés
 Iso
nf u
o rce
rm s
atique et support TI
6
13
1
20
Total
14
31
1
46
Total
86
283
6
375
Direction générale des infrastructures et de la logistique
3
4
7
Unité de la politique immobilière
5
4
9
Direction des infrastructures
2
2
4
Direction de
Us 
niitnf
é ra
d s
e tlru
a  ct
g u
e re
sti s
on immobilière et de la maintenance à Luxembourg
4
16
1
21
Direction de
Us 
niitnf
é ra
d s
e tlru
a  ct
g u
e re
sti s
on immobilière et de la maintenance des bureaux d'information
4
11
15
Direction de
Us 
niitnf
é ra
d s
e tlru
a  ct
g u
e re
sti s
on immobilière et de la maintenance à Bruxelles
6
33
39
Direction de
Us 
niitnf
é ra
d s
e tlru
a  ct
g u
e re
sti s
on immobilière et de la maintenance à Strasbourg
6
18
24
Total
22
80
1
103
Direction de la logistique
4
4
8
Direction de
U l
na
it l
éo
  g
T is
rati
nq
su
p e
ort de personnes
4
25
1
30
Direction de
U l
na
it l
éo
  g
d is
e t
s iq
h u
uie
ssiers de conférence
1
41
2
44
Direction de
U l
na
it l
éo
  g
d is
e t
s iq
a ue
cquisitions, gestion des biens et inventaire
1
3
4
Direction de la logistique
Service de l'inventaire
6
6
Direction de la logistique
Service des dépôts et magasins
5
5
Direction de la logistique
Service des acquisitions
13
13
Direction de
U l
na
it l
éo
  g
d is
e  t
l iq
a  ue
restauration et de la centrale d'achats
3
16
1
20
Direction de
U l
na
it l
éo
  g
T is
rati
nq
su
p e
ort de biens
1
24
25
Direction de
U l
na
it l
éo
  g
d is
e t
s iq
h u
uie
ssiers d'étage
1
26
27
Direction de
U l
na
it l
éo
  g
Ois
n ti
e qu
-Ste
op Shop pour les députés
1
8
9
Total
16
171
4
191
Direction des ressources
2
1
3
Direction de
Us 
nire
tés
  s
d o
u u
  rce
pe s
rsonnel
2
5
7
Direction des ressources
Service Recrutement et carrières
1
3
4
Direction de
Us 
nire
tés
  s
d o
e u
 l rce
a p s
rogrammation, du suivi et du contrôle budgétaire
1
2
3
Direction des ressources
Service de la programmation et du suivi budgétaire
1
3
4
Direction des ressources
Service du contrôle interne
3
5
8
Direction de
Us 
nire
tés
  s
d o
e u
s rce
co s
ntrats et marchés publics
9
11
1
21
Direction de
Us 
nire
tés
 Iso
nf u
o rce
rm s
atique et support TI
2
8
10
Total
21
38
1
60
Direction des Projets immobiliers
2
2
4
Direction de
Us 
niPro
té  j
d ets
s   i
p m
ro m
je o
t b
s iilie
m rs
mobiliers à Luxembourg
9
13
1
23
Direction de
Us 
niPro
té  j
d ets
s   i
p m
ro m
je o
t b
s iilie
m rs
mobiliers à Bruxelles
6
12
18
Direction de
Us 
niPro
té  j
d ets
s   i
p m
ro m
je o
t b
s iilie
m rs
mobiliers à Strasbourg
2
8
10
Total
19
35
1
55
Total
86
332
7
425

Annex Q48 - Overview of posts 2014-2018
2015

Direction générale / Direction / Unité / Service
AD
AST
SC
Total
Direction générale de la traduction
1
2
3
Unité Multilinguisme et relations externes
5
5
10
Service de coordination de la qualité
2
3
5
Direction du support et des services technologiques pour la traduction
4
5
9
Direction du
U s
niu
t p
é p
do
ért
v  e
el t 
o d
p e
p s
e s
merv
enti ce
d s
'a  t
p e
plch
i n
cato
i l
oo
ng
si q
eu
t e
ds 
e p
 sou
ys r 
t l
è a 
m tra
es d
i u
nfct
o ion
rmatiques
4
2
1
7
Direction du support et de
Ses s
rvi erv
ce  ice
de s
s   t
a e
p ch
pli no
ca lto
i g
o i
n q
s u
  e
d s
e   p
s o
ui u
vir 
  l
da
e tlra
a  d
p uct
rodio
u n
ction
3
2
5
Direction du support et de
Ses s
rvi erv
ce  ice
Ou s
ti  lte
s  ch
de n
  o
T log
AO iq
e u
t  e
d s
e  po
co u
ll r 
a l
ba
o tra
rati d
ou
nction
3
7
10
Direction du
U s
niu
t p
é p
do
ert
 l  e
a  t d
rae
ds 
u se
cti rv
oni ce
exs
t  t
e ech
rne nologiques pour la traduction
1
1
2
Direction du support et de
Ses s
rvi erv
ce  ice
du  s 
Plte
a ch
ce no
m l
e o
n g
t iques pour la traduction
1
14
15
Direction du support et de
Ses s
rvi erv
ce  ice
Ex s
é  te
cutch
io n
n o
dlo
e g
s iqu
co e
nts p
rat o
s ur la traduction
3
5
8
Direction du
U s
niu
t p
é p
do
ert
   
