Esta es la versión HTML de un fichero adjunto a una solicitud de acceso a la información 'Working Party on Technical Harmonisation'.


Brussels, 14 November 2019
WK 12885/2019 INIT
LIMITE
COMPET
MI
ENV
ENT
CHIMIE
SAN
CONSOM
DELACT
WORKING PAPER
This is a paper intended for a specific community of recipients. Handling and
further distribution are under the sole responsibility of community members.
WORKING DOCUMENT
From:
European Commission
To:
Delegations
N° prev. doc.:
ST 13972/2/19 REV 2
N° Cion doc.:
ST 12919/19 + ADD 1 - C(2019) 7227
Subject:
Commission Delegated Regulation (EU) …/…of 4.10.2019 amending, for the
purposes of its adaptation to technical and scientific progress, Regulation (EC)
No. 1272/2008 of the European Parliament and of the Council on classification,
labelling and packaging of substances and mixtures and correcting that regulation
- Non-Paper by the Commission to the Permanent Representations of Member
States on the Harmonised Classification of Titanium Dioxide (TiO2)
Delegations will find in the Annex the Non-Paper by the Commission concerning the above Delegated
Act as requested by Delegations at the Attaché s Meeting of the Working Party on Technical
Harmonisation on 8 November 2019. 
WK 12885/2019 INIT
ECOMP 3 A     AW/at
LIMITE
EN


 
 
 
Non-Paper to Permanent Representations of Member States on the harmonised 
classification of TiO2 
Introduction 
In  the  course  of  the  Council  Working  Party  on  Technical  Harmonisation  (Dangerous 
Substances-Chemicals)  on  8  November  2019,  Commission  and  Member  States  have  held 
discussions  regarding  a  few  substances  amongst  which  titanium  dioxide  (TiO2),  more 
specifically  on  their  harmonised  classification  and  labelling  under  the  14th  Adaptation  to 
Technical  and  Scientific  Progress  (ATP)  to  the  CLP  Regulation.  It  was  the  first  time  that  a 
Commission Delegated Regulation had been adopted for CLP as the former ATPs had been 
subject to the regulatory procedure with scrutiny, since they had been adopted before the 
entry into force of the recent Omnibus Regulation1. 
The  Commission  wishes to  highlight  again  the importance  of harmonised  classification and 
labelling for both human health and the environment. 
 
The  need  for  harmonised  substance  classification  to  protect  human  health 
and the environment  
 
One of the main aims of CLP is to ensure a high level of protection of human health and the 
environment.  Harmonised  classification  on  the  basis  of  RAC  opinions2  allows  a  more 
thorough  and  independent  assessment  of  hazards  compared  to  self-classification  by 
industry.  Applying  the  harmonised  classification  and  labelling  (CLH)  process  to  the 
substances of highest concern also ensures that those substances are labelled and packaged 
in  an  appropriate  and  harmonised  way.  Although  a  detailed  benefits  analysis  of  the  CLH 
process in general and of a harmonised classification for a specific substance in particular is 
difficult to carry out, it can reasonably be expected that a correct classification and labelling 
resulting from the CLH process improves the quality of information on hazards and risks of 
substances  and  subsequently  users'  safety  when  handling  the  substances.  In  addition, 
benefits  for  health  of  consumers  and  workers  and  for  the  environment  may  derive  from 
measures triggered by downstream legislation linking specific risk management measures to 
CLP classification. 
 
 
                                                 
1 Regulation (EU) 2019/1243 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 20 June 2019 adapting a number 
of legal acts providing for the use of the regulatory procedure with scrutiny to Articles 290 and 291 of the 
Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (OJ L 198/241, 25.7.2019, p.241). 
2 Opinions adopted by the Risk Assessment Committee at the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA), based on 
which the Commission adopts harmonised classification and labelling under CLP. 

 

Substances  with  a  harmonised  classification  are  listed  in  Annex  VI  to  CLP.  There  is  a  legal 
obligation under Article 37(5) CLP for the Commission to include, without undue delay, [new 
or  revised]  classifications  (entries)  in  Annex  VI  on  the  basis  of  the  scientific  assessment 
carried out by the Committee for Risk Assessment (RAC). The 14th ATP to CLP introduces new 
or modified harmonised classifications for 28 substances, amongst which more than 10 are 
classified as CMRs (carcinogenic, mutagenic or toxic for reproduction). Examples are cobalt 
(CMR  -  most  relevant  for  workers  protection)  and  diisohexyl  phthalate  (toxic  for 
reproduction  -  most  relevant  for  consumers  as  it  can  be  found  in  consumer  products). 
Methylmercuric chloride and several pesticides have also been classified as CMRs.  
 
