Ceci est une version HTML d'une pièce jointe de la demande d'accès à l'information 'The EEAS-Commission services issues paper for PSC on the Integrated Approach to Conflict and Crises'.



EEAS/COM(2017)8 
Ref. Ares(2017)2821812 - 06/06/2017
Limited 
 
EUROPEAN EXTERNAL ACTION SERVICE 
 
CSDPCR.PRISM  - Conflict Prevention, RoL/SSR, Integrated Approach, Stabilisation and Mediation 
 
 
Working document of the European External Action Service 
 
 

of 02/06/2017 
 
 
 
 

 
EEAS Reference 

EEAS/COM(2017)8 
 
 

Limited 
Distribution marking 
 

 
 
To [and/or GSC 

GSC  
distribution acronyms] 
 
 

The EU Integrated Approach to external conflicts and crises 
Title / Subject  
- EEAS-Commission services Issues Paper for PSC 
 
 
 
[Ref. prev. doc.] 

 
 
 
 

 
 
EEAS/COM(2017)8 
CSDPCR.PRISM  - Conflict Prevention, RoL/SSR, Integrated Approach, Stabilisation and 
Mediation 

Limited 

EEAS/COM(2017)8 
Limited 
 
 
The EU Integrated Approach to external conflicts and crises 
EEAS-Commission services Issues Paper for PSC 
 
Introduction  
Introducing the Integrated Approach 
1.  The Global Strategy mentions the Integrated Approach to external conflicts and crises as one of 
its  priorities,  with  the  aim  of  further  strengthening the  EU's  and  Member  States'  action  in  this 
area. It advocates an approach that fosters human security, is conflict sensitive and ensures that 
women's  key  role  in  peacebuilding  and  State-building  is  fully  acknowledged  and  supported. 
Also,  the  Integrated  Approach  sees  adherence  to  human  and  fundamental  rights  as  crucial  in 
assessing,  preventing  and  resolving  conflict.  The  Integrated  Approach  bases  itself  on,  and 
expands  the  scope  and  ambition  of  the  Comprehensive  Approach.  The  Integrated  Approach 
requires  the  EU  to  further  strengthen  the  way  it  brings  together  institutions,  expertise,  and 
instruments,  and  works  with  Member  States  in  prevention  (in  the  case  of  countries  with  high 
levels of structural risks or fragility)1, peacebuilding, crisis response and stabilisation in order to 
contribute to sustainable peace.  
 
2.  The  Integrated  Approach  is  also  reflected  in  the  new  European  Consensus  on  Development, 
which emphasizes that the EU and its Member States will use development cooperation as part 
of the full range of policies and instruments to prevent, manage and help resolve conflicts and 
crises,  avert  humanitarian  needs  and  build  lasting  peace  and  good  governance.  The  new 
Consensus  highlights  peacebuilding  and  statebuilding  as  essential  for  sustainable  development 
and should take place at all levels, from global to local, and at all stages of the conflict cycle. It 
also  points  to  the  need  to  ensure  that  economic,  social  and  environmental  objectives  are  fully 
integrated with security and development objectives. 
 
3.  The  Integrated  Approach  aims  to  address  all  policy  dimensions  of  a  conflict.  It  does  this  by 
bringing  together  multiple  means  of  engagement,  such  as  diplomatic  engagement,  Common 
Security  and  Defence  Policy  (CSDP)  missions  and  operations,  development  cooperation  and 
humanitarian  assistance2  (multi-dimensional).  The  Integrated  Approach  describes  the  separate 
phases  of  conflict  (multi-phased),  aiming  to  identify  the  instruments  and  tools  that  are 
appropriate to each of the phases. The need for cooperation with external partners (multi-lateral) 
is  clearly  spelled  out  in  order  to  ensure  the  synergies  of  all  instruments.  The  Integrated 
Approach  will  further  improve  the  EU's  effectiveness  on  the  ground  by  acting  at  an 
international, regional, national and local level in an integrated manner (multi-level). 
 
