Ceci est une version HTML d'une pièce jointe de la demande d'accès à l'information 'Documents related to a tender on ESG factors'.



 
Ref. Ares(2020)3130203 - 16/06/2020
EUROPEAN COMMISSION 
Budget 
 
 
Central Financial Service 
 
 
 
VADE-MECUM 
ON PUBLIC PROCUREMENT  
IN THE COMMISSION 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
February 2016 
 
 
Updated January 2020 
 
 

 
 
 
 
Disclaimer 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Finally, it must be borne in mind that, although the Vade-mecum provides information and explanations that 
are in strict compliance with the rules and regulations in force, it cannot be relied on in law.  The rules and 
regulations and any clarification provided by Court judgments take precedence. 
 
 

link to page 19 link to page 19  
1.2.3. What procedure to use? 
  
Do you want an “all-in-one” procedure, where any interested economic operators will get all 
the information they need for preparing a tender and then you will evaluate all the tenders 
in one go and choose the best one? Then you might opt for an: 
3.3 Open procedure 
 
Do you want to pre-select operators who have the economic and technical capacity necessary 
for  implementing  your  contract  and  ask  only  them  to  send  you  a  tender?  Then  you  might 
choose a: 
3.4 Restricted procedure 
 
You are in a situation where you can negotiate with tenderers, e.g.:  
you need a concession contract;  
you need training or hotel or restaurant services; 
Then you might be interested in a: 
3.5 Competitive procedure with negotiation 
 
Do you need a series of similar services or supplies over a period of time and do not yet know 
exactly when nor all the details, but are sure that the yearly value will be below Directive 
threshold? Then the best way to deal with this situation might be to launch one of these two 
procedures: 
3.6.3. List of pre-selected candidates 
 
3.6.4 List of vendors 
 
The value of your procurement is below the Directive threshold? Then you may use the: 
3.7. Negotiated procedure for middle or low- value contracts 
 
You are in exceptional circumstances, e.g.: 
You have received no tender in response to your open or restricted procedure and this is 
definitely not due to bad timing or imprecise tender specifications. 
There is a monopoly situation on the market. 
Then you might be interested in a: 
3.8. Negotiated procedure without publication 
 
 
You  intend  to  procure  a  particularly  complex  product  or  service  and  you  want  to  hold 
discussions  with  pre-selected  candidates  to  come  up  with  options  for  the  best  solution  and 
then ask them to send you their tender based on the outcome of this dialogue? Then you are 
entitled to use a: 
3.9. Competitive dialogue 
 
You intend to procure something which does not exist so you will finance research services 
and purchase the end-product. Then you should use an:  
3.10. Innovation partnership  
 
You need fresh ideas in a field where creativity is a must and where you have to ask for 
proposals without previously giving details of every aspect of the future contract? In this case 
you could go for a: 
3.11. Design contest 
 
 
 
13 

 
 
1.4. What is public procurement? 
1.4.1. Basic information about EU public procurement 
“Public  procurement”  means  the  purchasing  of  works,  supplies  and  services  by  public  bodies  at  either  national  or 
Union level. Public procurement within the European Union is governed by Directive 2014/24/EU, while the legal 
basis for Commission procurement is laid down in the Financial Regulation (FR). 
 
The goal of procurement rules 
EU  public  procurement  plays  an  important  part  on  the  single  market  and  is  governed  by  rules  intended  to  remove 
barriers and open up markets in a non-discriminatory and competitive way. The objective of public procurement is 
to  increase  the  choice  of  potential  contractors  to  public  bodies,  thereby  allowing  achieving  a  most 
economically advantageous tender, while at the same time developing market opportunities for companies
The following rules should be followed: 
 
Accountability:  effective  mechanisms  must  be  in  place  in  order  to  enable  authorising  officers  of  the  contracting 
authority to discharge their personal responsibility on issues of procurement risk and expenditure.  
Competition: procurement should be carried out by competition, unless there are justified reasons to the contrary.  
Consistency: economic operators should be able to expect the same general procurement policy across the public 

sector.  
Effectiveness:  the  contracting  authority  should  meet  its  commercial,  regulatory  and  socio-economic  goals  in  a 

balanced manner.  
Efficiency: procurement processes should be carried out as cost effectively as possible.  
Equal  treatment:  economic  operators  should  be  treated  fairly  and  without  discrimination,  including  protection  of 
commercial  confidentiality  where  required.  The  contracting  authority  should  not  impose  unnecessary  burdens  or 

constraints on economic operators. 
Informed decision-making: the contracting authority needs to base decisions on accurate information and to monitor 

requirements to ensure that they are being met. 
Integrity: there should be no corruption or collusion with or between economic operators.  
Legality: the contracting authority must conform to European Union law and other legal requirements.  
Responsiveness: the contracting authority should endeavour to meet the aspirations, expectations and needs of the 

community served by the procurement. 
Transparency: the contracting authority should ensure that there is openness and clarity on procurement policy and 

its delivery.  
 
Advertising the contract 
Most contracts covered by the public procurement rules must be subject to a call for tenders in the form of a notice in 
the OJ S.  
 
Choosing the right award procedure  
The notice published in the OJ S must specify the  procurement procedure that the contracting authority will follow. 
There are three main award procedures: open, restricted and negotiated. The contracting authority has a free choice 
between the open and restricted procedure, but may use the negotiated procedure only in specific circumstances. 
 
Conclusion 
Any contracting authority awarding a contract should remember the following key principles: 
Be open and transparent – allow tenderers to understand what you are going to do and how 
you are going to do it.  
Be objective and ensure equal treatment of tenderers – allow all tenderers a fair and equal 
chance of winning the contract.  
Be consistent – do what you said you were going to do. 
Tenderers should ensure that they understand the procedure and, if in doubt, seek clarification from the contracting 
authority. 
 
16 
 

 
1.4.2. Legal basis and general principles  
The  legal  basis  for  EU  procurement  consists  of  the  relevant  articles  of  the  Financial 
Regulation (FR) and its Annex 1. Please note that all legal references to the FR should point 
to the initial act only, which include by definition all subsequent amendments (dynamic legal 
reference)1.  
  Financial  Regulation  –  Regulation  (EU,  Euratom)  No  2018/1046  of  the  European 
Parliament  and the  Council  of  18  July  2018 on  the  financial rules  applicable  to  the 
general  budget  of  the  Union2,  Part  One,  Title  V  (Common  rules),  Title  VII  (Public 
procurement and concessions) and Annex 1. 
  Judgments, mainly of the General Court in procurement cases. 
The  FR  incorporates  the  rules  from  Directive  2014/24/EU3  on  public  procurement  (“the 
Directive”) and Directive 2014/23/EU on concessions4. 
The provisions of the FR will be described in detail, with examples, in each chapter of this 
Vade-mecum.  At  this  stage  it  is  important  to  look  at  some  of  the  fundamental  concepts 
underlying  procurement  which  contracting  authorities  must  keep  in  mind  throughout  the 
procedure. 
  All EU procurement must comply with the principles of transparency, proportionality, 
equal treatment and non-discrimination and sound financial management. 
  The  basic  rule  underlying  public  procurement  is  to  ensure  competition  between 
economic operators. Cases where a contracting authority can approach an operator of 
its  choice  without  launching  a  competitive  procedure  are  the  exception  and  are 
reserved for specific, clearly defined situations. 
  Competitive procedures are based first on a precise definition of the subject and terms 
and conditions of the contract and, second, on a variety of criteria, of which operators 
must be notified so that they can draw up their tender accordingly.  
  The  EU  institutions  are  not  legally  bound  vis-à-vis  an  economic  operator  until  the 
contract  is  signed.  This  should  be  made  clear  in  all  contacts  with 
candidates/tenderers.  Up  to  the  time  of  signature,  the  contracting  authority  may 
cancel  the  procedure  without  the  candidates/tenderers  being  entitled  to  any 
compensation.  Reasons  must,  of  course,  be  given  for  the  decision  and  the 
candidates/tenderers must be notified. 
Complying with the legal requirements relating to public procurement should not be seen as 
a  mere  formality  or  bureaucratic  requirement  with  no  real  implications,  as  any  economic 
operator who is eliminated from a procurement procedure can use failure to comply with any 
one  of  these  requirements  as  grounds  to  challenge  the  decision  awarding  the  contract  and 
possibly have it  annulled. Moreover, failure to comply may lead to non-contractual liability 
(damages) against the contracting authority. Compliance is also essential for administrative 
and political reasons (scrutiny by the European Parliament’s Budgetary Control Committee, 
the Ombudsman, the Court of Auditors, etc.). 
 
 
                                                
1  See the DAP (Drafter's Assistance Package): http://www.cc.cec/wikis/pages/viewpage.action?pageId=167740463 
(only Commission access)  
2 Regulation (EU, Euratom) 2018/1046 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 18 July 2018 on the 
financial rules applicable to the general budget of the Union, amending Regulations (EU) No 1296/2013, (EU) No 
1301/2013, (EU) No 1303/2013, (EU) No 1304/2013, (EU) No 1309/2013, (EU) No 1316/2013, (EU) No 223/2014, 
(EU) No 283/2014, and Decision No 541/2014/EU and repealing Regulation (EU, Euratom) No 966/2012, OJL 193, 
30.7.2018, p. 1, see https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-
content/EN/TXT/?uri=uriserv:OJ.L_.2018.193.01.0001.01.ENG&toc=OJ:L:2018:193:TOC 
 
3 OJ L 94, 28.03.2014, p. 65, see http://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-
content/EN/TXT/PDF/?uri=CELEX:32014L0024&from=EN  
4 OJ L 94, 28.03.2014, p. 1, see http://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-
content/EN/TXT/PDF/?uri=CELEX:32014L0023&from=EN  

 
17 

 
1.6. Conflict of interests in procurement 
The term "conflict of interests" is used with different meanings in different contexts. To avoid 
confusion, four main cases can be distinguished:  
(1) conflict of interest for the contracting authority,  
(2) grave professional misconduct,  
(3) involvement in drafting tender specifications and distortion of competition,  
(4) professional conflicting interests.  
(1)  The  notion  of  conflict  of  interests  refers  normally  to  situations  where  an  agent  of  the 
contracting authority is in one of the cases listed in Article 61 FR, i.e. where the impartial 
and  objective  exercise  of  the  function  of  the  person  is  compromised  for  reasons  involving 
family,  emotional  life,  political  or  national  affinity,  economic  interest  or  any  other  interest 
with a candidate, tenderer or contractor.  
If this situation happens or if there is a risk that this situation may happen, the person has 
the obligation to inform its hierarchy in writing and the hierarchy will decide the appropriate 
action.  This  includes  finding  that  there  is  no  conflict,  removing  the  person  from  a  specific 
activity, etc.  
In procurement, this applies to the persons and authorising officer in charge of the procedure 
as well as to persons involved in opening and evaluation phases.  
The term "conflict of interests" does not apply to economic operators and should not be used 
with reference to them. It can only refer to the contracting authority.  
(2) There are specific situations for economic operators which qualify as "grave professional 
misconduct" and not as conflict of interests, e.g.:  
-  where  the  operator  attempts  to  unduly  influence  the  decision-making  of  the  contracting 
authority during a procurement procedure;  
-  where  the  operator  enters  into  agreement  with  other  operators    in  order  to  distort 
competition;  
-  where  the  operator  tries  to  obtain  confidential  information  that  may  give  it  undue 
advantages in the procedure.  
These cases are listed in Article 136(1) (c) FR and are a basis for exclusion of the operator. 
(3) There are cases where the contracting  authority used a technical assistance contract to 
help drafting the tender specifications of a subsequent procurement procedure. In this case, 
it is the responsibility of the contracting authority to ensure equality of treatment between 
the  operator  involved  in  the  technical  assistance  and  other  economic  operators.  The 
contractor  involved  in  the  preparation  of  procurement  documents  can  be  rejected  from  the 
subsequent procedure only if its participation entails a distortion of competition and that this 
cannot be remedied otherwise (Article 141(1) (c) FR).  
It is up to the contracting authority to prove the distortion of competition and to prove that it 
has  taken  all  possible  measures  to  avoid  the  rejection.  Such  rejection  is  subject  to  a 
contradictory procedure, so the tenderer must be given the opportunity to prove that its prior 
involvement cannot distort competition.  
In practice, it is strongly recommended to avoid the rejection and to prepare the necessary 
measures to avoid distortion of competition from the beginning, i.e. from the first contract.  
In  particular,  the  information  given  to  the  technical  assistance  contractor  during  the 
preparation  of  the  tender  specifications  should  also  be  communicated  to  other  economic 
operators in the second procedure.  
Besides, the time limit for receipt of tenders of the second procedure should be long enough 
(well  above  the  legal  minimum)  to  ensure  that  all  operators  can  absorb  the  relevant 
 
21 

  
information.  A  short  time  limit  would  indeed  give  an  undue  advantage  to  the  technical 
assistance contractor.  
(4) Finally, there are specific cases where the operator has a professional conflicting interest 
which negatively affects its capacity to perform a contract (Point 20.6 Annex 1 FR). This is 
treated  at  the  selection  stage.  This provision  is  meant  to  avoid  cases  where  an  operator  is 
awarded  a  contract  to  evaluate  a  project  in  which  it  has  participated  or  to  audit  accounts 
which it has previously certified.  
If the operator is in such a situation, the corresponding tender is rejected. These cases often 
arise  in  evaluation  or  audit  framework  contracts,  where  the  contractor  can  have  a 
professional conflicting interest for a specific contract.  
 
22 

 
Part 2. Conceiving the purchase and the contract 
2.1. Financing decision 
Contracts  must  be  covered  by  a  “financing  decision”,  as  provided  for  by  Article 110  FR,  in 
case  of  operational  appropriations.  This  is  not  necessary  in  the  case  of  administrative 
appropriations including technical support lines (of the form XX 01, also called ex-BA lines).  
The  financing  decision  is  needed  for  framework  contracts,  even  if  no  appropriations  are 
needed at this stage, and for direct/specific contracts.  
It must indicate: 

the total budget reserved for the procurements during the year; 

the  indicative  number  and  type  of  contracts  envisaged  and,  if  possible,  their 
subject in generic terms; 

the indicative timeframe for launching the procurement procedures. 
Further information is available in the circular on financing decisions 
2.2. Characteristics of the purchase 
For  departments  considering  launching  a  procurement  procedure,  the  first  step  is  to 
determine the characteristics of the contract, i.e. its subject, duration and value.  
Note that as a matter of principle, to ensure transparency and sound financial management, 
a framework contract should not be envisaged if the same subject matter is already covered 
by another existing framework contract (inter institutional or not) to which the contracting 
authority has  access. 
Union  institutions  and  bodies  are  deemed  to  be  contracting  authorities  except  where  they 
conclude service-level agreements (SLAs) with each other.  In other words, the Commission 
and  the  Parliament  or  the  Commission  and  an  executive  or  decentralised  agency  can 
conclude  SLAs.  SLAs  can  also  be  agreed  upon  between  departments  of  Union  institutions. 
For instance, two Commission DGs or an Office and an agency can conclude SLAs. 
When  the  JRC  participates  in  a  procurement  procedure  and  is  awarded  the  contract,  the 
contract will also take the form of an SLA6.  
2.2.1. Subject matter and type of purchase 
It is essential to identify the subject matter in order to select the procurement procedure to 
be followed and the type of contract. A more detailed description of the various subjects can 
be  found  in  the  reference  nomenclature  provided  by  the  common  procurement  vocabulary 
(CPV) established by Regulation (EC) No 2195/20027. 
The  subject  matter  must  be  clear,  giving  a  full  and  accurate  description  of  what  is  being 
procured. The technical content must be clearly set out, indicating the duration, estimated 
value and type of contract. 
Procurement can be used for four different types of purchases:  
 'service' covers all intellectual and non-intellectual services other than those covered by 
supply contracts, works contracts and buildings contracts; 
 'supply' covers the purchase, leasing, rental or hire purchase, with or without option to 
buy, of goods (it may also include siting, installation and maintenance); 
 'works' cover either the execution, or both the execution and design, of works related to 
one of the activities referred to in Annex II to Directive 2014/24/EU or the  execution or 
                                                
6  Please  consult  the  Commission  circular  of  9  July  2004  on  JRC  participation  in  procurement  and  grant 
procedures, available on BudgWeb.  
7 OJ  L 340, 16.12.2002, p. 1, as a m en ded by Regu la t ion  (E C) No 2151/2003 (OJ  L 329, 17.12.2003, p. 1).  
 