pet
ré d
-t es
ra  
d s
uerv
cti i
o ce
n  s t
Eu ech
ram n
i o
s logiques pour la traduction
7
8
15
Direction du
U s
niu
t p
é po
C rt
o  
o et
rd  id
n e
a s
ti  s
o e
n  rv
d i
e ce
 las
 t t
eech
rmi n
n o
o llo
o g
g iiq
e ues pour la traduction
6
4
10
Total
32
48
1
81
Direction de la traduction
5
3
8
Direction de
U l
na
it t
éra
 d d
e u
 l ct
a  iton
raduction danoise
30
12
42
Direction de
U l
na
it t
éra
 d d
e u
 l ct
a  iton
raduction allemande
37
16
53
Direction de
U l
na
it t
éra
 d d
e u
 l ct
a  iton
raduction grecque
30
15
45
Direction de
U l
na
it t
éra
 d d
e u
 l ct
a  iton
raduction anglaise et irlandaise
20
14
34
Direction de la traduction
Service de la traduction irlandaise
5
1
6
Direction de
U l
na
it t
éra
 d d
e u
 l ct
a  iton
raduction espagnole
31
17
48
Direction de
U l
na
it t
éra
 d d
e u
 l ct
a  iton
raduction française
36
15
51
Direction de
U l
na
it t
éra
 d d
e u
 l ct
a  iton
raduction italienne
31
13
44
Direction de
U l
na
it t
éra
 d d
e u
 l ct
a  iton
raduction néerlandaise
29
13
42
Direction de
U l
na
it t
éra
 d d
e u
 l ct
a  iton
raduction portugaise
28
14
42
Direction de
U l
na
it t
éra
 d d
e u
 l ct
a  iton
raduction finnoise
30
13
43
Direction de
U l
na
it t
éra
 d d
e u
 l ct
a  iton
raduction suédoise
27
14
41
Direction de
U l
na
it t
éra
 d d
e u
 l ct
a  iton
raduction tchèque
30
11
41
Direction de
U l
na
it t
éra
 d d
e u
 l ct
a  iton
raduction estonienne
28
11
39
Direction de
U l
na
it t
éra
 d d
e u
 l ct
a  iton
raduction hongroise
29
11
40
Direction de
U l
na
it t
éra
 d d
e u
 l ct
a  iton
raduction lituanienne
29
12
41
Direction de
U l
na
it t
éra
 d d
e u
 l ct
a  iton
raduction lettone
29
10
39
Direction de
U l
na
it t
éra
 d d
e u
 l ct
a  iton
raduction maltaise
27
11
38
Direction de
U l
na
it t
éra
 d d
e u
 l ct
a  iton
raduction polonaise
32
12
44
Direction de
U l
na
it t
éra
 d d
e u
 l ct
a  iton
raduction slovène
28
11
39
Direction de
U l
na
it t
éra
 d d
e u
 l ct
a  iton
raduction slovaque
28
11
39
Direction de
U l
na
it t
éra
 d d
e u
 l ct
a  iton
raduction bulgare
29
12
41
Direction de
U l
na
it t
éra
 d d
e u
 l ct
a  iton
raduction roumaine
29
11
40
Direction de
U l
na
it t
éra
 d d
e u
 l ct
a  iton
raduction croate
27
11
38
Direction de
U l
na
it t
éra
  d
Pl u
a ct
nnio
nn
g
1
1
2
Direction de la traduction
Service de Gestion de la demande
2
20
22
Direction de la traduction
Service Qualité
1
3
4
Direction de la traduction
Service des Relations avec les clients
7
1
8
Direction de
U l
na
it t
éra
  d
Véu
rict
fi ion
cation rédactionnelle
9
2
11
Total
704
321
0
1025
Direction des ressources
2
1
3
Direction de
Us 
nire
tés
  s
Ro
eu
s rce
so s
urces humaines
2
7
9
Direction de
Us 
nire
tés
  so
G u
esrce
tio s
n des ressources financières et contrôles
2
11
13
Direction de
Us 
nire
tés
  s
F ource
rmats
ions et stages
2
6
8
Direction de
Us 
nire
tés
 Iso
nf u
o rce
rm s
atique et support TI
1
1
2
Direction des ressources
TRAD Service Desk
11
11
Direction des ressources
Service Administration des systèmes
3
3
Direction des ressources
Service Coordination des projets
1
3
4
Direction des ressources
Gestion des services TI
1
1
2
Total
11
44
0
55
Total
755
423
1
1179
Direction générale de l'interprétation et des conférences
2
3
5
Unité des paiements AIC
2
9
11
Unité de la communication externe
2
2
4
Unité de la gestion de la qualité
3
2
5
Direction de l'interprétation
1
3
4
Direction de
U l
n'iin
t t
é e
  rp
de ré
l'i ta
nt ti
e on
rprétation danoise
11
11
Direction de
U l
n'iin
t t
é e
  rp
de ré
l'i ta
nt ti
e on
rprétation allemande
28
28
Direction de
U l
n'iin
t t
é e
  rp
de ré
l'i ta
nt ti
e on
rprétation grecque
16
16
Direction de
U l
n'iin
t t
é e
  rp
de ré
l'i ta
nt ti
e on
rprétation anglaise
30
30
Direction de
U l
n'iin
t t
é e
  rp
de ré
l'i ta
nt ti
e on
rprétation espagnole
21
21
Direction de
U l
n'iin
t t
é e
  rp
de ré
l'i ta
nt ti
e on
rprétation finnoise
16
16
Direction de
U l
n'iin
t t
é e
  rp
de ré
l'i ta
nt ti
e on
rprétation française
25
25
Direction de
U l
n'iin
t t
é e
  rp
de ré
l'i ta
nt ti
e on
rprétation italienne
22
22
Direction de
U l
n'iin
t t
é e
  rp
de ré
l'i ta
nt ti
e on
rprétation néerlandaise
15
15
Direction de
U l
n'iin
t t
é e
  rp
de ré
l'i ta
nt ti
e on
rprétation portugaise
16
16
Direction de
U l
n'iin
t t
é e
  rp
de ré
l'i ta
nt ti
e on
rprétation suédoise
13
13
Direction de
U l
n'iin
t t
é e
  rp
de ré
l'i ta
nt ti
e on
rprétation polonaise
20
20
Direction de
U l
n'iin
t t
é e
  rp
de ré
l'i ta
nt ti
e on
rprétation tchèque
10
10
Direction de
U l
n'iin
t t
é e
  rp
de ré
l'i ta
nt ti
e on
rprétation hongroise
17
17
Direction de
U l
n'iin
t t
é e
  rp
de ré
l'i ta
nt ti
e on
rprétation slovaque
9
9
Direction de
U l
n'iin
t t
é e
  rp
de ré
l'i ta
nt ti
e on
rprétation slovène
6
6
Direction de
U l
n'iin
t t
é e
  rp
de ré
l'i ta
nt ti
e on
rprétation estonienne
8
8
Direction de
U l
n'iin
t t
é e
  rp
de ré
l'i ta
nt ti
e on
rprétation lituanienne
10
10
Direction de
U l
n'iin
t t
é e
  rp
de ré
l'i ta
nt ti
e on
rprétation lettone
9
9
Direction de
U l
n'iin
t t
é e
  rp
de ré
l'i ta
nt ti
e on
rprétation maltaise
4
4
Direction de
U l
n'iin
t t
é e
  rp
de ré
l'i ta
nt ti
e on
rprétation bulgare
13
13
Direction de
U l
n'iin
t t
é e
  rp
de ré
l'i ta
nt ti
e on
rprétation roumaine
12
12
Direction de
U l
n'iin
t t
é e
  rp
de ré
l'i ta
nt ti
e on
rprétation croate
8
1
9
Total
340
4
0
344
Direction de l'organisation et de la programmation
1
2
3
Direction de
U l
n'o
it rg
é  a
d n
u isa
re tio
crun
t  
eet
m d
e e
nt la
d  
ep
sro
 a g
u ra
xilm
ia m
i a
re t
s i o
i n
nterprètes de conférence
6
3
9
Direction de
U l
n'o
it rg
é  a
d n
e ilsa
a  ti
p on
ro  
g et
ra d
me 
mla
at ip
oro
n grammation
11
9
20
Direction de
U l
n'o
it rg
é  a
d n
e i
ss
  at
ré io
u n
ni  e
o t
n  
sd
  e
et la 
cop
nro
fégra
renmm
ces ation
6
13
19
Direction de
U l
n'o
it rg
é  a
d n
e i
ss
  a
t t
e ion
ch  
niet
ci  d
e e
n  
s l a
d  p
e  ro
cog
nra
fém
rem
n at
ce ion
2
46
48
Direction de
U l
n'o
it rg
é  a
d n
u is
s a
o ti
u o
ti n
e  e
n  t 
a d
u e l
m a
u  
l p
tilro
in gra
ui m
s m
meation
3
3
6
Direction de
U l
n'o
it rg
é  a
d n
e ilsa
a  t
f io
o n 
rm e
at id
o e
n  la
d  
ep
s ro
 i g
nt ra
e m
rp m
rèt a
e t
sion
3
2
5
Direction de
U l
n'o
it rg
é  a
F n
o isa
rm t
aito
i n
o  
ne
  t
e d
n e
li  l
ga
n p
e rogrammation
2
2
4
Total
34
80
0
114
Direction des ressources
1
1
2
Direction de
Us 
nire
tés
  s
Ro
eu
s rce
so s
urces humaines
2
10
12
Direction de
Us 
nire
tés
 Iso
nf u
o rce
rm s
atique et support TI
4
7
11
Direction de
Us 
nire
tés
  s
d o
u u
  rce
bud s
get
2
4
6
Total
9
22
0
31
Total
392
122
514