4.  There  are  strong  relationships  between  actions  to  take  forward  the  Integrated  Approach  to 
external conflicts and crises and other follow-up to the Global Strategy. In particular, the Joint 
Communication  on  Resilience  will  highlight  the  relevance  of  investing  in  upstream  conflict 
                                                
1 This papers uses 'prevention' or 'conflict prevention' as shorthand for prevention of violent conflict. Prevention also 
includes prevention of relapse into conflict and prevention of the spill over of violence. 
2 EU humanitarian aid is provided solely on the basis of the needs of affected populations, in line with the European 
Consensus on Humanitarian Aid, and beyond any strategic, military, economic or other EU objective. 
 
EEAS/COM(2017)8 
CSDPCR.PRISM  - Conflict Prevention, RoL/SSR, Integrated Approach, Stabilisation and 
Mediation 

Limited 

EEAS/COM(2017)8 
Limited 
 
prevention, crisis response and conflict resolution. There are also important areas of read-across 
with the Security and Defence Implementation Plan, including maximising the potential of the 
Common  Security  and Defence  Policy  as  part  of  a  wider  EU  Integrated  Approach  to  conflicts 
and crises. 
 
Building on the achievements of the Comprehensive Approach 
 
5.  As indicated, the Integrated Approach bases itself on the concept and priorities of the 2015 Joint 
Communication  on  the  Comprehensive  Approach  to  external  conflicts  and  crises,  jointly 
developed  and  implemented  by  the  EEAS  and  Commission  Services  (including  DEVCO, 
ECHO, FPI and NEAR), and the success of its subsequent implementation. The Comprehensive 
Approach has allowed for important work in elaborating concepts and increasing coherence in 
EU and Member States external action. The way of working together and the need for increased 
coherence  and  greater  synergies  between  development,  humanitarian  and  peace-building 
activities,  as  promoted  by  the  Comprehensive  Approach,  is  retained  as  part  of  the  Integrated 
Approach.  The  Integrated  Approach  streamlines,  operationalises  and  deepens  the 
Comprehensive Approach.  
 
6.  The Integrated Approach streamlines the Comprehensive Approach by addressing the phases of 
the conflict and describing the EU's approach to each of these phases. The Integrated Approach 
operationalises  further  the  coordination  and  complementarity  of  tools  and  policies.  Doing  this 
will create more clarity on the process and enable a more strategic use of the available tools and 
policies. In this way, the EU together with Member States, can be more effective in preventing 
and responding to external conflicts and crises. 
 
 
7.  The Integrated Approach operationalises the Comprehensive Approach by increasing the EU's 
impact on the ground. The Integrated Approach will ensure a coherent EU response by aligning 
the  EU’s  diplomatic,  development  and  security  efforts.  The  EU  will  also  increase  its 
engagement  with  Member  States  on  external  conflicts  and  crises  in  order  to  achieve  an  even 
more closely coordinated position. It advocates, where useful and possible, information sharing, 
joint  analysis,  joint  programming  and  joint  implementation  with  and  between  Member  States 
and other partners.  
 
8.  The  Integrated  Approach  deepens  the  Comprehensive  Approach  by  applying,  to  the  extent 
possible, its  principles  to the  full  breadth  of  the EU's  work  on  external  conflicts and crises.  In 
pursuing  this  aim,  the  Integrated  Approach  respects and  reaffirms  the  various  mandates,  roles, 
aims and legal frameworks of the stakeholders involved. 
 
9.  The EEAS and the Commission services will act as catalysts to promote implementation of the 
Integrated  Approach  by  providing  services  and  advice.  In  order  to  support  implementation  of 
the  Global  Strategy,  the  HRVP  established  PRISM  (Prevention  of  conflict,  Rule  of  law/SSR, 
Integrated Approach, Stabilisation and Mediation), which will be the focal point for the EEAS 
and  –  together  with  relevant  EEAS  and  Commission  services,  and  in  complementarity  with 
CSDP,  geographic  and  horizontal  services  –  for  EU  responses  to  the  conflict  cycle,  including 
shared  analysis,  conflict  prevention,  early  warning,  mediation,  security  sector  reform  and  the 
rule of law as well as crisis response and stabilisation. 
 