23 

link to page 13   
both the execution and design of a work corresponding to the requirements specified by 
the  contracting  authority.  A  “work”  means  the  outcome  of  building  or  civil  engineering 
works  taken  as  a  whole  that  is  sufficient  of  itself  to  fulfil  an  economic  or  technical 
function; 
 'building'  covers  the  purchase,  exchange,  long  lease,  usufruct,  leasing,  rental  or  hire 
purchase, with or without option to buy, of land, buildings or other real estate. It covers 
both existing buildings and buildings before completion provided that the candidate has 
obtained a valid building permit for it. It does not cover buildings designed in accordance 
with the specifications of the contracting authority that are covered by works contracts. 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
2.2.3. Duration of the contract 
The  direct  contract  (see  Chapter  2.6.1)  stipulates  a  limited  duration  for  performance 
(duration of execution of the tasks). It is recommended that this duration includes both the 
execution of tasks and the approval of interim deliverables if any, since the approval of an 
interim deliverable usually conditions the continuation of the execution of the tasks by the 
contractor. In addition, the time taken for the contracting authority to approve a deliverable 
should not be at the detriment of the time given to the contractor to perform the contract. 
The  period  of  approval  of  the  final  deliverable  can  be  outside  that  duration  since,  at  that 
moment,  the  contractor  has  finished  performance.  A  direct  contract  itself  does  not  have  a 
fixed  duration;  the  contract  ends  when  both  parties  have  fulfilled  their  obligations:  the 
contractor has delivered according to the terms of the contract and the contracting authority 
has made the final payment; in addition, some conditions linked to confidentiality and access 
for auditors are still in force long after performance. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
  
24 

  
 
 
 
2.2.4. Estimating the value of a contract 
The contracting authority must estimate the value of a purchase (Point 34 Annex 1 FR) on 
the  basis  of  previous  experience,  previous  similar  contracts  and/or  on  the  basis  of  a 
preliminary market research. It is possible to consult specialised services (e.g. DG COMM for 
communication services, DG DIGIT for IT purchases) to obtain information on the  value of 
the purchase.  
This estimate is made at the very beginning, in any event before the contracting authority 
launches  the  procurement  procedure.  Indeed,  the  value  is  the  basis  for  the  choice  of 
procedure.  
The  estimated  value  of  a  contract  may  not  be  established  in  such  a  way  as  to  avoid  the 
competitive  tendering  procedure  or  to  circumvent  the  rules  which  apply  to  certain 
procurement  procedures  or  above  a  certain  threshold.  Nor  may  a  contract  be  split  for  that 
purpose. 
The  estimated  value  is  based  on  the  total  volume  of  the  services  /  supplies  /works  to  be 
purchased  for  the  full  duration  of  the  intended  contract  including  all  options,  phases  or 
possible  renewals.  It  must  be  calculated  without  VAT.  It  includes  the  total  estimated 
remuneration  of  the  contractor,  including  all  types  of  expenses  (for  instance,  travel  and 
subsistence expenses). 
As  a  result,  thought  must  be  given  to  whether  the  product  or  service  requires  a  one-off 
operation or is of a permanent or repetitive nature and will have to be renewed over a given 
period. For instance, it should be checked whether the contract stands on its own or covers a 
product or service which forms part, with others, of a technical or financial whole (e.g. the 
various services which must be ordered when organising a conference) and another question 
is whether the purchase of a product would also create a need for services (e.g. maintenance). 
If the contract is split into lots, the combined value of all lots should be taken into account.  
In the case of works contracts, account must be taken not only of the value of the works but 
also  of  the  estimated  total  value  of  the  supplies  needed  to  carry  out  the  works  and  made 
available to the contractor by the contracting authority. 
If the contract includes revenues 
The value of the contract takes into account not only the expenses but also the revenues of 
the contract. In the case of banking or financial services, the fees, commissions, interest and 
other types of remuneration must be taken into account in the estimation. The same applies 
to  insurance  services  and  design  contracts.  In  practice,  the  sum  of  all  revenues  and  all 
possible expenses (in absolute value) should be used for estimation.  
  
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
25 

  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
  
  
 
 
  
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
  
2.3. Risk Management 
Any big project is always exposed to certain risks. In other words, there are many things that 
could  go  wrong.  The  detailed  project  planning,  choosing  the  procedure  and  preparing  the 
technical specifications stage is the right time to consider potential risks.  
Risk  management  should  be  integrated  into  the  normal  management  and  identification 
process,  whereas  assessments  should  be  carried  out  as  early  as  possible  at  every  phase  of 
project  management.  It  is  especially  important  to  assess  the  risks  properly  at  the  stage  of 
preparing the tender procedure when it is still possible to include protection mechanisms in 
the contract or to change the project architecture. This is in line with the impact/likelihood 
approach, which implies focusing on the most significant risks.  
Do not forget the two basic risk management methods to be used at the stage of preparing 
the technical specifications: 
  critical analysis of the project (tender) documentation, possibly by a person not involved 
in the earlier stages of preparation of the project; and 
26 

  
  feedback from implementation of previous projects (“lessons learned”). 
For more information see the Internal Control and Risk Management website and especially in Guidelines and 
templates for internal control and risk assessment, there is a Specific Guidance for Procurement. 
 
27 

 
2.6. Types of contracts 
A written contract must be drawn up for each public or concession contract awarded by the 
contracting  authority,  except  for  payments  against  invoices  equal  to  or  less  than  €1000 
(Point 14.5 Annex 1 FR).  
The type of purchase (services, supplies, works and buildings) as well as the characteristics 
of the purchase (one-off, repetitive, long-term exploitation) determine the type of contract to 
be used.  
It should be noted that the Commission (as well as the other institutions like the Council and 
the EP) is not a distinct legal entity but a European Union institution which acts on behalf of 
the Union (and possibly of the Atomic Energy Community) (Articles 47 TUE and 335 TFUE). 
Consequently,  the  contract  should  be  established  in  the  name  of  the  European  Union, 
represented by the Commission. 
The various model contracts are available on Budgweb.  
2.6.1. Direct contracts or purchase orders 
 The subject matter, remuneration and duration of performance of the contract are defined at 
the  outset,  as  well  as  all  other  necessary  legal  conditions.  As  such,  a  direct  contract  is 
definitive  and  self-sufficient  in  that  the  contract  can  be  implemented  without  further 
formalities.  
A  purchase  order  is  a  simplified  form  of  direct  contract  which  may  be  used  for  simple 
purchases  below  the  Directive  threshold.  It  is  not  recommended  to  use  it  when  acquiring 
intellectual property rights. 
Direct contracts can be used for all types of purchases (services, supplies or works) and for 
buildings  although  in  this  last  case  there  are  several  types  of  contracts  and  they  are  not 
standard.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
29 

 
2.9. Purchase of studies 
A  study  is  the  product  of  intellectual  services  necessary  to  support  the  institution's  own 
policies or activities. A study is financed through the EU budget. It may be produced inside 
the  institution  (e.g.  JRC)  or  commissioned  from  an  external  provider,  generally  through 
procurement procedures.  
In most cases the subject of the study is production of a scientific, technical, economic, legal 
or other analysis of a de facto or de jure situation in the form of a report. The focus of the 
study  may  vary  depending  on  the  sector  of  activities  and  on  the  specific  objectives  of  the 
study.  
The  EU  institutions,  although  legally  and  administratively  obliged  to  keep  records  of 
contracts  and  administrative  documents  for  a  certain  period,  have  no  legal  obligation  to 
preserve  studies  as  such.  However,  in  order  to  avoid  overlap  and  to  allocate  resources 
adequately,  services  should  have  a  clear  overview  of  their  study  portfolio  (completed  and 
planned studies). The planning of intended studies must be provided as part of the Annual 
Management Plan of each DG/service.  
Tender  specifications  should  cover  all  aspects  of  the  study:  scope,  background,  data  needs, 
analysis,  recommendations,  final  presentation  format  (abstract,  executive  summary, 
electronic  format,  visual  identity,  standard  disclaimer)  and  intellectual  property  rights 
("IPR", in the draft contract). Special effort should be devoted to the description of what the 
contracting authority would like to buy, especially where the results are to be published on 
paper  on  internet,  or  publicly  used  in  any  other  way,  modified  or  made  available  to  third 
parties.  
Technical  specifications  should  provide  information  regarding  the  format  of  the  study 
deliverables. They should also contain as standard technical requirements an abstract of no 
more  than  200  words  and,  as  a  separate  document,  an  executive  summary  of  maximum  6 
pages, both in at least EN and FR.  
The  purpose  of  the  abstract  is  to  act  as  a  reference  tool  helping  the  reader  to  quickly 
ascertain the study's subject. Using keywords is a vital part of abstract writing, to facilitate 
electronic information retrieval.  
An  executive  summary  is  a  succinct  overview  of  the  whole  study,  which  is  published  in 
isolation from the main text and should therefore stand on its own and be understandable 
without reference to the study itself. It should report the latter's essential facts. Its purpose 
is to act as a reference tool, enabling the reader to decide whether or not to read the full text.  
Special attention should be paid to the elaboration of the list of deliverables as well as the 
definition of their format. Electronic format should be considered as standard requirement in 
order to fulfil obligation of studies preservation.  
Each  study  is  uniquely  identified  by  a  catalogue  number  and  other  identifiers  provided  by 
the Publications Office.   
Please  note  that  the  "study  report"  is  the  main  contract  "deliverable"  and,  as  a  rule,  is 
different from the technical implementation “progress reports” that the service provider may 
be required to present (in accordance with the model service contract). 
All Commission publication including studies shall apply the EC Visual Identity.  
For more information see the circular on contracts for studies and the Secretariat General page on managing 
studies 
 
 
35 


 
 
Part 3. Procurement procedures and systems 
 
 
 
36 
 

 
3.1. Choice of procedure 
Now  that  the  characteristics  of  the  contract  are  defined,  it  is  possible  to  identify  the 
procedure to be followed using this table: 
Estimated value of contract 
Type of standard procedure 
Special 
minimum applicable procedure 
procedures 
Services or supplies 
Works 
Dynamic 
Simple payment against invoice 
€0.01 - €1 000 
Point 14.5 Annex 1 FR 
purchasing 
system for 
Negotiated procedure with a single tender 
commonly used 
€1 000.01 - €15 000 
Point 14.4 Annex 1 FR 
purchases  
Negotiated procedure with at least three 
Point 9 Annex 1 
 €15 000.01 - €60 000 
candidates, without a contract notice 
FR 
Point 14.3 Annex 1 FR 
Competitive 
€60 000.01 to 
€60 000.01 
Negotiated procedure with at least five 
dialogue for 
<€139 000 
< €5 350 000 
candidates, without a contract notice 
particularly 
Point 14.2 Annex 1 FR 
complex 
contracts  
Point 10 Annex 
Procedures following a call for expressions of  1 FR 
interest  (list  of  pre-selected  candidate  or  list  Negotiated 
of vendors)  
procedure 
(Procedure useful if a number of contracts are  without prior 
planned over a period of several years.) 
publication of a 
Point 13 Annex 1 FR 
contract notice 
> €139 000* 
> €5 350 000*  Open or restricted procedure with publication  for exceptional 
of a contract notice in the Official Journal 
cases 
Article 164(5) (a) FR 
Point 11 Annex 
1 FR 
Design contest 
Point 8 Annex 1 
FR 
Innovation 
partnership for 
research  
Point 7 Annex 1 
FR 
 
Services under Annex XIV 
N/A 
Competitive procedure with negotiation  
 
to Directive 2014/24/EU, 
Point 12 Annex 1 FR 
concessions, certain 
research services  and 
certain audio-visual or 
media services, without 
limit 
*The Directive thresholds indicated in the table are the euro equivalents of the amounts laid 
down in SDR (special drawing rights – a virtual currency made up of a number of currencies 
(euro,  dollar,  yen  and  pound  sterling)  and  used  as  a  unit  of  account  by  the  International 
Monetary Fund). 
130 000 SDR  These  amounts  in  euro  may  be  revised  every  two  years;  they 
5 000 000 SDR  are applicable from 1st of January of even years. 
 
 
37 

 
Notes to the table on choice of procedure 
  Use of the open or restricted procedure with publication of a contract notice in the Official 
Journal  is  always  an  option.  The  other  procedures  are  the  minimum8  to  be  followed  in 
each case. 
  In specific circumstances, the competitive procedure with negotiation may be used.  
  In  exceptional  cases  the  negotiated  procedure  without  prior  publication  of  a  contract 
notice in the Official Journal may be used. 
  The  possibility  of  using  a  dynamic  purchasing  system  (theoretical  at  the  moment) 
depends not on the value of the contract but on its subject: commonly used purchases.  
  The  competitive  dialogue  is  an  option  available  to  the  contracting  authority  when  a 
contract is particularly complex. 
  The estimated value or type of contract must not be established in such a way as to evade 
the procedure that would apply if that value or type were defined correctly. 
  If there are doubts concerning the estimated value of the contract or if the value is close 
to a threshold, it is advised to use a procedure for a higher level, as what counts for the 
validity of the procedure is not the initial estimate but the actual final price. 
  In the case of buildings contracts, the negotiated procedure without prior publication of a 
contract  notice  after  prospecting  the  local  market  may  be  used  (Point  11.1  (g) Annex  1 
FR). 
 
 
                                                
8 To be understood as the lowest level of flexibility allowed by the FR as regards the legal basis for the 
procurement procedure. 
38 
 

 
 
3.2. Time limits for receipt of requests to participate and tenders 
 
Legal minimum time limits in days (Point 24 Annex 1 FR) 
 
Procedure 
Request to participate 
Tender 
If procurement documents not electronic: + 5 days 
If free text in contract notice is longer than 500 words: + 5 days 
If e-submission of tenders is allowed: - 5 days (only for tenders, for open or restricted 
procedure) 

Open 
37  
(urgent: 15) 
Restricted 
32  
30 
(urgent: 15) 
(urgent: 10) 
Competitive procedure with negotiation 
32  
30 
Competitive dialogue,  
32  
Reasonable time 
Innovation partnership 
10 
Dynamic purchasing system 
Open for maximum 
48 months 
Call for expressions of interest  
10  
10 
(one or two steps) 
(if applicable) 
Notes on time limits 
  Time limits run from the day following the date of dispatch of the contract notice to the 
Publications Office or the day following the date of dispatch of the invitation to tender to 
selected candidates and are given in calendar days9.  
  The  Publications  Office  has  up  to  7  days  after  dispatch  to  publish  the  notice  in  the 
Official  Journal  provided  the  free  text  in  the  contract  notice  is  less  than  500  words, 
otherwise it is 12 days and the 5 extra days must be added to the legal minimum.  
  If the last day of a time limit falls on a Commission holiday, a Saturday or a Sunday, the 
period allowed must include the next (Commission) working day.  
  The time limits set out above are the minimum. The actual limits must be long enough to 
allow interested parties a reasonable and appropriate time to prepare their tenders and 
for the contracting authority to receive them, taking particular account of the complexity 
of  the  contract.  Longer  time  limits  must  be  allowed  where  a  prior  visit  to  the  site  is 
required. Longer deadlines mean wider competition and higher-quality tenders. It is also 
advisable to take into the account the period of the year and to give proportionally longer 
time if tender is launched e.g. before Christmas, Easter or summer holidays. 
 
                                                
9   By  application  of  the  Regulation  (EEC,  Euratom)  1182/71  of  the  Council  of  3  June  1971 
determining the rules applicable to periods, dates and time limits.  
 
39 


 
3.3. Open procedure 
 
 
 
40 
 

 
3.3.1. Scope and characteristics 
This is a standard procedure in one step that may be used for any contract. 
In this procedure, any economic operator who is interested may submit a tender.  
The  procedure  starts  with  publication  of  a  contract  notice  in  the  S  series  of  the  Official 
Journal.  The  procurement  documents  are  made  available  in  electronic  format  from 
publication of the contract notice.  
One  of  the  specific  features  of  this  procedure  is  that  the  opening  session  is  public,  i.e. 
tenderers are invited to attend.  
3.3.2. Applicable time-limits 
The  time-limit  for  receipt  of  tenders  is  minimum  37  days  counting  from  the  day  after 
dispatch of the contract notice to the Publications Office.  
The  time-limit  for  sending  the  contract  award  notice  for  publication  is  maximum  30  days 
after signature of the contract.  
Where  the  urgency  of  the  situation  renders  the  normal  time  limits  impracticable,  the 
contracting authority may use an accelerated procedure. It must duly justify the existence of 
objective circumstances giving rise to urgency and making it genuinely impossible to comply 
with the normal time limits. This is announced in the contract notice. Since the time limit is 
much shorter, there is a fairly high risk of ending up with little or inadequate competition. 
Indeed,  attempting  to  reduce  the  time  to  award  the  contract  could  even  result  in  a  longer 
procedure because no application is received.  
In  cases  of  urgency,  the  minimum  time  limit  for  receipt  of  tenders  is  15  days  from  the 
dispatch of the contract notice to the Publications Office.  
 
41 

link to page 8 link to page 24 link to page 52 link to page 56 link to page 55 link to page 57 link to page 58 link to page 61 link to page 61 link to page 64 link to page 71 link to page 72 link to page 75 link to page 77 link to page 78  
Overview of the open procedure 
Step of the 
Short description, 
Time requirement 
References: 
Model documents 
Legal basis 
procedure 
requirements, limitations or remarks 
Vade-mecum, circulars 
Articles 
Points 
FR 
Annex 1 
Financing decision 
 
 
Chapter 2.1 
 
110 
-- 
[optional] 
To be published in the OJ S or 
maximum 12 months before 
Chapter 4.2 
To be submitted via 
-- 
2.2 
Prior information 
buyer profile 
dispatch of contract notice 
eNotices 
notice 
 
 
Contract notice 
Published in the OJ S. 
Publications Of ice has 7 days for 
Chapter 4.3.4 
To be submitted via 
163(1)(a) 
2.1   
Full, direct electronic access to the 
publication 
 
eNotices 
procurement documents 
Drafting notice 
 
Procurement 
Procurement documents consist of: 
From the time the contract notice is 
Chapter 4.5.4 
Model invitation to 
166(2) 
16 
documents available  - invitation to tender, 
published at least until the deadline 
tender 
in e-Tendering 
- tender specifications,  
 
- draft contract,  
Model contracts 
- contract notice 
[optional] 
Must be published at the place where 
Must be published ASAP and no 
Chapter 4.5.1 
 
169 
25.2, 25.3 
Clarifications, 
the procurement documents are 
later than six days before the 
answers to 
published 
deadline. Requests less than six 
questions, 
working days before the deadline 
corrigenda 
do not have to be answered 
Receipt of tenders 
The mechanism for registering the 
Not earlier than 37 days after 
Chapter 4.5.5 
 
168(1) 
24.2 
exact date and time of receipt should 
dispatch of the contract notice 
be established.  
 