Annex Q48 - Overview of posts 2014-2018
2015

Direction générale / Direction / Unité / Service
AD
AST
SC
Total
Direction générale des finances
3
5
8
Cellule budgétaire et vérification
3
4
7
Direction du budget et des services financiers
1
1
2
Direction du
U b
ni u
t d
é  g
de
ut  e
b t
u  d
d e
g s
et services financiers
5
4
9
Direction du
U b
ni u
t d
é  g
det  le
a t  de
co s
m  s
pte
arv
bi ilce
ités
   
efti na
d n
e lci
a e
 t rs
résorerie
3
3
6
Direction du budget et des
Se  s
rv e
i rv
ce i ce
de s
 l  f
a i n
t a
rén
s ci
o ers
rerie
1
9
10
Direction du budget et des
Se  s
rv e
i rv
ce i ce
de s
 l  f
a i na
co nci
mpe
t rs
abilité
1
10
11
Direction du
U b
ni u
t d
é  g
fi e
nt 
a e
n t d
ci e
è s
re se
cerv
nt ice
ral s
e  financiers
4
2
6
Direction du
U b
ni u
t d
é  ge
reft 
oe
nt d
e e
ds 
u s
  e
s rv
yst ice
èms 
e f
 iin
n a
f n
o ci
rme
ars
tique financier
4
1
5
Total
19
29
1
49
Direction des droits financiers et sociaux des députés
2
2
4
Direction de
Us 
nid
t ro
é  its
ré  f
m in
u a
n n
é ci
rate
i rs
on et so
d ci
roi a
t u
s  x
s  d
o e
ci s
a  d
uxé
  p
d u
e t

  s
députés
3
1
4
Direction des droits financi
Se e
rvrs
i  e
ce  t 
p s
eo
nci
sia
ou
nx
s d
e e
t  s
a d
s é
s p
u u
ra té
n s
ces des députés
4
4
Direction des droits financi
Se e
rvrs
i  e
ce  t 
d s
eo
sci
 f au
rai x
s  d
d e
e s d
m é
al p
a u
d tié
e s
 des députés
4
4
Direction des droits financi
Se e
rvrs
i  e
ce  t s
ré oci
mu a
n u
é x 
rad
ti e
os
n dé
ep
su
  t
dés
putés
3
3
Direction de
Us 
nid
t ro
é  i
ats
s  
s fiin
st a
a n
n cie
ce  rs
p  
a e
rl t 
e so
m ci
e a
nt u
aix d
re  e
e s
t   fdé
raip
s u
  t
g és
néraux des députés
3
21
24
Direction de
Us 
nid
t ro
é fits
ra  if
si na
d n
e  ci
v e
o rs
ya  e
g t
e  
ss
  o
e ci
t  a
d u
e  x
s  d
éj e
o s
u  d
r  é
d p
e u
s  té
d s
éputés
3
28
31
Total
11
63
0
74
Direction Financement des structures politiques et ressources
1
2
3
Direction Financement de
Ses s
rvi tru
ce ct
  u
O re
rg s
a  
n p
i o
salittiiq
o u
n  e
d s
e  e
s  t 
v re
o ss
ya o
g u
e rce
s
s
2
8
10
Direction Fin
U a
ni n
t ce
é Fm
ine
ant d
ce es
m  
est
n ru
t dct
e u
s re
st s 
rupo
ct l
uitiq
re u
s  e
p s
o  
lie
tit 
qre
u s
e s
s ources
5
6
11
Direction Fin
U a
ni n
t ce
é dm
e e
s  n
t t
e  de
ch s
n  
o s
l t
o ru
gi ct
e u
s  re
des
 l p
'i o
nf li
otiqu
rm e
at s
i  
o e
n t  re
et  s
d s
eo
 lu
'i rce
nv s
entaire
2
2
Direction Financement de
Ses s
rvi tru
ce ct
 I u
nf re
o s 
rm p
ao
ti li
qtiq
u u
e  e
e s
t   le
o t 
gire
st s
i s
q o
u u
e rces
2
4
6
Direction Financement de
Ses s
rvi tru
ce ct
 I u
n re
ve s
n  tp
a o
i li
retiques et ressources
5
5
Direction Fin
U a
ni n
t ce
é  m
Re e
s n
s t
o d
u es
rce s
s tru
huct
mu
are
in s
e p
s  o
e lti tfiq
o ue
rm s
a te
i t
o  re
n  s
p so
rof u
e rce
ssi s
onnelle des députés
1
1
Direction Financement de
Ses s
rvi tru
ce ct
 Ru
ere
s s
s  
o p
u olit
rce iq
s  u
h e
u s 
me
ati re
ne ssources
2
2
Direction Financement de
Ses s
rvi tru
ce ct
 F u
o res
rm  
ap
tiolit
n iq
p ue
rof s
e e
s t
si re
onss
n o
ellurce
e d s
e  députés
5
2
7
Direction Financement de
Ses s
rvi tru
ce ct
  ure
Ma s 
rch p
é o
s l it
p iq
u u
bl e
i s 
cs et ressources
1
1
Total
19
29
0
48
Total
55
130
1
186
Direction générale de l'innovation et du support technologique
2
4
6
Direction du développement et du support
10
3
13
Direction du
U d
ni é
t v
é  elo
Su p
p p
p e
o m
rt  e
a n
u t 
x e
  t
u  
t d
iliu
s  s
atu
ep
upo
rs rt
2
4
6
Direction du développem
ITent
EC et d
Se u
rv  isu
ce p
  p
D o
e rt
sk
5
26
1
32
Direction du développement 
MEP  et 
Sedu
rvi su
ce pp
D o
e rt
sk
1
5
6
Direction du développement
Accè e
s  tI d
T, u
   s
G u
e p
st p
i o
o rt
n des equipements et LSU
2
12
14
Direction du
U d
ni é
t v
é  el
C op
n pe
ce m
ptien
o t
n  e
ett  d
d u
é  
vsu
el p
o p
p o
p rt
ement
1
2
3
Direction du développem
Ple
anti fe
i t d
cat u
i  
o s
n u
  p
et p
  ort
Évaluation
2
3
5
Direction du développem
G en
s tt ie
o t 
n du
d  
e s
s up
p p
ro o
j rt
ets
7
4
11
Direction du développem
T e
e n
st t 
s e
  t
d  d
e  u 
ré su
ce pp
ti ort
n
3
2
5
Direction du développeme
Mén
t t
h e
o t
d  d
ol u
o  s
gi u
e p
s p
  o
d rt
es projets
2
2
Direction du
U d
ni é
t v
é  elo
Év p
o p
l e
utim
o e
n n
et et
m d
aiu
n tsu
e p
n p
a o
n rt
ce
2
3
5
Direction du développeme
Se nt
rv  iet
ce d
s  u
p  s
a u
rl p
e p
mort
entaires
4
5
9
Direction du développeme
Se nt
rv  iet
ce d
s  u
l  
é s
gu
i p
sl p
a o
ti rt
fs
3
4
7
Direction du développeme
Se nt
rv  iet
ce d
s  u 
resu
s p
o p
u ort
rces humaines
3
5
8
Direction du développeme
Se nt
rv  iet
ce d
s  u
a  s
d u
mp
i p
ni o
s rt
tratifs
3
7
10
Direction du développeme
Se nt
rv  iet
ce d
s  u 
w s
e u
b pport
2
3
5
Total
52
88
1
141
Direction de l'édition et de la distribution
1
2
3
Direction de
U l
n'é
it d
é i
  ti
d o
e n
s  
  e
s t
e d
rve
i  la
ce  
s d
 i is
nttri
rab
nu
etion
1
5
6
Direction de l'édition et de
Se  la
rvi di
ces
  tri
R b
el u
a tions clients et bureau projets
2
15
17
Direction de l'édition et de
Se  la
rvi di
ces
  t
I ri
ntbu
ra ti
n o
e n
t
3
7
10
Direction de
U l
n'é
it d
é i
  tion
Pro  
de
ut d
cti e
o  l
na
   