EEAS/COM(2017)8 
CSDPCR.PRISM  - Conflict Prevention, RoL/SSR, Integrated Approach, Stabilisation and 
Mediation 

Limited 

EEAS/COM(2017)8 
Limited 
 
 
The way forward 
10. The Comprehensive Approach established a process based on action plans and progress reports. 
This  process  has  been  valuable  in  establishing  lessons  learned  on  how  the  EU  could  most 
usefully  work  in  a  coherent  way.  At  the  same  time,  this  process  made  the  system  somewhat 
rigid by the nature of the process and by focusing in advance on a limited number of priorities.  
 
11. Under  the  Integrated  Approach,  the  EU  will  prioritise  engaging  internally  and  with  Member 
States  on  substance  rather  than  on  process.  The  EU  will  engage  with  Member  States  to 
exchange  information  on  and  look  for  complementarities  with  regard  to  the  identification, 
prevention  of  and  response  to  external  conflicts  and  crises,  on  the  basis  of  country  cases  and 
thematic  issues.  The  EU  would  like  to  reflect  with  Member  States  on  how  they  can  be  more 
strongly  involved  in  the  result  areas  and  activities  included  in  this  paper.  This  paper  gives  an 
overview of the results the EU envisions to achieve by implementing the Integrated Approach.  
 
12. Following  completion  of  the  2016-2017  Comprehensive  Approach  Action  Plan,  it  is  now 
foreseen  that  the  Integrated  Approach  should  succeed  the  Comprehensive  Approach  as  the 
framework to promote a more coherent approach by the EU to external conflicts and crises. The 
EU  will  present  a  final  report  on  the  implementation  of  the  2016-2017  Comprehensive 
Approach Action Plan in spring 2018. 
  
 
EEAS/COM(2017)8 
CSDPCR.PRISM  - Conflict Prevention, RoL/SSR, Integrated Approach, Stabilisation and 
Mediation 

Limited 

EEAS/COM(2017)8 
Limited 
 
The  section  below  outlines  how  the  EU  will  strengthen  its  (preventive)  response  to  external 
conflicts  and  crises  on  cross  cutting  themes.  It  looks  at  the  different  phases  of  the  conflict  cycle 
ranging from prevention, to crisis response and stabilisation, and identifies results to be achieved. 
 
Common aspects to the full conflict cycle 
 
A.  Shared analysis and conflict sensitivity 
The  reinvigorated  EU  approach  to  Resilience  implies  a  progressive  shift  in  emphasis  from  crisis 
containment  to  upstream  measures  founded  in  long-term,  but  flexible,  country  and  regional 
strategies that are better risk-informed and less instrument driven. In order to achieve this, the EU 
will further enhance its capacity to conduct analysis. The purpose of such analysis is to assess the 
underlying  vulnerabilities  and  causes  of  (emerging)  conflicts,  potential  factors  of  resilience  and, 
consequently,  options  on  what  type(s)  of  engagement  are  most  effective  given  the  context.  This 
analysis provides a basis for drafting conflict sensitive strategic and operational plans and, where 
feasible, for joint implementation.  
 
The  EU  should  further  strengthen  the  degree  to  which  its  engagement  is  informed  by  conflict 
analysis.  Also,  it  should  further  strengthen  the  resilience  and  gender  sensitivity  of  its  conflict 
analyses.  The  EU  will  ensure  that  there  is  up-to-date  conflict  analysis  at  the  basis  of  its  most 
intensive engagements. The EU is currently engaged in a mapping of the use of analyses that will 
inform  where  future  analyses  need  to  be  conducted.  Also,  the  EU  will  pilot  the  use  of  local  level 
analysis,  acknowledging  the  multi-level  nature  of  conflicts.  Recognizing  the  transaction  costs  of 
drawing-up  high  quality  conflict  analyses,  the  EU  will  facilitate  burden  sharing  by  coordinating 
with  Member  States,  civil  society,  other  international  organizations,  like  the  United  Nations, 
academia and other partners. 
 