Opening 
Public opening 
Reasonable time after deadline for 
Chapter 4.6 
Model record of 
168(3) 
28 
Writ en record signed by opening 
receipt of tenders, allowing tenders 
opening of tenders 
committee members 
sent by mail to reach the 
contracting authority 
Checking of 
By an evaluation committee or by other 
 
Chapter 4.7 
 
136, 137, 
29 
exclusion criteria 
means ensuring there is no conflict of 
141, 167 
and selection 
interest 
criteria 
Evaluation of award 
Evaluation report signed by the 
 
Chapter 4.7 
Model evaluation 
167 
29, 30 
criteria 
evaluation committee and if applicable, 
report 
persons involved in assessing 
exclusion and selection 
 
[optional] 
Request of additional material for 
 
Chapter 4.7.4 
 
151, 169 
-- 
Submission of 
exclusion or selection. Correction of 
additional materials 
clerical errors. In no circumstances 
or clarifications by 
may the tenders be altered 
tenderer 
Award decision 
Taken by the AO on the basis of 
 
Chapter 4.9 
Model award 
170(1) 
30 
recommendations of the evaluation 
decision 
report 
Notification of 
By electronic means 
ASAP after award decision is taken 
Chapter 4.11 
Model information 
170(2) 
31 
tenderers 
let ers 
170(3) 
Signature of the 
Only after adoption of the budgetary 
Not earlier than 10 calendar days 
Chapter 4.13 
Model contracts 
175(2) 
35 
contract 
commitment (except framework 
after electronic dispatch of 
175(3) 
contract) 
notification to tenderers 
[optional] 
If tenderers were requested to provide 
 
Chapter 5.6 
 
168(2) 
-- 
Release of the 
guarantees 
tender guarantees 
Beginning of 
Cannot start before the contract is 
 
 
 
172(1) 
-- 
implementation of 
signed 
the contract 
Award notice 
To be sent to Publications Of ice for 
Not later than 30 days after 
Chapter 4.14.1 
To be submitted via 
163(1)(b) 
2.3, 2.4 
publication in the OJ S 
signature of the contract 
e-Notices 
Archiving 
Proper filing of the documentation of 
To be kept for 10 years following 
Chapter 4.15 
Reference file for 
74(6, 75) 
-- 
the procedure 
signature of the contract or 
public procurement 
cancellation of the procedure 
42 
 

 
 
 
Part 4. Stages in the procurement procedure 
4.1. Preliminary market analysis 
The  contracting  authority  may  conduct  a  preliminary  market  analysis  with  a  view  to 
preparing  the  procurement  procedure  (Art.  166(1)  FR  and  Point  15  Annex  1  FR).  Gaining 
prior knowledge and understanding of the relevant market, thereby saving time and efforts 
by bringing a precise focus to the planned procurement, derives from the principle of sound 
financial management. 
The  preliminary  market  analysis  is  mandatory  in  the  case  of  innovation  partnerships, 
considering that it is necessary to ensure that the innovation partnership is used only when 
the  desired  product  does  not  exist  on  the  market  since  its  objective  is  to  finance  research 
(Point 7.2 Annex 1 FR). 
It  is  advisable  to  conduct  a  preliminary  market  analysis  when  envisaging  a  negotiated 
procedure without prior publication for a contract that can be awarded only to a particular 
economic operator (Point 11.1 (b) Annex 1 FR) (see Chapter 3.8). 
Purpose 
The main purpose is to allow the contracting authority: 
-   developing general market knowledge (established market - market in development phase 
- existence of sufficient suppliers to ensure effective competition); 
-   assessing  the  capability  of  the  market  to  deliver  what  is  required,  within  the  required 
time-limits and on the required scale, and consequently the feasibility of the procurement; 
-   gaining knowledge of the terms and conditions usually applied to contracts in the relevant 
market  and  identifying  potential  market  constraints  (for  instance,  for  a  specific  market 
the contracting authority's standard terms may deter economic operators from submitting 
a tender); 
-   refining  and  further  clarifying  its  requirements  and  specifications  without,  however, 
having its needs influenced and determined by what the market offers; 
-   making a correct estimate of the contract value; 
-   defining appropriate selection and award criteria; 
-   gaining understanding of potential risks of contract performance 
-   providing for sufficient time-limit as regards the preparation of tenders 
Method 
There is no uniform method for consulting the market, but the most commonly used one is 
the "desk research" (based on internet, mail and phone). Frequent sources of information are: 
-   catalogues of producers, distributors, dealers 
-   press publication (specialized journals, magazines, newsletters, etc.) 
-   trade associations/organizations and/or chambers of Commerce 
-   market studies prepared by consultancy companies 
When  relevant  or  necessary,  other  more  active  market  prospecting  activities  can  be 
envisaged, such as: 
-   participation in conferences, fairs, seminars; 
-   interviews  of  market  actors  or  contacts  with  knowledgeable  persons  in  the  relevant 
market,  e.g.  seeking  advice  from  independent  experts,  specialised  bodies  or  economic 
operators;  
 
 
82 

 
 
General principles 
Even  though  there  are  no  specific  rules  regulating  the  process  of  market  consultation,  the 
fundamental  principles  of  non-discrimination,  equal  treatment  and  transparency  must 
always  be  respected.  This  is  particularly  important  in  case  the  contracting  authority 
undertakes to seek or accept advice from external persons or entities. 
Particular  care  must  be  taken  not  to  impair  fair  competition  by  providing  some  economic 
operators with early knowledge of a planned procurement procedure and/or its parameters. 
Competition  could  be  also  impaired  if  the  technical  specifications  may  be  perceived  as 
influenced or "mirroring" the specifications of a particular product or service on the market. 
In  any  case,  all  actions  (whether  mandatory  or  not)  linked  to  the  preliminary  market 
analysis will have to be properly documented and reported in writing for each procurement 
file, in order to ensure transparency and auditability. 
 
83 

 
 
4.2. Ex-ante publicity 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
4.2.1.1. Arrangements for publication 
There are two methods of publishing a prior information notice: 
(a)   publication in the Official Journal "S" series (OJ S), 
(b)   publication  on  the  buyer  profile14  plus  information  in  the  OJ  S  indicating  where  the 
prior information can be found. 
The  eNotice  form  as  indicated  in  the  instruction  on  drafting  notice  must  be  used  for 
publication  of  a  prior  information  notice.  The  instruction  explains  the  arrangements  for 
sending  the  notice  to  the  Publications  Office,  along  with  best  practices  and  advice  on 
completing the forms online via eNotices. 
In cases where the prior information is published in the buyer profile, a Notice on a Buyer 
Profile must be sent to the Publications Office.  
The  prior  information  notice  will  be  published  by  the  Publications  Office  within  7  days  of 
dispatch. 
The contracting authority must be able to provide evidence of the date of dispatch. 
Particular  care  should  be  taken  with  the  following  aspects  when  drafting  the  prior 
information notice: 
-    provide the most accurate description possible of the subject of each contract; 
-    give an estimated value for each of the contracts referred to; 
-    indicate  the  estimated  date  of  publication  of  the  contract  notice  within  the  next 
12 months, for each of the contracts in question. 
4.2.1.2. Other forms of publicity 
In  addition,  but  not  as  an  alternative  to  publication  of  the  prior  information  notice,  the 
contracting authority may use any other form of publicity, including electronic. 
Such publicity must not precede publication of the prior information notice, which is the only 
authentic  version,  and  must  refer  to  the  notice.  Nor  must  it  introduce  any  discrimination 
between  candidates  or  tenderers  or  contain  any  information  other  than  that  in  the  prior 
information notice. 
                                                
14  Buyer  profile  must  be  understood  as  an  internet  web  site  clearly  identified  as  a  place  where  the 
contracting authority publishes information about its procurement procedures. 
84 

 
 
This additional publicity might, for example, take the following forms: 
–  publication on the contracting authority's website; 
–  publication in the general or specialist press; 
–  letter  to  the  professional  associations  or  organisations  representing  businesses,  drawing 
their attention to the prior information notice and asking them to circulate it among their 
members, etc., 
–  mailshot  based  on  transparent  and  not discriminatory  criteria,  e.g.  list  constructed  by  a 
webpage subscription mechanism. Mailshots must not be limited to only a few economic 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
4.2.2.2. Other forms of publicity 
In addition to publishing the call for expressions of interest, the  contracting authority may 
use  any  other  form  of  publicity  that  it  chooses,  including  electronic.  Indeed,  it  is  in  its 
interest to do so, given that the aim is to encourage requests. 
Such publicity must not predate publication of the notice in the Official Journal, which is the 
only  authentic  version,  and  must  refer  to  the  notice.  Nor  must  it  introduce  any 
discrimination between candidates or tenderers or contain any information other than that 
in the call for expressions of interest. 
This additional publicity might, for example, take the following forms: 
  publication on other websites; 
  publication in the general or specialist press; 
  letters to the professional associations or organisations representing businesses, drawing 
their  attention  to  the  call  for  expression  of  interests  and  asking  them  to  circulate  it 
among their members;  
  mailshot based on transparent and not discriminatory criteria, e.g. list constructed by a 
webpage subscription mechanism. Mailshots must not be limited to only a few economic 
operators known to the contracting authority. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
85 

link to page 13 link to page 22 link to page 24 link to page 28 link to page 48 link to page 51 link to page 52 link to page 56  
 
4.3. Preparation of the procurement documents 
After  defining  the  type  of  contract  (see  Chapter  2.6),  possibly  conducting  a  preliminary 
market analysis (see Chapter 4.1) and  choosing the appropriate procedure, and making ex-
ante publicity where applicable (see Chapter 4.2) the contracting authority’s first task is to 
draft the procurement documents. 
The procurement documents consist of: 

(i)  the  contract  notice  published  in  the  Official  Journal  or  other  publication  if 
applicable; 

(ii) the invitation to tender;  

(iii) the tender specifications or the descriptive document for a competitive dialogue; 

(iv) the draft contract.  
They are designed to achieve a number of distinct and complementary objectives: 
–   (i) to advertise the procurement procedure 
–  (ii) to lay down the conditions governing submission of requests to participate or tenders;  
–  (iii) to provide an exact definition of the characteristics of the supply or service required by 
the contracting authority and to announce the criteria and method on the basis of which 
the contracting authority will award the contract; 
–  (iv)  to  describe  the  contractual  terms  on  which  the  contracting  authority  is  prepared  to 
acquire the supply or service. 
Procurement documents are mandatory for all types of public procurement procedures.  
   
 
 
 
 
 
The  procurement  documents  must  be  regarded  as  a  set  in  which  the  various  elements 
complement each other to ensure compliance with the rules. 
These  documents  constitute  the  cornerstone  of  transparent  and  competitive  procedures. 
Tenders  must  be  received,  opened  and  evaluated  and  the  contract  awarded  in  accordance 
with the arrangements set out in these documents. These are the rules which the contracting 
authority itself has laid down and is therefore bound to comply with. 
It  is  particularly  important  to  ensure  total  consistency:  there  should  be  no  divergence 
between  the  various  documents.  The  contract  notice  (or  other  publication  if  applicable) 
should provide an exact summary of the other documents or a link to the other documents 
where they are accessible on line. It is recommended not to repeat identical information in 
the  tender  specifications  or  descriptive  document,  the  draft  contract  and  the  invitation  to 
tender. 
It is recommended to prepare the procurement documents in the following order: 
The  tender specifications  (see  Chapter  4.3.1) will be  prepared  first. The  draft contract  (see 
Chapter 4.3.2)  will  then  be  prepared  by  filling  in  the  model  contract  with  the  appropriate 
elements in view of the tender specifications. The invitation to tender (see Chapter 4.3.3) will 
be prepared in the third place as it contains the deadline for receipt which can be set only 
when the procedure is almost ready for launching. The contract notice or other publication if 
applicable (see Chapter 4.3.4) will be prepared in the last place as it will essentially refer to 
the content of the other procurement documents. 
In  the  case  of  procedures  in  one  or  two  steps  with  publication  of  a  contract  notice,  the 
procurement documents must be published on internet from the date of publication of the 
contract notice (see Chapter 4.5.4)
86 

 
 
 
87 

link to page 67 link to page 6  
 
4.3.1. Tender specifications 
4.3.1.1. Title, purpose and context of the procurement 
This must include the reference number of the procurement procedure. 
Where appropriate, a description of each lot must be given. 
This section provides operators with background information including through web links to 
the  departments’  activities,  ongoing  Union's  programmes,  political  events,  etc.  It  helps 
operators to understand the subject of the contract.  
4.3.1.2. Subject of the contract and technical specifications 
The  technical  specifications  describe  what  the  contracting  authority  is  going  to  buy.  The 
quality of the description determines not only the quality it will get, but also the price that it 
will  pay.  Therefore,  it  is  essential  that  sufficient  time  is  spent  on  drafting  the  technical 
specifications.  
The technical specifications must be comprehensive, clear and precise. They define, lot by lot 
where  appropriate,  the  characteristics  required  of  supplies,  services  or  works,  taking  into 
account the purpose for which they are intended by the contracting authority. 
General requirements concerning technical specifications: 
The  technical  specifications  must  afford  equal  access  to  tenderers  and  must  not  have  the 
effect of creating unjustified obstacles to competitive tendering. 
They  define  the  characteristics  required  of  products,  services,  materials  or  works, 
considering  the  purpose  for  which  they  are  intended  by  the  contracting  authority.  In 
particular, save in exceptional cases which must be justified, they may not refer to a specific 
make or source, or to a particular process, or to trade marks, patents or types, or to a specific 
origin or production which would have the effect of favouring or eliminating certain products 
or operators. 
In  marginal  cases  where  it  is  not  possible  to  provide  sufficiently  detailed  and  intelligible 
specifications,  the description  must be  followed  by  the  words  “or  equivalent”.  For instance, 
the specifications may ask for a report "on MS Word or equivalent".  
The  tasks  entrusted  to  contractors  may  not  involve  exercising  public  authority  power  or 
budgetary  implementation  tasks  (Art.  62(3)  FR).  For  instance,  the  task  may  include 
administrative tasks such as managing the reimbursement of participants in a conference, 
but the contractor may not decide the list of guests or the rules for reimbursement.  
Opinions may be sought or accepted when drawing up technical specifications. However, the 
contracting  authority  must  ensure  that  such  advice  will  not  be  biased  and  the  resulting 
tender specifications will ensure equal treatment and as wide competition as possible.  
There  is  no  ground  for  automatically  rejecting  an  operator who was  previously  involved  in 
the preparation of the technical specifications from the resulting procurement procedure. The 
economic operator shall only be rejected from the given procedure when there are no other 
means to ensure compliance with the principle of equal treatment (see Chapter 4.7.5.4 and 
Chapter 1.6). 
The duration of execution of tasks must be specified. It is recommended that this duration 
includes both the execution of tasks and the approval of interim deliverables if any. Indeed, 
the  time  taken  for  the  contracting  authority  to  approve  a  deliverable  should  not  be  at  the 
detriment of the time given to the contractor to perform the contract. The period of approval 
of the final deliverable can be outside that duration since, at that moment, the contractor has 
finished  performance.  A  direct  contract  does  not  have  a  fixed  duration;  the  contract  ends 
when both parties have fulfilled their obligations: the contractor has delivered according to 
the  terms  of  the  contract  and  the  contracting  authority  has  made  the  final  payment;  in 
addition,  some  conditions  linked  to  confidentiality  and  access  for  auditors  are  still  in  force 
long after performance. Only framework contracts have an expiry date.  
88 

 
 
Any  conditions  for  approval  of  deliverables  should  be  specified  (quantitative,  qualitative, 
provisional and/or definitive). 
Technical specifications for services may include:  
-  a  full  and  comprehensive  description  of  the  starting-point:  the  current  state  of  play, 
information and knowledge already possessed by the contracting authority; 
-  full  and  appropriate  information  in  cases  where  previous  contracts  have  been  delivered 
concerning the same topic; providing tenderers with the fullest possible information is the 
only way to avoid possible unequal treatment; 
-  a full description of the tasks; 
-  a full description of the expected output; 
-  if appropriate, requirements concerning the methodology; 
-  requirements concerning the time schedule (imposed or to be proposed); If it is imposed, 
the time schedule should be relative to start date (i.e. X months after start date) unless an 
external  fixed  event  (e.g.  a  Presidency)  is  relevant  to  the  tender  specifications.  At  the 
beginning of contract execution, any deadline for delivery should be clarified as fixed date 
in order to facilitate management and prevent disputes.  
-  technical and organisational information (e.g. place of delivery); 
-  information  about  additional  requirements  (e.g.  in  the  case  of  training,  if  the contractor 
has  to  provide  participants  with  materials  or  organise  transport  for  them  and  any 
participant/client satisfaction survey to be conducted);  
-  the resources required of the contractor and any other requirements;  
-  the  necessary  phasing-in,  phasing-out  and  handover  requirements  in  case  of  recurrent 
contracts  (contracts  which  are  put  into  competition  on  a  regular  basis)  for  purchases 
needed on a continuous basis (e.g. IT contracts for exchange information systems). 
Technical specifications for supplies may include: 
-  a full description of the requirements imposed on the product (making sure that this is not 
discriminatory); 
-  the required functional characteristics; 
-  conditions of delivery (packaging, transport, safety, assembly, etc.); 
-  delivery schedule and destination(s);  
-  arrangements for receipt of deliveries; 
-  installation and user training, where appropriate; 
-  requirements concerning after-sales services and technical assistance; 
-  requirements concerning the warranty (there may be minimum requirements with which 
tenderers must comply, but also extra warranty beyond this minimum may be offered and 
be the subject of an award criterion). 
Minimum requirements to be met by the tender 
Minimum  requirements  are  the  requirements  to  be  met  by  the  tender  for  considering  it 
compliant  with  the  technical  specifications.  These  minimum  requirements  must  be  clearly 
specified. They may relate to part of or all the technical specifications. It is not obligatory to 
“list” them as a separate item of the specifications, as they can be included in the text and 
may  be  expressed  as  a  minimum,  a  range,  a  maximum  or  an  obligation  (“the  tenderer 
must…”) depending on the context.  
 Minimum requirements may relate to e.g.: 
-  the  time  schedule  for  the  execution  of  tasks  (e.g.  final  delivery  within  maximum  10 
months); 
-  the geographic coverage (e.g. at least 8 EU countries); 
-  the language and format of the deliverable (e.g. must be delivered in English); 
89 

 
 