dd
oist
curib
m u
e t
nio
t n
aire
3
9
12
Direction de l'édition et de
Se  la
rvi di
ces
  tri
C b
h u
aî ti
n o
e n
s de production documentaire
6
6
Direction de l'édition et de
Se  la
rvi di
ces
  tri
C b
o ut
rreio
ctn
ion et préparation documentaire
27
27
Direction de
U l
n'é
it d
é i
  t
I io
m n
p  e
ret 
s d
sie
o la
n   d
m is
ul tri
i b
-s u
u ti
p o
p n
ort
1
2
3
Direction de l'édition et de
Se  la
rvi di
ces
  tri
C b
o u
ul ti
e o
u n
r et produits multi-support
35
35
Direction de l'édition et de
Se  la
rvi di
ces
  t
I ri
mbu
p ti
re o
s n
sion législative
14
14
Direction de l'édition et de
Se  la
rvi di
ces
  trib
Ad u
m tiio
ni n
stration, logistique et innovation
7
7
Direction de
U l
n'é
it d
é i
  ti
Do
ifn
f  e
usti d
o e
n  la distribution
1
1
2
Direction de l'édition et de
Se  la
rvi di
ces
  tri
G b
ui uti
ch o
e n
ts
17
1
18
Direction de l'édition et de
Se  la
rvi di
ces
  tri
Di b
ff uti
s o
i n
o  multi-support
13
13
Total
12
160
1
173
Direction des ressources
1
2
3
Direction des ressources
Service Vérification Ex-ante
1
4
5
Direction de
Us 
nire
tés
  s
Ro
eu
s rce
so s
urces humaines
2
6
8
Direction de
Us 
nire
tés
  so
G u
esrce
tio s
n des ressources financières
2
11
13
Direction de
Us 
nire
tés
  so
G u
esrce
tio s
n des marchés et contrats
2
1
3
Direction des ressources
Service Administration des marchés publics
1
5
6
Direction des ressources
Service Administration des contrats
1
5
6
Direction de
Us 
nire
tés
  s
Ro
eu
l rce
atio s
ns clients et communication
2
1
3
Direction des ressources
Service Gestion des relations clients
5
8
13
Direction des ressources
Service Communication
2
2
4
Total
19
45
0
64
Direction des infrastructures et des équipements
1
1
2
Direction de
Us 
niitnf
é ra
G s
etru
sti ct
o u
n  re
d s
e  
s e
 i t 
nfde
ra s
s  
t éq
ru u
ct ip
u e
rem
s ents
1
1
2
Direction des infrastructIu
nre
g s
é  
ne
i t
e d
ri e
e s 
eté
  q
a uip
rch e
it m
e e
ct n
u ts
re des réseaux informatiques
2
8
10
Direction des infrastructu
D re
é s
pl  e
oi t 
e de
m s
e  
n é
t  q
d u
e ip
s  e
i m
nf e
ra n
s tts
ructures réseaux
6
6
12
Direction des infrastructu
D re
é s
pl  e
oi t 
e de
m s
e  
n é
t  q
d u
e ip
s  e
i m
nf e
ra n
s tts
ructures d'hébergement
3
3
Direction de
Us 
niitnf
é ras
Eq tru
ui ct
pe ure
me s
n  
t e
s t
 i d
n e
dis
v ié
dq
uu
eilp
se
  m
et  e
l n
o t
g s
i tique
2
7
9
Direction des infrastructure
Su s
p  
p e
o t 
rt d
  e
à  s
l  é
'é q
v u
ol ip
ut e
i m
on e
  n
d t
e s
s équipements individuels
2
10
12
Direction des infrastructu
G re
e s
st  ie
o t 
n d
  e
d s
e   lé
'i q
nfuip
ra e
st m
ru en
ct t
u s
re individuelle
2
7
9
Direction de
Us 
niitnf
é ra
O s
ptru
é ct
ratiu
ore
n s
s   e
et t  d
H e
é s
b  é
e q
rgu
eip
mem
nte
  n
d t
es TIC
1
5
6
Direction des infrastructure
Su s
p  
e et
rv  id
sie
os 
n é
  q
et u
  ip
O e
p m
é e
rat n
i t
o s
ns
3
11
14
Direction des infrastructu
C re
a s
p  
a et
ci  
t d
é e
  s
et  éq
C u
o i
n p
ti e
n m
uite
énts
3
4
7
Direction des infrastructu
G re
e s
st  ie
o t 
n d
  e
d s
e  
s é
  q
d u
e ip
m e
a m
nd en
s t s
d'Hébergement et de service
3
2
5
Direction de
Us 
niitnf
é ras
St t
a ru
n ct
da ure
rds s
   
e e
t  t 
s d
é es
cu  é
rit q
é u
  i
d p
e e
s m
 T e
I n
C ts
1
2
3
Direction des infrastructure
Sé s 
cu e
ri tt d
é  e
d s
e  é
s  q
T u
I ip
C ements
8
2
10
Direction des infrastructu
C re
o s
nf  ie
g t 
u de
rat s
i  

nq
s u
  i
s p
t e
a m
nd e
a nt
rd s
1
7
8
Total
39
73
0
112
Total
124
370
2
496