The classification process of TiO2 
 
Introduction 
 
The RAC opinion on TiO2 was adopted in September 2017 and was subsequently transmitted 
to the Commission. While the Member State that submitted the classification dossier to RAC 
had  proposed  to  classify  TiO2  as  a  presumed  carcinogen  (Carcinogen  Category  1B),  RAC 
concluded  in  their  opinion  that  a  classification  as  a  suspected  carcinogen  (Carcinogen 
Category 2) was warranted.  
The harmonised classification of TiO2 was discussed in expert group meetings (meetings of 
Competent Authorities on REACH and CLP - CARACAL) several times as well as in an expert 
meeting dedicated especially to the classification of TiO2 in April 2018. On the basis of the 
discussions  held  and  input  received  during  these  meetings,  the  Commission  developed  its 
draft legal text, which was subsequently discussed several times in the regulatory committee 
(REACH Committee) as an act subject to the regulatory procedure with scrutiny. 
Following  the  entry  into  force  of  the  alignment  ‘Omnibus  Regulation’  (Regulation  (EU) 
2019/1243) on 26 July 2019, the form of the draft act changed from ‘Commission Regulation’ 
subject to the regulatory procedure with scrutiny to ‘Commission Delegated Regulation’. The 
draft  delegated  act  was  presented  for  a  final  consultation  at  the  CARACAL  meeting  on  18 
September 2019. Based on that consultation, as well as on all previously received comments, 
including  comments  received  through  the  World  Trade  Organisation  Technical  Barriers  to 
Trade notification (WTO – TBT), the Commission concluded that the proposed classification 
was the most balanced one and proceeded with the adoption of the Commission Delegated 
Regulation. 
 
 

 

A  balanced  proposal  –  scope  of  the  classification  of  TiO2  and  of  mixtures 
containing TiO2  
 
As stated above, throughout the many discussions that were organised, several arguments 
were  raised  in  favour  of  and  against  the  harmonised  classification  of  TiO2.  Very  clear  and 
strong  arguments  in  favour  of  harmonised  classification  under  CLP  were:  (i)  the  legal 
obligation for the Commission to follow up on a RAC opinion and (ii) the obligation to inform 
people (consumers, workers and self-employed workers) about the hazards of the products 
they  use.  This  element  of  hazard  communication  through  labelling  is  essential  in  the 
protection of human health and the environment under CLP. It should be noted that hazard 
communication through labelling reflects the outcome of a scientific assessment (by RAC in 
this case) and should not take into account any use or exposure-related considerations.  
On the other hand, it was argued that the toxicity caused by TiO2 is of a particular nature, 
i.e.  it  concerns  particle  toxicity.  Only  when  particles  can  be  respired  and  reach  the  lower 
regions of the lung can toxicity arise. It was questioned to what extent such particle toxicity 
should  be  covered  under  CLP  and  it  was  argued  that  a  direct  translation  of  the  substance 
identity  in  the  RAC  opinion  would  not  reflect  the  fact  that  the  concern  is  related  only  to 
respirable particles.  
Considering  it  essential  not  to  deprive  users  of  chemicals  of  information  on  their  hazards, 
the  Commission  concluded  it  was  necessary  to  proceed  with  the  classification,  albeit  in  an 
adapted form, in order to address the concerns expressed with regard to the nature of the 
toxicity caused by TiO2.   
 