-  functional characteristics of the supplies; 
-  the warranty. 
The minimum requirements must always include compliance with applicable environmental, 
social  and  labour  law  obligations  established  by  Union  law,  national  legislation,  collective 
agreements  or  the  international  environmental,  social  and  labour  conventions  listed  in 
Annex  X  to  the  Directive,  as  well  as  compliance  with  data  protection  obligations  resulting 
from Regulation (EU) 2016/67915.  
By  submitting  a  tender,  the  tenderer  accepts  the  terms  and  conditions  set  out  in  the 
procurement  documents  and  this  includes  the  requirement  of  compliance  with  law 
obligations. It is not necessary to repeat it in a declaration on honour or to require specific 
confirmation in the tender.  
Regarding  the  evaluation,  compliance  with  law  obligations  is  not  subject  to  systematic  ex-
ante  verification.  It  is  only  in  case  of  doubts  that  it  should  be  verified  (e.g.  in  the  case  of 
abnormally low tender – Point 23 Annex 1 FR). 
4.3.1.3. Environmental and social aspects 
Wherever possible and cost-effective, environmental and social aspects should be taken into 
account in the technical specifications. These aspects may include:  
-   environmental performance characteristics;  
-   climate performance characteristics; 
-   design for all types of users. 
For  the  latter,  where  relevant  in  view  of  the  subject  matter  of  the  contract,  accessibility 
criteria  for  people  with  disabilities  must  be  included.  The  only  exception  is  for  contracts 
where the subject matter is irrelevant (i.e. not for users, such as printer cartridges or petrol). 
This  obligation  includes  for  instance:  for  works,  accessibility  of  a  future  building;  for 
supplies, telephones, printers which include accessibility features; for transport services, the 
possibility  to  carry  wheelchairs;  for  IT  services,  adapted  software  (for  use  by  partially-
sighted or deaf people);, for information (website, documents, publications, multimedia…) the 
possibility to be used by all users; for event organisation, the conference building should be 
accessible and the information should be accessible to all (e.g. sign language translator). 
Environmental  and  social  specifications  may  be  formulated  in  any  of  the  following  ways 
(Point 17.3 Annex 1 FR):  
(a)   in  order  of  preference,  by  reference  to  European  standards,  European  technical 
assessments,  common  technical  specifications,  international  standards,  other  technical 
reference systems established by European standardisation bodies or, failing this, their 
national equivalents; every reference shall be accompanied by the words "or equivalent"; 
(b)   in  terms  of  performance  or  of  functional  requirements,  including  environmental 
characteristics, provided that the parameters are sufficiently precise to allow tenderers 
to determine the subject matter of the contract and to allow the contracting authority to 
award the contract; 
(c)   by a combination of those two formulation methods. 
They can also be formulated by requiring a specific label or the specific requirements from a 
label under the following conditions (Point 17.6 Annex 1 FR):  
(a)   the label requirements only concern criteria which are linked to the subject matter of the 
contract; 
(b)   the  label  requirements  are  based  on  objectively  verifiable  and  non-discriminatory 
criteria; 
                                                
15 Regulation (EU) 2016/679 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 27 April 2016 on the 
protection  of  natural  persons  with  regard  to  the  processing  of  personal  data  and  on  the  free 
movement  of  such  data,  and  repealing  Directive  95/46/EC  (General  Data  Protection  Regulation) 
(Text with EEA relevance), OJ L 119, 4.5.2016, p. 1–88.   
90 

link to page 44 link to page 44  
 
(c)   the  labels  are  established  in  an  open  and  transparent  procedure  in  which  all  relevant 
stakeholders may participate; 
(d)   the labels are accessible to all interested parties;  
(e)   the  label  requirements  are  set  by  a  third  party  over  which  the  economic  operator 
applying for the label cannot exercise a decisive influence. 
A tender cannot be rejected if the proposed solution satisfies the requirements defined in the 
technical specifications in an equivalent manner.  
The contracting authority can also determine in the tender specifications certain provisions 
relating to performance of the contract in relation to the application of environment-friendly 
management  measures  (e.g.  the  means  of  transport  for  the  goods  purchased).  These 
provisions  cannot  be  selection  criteria  or  disguised  award  criteria.  They  relate  solely  to 
performance of the contract. That means that all tenderers must be in a position, when the 
contract is awarded, to apply these provisions.  
For more information and practical tips, DG Environment provides a website on Green Public Procurement 
which includes the green public procurement criteria and a toolkit.  
4.3.1.4. Site visit 
If it is necessary to invite the tenderers for a site visit, it should be announced in the contract 
notice for the sake of transparency (for instance security contracts that require knowing the 
disposition  of  a  building  to  draft  the  tender).  This  can  in  no  way  replace  the  obligation  to 
draft  the  technical  specifications  in  detail.  Transparency  also  requires  that  a  record  be 
produced of the organised site visit and sent to all candidates. Due to the organisation and 
timing requirements a restricted procedure should be used.  
Attention  must  be  drawn  to  the  risk  of  concerted  practices,  collusion  or  distortion  of 
competition, so it is recommended to organise several visits to avoid all competitors meeting 
each other.  
4.3.1.5. Variants 
If  the  contract  is  awarded  to  the  tender  offering  the  best  price-quality  ratio,  the  contract 
notice must indicate whether or not variants are accepted. If there is no indication, variants 
will not be authorised. 
“Variant”  means  a  solution  technically  or  economically  equivalent  to  a  model  solution 
described  by  the  contracting  authority.  Variants  may  relate  to  the  whole  contract  or  to 
certain  parts  or  aspects  of  it.  Variants  must  be  submitted  separately  and  identified  as 
variants.  
If  variants  are  accepted,  the  minimum  requirements  which  they  must  fulfil  must  be 
indicated  in  a  separate  section  of  the  technical  specifications.  The  assessment  framework 
that will be used to compare the model solution with the variant must also be specified.  
For detailed information see the note on variants. 
4.3.1.6. Access to the market 
Participation  in  procurement  procedures  is  open  on  equal  terms  to  all  natural  and  legal 
persons falling within the scope of the Treaties. This includes all legal entities registered in 
the EU and all natural persons having their domicile in the EU. Participation is also open to 
all natural and legal persons registered or having their domicile in a non-EU country which 
has  an  agreement  with  the  European  Union  in  the  field  of  public  procurement  on  the 
conditions  laid  down  in  that  agreement.  The  rules  of  access  to  the  market  do  not  apply  to 
subcontractors. 
For  information  on  supporting  documents  concerning  access  to  the  market  (see  Chapter 
4.3.1.17)
.  
For further information please consult the note on the access of candidates and tenderers from third countries 
 
91 

link to page 33 link to page 33  
 
4.3.1.7. Joint tenders and subcontracting 
The  principle  is  that  economic  operators  on  the  market  are  free  to  organise  themselves  as 
they so wish.  As a rule, groups  of  economic  operators  are  authorised  to  submit  a  tender  or 
r equ est   t o  pa r t icipa t e  t o  a   join t   t en der   a n d  subcontracting  is  allowed16.  A  joint  tender  may 
also  involve  subcontracting.  The  number  of  entities  in  a  joint  tender  or  the  number  of 
subcontractors or the share of subcontracting may be not limited. 
Although subcontracting cannot be refused  or limited, it is possible to  require tenderers to 
provide information about intended subcontractors. Awarding the contract to a tenderer who 
included  named  subcontractors  in  its  tender  amounts  to  agreeing  to  the  listed 
subcontractors. No separate agreement is necessary or disagreement possible. 
Exclusion criteria (see Chapter 4.3.1.9) apply to each entity in a joint tender. 
The contracting authority is entitled to demand that exclusion criteria be applied also to any 
subcontractors  proposed  (whether  during  the  procedure  or  during  performance  of  the 
contract). In some cases, the number of subcontractors may be high for a non-essential part 
of the contract (e.g. a study with translations, with translation subcontracted to freelancers) 
so it is possible to apply the exclusion criteria only for subcontractors that are meant to earn 
a significant proportion of the budget (e.g. 5%, 10%... depending on the case) so as to avoid 
having to check a very large number of subcontractors.  
As for selection criteria (see Chapter 4.3.1.10), they are generally applied on the candidate or 
tenderer  as  a  whole  (one  legal  entity,  several  entities  submitting  a  joint  request  to 
participate  or  tender,  or  one  or  several  entities  and  subcontractors)  and  they  may  apply 
individually  only  where  it  is  relevant  in  view  of  their  nature.  For  technical  and  financial 
capacity, it must be assumed that the very purpose of subcontracting  and joint requests to 
participate or tenders is to come up to the required minimum capacity level. A candidate or 
tenderer cannot therefore be rejected for the sole reason that a single subcontractor alone is 
not up to the level set. The combined capacity of the entities participating in the contract has 
to be considered. 
For  submission  of  a  tender  or  a  request  to  participate,  contracting  authorities  may  not 
require  groups  of  economic  operators  to  take  any  specific  legal  form,  but  the  selected 
grouping may be required to adopt a given legal form once it has been awarded the contract 
if this change is necessary for proper performance of the contract.  
The technical specifications have to explain clearly that if the economic operator is relying on 
other  entities  (e.g.  subcontractors,  parent  company,  other  company  in  the  same  group,  or 
third  party)  in  order  to  achieve  the  required  level  of  economic,  financial,  technical  and 
professional capacity, it must prove in its tender or request to participate  that it will have 
their resources at its disposal. This obligation may be fulfilled by presenting statements from 
those entities or the grouping agreement.  
If a third party provides the whole or a large part of the financial capacity, the contracting 
authority may demand that  that entity signs the contract, or alternatively, the third party 
may  commit  itself  to  execute  the  contract  jointly  and  severally  with  the  contractor  by 
providing a letter or intent to that effect.  
For detailed information see the circular on subcontracting and joint tenders.  
 
                                                
16   See in particular the Judgements of the ECJ C-314/01 of 18/03/2004, (Siemens AG Österreich und 
ARGE Telekom & Partner vs. Hauptverband der Österreichischen Sozialversicherungsträger) and 
C-176/98 of 02/12/1999 (Holst Italia SpA vs. Comune di Cagliari). 
92 

link to page 44  
 
4.3.1.8. Criteria 
The criteria for choosing the contractor are divided in three categories: exclusion, selection 
and award. Exclusion and selection criteria are related to the candidate or tenderer, whereas 
award  criteria  are  related  to  the  tender.  Exclusion  and  selection  criteria  are  verified  on  a 
pass/fail basis. Award criteria are meant to rank the tenders according to their merits (most 
economically  advantageous  tender)  after  verifying  that  the  tender  complies  with  the 
minimum  requirements  of  the  procurement  documents.  These  criteria  are  applicable  in  all 
procurement  procedures  and  must  be  announced.  No  modification  of  criteria  is  allowed 
during the procedure. In a procedure in two steps, the exclusion and selection criteria will be 
used to select the candidates who will be invited to tender.  
The criteria may be applied in no particular order (e.g. starting with the award criteria in a 
procedure  in  one  step);  if  the  tenderer  or  tender  does  not  pass  a  category,  it  will  not  be 
evaluated under the other categories. The tender specifications must indicate the method for 
applying  the  criteria  (in  no  particular  order  or  in  a  pre-defined  order  for  each  of  the  three 
categories).  
4.3.1.9. Exclusion criteria 
The sole purpose of the exclusion criteria is to determine whether an operator is allowed to 
participate in the procurement procedure or to be awarded the contract. 
The  exclusion criteria must  be  included  in  the  tender specifications through  a  reference  to 
the  declaration  on  honour  (which  contains  the  list),  except  in  procedures  in  two  steps 
following  the  publication  of  a  notice  of  call  for  expressions  of  interest,  in  which  cases  they 
appear only in the call for expressions of interest and will already have been checked before 
the invitations to tender are sent out. For procedures involving the publication of a contract 
notice,  the  notice  will  refer  to  the  tender  specifications  published  as  from  the  date  of 
publication of the contract notice. 
The  only  criteria  which  should  be  applied  are  set  out  in  Articles 136  and  141 FR,  with 
nothing added, deleted or altered. 
For information on supporting documents concerning exclusion criteria, see Chapter 4.3.1.18. 
4.3.1.10. Selection criteria 
The sole purpose of the selection criteria is to determine whether a tenderer has the capacity 
necessary to implement the contract. This includes the legal and regulatory capacity where 
applicable, the economic and financial capacity and the technical and professional capacity. 
All  selection  criteria  must  be  clear,  non-discriminatory,  appropriate  and  proportionate  in 
view of the subject, value and possibly other aspects of the contract. 
The selection criteria must be included in the tender specifications, except in procedures in 
two  steps  following  the  publication  of  a  notice  of  call  for  expressions  of  interest,  in  which 
cases  they  appear  only  in  the  call  for  expressions  of  interest  and  will  already  have  been 
checked  before  the  invitations  to  tender  are  sent  out.  For  procedures  involving  the 
publication of a contract notice, the notice will refer to the tender specifications published as 
from the date of publication of the contract notice.  
The  contracting  authority  should  opt  for  selection  criteria  which  enable  it  to  determine 
whether  a  tenderer  has  the  capacity  required  for  the  contract  in  question,  rather  than  in 
general.  It  should  also  make  sure  that  it  imposes  criteria  that  can  be  easily  verified.  The 
right balance must be struck between the need for targeted selection criteria and the need to 
attract enough tenders to ensure genuine competition.  
Minimum capacity level 
A selection criterion must consist in three elements: (i) the criterion, (ii) the minimum level 
or  minimum  requirement  and  (iii)  the  relevant  supporting  documents  (Point  18.2  Annex  1 
FR). It is not sufficient to require "sufficient financial capacity" without any precise criteria, 
or  to  require  experience  with  no  minimum  number  of  years  of  experience  or  without 
specifying its precise field. Selection criteria are not scored and do not necessitate marking; 
they are just “pass or fail”. 
93 

 
 
The minimum capacity level set for each of the criteria defines the capacity below which the 
candidate  or  tenderer  will  not  be  selected  because  it  is  considered  as  not  capable  of 
implementing  the  future  contract.  Therefore,  below  these  levels,  the  candidate  will  not  be 
invited to submit a tender (procedures in two steps) or the tender will be rejected (procedure 
in one step). 
Where  a  contract  is  divided  into  lots,  it  is  possible  to  set  additional  minimum  levels  of 
capacity in the case several lots are awarded to the same contractor. The case of a candidate 
or tenderer not fulfilling the capacity requirements for all the lots for which it requests to 
participate  or  submits  a  tender  should  be  provided  for  in  the  tender  specifications.  The 
candidate  or  tenderer  should  be  requested  to  indicate  its  order  of  priority  for  the  different 
lots.  In  case  it  fails  to  give  such  order,  a  pre-defined  order  applicable  in  the  absence  of 
indication of priority should be set in the tender specifications. 
The  information  requested  and  the  minimum  capacity  levels  demanded  should  respect  the 
legitimate  interests  of  economic  operators,  especially  as  regards  protection  of  companies’ 
technical and business secrets.  
Individual vs. consolidated assessment 
Selection criteria can be applied:  
- to the tenderer as a whole (including all members of a joint tender, subcontractors and 
third parties on which the tenderer relies to fulfil some selection criteria); 
- to each economic operator involved in a request to participate or tender separately;  
-  to  at  least  one  economic  operator  involved  in  a  request  to  participate  or  tender;  this 
includes application of a selection criterion to the entity or entities performing a specific 
task or part of the contract.  
In any case, selection criteria must be proportionate to the subject matter of the contract and 
not create discrimination among tenderers. The tender specifications must be very precise in 
this respect.  
Selection criteria are generally applied to the candidate or tenderer as a whole and they may 
apply individually only where it is relevant in view of their nature. 
If  selection  criteria  are  applied  individually  to  subcontractors,  it  is  recommended  to  do  so 
only for subcontractors representing a significant part (e.g. 5%, 10%, etc.) of the value of the 
contract.  Otherwise,  the  criterion  may  be  discriminatory  and  verification  of  each 
subcontractor may lead to a disproportionate workload.  
Legal and regulatory capacity 
Where relevant in view of the subject matter of the contract, the contracting authority may 
require economic operators to be enrolled in a relevant trade or professional register or, for 
service contracts, to hold a particular authorisation proving that it is authorised to perform 
the  contract  in  its  country  of  establishment  or  to  be  a  member  of  a  specific  professional 
organisation. 
Technical and professional capacity 
It is frequent to request past projects carried out by the tenderer (e.g. 2 projects on a specific 
subject  matter  of  at  least  X  thousand  euros  covering  X  countries).  Therefore,  current 
contractors may ask the contracting authority for such project reference to use in future calls 
for tenders. A model for project reference letter is available on BudgWeb. 
The rules provide for a long list of possible evidence of technical and professional capacity. In 
particular, the contracting authority may require the tenderer to explain the environmental 
measures  that  it  will  be  able  to  apply  during  contract  performance  and  to  request  a 
certificate  drawn  up  by  an  independent  body  attesting  the  compliance  with  certain 
environmental management systems or standards. In these cases, the contracting authority 
must refer to the EU Eco-Management and Audit Scheme (EMAS) provided for in Regulation 
(EC)  No  1221/2009  or  other  standards  based  on  European  or  international  standards.  It 
must  also  accept  other  evidence  of  equivalent  environmental  management  measures  from 
economic operators.  
94 