Annex Q48 - Overview of posts 2014-2018
2015

Direction générale / Direction / Unité / Service
AD
AST
SC
Total
Direction générale de la sécurité et de la protection
1
1
Unité de l'évaluation des risques
3
13
16
Direction pour la proximité et l'assistance, la sécurité et la sûreté
1
2
3
Direction po
Uu
nr 
it la
é   proxi
Accrém
di itté
at ie
o t 
n l'assistance, la sécurité et la sûreté
2
27
1
30
Direction po
Uu
nr 
it la
é   pro
Sé x
cuim
rit i
ét é
e te
  t
s l
û'as
ret s
éi stan
Bru ce
xel,l l
ea
s  sécurité et la sûreté
6
29
35
Direction po
Uu
nr 
it la
é   pro
Sé x
cuim
rit i
ét é
e te
  t
s l
û'as
ret s
éi sta
St n
race
sb, 
ola
u  s
rg écurité et la sûreté
1
1
1
3
Direction po
Uu
nr 
it la
é   pro
Sé x
cuim
rit i
ét é
e te
  t
s l
û'as
ret s
éi st
L a
u n
x ce
e ,
m  l
b a
o  s
u é
rgcurité et la sûreté
1
2
3
Total
11
61
2
74
Direction de la prévention, des premiers secours et de la sécurité incendie
1
1
2
Direction de
U l
na
it p
é réve
Pré n
v t
e io
nt n
i ,
o  d
n  e
d s
e  p
s ire
n m
ce ie
n rs
di  
e se
  cou
Bru rs
xe  
llet
e  
sde la sécurité incendie
1
2
3
Direction de
U l
na
it p
é réve
Pré n
v t
e io
nt n
i ,
o  d
n  e
d s
e  p
s ire
n m
ce ie
n rs
di  
e se
  co
St u
ra rs
s  
b e
o t 
u de
rg  la sécurité incendie
1
3
4
Direction de
U l
na
it p
é réve
Pré n
v t
e io
nt n
i ,
o  d
n  e
d s
e  p
s ire
n m
ce ie
n rs
di  
e se
  co
Lu u
x rs
e  
me
bt 
od
ue 
rgla sécurité incendie
1
3
4
Direction de
U l
na
it p
é ré
F v
o en
rm ti
a o
ti n
o , 
n d
  e
et s
   
s p
é re
cum
ritie
é rs
in se
ce co
ndiu
ers et de la sécurité incendie
1
1
2
Total
5
10
0
15
Direction de la stratégie et des ressources
1
1
Direction de
U l
na
it s
é tra
dut ég
Di ie
s  
p e
a t
t  d
che
i s
n  
gressources
2
4
6
Direction de
U l
na
it s
é tra
dut é
pg
eie
rs e
o t
n d
n e
el s
   
ere
t  s
d s
e o
  u
pl rce
anifs
ication
3
8
11
Direction de
U l
na
it s
é tra
dut é
bg
uie
d  
get des ressources
1
13
14
Direction de
U l
na
it s
é tra
deté
s  g
t i
ee e
ch t
n  d
ol e
o s
g  ire
ess
  s
e o
t  u
d rce
e l s
a sécurité des informations
4
19
23
Total
11
44
0
55
Total
31
128
2
161
Service juridique
3
4
7
Service des ressources
1
4
5
Unité de la coordination législative et judiciaire
3
4
7
Direction des Affaires institutionnelles et parlementaires
1
1
2
Direction de
Us 
niAf
té f
  a
Dire
rois
t  
 iin
n s
s t
tiit
t u
u t
tiio
o n
n n
n e
elll e
e s
t   e
b t
u  p
d a
g rl
ét e
a m
i e
re ntaires
4
2
6
Direction de
Us 
niAf
té f
  a
Rire
el s
at iin
o s
n t
si tu
e t
xio
t n
é n
ri e
e l
u le
re s et parlementaires
4
2
6
Direction de
Us 
niAf
té f
  a
Dire
rois
t  
si ns
p t
a it
rl u
e tio
m n
e n
nt e
aliles
re   e
et t  p
ré a
g rl
l e
e m
m e
e n
nt ta
ai ire
re s
8
4
12
Total
17
9
0
26
Direction des Affaires législatives
4
2
6
Direction de
Us 
niAf
té f
  aire
Poli s
ti  l
q é
u g
e is
s la
é tiv
co e
n s
omiques et scientifiques
7
1
8
Direction de
Ds
i  Af
re f
ct a
i i
o re
n  s
d  l
e é
s g
  i
a s
ffla
aitiv
re e
s s
législatives - Unité Politiques structurelles et de cohésion
4
2
6
Direction de
Us 
niAf
té f
  aire
Justs
i  lé
ce g
eits
  la
Li ti
b v
e e
rt s
és Publiques
8
2
10
Total
23
7
0
30
Direction des Affaires administratives et financières
1
1
2
Direction de
Us 
niAf
té f
  a
Dire
rois
t  
sa
  d
etm
 oin
blist
g ra
atiti
ov
ne
s s
   