The EU will reinforce its analysis sharing with Member States at headquarters level and in the field. 
In order to do this the EU will keep Member States informed of analyses it is conducting and, where 
possible, the EU will invite Member States to participate in conflict analyses workshops and it will 
debrief  Member  States  of  the  outcomes.  Recent  analyses  on  Egypt,  Jordan  and  Burundi  were 
conducted with the full involvement of Member States present locally. Member States are welcome 
to reciprocate and share relevant analysis with the EU.  
 
The  EU  will  further  strengthen  conflict  sensitivity  of  its  external  action  by  ensuring  that  its 
programming and design of interventions is informed by conflict analysis in order to maximize their 
impact and ensure that they do not cause harm. The EU will promote joint planning, programming 
and/or implementation with Member States, in fragile and conflict-affected countries. The EU will 
assess  its  on-going  relevant  EU  training  curricula  in  order  to  strengthen  the  focus  on  conflict 
sensitivity  where  needed.  For  example,  in  April  of  this  year  the  EU  provided  a  new  three  day 
training  course  for  the  EU  and  Member  States  on  conflict  analysis.  The  EU  will,  where  relevant, 
include  sessions  on  conflict  sensitivity  in  regional  seminars  of  EU  Delegations  and  by  promoting 
the use of the recently developed EU online course in conflict sensitivity. 
 
B.  Mediation support 
 
EEAS/COM(2017)8 
CSDPCR.PRISM  - Conflict Prevention, RoL/SSR, Integrated Approach, Stabilisation and 
Mediation 

Limited 

EEAS/COM(2017)8 
Limited 
 
A political settlement of a dispute is one of the best guarantees for its sustainable resolution, and 
mediation support is a crucial part  of any effort to arrive at such a settlement. In order to ensure 
efficiency, it needs to be adequately embedded in relevant structures and processes. 
To improve the work of the EU in the field of Mediation Support it is important to further raise the 
political  profile  of  this  work.  Therefore,  the  EEAS  will  integrate  its  mediation  support  capacity 
better into peace process-related work of the EU, including in the Political and Security Committee 
or  when  drafting  relevant  Foreign  Affairs  Council  conclusions.  Secondly,  the  EU  will  strengthen 
cooperation  with  mediation  support  capacities  in  international  and  regional  organisations,  in 
particular the UN, AU, OSCE and African regional economic commissions. 
 
Considering the effectiveness of mediation, the EU will engage early in peace process support; and 
seek  to  utilise  mediation  more  as  a  'tool  of  first  response  to  ongoing  and  emerging  crises'  as 
stipulated by the 2009 Concept on Mediation. The EU will enhance the capacity of CSDP missions 
to engage in mediation, including through a tailored training offer and enhanced outreach to them 
by  the  Mediation  Support  Team.  The  EU  will  also  increase  the  capacity  of  EU  Delegations  to 
support local infrastructures for peace, including mediation and peacebuilding civil society as well 
as  individual  actors,  including  in  particular  women's  organisations,  and  relevant  institutions.  The 
Mediation  Support  Team  will  identify  additional  ways  to  further  strengthen  the  EU's  profile  and 
institutional readiness for effective mediation work through enhanced preparedness and deployment 
of staff. This work will be linked with the UNSG's new initiative for mediation.  
 