The final entry for TiO2 in Annex VI to CLP as adopted, therefore, looks as follows: 
At  substance  level,  only  TiO2  in  the  respirable  form  (TiO2  particles  with  an  aerodynamic 
diameter ≤ 10 µm) will be classified as a suspected carcinogen, 
For mixtures containing TiO2, a similar consideration with regard to respirability was taken 
into account (if the mixture cannot be respired, a fortiori any TiO2 contained in the mixture 
cannot be respired): 
-  only  mixtures  in  powder  form  containing  ≥  1%  of  TiO2  which  is  in  the  form  of  or 
incorporated in particles with aerodynamic diameter ≤ 10 µm will be classified as suspected 
carcinogen, 
-  liquid  mixtures  (e.g.  paints)  containing  such  respirable  particles  of  TiO2  will  not  be 
classified, 
 
 

 

- solid mixtures containing such respirable particles of TiO2 will not be classified. 
In  order to  address the situation  where  liquid  mixtures  containing  ≥  1% of  respirable TiO2 
particles (such mixtures would not have to be classified)  are used in such a way that small 
droplets are formed that are respirable, a labelling requirement was added:  
'Warning!  Hazardous  respirable  droplets  may  be  formed  when  sprayed.  Do  not  breathe 
spray or mist'. 
A similar warning statement was introduced for solid mixtures containing ≥ 1% of respirable 
TiO2 particles: 
'Warning! Hazardous respirable dust may be formed when used. Do not breathe dust.' 
 
The  alignment  of  the  Commission’s  adopted  classification  of  TiO2  with  RAC’s 
conclusion 
 
It has been claimed that the classification of TiO2 is unfounded and not commensurate with 
expert  opinions.  It  should  be  noted,  however,  that  the  Commission  relied  on  the  scientific 
opinion of the Risk Assessment Committee (RAC) of the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA). 
In September 2017, RAC concluded that TiO2 should be classified as a substance suspected 
of causing cancer (carcinogenic Category 2) by inhalation. This is in line with the conclusion 
of  the  International  Agency  for  Research  on  Cancer  (IARC),  a  World  Health  Organisation 
agency, which categorised TiO2 as ‘possibly carcinogenic to humans’. Moreover, with regard 
to  the  claim  that  interspecies  differences  exist  between  rats  and  humans,  questioning  the 
extent to which test results in rats can be extrapolated to humans, in the RAC opinion it was 
emphasised  that  the  experimental  and  human  evidence  currently  available  does  not 
conclusively  exclude  a  carcinogenic  potential  or  hazard  of  TiO2  in  humans.  In  addition,  it 
should  be  noted  that  under  the  Cosmetics  Regulation  (see  Commission  Regulation  (EU) 
2016/1143)  the  use  of  TiO2  (nano)  in  cosmetics  is  already  restricted  as  its  use  in  spray 
products cannot be considered safe. 
 In its opinion, RAC concluded that TiO2 is a suspected carcinogen only in case of inhalation. 
In the legal act, this was transposed by specifying that only TiO2 in the powder form needs 
to be classified, if the particle size of the substance has an aerodynamic diameter ≤ 10 µm. In 
other words, based on input from scientific experts, the Commission translated the concept 
of  respirability  into  a  specific  value  for  the  particle  diameter.  This  would  also  facilitate 
enforcement.  
It  should  be  noted  that  the  RAC  opinion  did  not  provide  any  advice  on  how  mixtures 
containing TiO2 should be classified, as the mandate of RAC is limited to assessing substance 
hazards  only.  Any  derogations  or  requirements  relating  to  mixture  classification  can 
therefore not be in contradiction with the RAC opinion. 
 
 

 

Should particle toxicity be covered by CLP at all? 
 
It  has  been  claimed  that  the  effects  on  the  lung  that  lead  to  the  adopted  harmonised 
classification are non-substance specific or not intrinsic to TiO2, but are rather a dust effect 
(commonly called particle toxicity) and should therefore not be covered under CLP. 
 
Indeed,  TiO2  has  been  associated  to  a  group  of  substances  designated  as  ‘poorly  soluble 
particles of low toxicity’ or PSLTs. These substances are chemically inert and thus show low 
toxicity based on conventional biochemical mechanisms. However, PSLTs have been shown 
to  be  able  to  overwhelm  clearance  mechanisms  in  the  lung,  thereby  leading  to  chronic 
inflammation  and  eventually  to  the  possibility of  cancer.  The  question  of  the  scope  of  the 
CLP Regulation and of whether PSLT particles and particle toxicity should be covered under 
that Regulation has been discussed at length. The outcome was that particle toxicity can be 
considered an intrinsic property and should be considered as such under the CLP Regulation. 
The fact that not all dusts or particles are necessarily carcinogens demonstrates that there is 
still a substance-specific element at play in any toxicity exerted.  
 Other  substances  with  PSLT  particles  may  also  exhibit  similar  properties  to  TiO2. 
Nevertheless,  since  no  harmonised  classification  is  adopted  for  other  PSLT  particles,  these 
remain subject to self-classification at present and the harmonised classification only applies 
to TiO2 particles. 
 