link to page 6 link to page 31 link to page 46  
 
The  contracting  authority  should  announce  in  the  tender  specifications  that  any  tenderer 
with  a  professional  conflicting  interest  which  prevents  it  from  performing  the  contract 
adequately may be rejected (see Chapter 1.6).  
The contracting authority may announce in the tender specifications that it may require that 
certain  critical  tasks  be  performed  directly  by  the  tenderer  itself  or,  where  a  tender  is 
submitted  by  a  consortium  of  economic  operators,  a  participant  in  the  consortium.  This 
provision is to be used with caution, as it could be interpreted as a restriction to the market. 
It assumes that all tasks are very well defined and that one or two of them are critical for the 
contracting  authority.  In  this  case,  there  will  be  a  direct  contractual  link  between  the 
contracting  authority  and  the  entity  performing  these  tasks.  This  provision  is  not  to  be 
understood as the possibility to cap subcontracting.  
The selection criteria remain applicable throughout the whole performance of the contract, 
i.e.  the  contractor  must  comply  with  these  criteria  at  all  times.  This  is  used  in  particular 
when replacing staff in charge of delivering services. If one expert leaves the project, he/she 
will  have  to  be  replaced  with  another  expert  complying  with  the  selection  criteria.  A 
contrario, if selection criteria are not precise enough, change of members of the delivery team 
can cause problems since the minimum profile is not guaranteed.  
Economic and financial capacity 
The  yearly  turnover  is  the  most  commonly  used  criterion.  The  minimum  value  may  not 
exceed two times the annual value of the contract, except in duly justified cases linked to the 
nature of the purchase, which must be explained in the procurement documents.  
If the economic and financial selection criteria are fulfilled  for a large part  by relying on a 
third party, the contracting authority may demand, if that tender wins the contract, that this 
third  party  signs  the  contract  (becomes  a  contractor)  or,  alternatively,  commits  itself  to 
execute the contract jointly and severally with the contractor by providing a letter of intent 
to that effect. Imposing liability of the third party who provides the financial capacity allows 
better  protection  of  the  Union's  financial  interests.  It  should  be  announced  in  the  tender 
specifications.  If  the  third  party  chooses  to  sign  the  contract,  the  contracting  authority 
should  ensure  that  it  is  not  in  exclusion  situation  and  it  has  access  to  the  market  (see 
Chapter 4.3.1.6), so this should also be indicated clearly.  
Using  financial  ratios  can  be  done  only  if  one  expects  the  potential  tenderers  to  be 
homogeneous  enough  to  ensure  comparability  of  their  financial  statements  (and  derived 
ratios).  It  also  implies  to  have  enough  internal  expertise  when  analysing  the  market, 
defining ratios and setting up relevant minimum thresholds. Ratios and related thresholds 
must in any case be clearly defined in the tender specifications, for the sake of transparency. 
In particular, they must specify whether ratios will be applied on each member of the group 
in  case  of  joint  tender,  or  to  at  least  one  of  them,  to  subcontractors  or  to  third  parties 
providing capacity and under which conditions. When the financial capacity is verified using 
financial ratios, the following conditions should be fulfilled:  
-  make  sure  that  the  necessary  expertise  in-house  is  available  when  drafting  the  related 
part of the tender specifications and then when checking the criteria;  
-  evaluate if the set of ratios fits the expected type of tenderers (sector / size …);  
-  respect the general principles of non-discrimination and proportionality;  
-  use as simple, understandable and meaningful ratios and thresholds as possible; 
-  be ready to justify potential rejection decisions and or to deal with potential challenges / 
disputes.  
Given  that  a  company’s  economic  and  financial  situation  can  change  rapidly,  it  could  be 
useful, as part of managing the list of pre-selected candidates produced following a call for 
expressions  of  interest,  to  require  the  selected  candidates  to  send  in  updated  supporting 
documents for the economic and financial capacity every year in order to check again their 
economic and financial situation. 
For information on supporting documents concerning selection criteria, see Chapter 4.3.1.19.  
95 

link to page 38 link to page 41  
 
4.3.1.11. Award criteria 
The  award  criteria  are  not  related  to  the  tenderer  but  to  the  tender.  The  purpose  of  the 
award  criteria  is  to  evaluate  the  technical  and  financial  offer  with  a  view  to  choosing  the 
most economically advantageous tender (Point 21 Annex 1 FR).  
As  a  rule  the  contracting  authority  must  announce  the  relative  importance  of  each  of  the 
quality award criteria and of the price (if a weighting between quality and price is applied – 
see Chapter 4.3.1.12). If exceptionally the weighting is not possible for objective reasons, the 
criteria must be indicated in decreasing importance. If this exception is used, it must be duly 
justified and documented in a note to the procurement file.  
Quality award criteria must be clear, complete and related to the technical specifications and 
expected  content  of  the  tender.  They  may  be  divided  into  sub-criteria.  Criteria  and  sub-
criteria should include the maximum number of points (maximum score) to be awarded for 
each of them. It is also recommended to include the minimum number of points (minimum 
level)  below  which  the  criterion  (or  sub-criterion)  is  considered  as  failed.  They  must  be 
sufficiently  detailed  and  fully  described  with  complete  sentences:  the  link  with  a  specific 
aspect of the technical specifications, the expected input from the tender to pass the award 
criteria. The number of criteria depends on the level of complexity of the subject matter, and 
there should be as many as necessary (usually at least 5 of them) because the evaluation is 
easier when criteria are very precise and targeted. For instance, a criterion such as "quality 
of the methodology" or "organisation of the work" is vague by itself and requires more precise 
textual explanation of the specific elements to be addressed in the tender.  
Depending  on  the  subject  of  the  purchase,  quality  criteria  may  include  time  for  delivery, 
reaction  time,  method  of  communication,  after  sale  service,  packaging,  etc.  In  general  all 
elements  requested  from  tenderers  in  their  tenders  should  be  evaluated  and  weighted 
according  to  the  needs  of  the  contracting  authority.  The  criteria  should  encourage 
elaborating further  on the  issue  and/or  proposing  more  or  better  solutions;  in other  words, 
the criteria should be about the value-added brought by the tender. 
In the case of award based on the best quality-price ratio method, the rules provide examples 
of the type of technical criteria which may be taken into account, but it is for the contracting 
authority to opt for those best suited to the tender in question. 
The  technical  award  criteria  generally  used  for  service  contracts  /  studies  may  cover,  for 
example, the following areas: 
-  quality  and  relevance  of  the  methodology  set out  in  the  tender  (subdivided  according  to 
particular elements or tasks of the project); 
-  management and coordination of the future contract; 
-  organisation of the work for delivery of the service (i.e. organisation of responsibility for 
the tasks, contacts with the Commission, etc.);  
-  balance of profiles and breakdown of tasks (i.e. which profile is going to do which task, and 
how  much  time  each  profile  will  spend  on  each  task),  but  only  for  the  purposes  of 
providing  the  service  requested.  It  is  no  longer  possible  to  evaluate  qualifications  and 
experience of the team at this stage, but the way in which the tenderer plans to use the 
human resources to provide the service is part of the tender (see Chapter 4.3.1.13);  
-  efficiency, quality and usefulness of the proposed products or solutions (where the subject 
of the contract is such that it is for the tenderers to provide the details); 
-  match between the work programme and the intended completion schedule; 
-  efficiency  and  effectiveness  of  data-collection  methods  (where  the  contract  involves 
activities of this type). 
The  technical  award  criteria  for  supply  contracts  may  cover,  for  example,  the  following 
areas: 
-  efficiency (e.g. speed of printer); 
-  functional characteristics; 
96 

 
 
-  duration of warranty;  
-  after-sale service and technical assistance; 
-  delivery time; 
-  environmental performance (e.g. possibility of recycling the machine or materials); 
-  comfort of work (e.g. noise); 
-  aesthetics. 
Award criteria that should not be used:  
-  “quality  of  the  presentation”:  this  refers  to  the  tender  itself,  whereas  criteria  should  be 
about the actual subject matter of the purchase and future performance of the contract; 
-  “understanding  of  the  tender  specifications”:  if  a  tender  shows  no  understanding  or  a 
misunderstanding  of  the  tender  specifications,  it  can  be  eliminated  for  non-compliance 
with  the  tender  specifications  or  for  insufficient  quality  when  evaluating  other  quality 
criteria  (e.g.  methodology).  Indeed,  a  stand-alone  criterion  on  “understanding”  is  easy 
points to get for all tenderers just by copying or rewording the tender specifications, and 
this will not be helpful for evaluators to make the difference between the various tenders 
received. So understanding is in fact evaluated via other more precise criteria;  
-  criteria on items which are fixed in the tender specifications (e.g. a criterion on schedule 
when all the deadlines for delivery are already fixed: if there is no room for improvement 
for the tenderer, there should be no corresponding criterion).  
These technical criteria must be announced in advance. Please note that it is not appropriate 
to  copy-paste  any  or  all  of  the  above  examples.  Award  criteria  must  correspond  to  the 
technical  specifications.  The  award  criteria  send  a  strong  message  to  the  tenderers  about 
which  aspects  are  the  most  important  and  how  their  tenders  will  be  judged.  Generic, 
imprecise award criteria are unhelpful or can even be a hindrance. 
97 

 
 
4.3.1.12. Award methods 
The  award  of  contracts  is  based  on  the  most  economically  advantageous  tender,  which 
consists in one of three award methods: lowest price, lowest cost or best price-quality ratio 
(Art. 167(4) FR). The method chosen must be announced in the procurement documents. It is 
not possible to mix the methods.  
Lowest  price:  the  contract  is  awarded  to  the  lowest  tender  that  satisfies  the  minimum 
requirements set in the technical specifications. 
This method may be used for all types of contracts but in practice is used only for supplies or 
services whose technical content is defined in full in the specifications, thus ruling out the 
need to evaluate the quality of the tender but requiring only a check of the conformity of the 
technical tender. 
If the lowest price method is used, no award criterion other than price can be defined. 
Lowest  cost:  the  contract  is  awarded  based  on  a  cost-effectiveness  approach  including  life-
cycle costing. Life-cycle costing covers costs over the life cycle (acquisition, use, maintenance 
and end of life costs) as well as costs attributed to environmental externalities. 
The tender specifications must include the data to be provided by tenderers and the method 
that will be used to determine the life-cycle costs on the basis of those data. 
The method used for the assessment of costs attributed to environmental externalities must 
be based on objectively verifiable and non-discriminatory criteria. It must be described in the 
tender  specifications  and  economic  operators  should  be  able  to  provide  the  required  data 
with reasonable effort.  
Mandatory common methods for the calculation of life-cycle costs are provided for in Annex 
XIII of the Directive. Each time a new method is approved at EU level for a particular supply 
or service, the list of Annex XIII will be updated. Currently, the sole method available refers 
to the Clean Vehicle Directive.  
If the lowest cost method is used, no award criterion other than cost can be defined. 
Best  price-quality  ratio:  the  contract  is  awarded  taking  into  account  the  price  or  cost  and 
other quality criteria. 
Best price-quality ratio method 
This is the method most frequently used by the EU institutions.  
This method entails defining detailed award criteria to determine quality. 
The  tender  specifications  (or  the  descriptive  document  for  a  competitive  dialogue)  must 
indicate the maximum score that will be applied to each of the quality criteria and possibly 
sub-criteria. 
The  tender  specifications  (or  the  descriptive  document  for  a  competitive  dialogue)  must 
indicate  the  ranking  formula  to  calculate  the  final  score  taking  into  account  quality  and 
price. The formula may set a weighting between quality and price. 
The formula chosen to calculate the final score must reflect the concept of best price-quality 
ratio:  the  method  used  must  not  only  make  it  possible  to  choose  a  quality  tender  but  also 
place an obligation on tenderers to compete on price. Accordingly, it is possible to: 
-  set  a  minimum  score  (e.g.  50  %  or  65  %  of  the  maximum  possible  mark)  for  the  whole 
quality evaluation, as well as for each of the quality criteria and sub-criteria. Tenderers 
falling below those levels will be eliminated, so their final score is not calculated;  
-   set  a  weighting  to  respectively  quality  and  price.  For  instance,  a  60/40  weighting  of 
quality / price can be set to give a higher importance to quality.  
The weighting applied by the contracting authority to each of the criteria set for determining 
the tender offering the best price-quality ratio must be maintained throughout all stages of 
the  evaluation.  A  precise  definition  of  the  method  used  must  be  given  in  the  tender 
specifications. 
98 

 
 
In  exceptional  cases  in  which  weighting  is  not  technically  possible,  mainly  because  of  the 
subject of the contract, it is sufficient to indicate the various criteria in descending order of 
importance. This wording – technical impossibility of establishing a weighting – conveys that 
this situation is extremely rare and not normally justified for public contracts concluded by 
the institutions. 
In case of procedures with a single tenderer, the award criteria must be defined and applied 
to evaluate whether:  
-   the quality of the technical offer is acceptable (based on the weighted quality criteria and 
minimum scores announced in the tender specifications);  
-  the price is reasonable in view of the level of quality. 
Weighting 
If  a  weighting  is  applied  to  price  in  relation  to  the  other  criteria  it  must  not  result  in 
neutralisation of price in the choice of contractor. For example, a weighting of less than 30% 
for price is normally too low to have a significant impact on the result. In addition, it is also 
not recommended to have at the same time high minimum levels for quality (e.g. 70% of the 
maximum score) and a high weighting on quality vs. price in the ranking formula (e.g. 65% 
for quality, 35% for price), as this may neutralise price.   
Formula 
Unlike technical quality, which is usually evaluated by means of a mark, the price quoted by 
a tenderer is an objective element and cannot be marked. 
The formula used to rank tenders and to calculate which tender offers the best price-quality 
ratio should incorporate the quality mark and the price, expressed in the form of indices. The 
method used must be indicated in the procurement documents and must remain unchanged 
during the whole procedure. 
N.B.:  The  use  of  formula  only  makes  sense  when  several  tenders  have  passed  the  quality 
thresholds, so that they can be ranked. A single tender cannot be ranked so the formula is 
not applied.  
There is no unique way to define the best price-quality ratio but two formulae are commonly 
used:  
a) the most simple method (no weighting between price and quality): 
cheapest price 
Score for tender X  = 

total quality score (out of 100) for all criteria of tender X 
price of tender X 
 
b) the method applying a weighting for quality and price expressed in percentage (e.g. 
60%/40%): 
cheapest price 
price weighting 
total quality score (out of 100) 
quality criteria 
score for tender X  = 
*  100  * 


price of tender X 
(in %) 
for all award criteria of tender X 
weighting (in %) 
The weighting factor determines how much extra money the contracting authority is ready to 
spend  in  order  to  award  the  contract  to  an  economic  operator  whose  tender  is  of  a  higher 
technical value.  
Both  formulae  give  a  mark  out  of  100.  All  tenders  passing  minimum  quality  levels  are 
ranked. The tender with the highest mark wins. 
 
 
99 

 
 
 
The example given below shows the difference in calculation of results and ranking between 
the 2 methods for the case of 3 valid tenders (A – B – C) with the following prices and having 
received the following scores (out of 100) for quality:  
Tender 
Price 
Quality 
No weighting -  
Weighting: 40% for price and 60% 
formula (a) 
for quality - formula (b) 

100 
62 
100/100*62 = 62 points 
100/100*40  +  62*0,6  =  77,20 
First 
points 
Second 

140 
84 
100/140*84 = 60 points 
100/140*40  +  84*0,6  =  78,97 
Second 
points 
First 

180 
90 
100/180*90 = 50 points 
100/180*40  +  90*0,6  =  76,22 
Third 
points 
Third 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
100 

 
 
4.3.1.13. Distinction between selection and award criteria 
One of the main difficulties encountered by the services when drafting tender specifications 
consists in finding adequate selection criteria for the evaluation of the capacity of tenderers 
and  quality  award  criteria  for  the  evaluation  of  tenders.  The  distinction  must  be  made  at 
each stage of the procedure: when preparing the tender specifications and when tenders are 
evaluated.  Each  type  of  criteria  serves  its  own  specific  purpose  in  the  evaluation  process. 
Therefore  the  criteria  must  be  drafted  so  that  the  contract  goes  to  the  most  economically 
advantageous tender (as defined by the chosen award method), and not to the tenderer who 
appears to be best by reason of factors connected with its capacity to potentially perform the 
contract.  
Confusing  selection  and  award  criteria  constitutes  a  procedural  defect  which  is  likely  to 
result  in  the  procedure  being  annulled  in  the  event  of  a  dispute.  As  a  matter  of  fact,  the 
confusion  could  favour  certain  economic  operators  at  the  detriment  of  others  regardless  of 
the quality of their technical offer. This has been confirmed by the case-law of the Court17. 
The Financial Regulation (Art. 167(2) and (3) FR) is not aligned with the Directive on this 
point. In particular, qualification and experience of staff assigned to performing the contract 
should be used as a selection criterion only and not as an award criterion. Indeed, this would 
introduce  a  risk  of  overlap  and  double-evaluation  of  the  same  element.  Besides,  during 
contract  performance,  a  change  in  the  staff  assigned  to  performing  the  contract,  even  if 
justified  (by  e.g.  sickness  or  change  of  position),  would  call  into  question  the  conditions  of 
award of the contract, thereby creating legal uncertainty. 
At the stage of evaluation of award criteria, the contracting authority can no longer review 
the capacity or ability of the tenderers. Anything to do with experience, expertise, references 
for  past  projects,  work  already  done  and  resources  available  have  already  been  evaluated 
since  all these  are  covered  by  the  selection  criteria. Only  the  technical  and financial  offers 
must be evaluated at this stage, by reference to the award criteria which are directly related 
to  the  tender  specifications  and  which  are  used  to  assess  their  intrinsic  quality  without 
reference to the capacity of the tenderer. 
The following list of terms should be banned when drafting quality criteria or the evaluation 
report on award criteria because they refer exclusively to the capacity of the tenderers:  
- CVs  
- Profiles  
- Qualifications (education, background) 
- Skills (language, IT, other) 
- Experience  
- Expertise 
- Knowledge (of the subject, of languages…) 
- Familiarity (with the subject) 
- Resources (human, technical) 
- Technical ability  
- References (list of previous contracts) 
- Examples of previous deliverables 
                                                
17 C-31/87 Beentjes, § 15-16; C-315/01 GAT §65-67; C-532/06 Lianakis, §30-32; T-39/08 European Dynamics, § 21-
24 and 40-42 
101 

 
 