C.  Security Sector Reform 
The SSR Strategic Framework3 provides the EU with a coherent policy that applies to short-term, 
mid-term  and  long-term  support  activities,  including  CSDP  actions,  IcSP  programmes  and 
development cooperation in the  security sector of partner countries. The approach aims to ensure 
complementarity  and  coherence  of  these  actions,  based  on  human  security  and  good  governance 
principles. 
Central  to  increase  the  effectiveness  of  the  EU  support  to  SSR  will  be  the  development  of 
methodological  tools.  These  include  guidance  for  analysis  of  the  security  sector  and  joint 
monitoring and evaluation guidelines and a dedicated risk management methodology applicable to 
relevant  external  action  instruments  and  CSDP.  Furthermore  and  in  line  with  the  SSR  Strategic 
Framework,  the  EU  has  in  the  Spring  of  2017  conducted  integrated  SSR-missions  to  the  Central 
African  Republic,  Somalia  and  Mali  to  assist  the  EU  Delegations  in  preparing  SSR  coordination 
matrices. These matrices, based on the existing national plans, strategies, coordination mechanisms 
and available security sector analyses aim at providing a common vision of the EU support to SSR 
in a given context, in line with the national ownership principle. The coordination matrices also take 
into  account  actions  supported  by  international  partners  leading  to  increased  synergies  and 
consensus. 
 
 
To  meet  increasing  demands  and  to  strengthen  the  effectiveness  of  EU  supported  SSR 
actions on the ground additional technical expertise to partner countries will be supplied by the SSR 
facility financed under the Instrument Contributing to Stability and Peace.  
 
                                                
33 JOIN (2016) 31, 05/07/2016 
 
EEAS/COM(2017)8 
CSDPCR.PRISM  - Conflict Prevention, RoL/SSR, Integrated Approach, Stabilisation and 
Mediation 

Limited 

EEAS/COM(2017)8 
Limited 
 
Conflict prevention 
D.  EU Conflict Early Warning System 
In order to prevent the emergence, re-emergence or escalation of violent conflict early warning is 
indispensable.  A  simpler  and  more  transparent  conflict  Early  Warning  System  with  buy-in  of  the 
Member States, EEAS and Commission services contributes to more accurate early identification of 
risks/dynamics of violent conflict, contributing to taking early action to mitigate these risks. 
 
The  EU  Early  Warning  System  (EWS)  is  a  robust,  evidence-based  risk  management  tool  that 
identifies,  assesses  and  helps  prioritise  situations  at  risk  of  violent  conflict  for  non-EU  countries, 
focusing on structural factors and with a time horizon of four years. The EU has adapted its EWS to 
make  it  more  inclusive  and  transparent,  and  briefed  the  PSC  in  December  of  last  year.  The  EU 
shared  results  from  the  Early  Warning  System  more  widely  through  PSC  and  Council  Working 
Groups and has engaged in dedicated discussions on priority countries on conflict prevention. Also, 
under the new system, the EU's conflict prevention tools, like mediation support and security sector 
reform,  are  more  closely  linked.  The  EU  is  now  giving  additional  focus  on  implementation  and 
monitoring of early action and seeks involvement of EU Member States. To drive early action, EU 
Delegations are involved more strongly in the process and Heads of Missions are expected to report 
–  together  with  Member  States  -  on  the  implementation  of  early  action.  The  EU  has  involved 
Member  States  locally  in  the  risk  assessment  workshops  it  has  organised  as  part  of  the  Early 
Warning System. 
 
The EU is looking into possibilities of making the Early Warning System more sensitive to climate 
change, human rights, atrocities, and gender. If possible, indicators of resilience will be taken into 
account. The EU is working on an atrocity prevention toolkit and is consulting civil society on how 
it can benefit from their experiences in the field of promoting resilience. The EU is also following 
up  on  the  proposal  by  some  Member  States  to  create  an  informal  Early  Warning/Early  Action 
Group to discuss methodological issues and early warning findings. 
 