What level of protection will the classification provide?   
 
The  formal  adoption  of  RAC’s  scientific  conclusion  in  the  CLP  Regulation  will  increase  the 
level  of  protection  of  human  health.  It  will  oblige  industry,  inter  alia,  under  the  REACH 
Regulation,  to  perform  a  risk  assessment  for  workers  and  consumers  exposed  to  this 
substance,  thus  allowing  the  identification  of  risk  management  measures  to  reduce  any 
identified risk for human health. 
 
 

 

Could  a  better  level  of  protection  not  be  achieved  with  other  regulatory 
measures (occupational health and safety legislation, dust limit values)? 
It has been claimed that appropriate  occupational health and safety controls are adequate 
to protect public and workers’ health and safety in relation to potential TiO2 exposure.  The 
Commission  is  fully  aware  of  proposals  that  were  made  by  different  stakeholders  to  only 
address the issue of TiO2 hazard and exposure under workers protection legislation, through 
the  establishment  of  an  EU  harmonised  occupational  exposure  limit  (OEL). However,  while 
concerns  with  TiO2  are mainly  a  workers protection  issue, they  are  not exclusively  so.  The 
issue  also  pertains  to  consumers,  and,  importantly,  to  the  self-employed,  who  are  not 
covered by occupational health and safety legislation. In those cases, CLP would provide the 
necessary information to initiate the required actions to ensure protection. It is important to 
know  that  CLP  provides  information  on  hazardous  properties  of  substances  and  on  basic 
safety measures to be taken (e.g. wear gloves), while other pieces of legislation (e.g., REACH, 
OSH)  provide  more  detailed  risk  management  measures  to  deal  with  specific  hazard 
properties identified under CLP. Overall, the Commission believes that the CLP Regulation is 
the relevant legal instrument to address the overall human health concern related to TiO2 
that  can  be  complemented  by  more  specific  legislation  if  necessary,  including  workers 
protection legislation. 
 
What  is  the  Commission’s  assessment  of  the  socio-economic  impact  of  the 
classification of TiO2 as a suspected carcinogen? 
 
The question has been raised by some Member States and industry stakeholders to perform 
an  impact  assessment  of  the  harmonised  classification  and  labelling  of  TiO2.  The 
Commission  considers  that  such  impact  assessment  is  not  necessary,  whether  in  the 
framework of the harmonisation of classification in general or in the context of the 14th ATP 
in  particular.  The  CLP  Regulation  does  not  stipulate  any  obligation  to  perform  an  impact 
assessment  in  the  process  of  harmonised  classification  according  to  Article  37  of  the 
Regulation. More importantly, and regardless of any such obligation, it is considered that the 
benchmark  criterion  of  ‘significant  impacts’,  which  is  normally  required  for  an  impact 
assessment  to  take  place,  is  not  relevant  for  the  harmonised  classification  of  substances 
under the CLP Regulation. Indeed, the impacts in CLP Regulation of a new classification are 
related  mainly  to  labelling  and  packaging.  Thus,  when  deciding  on  the  harmonised 
classification of a substance, any decision on harmonised classification should solely rely on 
the hazardous properties of the substance, in line with the nature and the spirit of the CLP 
Regulation,  and  not  on  the  assessment  of  any  potential  impacts  in  other  legislation.  Such 
potential  downstream  consequences  of  classification  should  be  assessed  in  the 
corresponding  pieces  of  legislation  or  they  are  considered  to  have  been  assessed  when 
those pieces of legislation were adopted. 
 
 

 

Having  said  that,  in  order  to  address  the  concerns  expressed  by  various  stakeholders,  the 
Commission did a qualitative assessment of the consequences of classification of TiO2 as a 
suspected  carcinogen  on  various  pieces  of  downstream  legislation.  The  outcome  of  that 
review is described in the following section. 
 