4.3.1.14. Value of the contract 
The value of the contract in the tender specifications must be consistent with the information 
published  in  the  contract  notice,  which  only  allows  for  an  “estimated  total  value”  of  the 
contract.  
It is not possible to publish a range so it is recommended not to use this method in the tender 
specifications. 
If  the  contracting  authority  has  a  limited  budget  available  or  in  the  case  of  middle  or  low 
value contracts to avoid exceeding the threshold for the procedure, it may need to indicate 
that  the  “estimated  total  value”  in  the  contract  notice  is  a  maximum  and  that  tenders 
exceeding  it  will  be  rejected.  When  the  estimated  value  is  close  to  a  threshold,  it  is 
recommended to use the procedure valid above this threshold.  
When  indicating  a  maximum for  a  direct  contract,  the  contracting  authority must  be  clear 
about  what  is  included  in  this  maximum  budget,  i.e.  price,  renewals,  reimbursement  of 
expenses (excluding indexation), so that tenderers can take this into account when defining 
their financial offer.  
Setting a maximum value has disadvantages as it tends to weaken price competition.  
4.3.1.15. Price and reimbursement of expenses 
An indication should be given of whether the price quoted must be fixed and not subject to 
revision.  Otherwise,  the  specifications  must  lay  down  the  conditions  and  formula  for 
reviewing the price  during  the  validity  of  the contract,  taking  account  of  the  nature of the 
contract and the economic situation in which it will be performed, the nature and duration of 
the tasks involved and the EU financial interest. 
Under  Articles 3  &  4  of  the  Protocol  on  the  Privileges  and  Immunities  of  the  European 
Union,
  the  Union  is  exempt  from  all  charges,  taxes  and  duties,  including  value-added  tax; 
such  charges  may  not,  therefore,  be  included  in  the  calculation  of  the  price  quoted;  the 
amount  of  VAT  must  be  indicated  separately.  As  regards  the  relations  with  Belgian 
contractors, the Belgian ministry of finance requests that the name of the authorising officer 
signing the contract be part of the nominative list as maintained by DG HR – Unit B.1 and 
granting the delegation of signature. The Belgian authorities ask moreover that the contract 
specifies that the authorising officer acts on behalf and for the account of an EU Institution 
covered by the PPI for the VAT purpose. 
It  should  also  be  specified  that  the  price  tendered  must  be  all-inclusive  and  expressed  in 
euros,  including  for  countries  which  are  not  in  the  euro  zone.  For  tenderers  in  countries 
which are not in the euro zone, the price quoted may not be revised in line with exchange 
rate movements. It is up to the tenderer to select an exchange rate and accept the risks or 
benefits  resulting  from  any  variation.  However,  since  payments  in  some  non-EU  countries 
(delegations) cannot be made in euros in certain cases, national currencies may be used on a 
cash basis if instructions to that effect are given to the accounting officer in ABAC (workflow) 
or from imprest accounts. 
Any  ambiguity  in  the  formulation  of  the  financial  offer  may  cause  rejection  of  the  whole 
tender. The financial offer must be clear and in compliance with the tender specifications. In 
particular, reductions of the offered prices (discounts) based upon conditions not specified in 
the  tender  documents  (e.g.  following  ordered  quantities)  are  to  be  avoided.  Indeed,  any 
clarification request on the submitted price may imply a modification of the tender.  
If there is a list of unit prices, the tender specifications must clearly state which price will be 
used if there is a discrepancy between the total of the unit prices (verified during evaluation) 
and the aggregate price in the financial offer. 
As a rule, travel expenses should be included in the global price offered by the tenderer. For 
that,  the  contracting  authority  must  indicate  precisely  the  required  travel  in  the  tender 
specifications (e.g. number and location of  all meetings). Travel and accommodation should 
be  reimbursed  separately  from  the  global  price  only  when  necessary,  i.e.  where  it  is  not 
possible to identify the amount or place of travel required within the project. In this case, the 
102 

 
 
contracting  authority  should  provide  the  reimbursement  rates  for  travel  and  subsistence, 
based on the standard Commission rules, and  a maximum amount (in euro)  for travel and 
subsistence expenses payable under the whole contract. It should be estimated by using the 
maximum rates and the estimated necessary travel for performance of the contract.  
The  same  principle  applies  to  any  specific  expenditure  incurred  in  performance  of  the 
contract, which  cannot be  priced  by  the tenderer  during  the  procedure,  such  as the  cost  of 
translating  various  reports  of  unknown  length  into  the  languages  indicated  in  the 
specifications. In any case, the amount of reimbursable expenses compared to the price of the 
contract should be minor.  
In direct non-renewable contracts, the price is usually fixed and not subject to revision. 
In the case of multi-annual contracts (e.g. framework contracts), where a fixed price does not 
seem feasible, it is best for prices not to be revised before twelve months. The indexes used 
should  be  expressed  in  the  same  currency  as  the  contract;  indexes  published  by  Eurostat 
should be used where possible.  
See the Circular on price revision 
4.3.1.16. Contents of the tender 
When drafting instructions for tenderers in relation to the presentation and contents of the 
request to participate or tender, the following points should be considered: 
Documents which are not relevant and necessary for the evaluation should not be requested.  
All  and  only  the  documents  necessary  for  the  evaluation  (exclusion,  selection  and  award 
criteria) must be indicated, e.g. in a list. 
It  is  strongly  recommended  to  draw  a  clear  distinction  between  the  documents  required 
under  the  exclusion,  selection  and  award  criteria  respectively  to  avoid  the  risk  of  criteria 
being confused when tenders are evaluated.  
Tenderers can be invited  to organise their technical offer under headings or to structure it 
following  a  template  to  ensure  that  it  includes  the  expected  contents  and  meets  the 
requirements  set  out  in  the  technical  specifications  as  closely  as  possible.  This  is  likely  to 
favour a straightforward evaluation of tenders in the light of the award criteria. 
It  is  advisable  to  require  that  tenderers  submitting  joint  tenders  and  /  or  including 
subcontracting specify the role, qualifications and experience of each entity involved in the 
tender.  
It  is  also  necessary  to  require  an  itemised  use  of  human  resources  per  task  if  there  is  an 
award criterion on allocation of resources or organisation of the work.  
In  case  information  concerning  subcontractors  is  requested,  the  scope  of  this  information 
should be clear. In addition to information on exclusion criteria for identified subcontractors 
and  information  about  any  part  intended  to  be  subcontracted,  information  on  selection 
criteria  may  be  requested  as  well.  Normally,  the  tenderer  provides  this  as  part  of  the 
consolidated information for overall assessment of capacity. In any case, it is recommended 
to  limit  this  requirement  to  certain  overall  and/or  individual  value  of  subcontracting.  For 
framework contracts, it does not necessarily make sense to request the part intended to be 
subcontracted (as a percentage) given that there are repetitive purchases and they are not 
necessarily all identical.  
Tenderers  should  be  asked  to  submit  their  financial  offer  as  a  global  price.  An  itemised 
budget may be requested to facilitate the management of the contract in case of difficulties in 
its performance (e.g. detailing the price of the different tasks or per deliverable will make it 
easier to implement proportionate protective measures if necessary).  
In the case of framework contracts, the financial offer takes the form of a list of unit prices 
which  will  be  applied  to  the  specific  contracts  implementing  the  framework  contract.  The 
prices  of  the  list  are  maximum  prices  in  the  case  of  multiple  framework  contracts  with 
reopening  of  competition.  Care  should  be  taken  that  all  price  items  to  be  used  when  the 
103 

link to page 31 link to page 33  
 
framework contract is implemented are incorporated into the price list. It is recommended to 
attach a template on which to submit the prices to the tender specifications.  
It is a good practice to provide tenderers with standard forms for submission of tenders. They 
may  be  useful  in  particular  when  tenderers  are  requested  to  present  a  set  of  precise 
information, e.g. technical parameters or organisational details, price list. 
4.3.1.17. Identification, legal status and access to the market 
Tenderers should be asked to provide the following information and documents: 
Identification and legal status: 
Usually,  the  Commission  requests  submission  of  a  signed  Legal  Entity  Form  and  of  the 
relevant  evidence  listed  in  the  LEF  itself.  It  is  recommended  to  provide  the  following  web 
address  rather  than  copy  the  LEF  in  annex  to  the  tender  specifications  because  there  are 
three different templates, available in all languages:  
http://ec.europa.eu/budget/contracts_grants/info_contracts/legal_entities/legal_entities_en.cf
 
Access to the market: 
Tenderers  must  indicate  the  state  in  which  they  have  their  registered  office  or  domicile, 
providing  the  necessary  supporting  documents  in  accordance  with  their  national  law  (see 
Chapter 4.3.1.6)
SMEs 
Each tenderer (and each member of the group in case of joint tender) must declare whether it 
is  a  Small  or  Medium  Size  Enterprise  in  accordance  with  Commission  Recommendation 
2003/361/EC.
 This should be clearly requested in the tender specifications. This information 
must be published in the award notice and is used for statistical purposes only. 
4.3.1.18. Declaration and evidence on exclusion criteria 
The contracting authority must request the candidates or tenderers to provide the European 
Single  Procurement  Document  (ESPD)  or,  as  long  as  the  ESPD  is  not  available  for  EU 
institutions, a declaration on honour, signed and dated, stating that they are not in one of 
the exclusion situations (see Chapter 4.3.1.9). The contracting authority must provide a link 
to the ESPD or the model declaration as an annex. 
An economic operator may reuse an ESPD or a declaration which has already been used in a 
previous  procedure.  In  this  case,  it  must  confirm  that  the  information  contained  in  the 
document continues to be correct. 
The purpose is to alleviate the workload of tenderers having to submit and of the contracting 
authority  having  to  check  supporting  documents  for  all  tenderers.  For  procedures  as  from 
Directive  thresholds,  the  candidates  or  tenderers  must  provide  evidence  confirming  the 
ESPD  or  declaration  upon  request  of  the  contracting  authority  at  any  time  where  this  is 
necessary to ensure the proper conduct of the procedure (Art. 137(2) FR). 
In  practice,  for  contracts  with  a  value  as  from  the  thresholds  set  in  the  Directive,  the 
successful  tenderer  must  provide,  within  the  time  limit  stipulated  by  the  contracting 
authority  and  before  signature  of  the  contract,  evidence  confirming  the  above-mentioned 
ESPD or declaration. The authorising officer requests this evidence after taking the award 
decision  at  the  same  time  as  simultaneously  notifying  the  results  of  the  procedure  to  all 
tenderers. 
In  the  procurement  procedures  in  two  steps  with  publication  of  a  contract  notice,  if  the 
contracting authority specified a maximum number of candidates to be invited to tender and 
some  candidates  may  have  to  be  rejected  in  order  not  to  exceed  this  number,  all  the 
candidates  must  provide  the  evidence  on  non-exclusion  in  addition  to  the  ESPD  or 
declaration.  
 
104 

 
 
For  contracts  with  a  value  below  the  thresholds  set  in  the  Directive,  the  contracting 
authority  may,  if  it  has  doubts  about  whether  the  tenderer  to  whom  the  contract  is  to  be 
awarded is in one of the situations leading to exclusion, require the tenderer to provide the 
evidence on non-exclusion. 
For contracts with a value up to €15 000, the contracting authorities may decide, depending 
of their risk assessment, not to require the above-mentioned ESPD or declaration. 
The  contracting  authority  must waive  the  obligation  for  a  candidate or  tenderer  to  submit 
the  documentary  evidence  if  it  has  already  been  submitted  for  another  procurement 
procedure  of  the  same  contracting  authority  and  provided  the  documents  were  issued  not 
more than one year earlier and are still valid at the date of their request by the contracting 
authority.  In  such  cases,  the  candidate  or  tenderer  must  declare  on  its  honour  that  the 
documentary  evidence  has  already  been  provided  in  a  previous  procurement  procedure, 
provide reference to that procedure  and confirm that that there has been no change in the 
situation. This information must be included in the tender specifications.  
The  contracting  authority  must  also  waive  the  obligation  for  a  candidate  or  tenderer  to 
submit the documentary evidence if it can access it on a national database free of charge or 
in the case of material impossibility to provide such evidence. 
The documents to be requested are listed in Art. 137(3) FR and consist mainly in an extract 
of judicial record, a certificate on payment of social security and a certificate on payment of 
taxes. 
The extract from the judicial record and administrative certificates can be regarded as recent 
if they are not more than one year old starting from their issuing date and are still valid at 
the date of their request by the contracting authority.  
Lists  of  certificates  issued  by  the  Member  States  can  be  found  on  the  e-CERTIS  website: 
http://ec.europa.eu/markt/ecertis.  If  a  certificate  is  not  issued  in  the  country  concerned,  it 
may  be  replaced  by  a  sworn  statement  (made  before  a  person  authorised  by  law).  Failing 
that, it may be replaced by a solemn statement made by the interested party before a judicial 
or administrative authority, a notary or a qualified professional body (chamber of commerce, 
etc.). Normally, solemn statements are not made before an authority; this is a requirement 
added by the FR.  
If  contracting  authorities  have  doubts  about  the  personal  situation  of  candidates  or 
tenderers, they may themselves apply to the competent authorities to obtain any information 
they consider necessary about their situation. The list of these authorities can also be found 
on the website referred to above. 
Depending  on  the  national  legislation  of  the country  in which the  tenderer  or  candidate is 
established,  the  documents  must  relate  to  legal  persons  and/or  natural  persons,  including 
company directors or any person with powers of representation, decision-making or control in 
relation to the candidate or tenderer. 
 
 
105 

link to page 33  
 
 
4.3.1.19. Declaration and evidence on selection criteria 
The contracting authority must request the candidates or tenderers to provide the European 
Single  Procurement  Document  (ESPD)  or,  as  long  as  the  ESPD  is  not  available  for  EU 
institutions, a declaration on honour, signed and dated, stating that they fulfil the selection 
criteria (see Chapter 4.3.1.10). The contracting authority must provide a link to the ESPD or 
the model declaration as an annex. 
The purpose is to alleviate the workload of tenderers having to submit and of the contracting 
authority  having  to  check  supporting  documents  for  all  tenderers.  For  procedures  as  from 
Directive  thresholds,  the  candidates  or  tenderers  must  provide  evidence  confirming  the 
ESPD or declaration. The contracting authority may request all or part of the documentation 
at any time to ensure the proper conduct of the procedure (Point 18.4 Annex 1 FR). 
 
 For one-step 
procedures, the contracting authority may request all or part of the evidence with the tender 
or  during  the  evaluation  or  at  award  stage.  For  instance,  it  may  be  appropriate  to  ask  for 
CVs at tender stage; or to request evidence to the successful tenderer and to the second best 
tenderer  to  ensure  fast  contract  signature  in  case  of  problem  with  the  successful  tenderer 
while not raising legitimate expectations.  
The  contracting  authority  must waive  the  obligation  for  a  candidate or  tenderer  to  submit 
documentary evidence if such evidence has already been submitted for another procurement 
procedure of the same contracting authority and provided the documents are up-to-date. In 
such  cases,  the  candidate  or  tenderer  must  declare  on  its  honour  that  the  documentary 
evidence has already been provided in a previous procurement procedure, provide reference 
to  that  procedure,  and confirm  that  there  has been  no  change in  the situation.  The  above-
mentioned information must be included in the tender specifications.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Verification of the legal and regulatory capacity:  
The authorisation for the tenderer to perform the contract proven by inclusion in a trade or 
professional  register  (e.g.  the  bar  for  lawyers),  membership  of  an  organisation,  VAT 
registration or an express authorisation (e.g. inclusion on a national decree or law for certain 
professions) as indicated in Point 18.3 Annex 1 FR. 
106 

 
 
Verification of economic and financial capacity: 
Point  19  Annex  1  FR  provides  a  non-exhaustive  list  of  possible  documents,  but  it  is  not 
obligatory  to  request  them  all.  Only  the  documents  necessary  to  check  the  criteria  (and 
minimum  levels)  indicated  in  the  tender  specifications  should  be  requested,  e.g.  financial 
statements of the past two years (max. three) if there is a criterion on minimum turnover for 
that period. When  requesting  professional  risk  indemnity  insurance,  the  tender 
specifications must specify the amount to be insured as it constitutes a substantial element 
of the criterion. 
Tenderers who, for exceptional reasons, are unable to produce the references requested can 
prove their economic and financial capacity by any other means deemed appropriate by the 
contracting  authority.  For  instance,  a  company  created  less  than  two  years  before  the 
procedure may only provide financial statements for the past year instead of past two years 
and a business plan for the current year.  
The possibility for economic operators to rely on the capacity of other entities, as provided for 
in  Point  18.6  Annex  1  FR,  must  be  mentioned  in  the  tender  specifications.  If  the  tenderer 
uses  this  possibility,  the  contracting  authority  may  request  the  legal  entity  providing 
financial backing to be jointly liable for the execution of the contract, e.g. by requesting it to 
sign the contract or, failing that, to provide a joint and several first-call financial guarantee. 
Verification of technical and professional capacity:  
Point 20.2 Annex 1 FR  provides an exhaustive list of possible documents,  several of which 
relate  to supplies  or works  contracts,  but  it  is  not  obligatory  to request them  all. Only  the 
documents  necessary  to  check  the  criteria  (and  minimum  levels)  indicated  in  the  tender 
specifications should be requested. Generally, it is recommended to have the following:  
-  Criteria and minimum levels on services (or supplies) provided in the last three years, and 
request the list of these projects;  
-  Criteria and minimum levels of qualifications and professional experience of the person(s) 
directly involved in delivering the service (usually not applicable for supplies), and request 
the corresponding CVs.  
107 

 
 
4.3.2. Draft contract 
The draft contract is the third tender document. The model contract available on BudgWeb 
should be filled in as far as possible, including data on the contracting authority, the subject 
matter  of  the  procurement,  the  terms  of  payment,  requirements  concerning  guarantees  if 
applicable  and  intellectual  property  rights.  The  contractor  and  the  price  can  only  be  filled 
once the successful tenderer is known. All the terms of the contract should generally not be 
repeated  in  the  tender  specifications  in  order  to  avoid  inconsistencies;  it  is  better  to  make 
references to the draft contract.  
The contract must stipulate the position (e.g. Head of Unit, Director, etc.) and corresponding 
organisational  entity  of  the  person  responsible  as  data  controller  for  processing  of  all 
personal data during the procurement procedure and the contract performance. This can be 
the  authorising  officer  responsible  in  charge  of  the  procurement  in  question  or  the 
corresponding  authorising  officer  by  Delegation  or  a  specific  function  that  covers  all  data 
processing  for  procurement,  e.g.  Head  of  Unit  of  Unit  XXX  or  Director  of  Directorate  on 
Resources or Director General of DG XXX. The relevant person can be found by contacting 
the local Data Protection Coordinator.  
For more information see the note on protection of personal data in procurement and the website of the 
Secretariat General including the list of Data Protection Coordinators: 
https://myintracomm.ec.europa.eu/sg/dpo/Pages/index.aspx  
The model contracts are on Budgweb: 
https://myintracomm.ec.testa.eu/budgweb/en/imp/procurement/pages/imp-080-030-010_contracts.aspx.
 