 
E.  Institutionalise a Prevention Approach and Early Action 
"The  costs  of  not  preventing  war  and  violent  conflict  are  enormous.  The human  costs  of  war  and 
violent conflict include not only the visible and immediate – death, injury, destruction, displacement 
–  but  also  the  distant  and  indirect  repercussions  for  families,  communities,  local  and  national 
institutions and economies, and neighbouring countries."4.  
 
Where appropriate, country cases that are being discussed in the Foreign Affairs Council provide an 
opportunity  to  include  considerations  for  Conflict  Prevention  and  mediation  support.  The 
Commissioners  Group  on  External  Action  also  has  a  role  in  guiding  early  action  by  the  EU,  for 
instance when stronger political support is needed and where early warning on new fragility-related 
challenges is identified.  
 
The  EU  is  strengthening  its  partnership  with  the UN  on  conflict  prevention.  For  example,  the  EU 
and the UN recently agreed to hold quarterly video conferences to discuss concrete measures related 
to conflict prevention and sustaining peace. The EU will attempt to strengthen cooperation with UN 
Security  Council, including  through  non-permanent  EU  members.  Conflict  prevention will  be  one 
                                                
4 Kofi A. Annan. Prevention of Armed Conflict. Report of the Secretary General. February 2002. 
 
EEAS/COM(2017)8 
CSDPCR.PRISM  - Conflict Prevention, RoL/SSR, Integrated Approach, Stabilisation and 
Mediation 

Limited 

EEAS/COM(2017)8 
Limited 
 
of  the  priorities  for  the  EU  during  the  upcoming  UN  General  Assembly.  Consideration  could  be 
given  to  have  more  regular  high  level  UN  briefings  (Special  Representative  of  the  Secretary-
General  or  other  high-level  UN  officials)  at  the  Foreign  Affairs  Council  and  the  Political  and 
Security Committee.  
 
Moreover,  the  EU  is  also  strengthening  its  participation  in  other  conflict  prevention  fora,  such  as 
International  Dialogue  for  Peacebuilding  and  Statebuilding,  a  tripartite  partnership  between  the 
Group  of  G7+,  development  partners  and  civil  society,  where  it  co-chairs  the  Implementation 
Working Group for two years from 2017 onwards.  
 
 
 
 
 
EU response to crises 
 
F.  Crisis Response  
Upon  the  occurrence  of a  sudden, serious  deterioration  of  the  political,  security  and/or  economic 
situation or an event or development in a given country or region that might have an impact on the 
security  interests  of  the  EU  or  the  security  of  EU  personnel  or  citizens5,  the  EU  response  should 
envisage the use of all available resources in a coordinated and synergic way.  
The  EU  should  aim  to  enhance  synergies  between  the  EEAS  Crisis  Response  Mechanism  and 
emergency  response  systems  in  different  EU  institutions,  including  IPCR  Arrangements  in  the 
Council  and  ARGUS  in  the  Commission,  while  dedicating  particular  attention  to  further 
strengthening  synergies  with  DG  ECHO's  European  Response  Coordination  Centre.  The  EU  will 
support  the  roll  out  of  the  Joint  EU  Consular  Crisis  Preparedness  Framework  together  with  EU 
Member States, including the update of already existing crisis plan and follow-up of joint consular 
crises exercises in third countries. The EU will explore possibilities for cooperation with the crisis 
response mechanisms of Member States and key partners active in the crisis zone, such as the UN 
and  others.  The  EU  will  also  enhance  coordination  of  consular  response  to  arising  situations, 
including by use of the consular components of the EU Civil Protection Mechanism.  
 
G.  CSDP  
The effect of CSDP in response to conflict prevention, crisis and post-crisis situations is enhanced 
when  its  missions  and  operations  form  part  of  the  Integrated  Approach  in  which  all  actions  are 
synchronised with each other. Maintaining the shared and close collaborative endeavours in work 
on CSDP is crucial in delivering effect on the ground. 
 