Potential  downstream  consequences  of  classification  of  a  substance  as  a 
suspected carcinogen: waste and sectoral legislation 
 
It  is  a  known  fact  that  the  most  significant  downstream  legal  consequences  occur  for 
substances classified as carcinogen category 1 (known or presumed carcinogen), rather than 
category  2  (suspected  carcinogen).  Nevertheless,  also  for  suspected  carcinogens  certain 
downstream consequences may be expected.  
Substances  classified  as  carcinogens  category  1  are  normally  directly  banned  in  cosmetics, 
toys, pesticides and in chemicals for consumer use. In contrast, for carcinogens category 2, 
there  are  no  such  significant  direct  consequences.  More  specifically,  with  regard  to  the 
legislation  on  plant  protection  products,  biocidal  products,  food  additives,  contaminants, 
water  and  pharmaceuticals,  there  would  be  no  or  minor  consequences.  Regarding  other 
legislation,  the  use  of  TiO2  could  continue  under  certain  conditions  (e.g.  granting  of 
authorisation,  exemption,  demonstration  of  safe  use);  this  is  the  case  for  food  contact 
materials, plastic food contact materials, toys, feed additives, cosmetics and EU Ecolabel.  
After contacting other services responsible for these downstream pieces of legislation, and 
after research conducted, it is estimated that the number of mixtures placed on the market 
to be classified as carcinogenic will be  limited. 
With  regard  to  the  possible  consequences  on  waste  classification,  the  Commission 
developed  an  update  of  the  guidance  on  waste  classification3  to  cover  the  specific  case  of 
waste  containing  TiO2,  to  be  discussed  with  national  experts,  which  will  state  that  –  in 
analogy to classification of mixtures containing TiO2 under CLP - only waste in powder form 
containing 1% or more respirable particles of TiO2 (≤ 10 µm) will be classified as suspected 
carcinogen. 
 
More generally, on the question to what extent classification of TiO2 will hamper the circular 
economy, in addition to the amendments to the guidance on waste classification referred to 
above, it should be noted that even if waste containing TiO2 is classified as hazardous, this 
does not prevent it from being recycled. In other words, classification of waste per se does 
not necessarily impact the circular economy. 
 
 
                                                 
Commission notice on technical guidance on the classification of waste, C/2018/1447, OJ C 124, 9.4.2018, p. 
1–134 

 

Substance evaluation under REACH 
 
The  claim  has  been  made  that  since  TiO2  is  the  subject  of  substance  evaluation  under 
REACH, the outcome of the process should be awaited before any decision on classification 
under CLP is taken. It should be noted, however, that the tests proposed to be conducted in 
the  context  of  substance  evaluation  will  take  several  years  to  be  finalised.  Thus,  the 
Commission  sees  no  scientific  or  legal  justification  to  wait  for  such  information  before 
concluding  on  the  classification  of  TiO2.  If  the  information  resulting  from  the  substance 
evaluation  could  be  of  impact  on  the  harmonised  classification,  a  proposal  to  change  the 
existing classification can be submitted by a Member State in accordance with Article 37 of 
CLP. 
 
Problem of extending the deadline due to the specific case of CTPHT  
 
Due  to  an  administrative  oversight,  the  old  harmonised  classification  and  labelling  of  one 
substance  (pitch,  coal  tar,  high-temp.  (CTPHT)),  will  enter  into  application  on  1  December 
2019, with the result that the classification currently in force will be erroneously replaced by 
the  original  harmonised  classification  and  labelling.  The  14th  ATP  corrects  this  error.  If  the 
14th ATP does not apply in a timely manner, it will mean that manufacturers, importers and 
downstream  users  will  have  to  classify,  label  and  package  the  substance  CTPHT,  and 
mixtures containing it, in accordance with the original classification (i.e. carcinogen category 
1B,  instead  of  the  current  classification  as  carcinogen  category  1A  (stricter  than  1B), 
Mutagen  category  1B  and  Toxic  for  reproduction  category  1B).    This  will  potentially  also 
trigger  unwanted  consequences  on  other  pieces  of  legislation  (e.g.  product  specific 
legislation,  workers  protection  legislation,  etc.)  which  refer  to  the  CLP  classification.  In 
general,  it  is  expected  to  affect  the  current  level  of  protection  of  human  health  and  the 
efficient functioning of the internal market.  
____________________ 

 

Document Outline