4.3.2.1. Use of the DG BUDG model contracts 
DG  BUDG  model  contracts  are  in  three  parts:  special  conditions,  general  conditions  and 
annexes, which form an integral part of the contract. 
By definition, the special conditions are the variable part of the contract. They consist of a 
number  of  blanks  which  must  be  filled  in  carefully,  beginning  with  the  particulars  of  the 
parties.  They  also  include  a  number  of  mandatory  clauses,  to  be  chosen  from  versions 
proposed in square brackets, and optional clauses which can be kept or discarded. In order to 
avoid renumbering, it is advised to indicate "not applicable" in the relevant clauses instead of 
deleting them. 
On  the  other  hand,  the  general  conditions  should  not  be  changed  and,  in  normal 
circumstances,  are  incorporated  without  amendment.  In  the  case  of  a  simplified  contract 
(purchase order), they are to be found on the Europa website indicated on that contract. It is 
sometimes  necessary  to  modify  the  general  conditions.  Extra  care  should  be  taken  in  such 
cases  not  to  delete  an  essential  guarantee  or  to  create  incompatibilities.  Generally, 
derogations  to  general conditions  are  listed  in  the  special  conditions,  with  a  clause stating 
“By derogation to Article XX of the general conditions, etc.”  
Authorising officers can make whatever changes they consider necessary to adapt a contract 
to  the  specific  subject  and  circumstances.  DG  BUDG  (Central  Financial  Service,  Unit 
BUDG.D.2,  Financial  rules  2  and  Programme  management)  may  be  consulted  on  the 
changes made.  
4.3.2.2. Terms of payment 
The  draft  contract  includes  the  payment  schedule.  It  must  be  in  full  coherence  with  the 
tender  specifications,  or  the  tender  specifications  may  only  refer  to  the  contract  clause  to 
avoid inconsistencies.  
Pre-financing is meant to provide a float to the contractor, and normally it is used in grants, 
not  so  much  in  procurement  because  it  is  considered  as  a  risk  for  the  Union's  budget 
(payment  with  nothing  in  return).  It  should  be  exceptional  in  procurement  and  be  used  in 
justified  cases  (procurement  requiring  high  start-up  costs  e.g.  for  works  contracts,  or 
purchase of patents or practice of the sector such as booking of conference rooms).  
108 

 
 
Interim payments are made in exchange of receiving something of equivalent value (e.g. raw 
data  from  a  survey,  the  first  draft  of  a  report,  the  per  country  situation  of  5  out  of  28 
countries…). In order to facilitate access to SMEs to EU contracts, it is recommended to pay 
an interim payment fairly early in the payment schedule, but it should still be in exchange of 
a deliverable of equivalent value. Apart from reducing the risk to the budget, it is also useful 
in case of termination of the contract, as it ensures that the contracting authority does not 
pay more than what the deliverable is worth.  
The  payment  schedule  should  be  reasonable,  i.e.  payments  should  not  be  too  frequent  to 
minimize  workload  and  should  be  linked  to  the  milestones  of  the  implementation  of  the 
contract.  
4.3.2.3. Reimbursement of expenses 
Travel  and  subsistence  expenses  should,  as  a  rule,  be  included  in  the  global  price  of  the 
contract and not be reimbursed separately. Therefore the tender specifications must include 
in detail all necessary travel (e.g. number and place of meetings) so that tenderers can make 
their  own  cost  estimates  and  incorporate  them  in  their  all-in  financial  offer.  Separate 
reimbursement  must  be  foreseen  only  when  the  place  of  performance  is  not  known  at  the 
time of drafting the tender specifications (e.g. framework contract for audits in and outside 
the  EU,  where  the  volume  of  services  to  be  performed  in  each  country  is  not  known).  The 
same  argument  can  be  applied  to  reimbursement  of  other  costs  directly  linked  to 
performance of the contract (e.g. cost of translations). 
4.3.2.4. Guarantees 
There are four types of guarantees (Art. 152, 168(2) and 173 FR). In all cases, they must be 
announced  in  the  procurement  documents.  The  conditions  for  release  of  the  guarantees 
should be announced as well. Where contractors are required to submit a guarantee, it must 
be for an amount and a period that are sufficient for it to be called. 
Tender guarantee 
The  tender  guarantee  ensures  that  tenders  are  maintained  until  contract  signature.  It  is 
rarely  used  in  the  EU  institutions,  but  if  so  it  must  be  announced  in  the  tender 
specifications.  The  tender  guarantee  is  to  be  provided  with  the  tender.  It  is  equivalent  to 
1% to 2%  of  the  total  value  of  the  contract.  It  is  called  in  if  the  tender  submitted  is 
withdrawn before contract signature. The tender guarantee is released after information on 
the outcome of the procedure for tenders rejected based on the exclusion or selection criteria, 
and when the contract is signed for tenders ranked for the award of the contract.  
Guarantee for pre-financing 
In  case  of  pre-financing,  a  guarantee  may  be  requested  on  a  case-by-case  basis  if  it  is 
justified by a risk assessment documented internally. The assessment will take into account 
in  particular  the  value  of  the  contract,  its  subject  matter,  duration  and  pace,  and  the 
structure of the market. Pre-financing guarantees are not allowed for contracts not exceeding 
€60 000. 
Performance guarantee 
On  a  case-by-case  basis  and  subject  to  a  risk-analysis,  a  performance  guarantee  may  be 
required  from  the  contractor  in  order  to  ensure  compliance  with  substantial  contractual 
obligations  in  the  case  of  works,  supplies  or  complex  services.  The  performance  guarantee 
amounts to a maximum of 10 % of the total value of the contract and is to be released after 
final acceptance of the works, supplies or complex services. It may be released partially or 
fully upon provisional acceptance. Performance guarantees are not allowed for contracts not 
exceeding €60 000. 
Retention money guarantee 
The  use  of  a  retention  money  guarantee  is  restricted  to  a  particular  situation:  it  may  be 
requested, on a case-by-case basis and subject to a risk analysis, in order to ensure that the 
works, supplies or services have been fully delivered and when final acceptance according to 
the terms of the contract cannot be given upon final payment by the authorising officer. In 
109 

 
 
other words, if all tasks can be finalised and approved before payment of the balance, there is 
no  retention  money  guarantee.  Otherwise,  the  guarantee  will  cover  the  period  between 
provisional  acceptance  (at  payment  of  the  balance)  and  final  acceptance  (which  can  be 
several months later) and this is referred to as contract liability period. This is used e.g. for 
software development (the software is delivered but bugs may be detected for a period after 
final  delivery)  or  for  works  contracts.  It  may  take  the  form  of  a  retention  on  payment  of 
maximum  10 %  (which  is  recommended  as  it  is  easy  to  manage).  If  10%  is  not  considered 
adequate,  the  authorising  officer  may  set  a  lower  percentage  according  to  the  usual 
commercial  terms.  It  shall  be  proportionate  with  regard  to  the  nature  of  the  purchase,  its 
organisation  and  risk.  Retention  money  guarantees  are  not  allowed  for  contracts  not 
exceeding €60 000. 
If  the  contractor  so  requests  and  subject  to  approval  by  the  contracting  authority,  the 
retention on payment can be replaced by a financial guarantee.  
Contractual guarantees, when required, must be provided for in the draft contract.  
For financial guarantees, the model guarantee must be provided.  
For information on management and release of guarantees see Chapter 5.6. 
 
For further information see the Circular on guarantees. 
 
4.3.2.5. Intellectual property rights  
For  services,  the  draft  contract  should  include  all  the  necessary  information  about 
intellectual property rights, in particular about the rights to be purchased and the intended 
use  of  these  rights  in  the  future.  It  is  always necessary  to  adapt  the  clause  to  the  specific 
subject matter of the contract.  
More information is available in the Explanatory note on intellectual property rights.  
4.3.2.6. Contract phases, renewal or options  
A contract with phases includes several steps in a project, whereby  one step only begins if 
specific conditions are fulfilled at the end of the previous step. The value of the contract must 
be  calculated  over  the whole  duration,  including  all  phases,  and  the financial  commitment 
should include all phases, unless the condition is the availability of budget itself. The award 
criteria  (including  the ranking  formula)  must  take  account of  all phases,  and the  financial 
tenders  should  include  prices  for  each  phase.  For  instance,  a  contract  could  include  an 
information  campaign  with  reporting  of  its  impact  (phase  1).  If  the  impact  is  positive,  the 
campaign is pursued with a wider scope (phase 2), otherwise it is stopped. If the condition is 
fulfilled the second phase starts automatically.  
This  is  different  from  a  contract  with  renewal  because  in  this  case  each  phase  contains 
different tasks. In a contract with renewal, the tasks described in the tender specifications 
for the first period are repeated over the second period, with for instance conditionality on 
budget availability. It is recommended to use automatic contract renewal, i.e. if the condition 
is fulfilled the contract is renewed with no action by the parties, and if the contract is not 
renewed,  the  party  refusing  renewal  should  notify  the  other  party  at  least  three  months 
before  the  anniversary  date  of  the  contract.  When  renewal  is  not  automatic,  the  renewal 
must  be  notified  to  the  contractor,  and  if  it  is  forgotten  then  contract  terminates 
automatically.  Again,  the  value  of  the  contract  and  the  award  criteria  must  cover  the  full 
duration of the contract including all renewals.  
Options are qualitative or quantitative extras, ancillary to the main purchase, and which are 
optional for the contracting authority - it has the right to buy them or not – but not to the 
tenderers, who have to include them in their technical and financial tender. For instance, a 
contract for a study may include the option of translating the main report. Again, the value 
of the contract and the award criteria must cover the full duration of the contract including 
all options.  
 
110 

 
 
4.3.3. Invitation to tender  
An  invitation  to  tender  (Point  16.2  Annex  1  FR)  is  the  procurement  document  giving  the 
administrative  details  for  submitting  tenders,  outlining  the  procedural  requirements  for 
contacts  with  the  contracting  authority  (Art.  169  FR)  and  providing  extra-legal  clauses. 
These clauses do not need to be repeated in the tender specifications, and they include: 
-   Submission of a tender implies acceptance of all the terms and conditions set out in this 
invitation to tender, in the tender specification and in the draft contract;  
-   All costs incurred during the preparation and the submission of tenders are to be borne by 
the tenderers and will not be reimbursed;  
-   The invitation to tender is in no way binding on the contracting authority. Its contractual 
obligations commence only upon signature of the contract with the successful tenderer;  
-   Once  the  contracting  authority  has  opened  the  tender,  the  document  shall  become  its 
property and it shall be treated confidentially.  
In addition, the invitation to tender specifies the duration of validity of the tenders, i.e. the 
period  between  receipt  of  tenders  and  signature  of  contracts,  during  which  the  tenderers 
cannot modify their tenders, in particular price. The contract must be signed before the end 
of this validity, so it is recommended to be realistic with the time needed for evaluation (e.g. 
about six months for an open procedure).  
There is no need for a blue ink signature of the invitation to tender by the authorising officer. 
In  the  case  of  procedure  in  two  steps,  economic  operators  will  be  first  invited  to  submit  a 
request  to  participate.  The  invitation  to  tender  will  be  sent  in  the  second  step  only  to  the 
selected candidates. 
See model invitation to tender 
 
111 

link to page 54 link to page 54  
 
4.3.4. Contract notice 
The  purpose  of  the  contract  notice  is  to  inform  all  potentially  interested  operators  that  a 
procurement  procedure  is  launched,  providing  them  with  the  essential  details  and  all  the 
information required in order to participate.  
The contract notice is published in the Official Journal and is designed to attract as many 
tenders as possible. It can therefore be regarded as the most important form of publicity for 
public procurement. 
A contract notice is published for the following procedures only: open procedures, restricted 
procedures,  competitive  procedures  with  negotiation,  competitive  dialogues  and  innovation 
partnerships.  
It is not used for specific contracts based on framework contracts. 
Contracting authorities wishing to organise a contest make their intention known by means 
of a design contest notice (see Chapter 3.11). 
4.3.4.1. Content 
The contract notice must be drafted in one language using the standard eNotice. The choice 
of the language version must correspond to the language of the form used. The Publications 
Office will have the notice translated into all the EU official languages. 
The  contract  notice  must  be  consistent  with  the  prior  information  notice,  if  one  has  been 
published.  
The  textual  information  should  be  kept  to  a  minimum  and  must  not  exceed  500  words. 
Information already contained in the other procurement documents should not be repeated 
in  the  contract  notice.  Instead  of  copying  such  information,  the  contract  notice  should  use 
eTendering or, failing that, provide the link to the documents available on line (see Chapter 
4.4).
 
In  justified  cases,  the  contracting  authority  may  transmit  the  procurement  documents  by 
other  means  if  direct  access  by  electronic  means  is  not  possible  for  technical  reasons.  For 
instance, there would be no direct access if the volume of the tender specifications does not 
allow for downloading or the format of the document is not generally accessible or if access 
would require specialised office equipment. 
There  would  also  be  no  direct  access  to  the  whole  procurement  documents  if  they  contain 
confidential  information  (e.g.  details  of  security  systems);  in  this  case,  all  non-confidential 
parts of the procurement documents are provided with a caveat that confidential parts will 
only be provided to selected candidates.  
When it is necessary to repeat information, the contract notice must be fully consistent with 
the  other  procurement  documents  (e.g.  the  final  date  for  receipt  of  tenders  or  requests  to 
participate must be identical in the contract notice and the invitation letter). 
In the case of procedures in two steps, the indicative date for sending the invitation to tender 
to  the  selected  candidates  must  be  calculated  with  due  allowance  for  the  time  taken  to 
process the requests to participate. 
Under  an  open  procedure,  representatives  of  tenderers  may  attend  the  opening  session  so 
that they can ensure that their tender arrived closed and they can know their competitors. 
The contract notice must therefore specify who may attend and the date, time and place of 
opening.  The  department  concerned  must  make  all  the  necessary  practical  arrangements 
(book a sufficiently large room for a sufficient length of time, give instructions to guards on 
the  door  in  buildings,  prepare  a  presence  list,  etc.).  Any  tenderer  who  does  not  attend  the 
opening session can ask for this information and should be given the opening report (without 
the names of persons in charge of opening).  
The instruction on drafting notices sets out the arrangements for sending the notice to the 
Publications Office, together with advice on completing the forms online via eNotices. 
112 

link to page 56  
 
4.3.4.2. Additional publicity 
In addition, but not as an alternative, to publication of the contract notice, the contracting 
authority may use any other form of publicity. 
Such  publicity  must  not  precede  publication  of  the  contract  notice,  which  is  the  only 
authentic  version,  and  must  refer  to  the  notice.  Nor  must  it  introduce  any  discrimination 
between candidates or tenderers or contain any information other than that in the contract 
notice. 
This additional publicity might, for example, take the following forms: 
– publication on the Directorate-General’s website;  
– publication in the general or specialist press; 
–  letter  to  the  professional  associations  or  organisations  representing  businesses,  drawing 
their attention to the contract notice and asking them to circulate it among their members, 
etc.; 
–  mailshot  based  on  transparent  and  not  discriminatory  criteria,  e.g.  list  constructed  by  a 
webpage  subscription  mechanism.  Mailshots  must  not  be  limited  to  only  a  few  economic 
operators known to the contracting authority. 
4.3.4.3. Correction of a contract notice 
If a contract notice already published  must be amended prior to the  deadline for receipt of 
tenders or requests to participate, a corrigendum must be published by the same procedure 
as  the  original,  using  a  specific  model  (notice  for  changes  or  additional  information).  If 
necessary,  the  time  allowed  for  submitting  tenders  or  requests  to  participate  should  be 
extended.  Such  an  extension  is  necessary  if  substantial  changes  are  made.  The  number  of 
extra days to be allowed should be based on the extra work which will be necessary for the 
tenderers. For example, a significant change made just before the deadline may require an 
additional  period  of several weeks  (e.g.  because  of  the  different scope  of the work, types  of 
cost,  staff  needed  and,  probably,  different  composition  of  the  consortium).  In  the  case  of 
substantial amendment, the time should start running from the beginning.  
An extension is also compulsory if: 
-   access to the other procurement documents is not provided from the date of publication of 
the contract notice (see Chapter 4.5.4); 
-   additional information requested no less than 6 working days before the closing date was 
not provided at the latest six days before the closing date; 
-   translation of the procurement documents was not provided within 6 working days.  
 
113 

link to page 26 link to page 56  
4.4. Launching of the call for tenders  
The  first  phase  in  the  procurement  procedure  is  the  preparation  of  the  procurement 
documents (see Chapter 4.3). Once they are ready, the call for tenders can be launched. 
4.4.1. Procedures with a contract notice 
In  all  procedures  requiring  the  publication  of  a  contract  notice  in  the  Official  Journal  the 
procedure  is  launched at  the  moment  of  dispatch  of  the  contract  notice  to  the  Publications 
Office.  
The Publications Office has up to 7 days after dispatch to publish the contract notice in the 
Official Journal provided the free text in the whole contract notice is maximum 500 words. 
All contract notices published are available on the TED (Tenders Electronic Daily) database 
at  http://ted.europa.eu  .  The  contracting  authority  must  be  able  to  provide  evidence  of  the 
date of dispatch. 
At the moment of publication of a contract notice, the procurement documents must be made 
available by electronic means to all economic operators (see Chapter 4.5.4).  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
4.4.3. Translation 
The contract notice is translated by the Publications Office in all EU official languages. For 
the  Commission,  translation  of  the  other  procurement  documents  must  be  organised  in 
advance with DGT. 
The  contracting  authority  may  choose  the  official  language(s)  in  which  it  publishes  the 
procurement documents (except the contract notice, which is prepared in one language and 
published in all EU languages). However, in case of request for another official language, the 
translation  must  be  provided  within  6  working  days.  For  the  Commission,  DGT  would 
provide  the  translation  within  the  requested  deadline,  provided  that  the  procurement 
documents have been included in the planning of potential needs. A request for translation is 
not  as  such  a  ground for  extending  the  deadline  for  receipt  of  tenders  but  the  receipt  date 
should be postponed by at least the number of days of delay if the translation is not provided 
within the 6 working days. 
 