Under the Integrated Approach, CSDP structures will continue their coordination with other EEAS 
and  Commission  services  on  CSDP  related  matters.  They  will  enhance  their  involvement  in  the 
broader work on external conflicts and crises, also in areas where CSDP is not (or not yet) engaged. 
Moreover,  in  line  with  the  Concept  Note  on  the  operational  planning  and  conduct  capabilities 
                                                
5 This would include hybrid threats - of external nature or having an external dimension, potentially or actually 
impacting EU's or any Member States' interests. 
 
EEAS/COM(2017)8 
CSDPCR.PRISM  - Conflict Prevention, RoL/SSR, Integrated Approach, Stabilisation and 
Mediation 

Limited 

EEAS/COM(2017)8 
Limited 
 
agreed  by  Ministers  in  March  2017,  an  EEAS  taskforce  will  be  created  to  contribute  to  strategic 
foresight  on  possible  future  conflicts  and  crises,  and  identify  early  actions,  including  CSDP 
engagement  where  relevant.  Member  States  will  be  duly  informed  and  the  crisis  management 
procedures will continue to guide the planning and decision-making process in line with Article 38 
TEU.  This  taskforce  will  also  facilitate  increased  coordination  of  CSDP  with  other  EU  policies 
(such as support to SDG 16, migration policy, SSR policy and human rights policy). Also, the EU’s 
Early  Warning  System  and  joint  conflict  analysis  will  be  more  actively  used  to  support  CSDP 
planning  and  decision-making.  Consideration  could  also  be  given  to  the  possible  mobilisation  of 
CSDP instruments and structures in support of EU consular crisis responses. 
 
In consultation with the Commission, CSDP missions and operations will increase their work on the 
implementation of the guidelines and practices of UN Humanitarian Civil-Military Coordination, in 
relation to areas related to both Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid.  
 
H.  Civil Protection and Humanitarian Issues 
Effective humanitarian action must be based on a solid understanding of the multiple vulnerability 
and risk factors that communities face, including conflict risks. Failure to do so can undermine or 
reverse success, and ultimately could lead to an increase in humanitarian needs.  
EU  humanitarian  aid  is  guided  by  the  principles  of  humanity,  neutrality,  impartiality  and 
independence. Although a key part of EU's overall response to crises, it is not a crisis management 
instrument  as  such.  It  is  provided  solely  on  the  basis  of  the  needs  of  affected  populations,  in  line 
with  the  European  Consensus  on  Humanitarian Aid, and  beyond  any  strategic, military, economic 
or other EU objective ("In-but-Out"). 
Other  EU  instruments  (notably  development  and  foreign  policy  instruments)  aim  to  contribute  to 
decreasing  the  humanitarian  needs  by  addressing  the  root  causes  of  instability  and  migration,  and 
related  human  suffering.  The  EU  will  advocate  more  strongly  the  importance  of  International 
Humanitarian  Law  (IHL),  through  the  monitoring  of,  enforcing  or  reporting  on  International 
Humanitarian  Law  compliance,  including  in  the  context  of  CSDP,  by  providing  intensified  EU 
Training Missions modules on IHL training, to ensure the protection of civilians, humanitarian and 
medical  staff  and  infrastructure.  The  EU  will  actively  and  consistently  promote  its  objectives  for 
people affected by humanitarian crises, where applicable together with EU Member States, notably 
through demarches for humanitarian access and the promotion of respect for IHL, as well as early 
warning, de-confliction and protection. 
Stabilisation and Transitional Justice 
 
I.  Stabilisation 
On average, peace after a violent conflict lasts only seven years, 60% of all violent conflicts recur 
and  since  2000  the  rate  of  recurrence  has  further  risen.  Therefore,  post-conflict  stabilisation  is 
essentially also conflict prevention. In order to break the cycle of violence it is imperative to work 
in  an  integrated  way,  building  both  on  lessons  of  previous  engagements  and  on  solid  and  shared 
analysis of the situation at hand.  
 