s e
t t
a  tfi
u n
t a
ai nci
resères
4
2
6
Direction de
Us 
niAf
té f
  a
Cire
a s
rri  a
è d
re m
s  in
st is
at tra
ut t
a iive
re s
s  et financières
4
2
6
Direction de
Us 
niAf
té f
  a
Dire
rois
t  
  ad
co m
nt in
ra is
ct tra
ue t
l i
  v
e e
t  s
fi  e
n t
a  f
n in
ci a
e n
r cières
7
3
10
Direction de
Us 
niAf
té f
  a
Dire
rois
t  
  a
d d
e m
s  i
pnis
roj tra
et t
s ive
m s 
m e
o t 
b filin
ean
rs cières
7
4
11
Total
23
12
0
35
Total
70
40
110
Secrétaire général du Parlement européen
1
Cabinet du Secrétaire général
14
15
29
Protection des données
1
1
2
Secrétariat du Bureau et des questeurs
6
12
18
Unité d'audit interne
11
1
12
Secrétariat de la Conférence des présidents
5
4
9
Management Team Support Office
6
5
11
Unité Système de management environnemental et d'audit (EMAS)
4
4
8
Total
47
42
90
Secrétaire général adjoint
2
3
5
Cabinet du Secrétaire général adjoint
2
2
4
Unité Planning législatif et coordination
5
4
9
Unité Informations classifiées
3
4
7
Unité des relations interinstitutionnelles
5
4
9
Total
17
17
34
Cabinet du Président
17
22
39
Secrétariat des Vice-Présidents
1
18
19
Secrétariat des Questeurs
7
7
Direction pour les relations avec les groupes politiques
14
9
23
Groupe du Parti Populaire Européen (Démocrates-Chrétiens)
123
171
294
Groupe de l'Al iance Progressiste des Socialistes et Démocrates au Parlement européen
107
150
257
Groupe Al iance des démocrates et des libéraux pour l'Europe
41
57
98
Groupe des Verts/Al iance libre européenne
32
46
78
Groupe des Conservateurs et Réformistes européens
42
59
101
Groupe confédéral de la Gauche unitaire européenne/Gauche verte nordique
33
46
79
Groupe Europe de la liberté et de la démocratie directe
32
45
77
Non Inscrits
5
27
32
Comité du personnel
4
10
14
Total
3110
3600
28
6739

Annex Q48 - Overview of posts 2014-2018
2016

Postes organigramme par entités organisationnel es au 01/01/2016 (Sous réserve des modifications en cours)
Direction générale / Direction / Unité / Service
AD
AST
SC
Total
Direction générale de la Présidence
3
2
5
Unité Ressources
3
12
15
Unité Protocole
5
12
17
Direction de la séance plénière
2
1
3
Direction de
U l
na
it s
é é
da
en
sc
  e
p  
r p
o lé
c n
èsiè
- r
v e
erbaux et des comptes rendus de la séance plénière
6
6
12
Direction de
U l
na
it s
é éa
A n
ctic
ve
it p
é l

  n
d iè
esr e
députés
3
14
17
Direction de
U l
na
it s
é é
da
un
  c
d e
é  
r p
o lé
ul n
e iè
m re
ent et du suivi de la séance plénière
7
6
13
Direction de
U l
na
it s
é é
da
un
  c
d e
é  p
p l
ô é
t  n
d iè
e r
s e
 documents
3
5
8
Direction de
U l
na
it s
é é
da
un
  c
c e
o  
up
r l
r é
i n
er i è
o rfe
ficiel
2
26
1
29
Direction de
U l
na
it s
é é
da
en
 lc
ae
   
r p
é lé
c n
e i
p è
ti r
oe
n et du renvoi des documents officiels
4
11
15
Direction de
U l
na
it s
é éa
A n
d c
m e
i  
n p
islé
tr n
a itè
i r
o e
n des députés
3
5
8
Total
30
74
1
105
Direction des Actes Législatifs
2
1
3
Direction de
Us
n iA
t c
é  te
d s
e  lL
a é
  g
c i
o s
ola
r t
diif
ns
ation et du planning législatif
4
11
15
Direction de
Us
n iA
t c
é  te
Q s
u  L
al é
it g
é i
  s
l l
é a
g tiif
sls
ative A - Politique économique et scientifique
1
1
2
Direction des Actes Légis
P l
o a
li ttiifs
que économique et scientifique - Section grecque
3
2
5
Direction des Actes Légis
P l
o a
li ttiifs
que économique et scientifique - Section anglaise
8
4
12
Direction des Actes Légis
P l
o a
li ttiifs
que économique et scientifique - Section irlandaise
2
2
4
Direction des Actes Légis
P l
o a
li ttiifs
que économique et scientifique - Section italienne
3
2
5
Direction de
Us
n iA
t c
é  te
Q s
u  L
al é
it g
é i
  s
l l
é a
g tiif
sls
ative B - Politique structurelle et de cohésion
1
1
2
Direction des Actes Légis
P l
o a
li ttiifs
que structurelle et de cohésion - Section bulgare
3
2
5
Direction des Actes Légis
P l
o a
li ttiifs
que structurelle et de cohésion - Section maltaise
3
2
5
Direction des Actes Légis
P l
o a
li ttiifs
que structurelle et de cohésion - Section slovène
3
2
5
Direction des Actes Légis
P l
o a
li ttiifs
que structurelle et de cohésion - Section slovaque
3
2
5
Direction des Actes Légis
P l
o a
li ttiifs
que structurelle et de cohésion - Section croate
3
3
6
Direction de
Us
n iA
t c
é  te
Q s
u  L
al é
it g
é i
  s
l l
é a
g tiif
sls
ative C - Droits des citoyens
1
1
2
Direction des Actes Légis
Drla
oitif
s s
 des citoyens - Section allemande
4
3
7
Direction des Actes Légis
Drla
oitif
s s
 des citoyens - Section lituanienne
3
2
5
Direction des Actes Légis
Drla
oitif
s s
 des citoyens - Section néerlandaise
3
2
5
Direction des Actes Légis
Drla
oitif
s s
 des citoyens - Section polonaise
3
2
5
Direction des Actes Légis
Drla
oitif
s s
 des citoyens - Section roumaine
3
2
5
Direction de
Us
n iA
t c
é  te
Q s
u  L
al é
it g
é i
  s
l l
é a
g tiif
sls
ative D - Affaires budgétaires
1
1
2
Direction des Actes Légis
Af lfatiirfs
es budgétaires - Section danoise
3
2
5
Direction des Actes Légis
Af lfatiirfs
es budgétaires - Section espagnole
3
2
5
Direction des Actes Légis
Af lfatiirfs
es budgétaires - Section finnoise
3
2
5
Direction des Actes Légis
Af lfatiirfs
es budgétaires - Section française
4
2
6
Direction des Actes Légis
Af lfatiirfs
es budgétaires - Section portugaise
3
2
5
Direction de
Us
n iA
t c
é  te
Q s
u  L
al é
it g
é i
  s
l l
é a
g tiif
sls
ative E - Politiques externes
1
1
Direction des Actes Légis
P l
o a
li ttiifs
ques externes - Section tchèque
3
2
5
Direction des Actes Légis
P l
o a
li ttiifs
ques externes - Section estonienne
3
2
5
Direction des Actes Légis
P l
o a
li ttiifs
ques externes - Section hongroise
3
2
5
Direction des Actes Légis
P l
o a
li ttiifs
ques externes - Section lettone
3
2
5
Direction des Actes Légis
P l
o a
li ttiifs
ques externes - Section suédoise
3
2
5
Total
89
68
0
157
Direction des relations avec les parlements nationaux
1
2
3
Direction de
Us
n irte
é l a
dti
eo
 ln
as
   
ca
ov
oe
pc 
é l
r e
a s
ti  p
o a
n  r
i le
nsm
tite
un
ti ts
o  
nna
etlilo
enaux
5
4
9
Direction de
Us
n irte
é l a
dti
uo
  n
dis
a la
ov
ge
uc 
e l
  es
é  
gip
sa
l r
a lte
if ments nationaux
5
2
3
10
Total
11
8
3
22
Total
141
176
4
321