To  strengthen  the  EU's  stabilisation  response  the  EU  will  draft  a  stabilisation  concept  and 
guidelines  based  on  prior  and  existing  EU  engagement  and  lessons  learned  as  well  as  on  the 
principles  laid  out  in the  new  European Consensus  on  Development.  To improve  the  exchange of 
information  and  strengthen  coordination,  the  EU  will  support  (informal)  discussions  on  concrete 
 
EEAS/COM(2017)8 
CSDPCR.PRISM  - Conflict Prevention, RoL/SSR, Integrated Approach, Stabilisation and 
Mediation 

Limited 

EEAS/COM(2017)8 
Limited 
 
and  specific  stabilisation  efforts  with  Member  States  and  key  actors.  In  March  2017,  EUISS 
organised  a  seminar  on  an  integrated  approach  to  stabilisation  and  conflict  prevention  for  which 
Member States, academia, civil society and other actors were invited.  
 
To ensure a coherent and swift EU stabilisation response, in the framework of the Common Foreign 
and  Security  Policy,  the  EU  will  look  at  possibilities  to  implement  stabilisation  actions  including 
through the use of Article 28 TEU.   
 
The  EU  is  currently  mapping  existing  surge  mechanisms  and  mechanisms  to  access  external 
expertise (also from EU Member States), assess opportunities to gain in flexibility, speed and range 
and prepare a proposal for an EEAS surge mechanism (roster). Finally, the EU has also started to 
temporarily  deploy  EU  staff  from  HQ  into  the  field  to  support  EU  Delegations,  on  the  basis  of 
needs  identified  by  the  EU  Head  of  Delegation,  to  facilitate  coordination  of  analysis  and 
instruments with Member States and other key actors. The EU antenna in Agadez is an example of 
such a temporary deployment. 
 
The  EU  will  increase  its  capacity  for  monitoring  and  evaluation  on  engagement  with  external 
conflicts and crises. EEAS and Commission services will draft a plan for mapping past experiences 
in  stabilisation,  including  through  the  EU's  participation  in  Recovery  and  Peacebuilding 
Assessments (RPBAs) carried out together with the United Nations and the World Bank. 
 
 
J.  Transitional Justice 
Transitional  Justice  is  the  full  range  of  processes  and  mechanisms  associated  with  a  society’s 
attempts  to  come  to  terms  with  a  legacy  of  large-scale  past  abuses,  in  order  to  ensure 
accountability,  serve  justice  and  achieve  reconciliation.  Without  transitional  justice  measures,  the 
chance of conflict or human rights violations and abuses re-occurring increases significantly. The 
EU's  Policy  Framework  on  Support  to  Transitional  Justice6  makes  clear  that  any  transitional 
justice  support  must  be  context  specific,  centred  on  the  victims  and  driven  by  the  reality  of  the 
situation on the ground. 
 
Under the Integrated Approach, the EU will step up its efforts on transitional justice. The EU aims 
at  ensuring  that  the  EU's  support  to  transitional  justice  measures  is  embedded  in  the  wider  crisis 
response,  conflict  prevention,  security  and  development  efforts  of  the  EU.  It  will  improve 
coordination of transitional justice donors in country and at headquarter level to ensure efficient use 
of  resources. Also, the  EU  will  look  to  provide additional  technical expertise  to  partner countries, 
reinforcing, where appropriate, EU Delegation efforts. The EU will, where relevant, make sure that 
planning  processes  for  CSDP  missions  assess  how  the  mission  and  operation  could  support 
transitional  justice  process.  Finally,  the  EU  will  strengthen  training  opportunities  for  EU  and 
Member States staff on transitional justice. 
 
                                                
6http://eeas.europa.eu/archives/docs/top_stories/pdf/the_eus_policy_framework_on_support_to_transitional_justic
e.pdf 
 
EEAS/COM(2017)8 
CSDPCR.PRISM  - Conflict Prevention, RoL/SSR, Integrated Approach, Stabilisation and 
Mediation 
10 
Limited