Annex Q48 - Overview of posts 2014-2018
2016

Direction générale / Direction / Unité / Service
AD
AST
SC
Total
Direction générale des Politiques internes de l'Union
17
9
26
Unité de programmation stratégique
3
1
4
Direction des politiques économiques et scientifiques
1
2
3
Direction de
S s
e p
cro
éltiti
a q
ri u
a e
t  s
d  é
e  c
l o
a  n
c o
o m
m iq
m u
i e
sss
i  
oe
nt  s
d c
e i e
l' n
e tif
m iq
pl u
oie
  s
et des affaires sociales
11
8
19
Direction de
S s
e p
cro
éltiti
a q
ri u
a e
t  s
d  é
e  c
l o
a  n
c o
o m
m iq
m u
i e
sss
i  
oe
nt  s
d c
e ie
s  n
a t
f iffi
aq
iru
ee
s s
 économiques et monétaires
12
9
21
Direction de
S s
e p
cro
éltiti
a q
ri u
a e
t  s
d  é
e  c
l o
a  n
c o
o m
m iq
m u
i e
sss
i  
oe
nt  s
d c
u i en
m t
a irfi
c q
hu
ée
 i s
ntérieur et de la protection des consommateurs
12
9
21
Direction de
S s
e p
cro
éltiti
a q
ri u
a e
t  s
d  é
e  c
l o
a  n
c o
o m
m iq
m u
i e
sss
i  
oe
nt  s
d c
e i e
l'inti
dfiq
usu
t e
ri s
e, de la recherche et de l'énergie
13
10
1
24
Direction de
S s
e p
cro
éltiti
a q
ri u
a e
t  s
d  é
e  c
l o
a  n
c o
o m
m iq
m u
i e
sss
i  
oe
nt  s
d c
e i e
l' n
e t
nif
viq
r u
o e
n s
nement, de la santé publique et de la sécurité alimentaire
12
9
1
22
Direction de
Ds
é p
p o
a l
r itti
e qu
m e
e s
nt é
t c
h o
é n
mo
am
ti i
qq
uu
ee
  s
d  e
est  s
p c
o ile
itin
qtif
u iq
esu
  e
é s
conomiques, scientifiques et de la qualité de la vie
15
11
26
Direction de
Us
n ip
t o
é lit
d'iq
a u
s e
si s té
a c
n o
c n
e o
  m
à l iq
a  u
g e
o s
u  e
v t
e  rs
nci
a e
n n
c ti
e f
  iq
é u
c e
o s
nomique
8
5
13
Commission spéciale sur les rescrits fiscaux et autres mesures similaires par leur nature ou leur effet
4
3
7
Total
88
66
2
156
Direction des politiques structurelles et de cohésion
1
1
2
Direction de
S s
e p
cro
éltiti
a q
ri u
a e
t  s
d  s
e  tlru
a  c
c tu
o re
m ll
m e
i s
s  
sie
ot 
nd
  e
d  
ec
 lo
' h
a é
grs
i i
co
un
lture et du développement rural
11
9
20
Direction de
S s
e p
cro
éltiti
a q
ri u
a e
t  s
d  s
e  tlru
a  c
c tu
o re
m ll
m e
i s
s  
sie
ot 
nd
  e
d  
ec
 lo
ah
  é
p s
ê io
c n
he
10
8
18
Direction de
S s
e p
cro
éltiti
a q
ri u
a e
t  s
d  s
e  tlru
a  c
c tu
o re
m ll
m e
i s
s  
sie
ot 
nd
  e
d  
uc
  o
d h
é é
v s
elio
o n
ppement régional
10
8
18
Direction de
S s
e p
cro
éltiti
a q
ri u
a e
t  s
d  s
e  tlru
a  c
c tu
o re
m ll
m e
i s
s  
sie
ot 
nd
  e
d  
ec
so
 th
r é
a s
n io
s n
ports et du tourisme
14
8
1
23
Direction de
S s
e p
cro
éltiti
a q
ri u
a e
t  s
d  s
e  tlru
a  c
c tu
o re
m ll
m e
i s
s  
sie
ot 
nd
  e
d  
ec
 lo
ah
  é
c s
ulito
un
re et de l'éducation
8
7
1
16
Direction de
Ds
é p
p o
a l
r itti
e qu
m e
e s
nt s
t t
hru
é c
mtu
atrie
q ll
ues
   e
d t
e  
sd
  e
p  
oc
lio
ti h
q é
u s
eio
s n
structurelles et de cohésion
13
7
20
Total
67
48
2
117
Direction des droits des citoyens et des affaires constitutionnelles
1
3
4
Direction de
S s
e d
crro
ét it
as
ri d
ate
  s
d  c
e  ilto
a  y
c e
o ns
m  e
mi t 
s d
sie
os 
n a
  f
d f
ea
s i rle
i s
b  
e c
rto
én
s s
  t
c itu
vi tlio
e n
s, n
  e
d l
e l e
l s
a justice et des affaires intérieures
16
11
1
28
Direction de
S s
e d
crro
ét it
as
ri d
ate
  s
d  c
e  ilto
a  y
c e
o ns
m  e
mi t 
s d
sie
os 
n a
  f
d f
ea
s i re
afs
f  c
ai o
r n
ess
 jtit
u u
ri ti
d o
i n
q n
u e
eslles
13
7
1
21
Direction de
S s
e d
crro
ét it
as
ri d
ate
  s
d  c
e  ilto
a  y
c e
o ns
m  e
mi t 
s d
sie
os 
n a
  f
d f
ea
s i re
afs
f  c
ai o
r n
ess
  t
citu
o t
n io
stin
t n
u e
ti ll
o e
n s
nelles
8
6
14
Direction de
S s
e d
crro
ét it
as
ri d
ate
  s
d  c
e  ilto
a  y
c e
o ns
m  e
mi t 
s d
sie
os 
n a
  f
d f
ea
s i re
drs 
oic
t o
s n
dst
e i
 ltu
a t
  i
f o
e nn
m e
m ll
e e
  s
et de l'égalité des genres
7
7
14
Direction de
S s
e d
crro
ét it
as
ri d
ate
  s
d  c
e  ilto
a  y
c e
o ns
m  e
mi t 
s d
sie
os 
n a
  f
d f
ea
s i re
p s
ét ic
ti onstitutionnelles
9
9
18
Direction de
Ds
é d
p r
ao
rtits
e  d
m e
e s
nt  c
t i
hto
é ye
m n
atis 
q e
u t 
e d
  e
d s
e  a
  f
d f
r a
oiir
t e
s s
d c
e o
s n
c s
itti
otu
y t
e io
n n
s  n
e e
t  ll
des affaires constitutionnelles
10
8
18
Total
64
51
2
117
Direction des affaires budgétaires
1
2
3
Direction de
S s
e a
crff
é a
t i
are
i s
at b
du
ed
 l g
a é
  t
c a
o ire
m s
mission des budgets
11
9
20
Direction de
S s
e a
crff
é a
t i
are
i s
at b
du
ed
 l g
a é
  t
c a
o ire
m s
mission du contrôle budgétaire
8
7
15
Direction de
Ds
é a
p f
afra
t ir
e e
ms 
e b
n u
t  d
t g
h é
é ta
m i
a r
tie
qs
ue des Affaires budgétaires
9
5
14
Total
29
23
0
52
Direction de la coordination législative et des conciliations
1
1
2
Direction de
U l
na
it c
é o
do
erd
s  in
c a
o t
n io
ci n
li  l
a é
ti g
o is
n l
s a
  t
e itv
  e
d  
ee
 l t 
a d
  e
c s
o  
d c
éo
c n
i c
si il
o ia
n tions
9
4
1
14
Direction de
U l
na
it c
é o
do
er d
l i
an
  a
c t
o io
orn
d ilé
n g
atisl
o a
n t
  ilv
é e
g  ie
slt 
ad
ti e
v s
e c
eo
t n
dci
e l ilat io
prn
os
grammation
10
8
18
Direction de la coordinati
S o
e n
r  
v lié
c g
e i sl
C atliv
e e
n  
d e
ri t 
e d
r e
ds
e c
s o
r n
é c
u il
n ia
o ti
no
s ns
1
4
1
6
Direction de
U l
na
it c
é o
pord
urin
 l a
a ti
con
o l
r é
d g
i i
n s
a lta
i t
o iv
n e
d e
e t
s  d
a e
c s
ti  c
vi o
t n
é c
s  il
é ia
di tio
orn
i s
ales et de communication
4
3
1
8
Total
25
20
3
48
Direction des ressources
1
2
3
Direction de
Us
n irte
é s
  s
P o
e u
r r
s c
o e
n s
nel
4
14
18
Direction de
Us
n irte
é s
 Is
no
f u
o r
r ce
m s
atique
2
13
15
Direction de
Us
n irte
é s
  s
Fio
nu
arc
n e
c s
es
2
7
9
Total
9
36
0
45
Total
302
254
9
565
Direction générale des Politiques externes de l'Union
2
4
6
Direction des commissions
1
1
2
Direction de
S s
e c
cro
ém
tam
ri is
at s
  i
d o
e n
 l s
a commission des affaires étrangères
11
7
1
19
Direction des commissio
Sn
es
crétariat de la sous-commission de la sécurité et de la défense
7
5
12
Direction des commissio
Sn
es
crétariat de la sous-commission des droits de l'homme / Unité des droits de l'homme
7
6
13
Direction de
S s
e c
cro
ém
tam
ri is
at s
  i
d o
e n
 l s
a commission du développement
8
6
14
Direction de
S s
e c
cro
ém
tam
ri is
at s
  i
d o
e n
 l s
a commission du commerce international
16
10
26
Total
50
35
1
86
Direction des régions
1
1
2
Direction de
Us
n irtég
  io
E n
ur s
ope : Elargissement et Espace économique européen
3
4
7
Direction de
Us
n irtég
  io
Asn
i s
e, Australie et Nouvelle-Zélande
6
7
13
Direction de
Ds
é r

ag
rtio
e ns
ment thématique des relations extérieures
14
8
1
23
Direction de
Us
n irtég
  io
E n
ur s
omed et Moyen-Orient
5
6
11
Direction de
Us
n irtég
  io
A n
m s
érique latine
4
5
9
Direction de
Us
n irtég
  io
E n
ur s
ope : Partenariat oriental et Russie
4
5
9
Direction de
Us
n irtég
  io
Af n
ri s
que, Caraïbes et Pacifique
3
4
7
Direction de
Us
n irtég
  io
R n
el s
ations transatlantiques et G8
4
3
7
Total
44
43
1
88
Direction des ressources
2
2
4
Direction de
Us
n irte
é s
  s
P o
e u
r r
s c
o e
n s
nel
2
5
1
8
Direction de
Us
n irte
é s
  s
Fio
nu
arc
n e
c s
es
2
8
10
Direction de
Us
n irte
é s
 Is
no
f u
o r
r ce
m s
atique
1
4
5
Total
7
19
1
27
Direction du Soutien à la démocratie
1
1
2
Direction du Soutien à la
S d
e é
rvm
ic o
e c
  r
d a
e t ie
soutien à la médiation du Parlement européen
1
1
2
Direction du
U S
ni o
t u
é  ti
Ae
c n
ti  à
o  
n la
s   d
d é
é m
m o
o c
cr ra
at tiie
e et élections
5
3
8
Direction du
U S
ni o
t u
é  ti
Ae
c n
ti  à
o  
n la
s   d
pr ém
a o
d c
h r
é a
s tiie
on
3
1
4
Direction du
U S
ni o
t u
é  ti
Ae
c n
ti  à
o  
n la
s   d
dr é
o m
it o
s  c
d ra
e  t
l'ie
homme
3
2
5
Total
13
8
0
21
Total
116
109
3
228

Annex Q48 - Overview of posts 2014-2018
2016

Direction générale / Direction / Unité / Service
AD
AST
SC
Total
Direction générale des services de recherche parlementaire
2
2
4
BUDGET RESERVE COMITES
16
5
21
Unité Ressources
1
3
4
Service des ressources humaines
1
3
4
Service des finances
1
4
5
Service des technologies de l’information
1
4
5
Unité de la Stratégie et coordination
11
1
1
13
Direction Service de recherche pour les députés
1
2
3
Direction Se
U rv
ni i
t c
é e
   
d d
e e
s  
  re
p c
olih
tie
qrc
u h
e e
s   p
é o
c u
o r
n  l
o es
mi  d
q é
u p
e u
s tés
20
5
25
Direction Se
U rv
ni i
t c
é e
   
d d
e e
s  
  re
p c
olih
tie
qrc
u h
e e
s   p
st o
r u
u r
c  
t le
ur s
e ld
l é
e p
s utés
20
5
25
Direction Se
U rv
ni i
t c
é e
   
d d
e e
s  
  re
p c
olih
tie
qrc
u h
e e
s   p
d o
e u
s  r 
cile
t s
o  
y d
e é
n p
s utés
13
6
19
Direction Se
U rv
ni i
t c
é e
   
d d
e e
s  
  re
p c
olih
tie
qrc
u h
e e
s   p
e o
xt u
e r l
n es députés
17
6
23
Direction Se
U rv
ni i
t c
é e
   
d d
e e
s  
  re
p c
olih
tie
qrc
u h
e e
s   p
b o
u u
d r
g  l
é e
t s
ai  rd

s putés
6
1
7
Direction Se
U rv
ni i
t c
é e
  &