114 

link to page 56  
 
4.5. Submission phase 
4.5.1. Contacts during the submission phase 
Such contacts are allowed, by way of exception, in the following circumstances only (Art. 169 
FR): 
-  at  the  request  of  economic  operators,  the  contracting  authority  may  supply  additional 
information solely for the purpose of clarifying the procurement documents; 
-  on  its  own  initiative,  the  contracting  authority  may  inform  interested  parties  if  it  spots 
any error, inaccuracy, omission or other clerical error in the procurement documents. 
As  the  model  invitation  to  tender  includes  the  same  wording,  the  contracting  authority 
should receive no objections from economic operators seeking other information. 
Contacts  must  always  take  place  in  writing.  All  records  of  contacts  with  tenderers 
(correspondence),  in  any  of  the  situations  described  above,  must  be  kept  in  the  public 
procurement file,
 a model for which is available on BudgWeb. 
Any  additional  information  provided  at  the  request  of  an  economic  operator  and  any 
information  provided  by  the  contracting  authority  on  its  own  initiative  must  be  accessible 
simultaneously to all operators by the same means as for the procurement documents (see 
Chapter 4.5.4).  
If  requested  no  less  than  six  working  days  before  the  deadline  for  receipt  of  tenders  or 
requests to participate, additional information on the procurement documents and additional 
documents are provided as soon as possible. In practice, the information is provided as soon 
as the response is prepared and if several questions must be answered, the answers prepared 
fast should be provided earlier than those taking more time (good administration). 
In any case, the answers must be provided no later than six days before the deadline. If the 
information  is  given  less  than  6  days  before  the  deadline,  the  contracting  authority  must 
extend the time limit for receipt of tenders or requests to participate proportionally.  
Contracting authorities are not bound to reply to requests for additional information made 
less than six working days before the deadline for receipt of tenders or requests to participate 
but  may  do  so  if  at  all  possible.  In  case  the  deadline  for  receipt  of  requests  for  additional 
information does not fall on a working day, requests submitted on the first following working 
day should be accepted. 
In the open or restricted procedure for urgent cases, additional information, if requested in 
time, is provided no later than four days before the deadline. 
If the contracting authority needs to correct the procurement documents with  a significant 
change,  it  should  extend  the  time  limit  for  receipt  of  tenders  or  requests  to  participate  so 
that  operators  can  take  these  changes  into  account.  This  extension  will  have  to  be  made 
known in the same way as the original procurement documents, including correction of the 
contract  notice.  When  this  happens  very  close  to  the  deadline,  the  corrigendum  may  be 
announced with a warning message where the procurement documents are made available. 
If  the  change  is  minor  and  has  no  impact  on  the  preparation  of  tenders  or  requests  to 
participate,  then  a  new  version  of  the  corrected  procurement  documents  and  a  message 
concerning the change may be provided by the same means as for the original procurement 
documents, without corrigendum in the Official Journal.  
 
115 

link to page 52  
 
 
  
4.5.4. Dispatch of procurement documents 
The  means  of  communication  chosen  must  be  generally  available  and  must  not  have  the 
effect of restricting access by economic operators to the procurement procedure. 
Procedure with publication of a contract notice 
For all procedures in one or two steps with publication of a contract notice, the set of other 
procurement  documents —  i.e.  the  invitation  to  tender,  the  tender  specifications  and  the 
draft contract — must be made available by electronic means from the date of the publication 
of the contract notice (Point 25.1 Annex 1 FR).  
The  eTendering  platform  should  be  used.  This  platform  is  an  extension  to  TED  (Tenders 
Electronic Daily), the online version of the OJ S. 
For the contracting authority eTendering provides: 
-  synchronization  with  the  calls  for  tenders  elaborated  on  eNotices  and  published  on  TED 
portal; 
- possibility to process and organise answers to economic operators' questions; 
- possibility to process changes in the procurement documents. 
For economic operators eTendering provides: 
- access to all publicly available tender documents, including answers to questions; 
- additional services as notification related to changes in procurement documents; 
For more information please see the eTendering site page. 
Failing  that,  the  procurement  documents  should  be  made  available  for  download  from  the 
internet  site  of  the  contracting  authority  ("buyer  profile").  In  all  cases,  the  contract  notice 
must indicate the address from which the documents can be downloaded.  
In  justified  cases,  the  contracting  authority  may  transmit  the  procurement  documents  by 
other  means  if  direct  access  by  electronic  means  is  not  possible  for  technical  reasons  (e.g. 
architecture  plans,  specific  IT  formats  not  commonly  available)  or  if  the  procurement 
documents contain confidential information (for more details see Chapter 4.3.4.1). Only parts 
of  the  procurement  documents  which  cannot  be  accessible  from  the  outset  (i.e.  parts  with 
actual  technical  restrictions  or  parts  which  are  really  confidential)  should  be  subject  to 
restricted  access,  so  in  practice  there  will  always  be  parts  of  the  procurement  documents 
published with the contract notice (the invitation to tender, the draft contract, the subject, 
the tasks, the criteria…). The technical specifications should include a caveat explaining  
-  how  the  rest  of  the  documents  is  made  accessible,  in  case  of  technical  restrictions  (e.g. 
access to a specific software, on-site visit, paper format, etc.);  
- that the confidential terms will only be provided later to selected candidates and explain 
how (e-mail sending, paper, on site consultation, etc.).  
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
118 

link to page 62  
4.5.5. Receipt of tenders 
Before  the  deadline  for  receipt  of  tenders  the  procedure  for  registering  the  exact  date  and 
time of receipt should be established.  
Arrangements for the submission of tenders are set in the invitation to tender. 
The date of receipt is the date as of which the tenderer can no longer alter its tender, i.e.:  
  For submission by post, the postmark;  
  For submission by courier, the deposit slip of the courier service;  
  For  submission  by  hand,  the  receipt  of  the  Central  Mail  Service  for  Commission 
departments in Brussels and Luxembourg;  
  For electronic submission, the time stamp generated by the system.  
For information, see the model invitation to tender 
If  the  contracting  authority  authorises  the  submission  of  tenders  by  electronic  means,  the 
tools used and their technical characteristics shall be non-discriminatory, generally available 
and interoperable with technology in general use, and shall not restrict access of economic 
operators to the procurement procedure.  
In  practice,  below  the  Directive  threshold,  the  contracting  authority  should  guarantee 
confidentiality  and  integrity  of  the  tenders.  Submission  with  non-secure  electronic  means 
(i.e.  e-mail  to  a  functional  mailbox  -  several  persons  should  be  able  to  access  it  to  ensure 
continuous  check)  may  present  some  risks,  so  it  is  up  to  the  authorising  officer  to  decide 
whether, and up to which value, these means can be used.  
As  from  the  Directive  threshold,  the  device  for  electronic  receipt  of  tenders  must  fulfil  a 
number of conditions laid down in Article 149(3) FR.  
The  contracting  authority  must  make  arrangements  in  advance  to  receive  and  store  the 
tenders,  including  all  the  items  for  verifying  the  date  of  receipt,  in  particular  the  receipts 
issued when tenders are submitted by hand. It is essential that tenders remain sealed until 
the  opening  session.  In  case  a  tender  is  accidentally  opened  by  the  institution's  services 
before the opening session this error should be documented in a note for the file which should 
explain all the circumstances including how integrity and confidentiality was ensured.  
With a view to the stages of the procedure which will follow the opening of tenders, it is best 
to make arrangements early in the procedure to: 
-  organise the opening of tenders 
-   organise the evaluation of tenders; 
-  set  up  an  evaluation  committee  for  contracts  of  a  value  as  from  the  Directive  threshold 
(see Chapter 4.7.2).  
Any  specific  methods  to  be  used  in  subsequent  stages  of  the  procedure  (opening  and 
evaluation)  must  be  laid  down  before  that  stage  begins.  It  is  also  strongly  advised  to  lay 
down the evaluation method before tenders are opened, in order to avoid any dispute. 
The purpose of this working method for opening or evaluation is to lay down an operational 
practice.  Under  no  circumstances  may  it  alter  the  rules  for  determining  whether  tenders 
satisfy the requirements at the time of opening or the rules applying to evaluation. 
It  is  possible,  for  example,  to  establish  a  grid  for  all  evaluators  for  marking  the  technical 
aspects of  each  tender but  there can,  of  course,  be  no  question  of  altering  or  adjusting  the 
criteria and weightings set out in the specifications or the contract notice. 
When preparing the evaluation, it should be made clear to evaluators what principles are to 
be applied to avoid confusing exclusion criteria, selection criteria and award criteria. 
 
119 

 
4.6. Opening phase  
4.6.1. Opening of tenders 
The contracting authority must make arrangements in advance to hold a session for opening 
tenders a sufficient time after the closing date for  receipt of tenders considering that some 
tenders  sent  by  post  may  arrive  after  the  closing  date  despite  being  sent  before  the  time 
limit. 
In the case of open procedures, tenderers or their representatives are allowed to attend the 
opening of the tenders as specified in the contract notice.  
If tenders arrive after the opening, a second session must be organised along the same lines 
as the first. In particular, if the first session was public, the second must be public too, and 
all  tenderers who submitted  tenders,  including  the  persons who  attended the  first  session, 
must be invited to the second. 
The  department  concerned  must  make  all  the  necessary  practical  arrangements  (book  a 
sufficiently large room for a sufficient length of time, give instructions to guards on the door 
in buildings, prepare a presence list, etc.). 
4.6.2. Opening committee 
For  all  contracts  with  a  value  as  from  the  Directive  threshold,  tenders  are  opened  by  an 
opening  committee  appointed  by  the  responsible  authorising  officer. This  requirement  may 
be  waived  on  the  basis  of  a  risk  analysis  when  reopening  competition  within  a  framework 
contract and for negotiated procedures without prior publication of a contract notice (except 
where the contract follows a design contest or for building contracts). 
The opening committee is appointed by formal decision of the authorising officer using the 
model for Appointment of opening / evaluation committee. 
Composition 
The requirements for the opening committee are as follows: 
It must be made up of at least “two persons representing at least two organisational entities 
of  the  Union  institution  concerned  with  no  hierarchical  link  between  them".  The  use  of 
“persons”  here  rather  than  “officials"  or  "other  servants”  means  that  seconded  national 
experts or contract agents may be appointed. It can also be concluded that the members of 
the  committee  can  be  chosen  from  within  the  same  directorate,  provided  they  belong  to 
different units and the responsible authorising officer for the contract is at the Director level. 
In  representations  and  delegations  or  in  units  isolated  in  a  Member  State,  if  there  are  no 
separate  entities,  the  obligation  to  use  organisational  entities  with  no  hierarchical  link 
between them does not apply. 
Duties and tasks 
In  order  to  prevent  any  conflict  of  interest,  the  persons  appointed  are  bound  by  the 
obligations  set  out  in  Article 61 FR.  Accordingly  each  member  of  the  opening  committee 
should  sign  a  declaration  of  absence  of  conflict  of  interest  before  opening  the  tenders.  Any 
member  discovering  that  he  has  a  conflict  of  interest  is  under  an  obligation  to  inform  the 
authorising officer immediately.  
In  the  case  of  open  procedures,  the  opening  committee  must  check  the  credentials  of  the 
persons  wishing  to  attend  as  representatives  of  tenderers.  These  persons  must  sign  an 
attendance list which will be annexed to the record of the opening. 
The  date  of  receipt  of  each  tender  is  checked  against  the  deadline  set  in  the  procurement 
documents.  In case  of doubt,  a tenderer may be  asked  to  provide proof  of dispatch. One or 
more members of the opening committee will initial the proof of the date and time of receipt 
for each tender.  
120 

 
Tenders received before the deadline and in a closed envelope are deemed to be in order and 
are opened; however, in a procedure in two steps, any tender from an operator who has not 
been invited to submit a tender is rejected. 
In cases where two separate envelopes are required (one for the technical offer and the other 
for the financial offer) both must be opened. 
Where the opening is public, the names of the operators who have submitted a tender closed 
and on time are read out in the presence of the tenderers or their representatives. 
If the contract is awarded based on the lowest price or lowest cost method, the prices or costs 
shown in the tenders found to be in order are read out loud. 
After the opening, one or more members of the committee will initial either each page of each 
tender (the usual solution) or the cover page and each page of the financial  offer, in which 
case the integrity of the original tender is guaranteed by any appropriate technique applied 
by a department independent of the authorising department (except in the representations 
and local units and where there are no separate entities). 
After the opening session 
It  is  not  compulsory  to  scan  full  tenders  and  register  them  in  ARES.  At  least  the  opening 
record should be registered in ARES and this is sufficient. It is also important to know where 
tenders  are  stored  after  opening.  The  Secretariat  General  has  provided  instructions  on 
recording and scanning of tenders 
in ARES.  
Tenders  submitted  without  respecting  the  deadline  should  be  stored  or  sent  back  to  the 
economic operator if requested. A written track of the return ought to be kept. 
Tenders  suspected  of  not  being  in  conformity  with  the  tender  specifications  should  still  be 
registered as submitted, provided they meet the two basic conditions (received before date of 
receipt and integrity preserved). 
4.6.3. Reasons for rejection 
Since rejection of a tender for not being in order might have legal implications, it should be 
borne  in  mind  that  only  the  following  conditions  count:  tenders  must  be  received  by  the 
deadline and must be in a closed envelope (Art. 168(3) FR). 
The opening committee will under no circumstances consider the quality or completeness of 
the tenders.  
A tender received after the deadline must be rejected without opening it. 
A tender received already open must be rejected without examining its contents. 
In a procedure in two steps, any tender from a tenderer who has not been invited to submit a 
tender must be considered not to be in order. 
The following (non-exhaustive) list cannot be considered grounds for rejection: 
  the tender was sent in a single envelope rather than the two envelopes required, provided 
the envelope is sealed (the confidentiality of the tender has been preserved); 
  only one copy of the tender was sent, instead of the three (or more) required; 
  the tender combines the technical part and the financial part;  
  the tender has not used the requested standard presentation; However, the limitation of 
pages is possible as long as it is applied equally to all tenderers (i.e. there is no breach of 
the  equal-treatment  principle).  This  limitation  must  be  included  in  the  tender 
specifications, must be applied equally to all tenderers, and must allow the candidates to 
present  a  comprehensive  offer,  i.e.  the  limitation  of  pages  is  not  so  strict  that  makes  it 
impossible  to  present  an  appropriate  offer  according  to  the  requirements  of  the  tender 
specifications.     
 
  certain parts of the tender are clearly missing or the tender is clearly totally unrealistic; 
121 

link to page 31  
  the tenderer does not have access to the market (see Chapter 4.3.1.6)
If the tenderer has failed to sign the tender, the signature can be requested subsequently. 
When a tender has to be rejected, the tenderer must be notified in writing. There is no formal 
decision on rejection by the responsible authorising officer, the opening report is sufficient. 
The responsible authorising officer must inform tenderers of the reason for rejection of their 
tender immediately after the opening session. There is no standstill period.  
4.6.4. Opening record 
A record of the opening of the tenders is drawn up and signed by the persons in charge of 
opening. 
The record contains:  
-   the names of the tenderers (specifying the name of each participating entity in the case of 
a joint tender);  
-   the tenders which comply or not with submission rules, giving the reasons for rejection by 
reference  to  one  or  the  other  of  the  two  conditions  provided  above  (see  model  Record  of 
opening of tenders)
;  
-   in case of award on the basis of lowest price or lowest cost, the price or cost of each opened 
tender. 
If  a  tenderer  does  not  attend  the  opening  session  and  subsequently  requests  the  name  of 
competitors, it should be provided with this information or with a copy of the opening record 
(without the names of the persons in charge of the opening phase).  
 
122 

link to page 33 link to page 36 link to page 41 link to page 62  
4.7. Evaluation phase 
4.7.1. Evaluation of tenders 
All opened tenders are evaluated. This means that all tenders for a given contract must be 
read  and  evaluated  by  all  evaluators  in  order  to  guarantee  equal  treatment  and  non-
discrimination. 
The evaluation is based exclusively on the exclusion, selection and award criteria set out in 
the procurement documents with nothing added, removed or altered. For a description of the 
criteria,  see  Chapter  4.3.1.9  to  Chapter  4.3.1.11.  For  procedures  in  one  step,  the  three 
categories  of  criteria  will  be  evaluated  in  no  particular  order  or  in  a  pre-defined  order,  as 
announced in the tender specifications. Compliance with the minimum requirements in the 
procurement documents will also be verified. 
For  procedures  in  two  steps,  the  exclusion  and  selection  criteria  will  be  evaluated  at  the 
stage of evaluation of the requests to participate (see Chapter 4.5.3) and the award criteria 
at the stage of the evaluation of tenders. 
In order to ensure, during the evaluation of the tenders in procedures in one step, that there 
is  no danger of confusion  in  application  of  the  exclusion, selection  and  award  criteria,  it  is 
advised to separate clearly these phases in the evaluation process and also to ensure that the 
evaluators  examine  only  the  relevant  documents  for  each  phase.  The  principles  governing 
the distinction between the criteria (see Chapter 4.3.1.13) also apply to evaluation. 
In order to help the evaluators in their work, it may be useful to lay down a method for the 
evaluation, and it is strongly recommended that this be done before the tenders are opened 
in order to rule out any dispute. The method must in no way alter or adjust the criteria set in 
the procurement documents.  
It is important to keep timing under control and to reserve evaluation time in advance. If the 
evaluation lasts for too long (i.e. several months), the validity period of tenders may elapse 
before signature of the contract. In this case, the contracting authority will have to request 
all  tenderers  whether  they  accept  to  prolong  the  validity  of  their  tender  (including  their 
price) beyond that originally intended.  
 
Tips for the evaluations 
It  is  good  practice  for  the  authorising  officer  to  draft  an  evaluation  method  to  be 
communicated  to  the  evaluators  before  tenders  are  received.  It  may  include  the  following 
aspects:  
-  Evaluators  should  receive,  read  and  understand  fully  the  procurement  documents 
(including  possible  corrigenda,  additional  information  and  all  questions  and  answers) 
before  the  evaluation  starts.  They  should  be  given  an  evaluation  schedule  (meetings, 
deadlines). There is always a holiday period (Christmas, Easter or summer) to be taken into 
account  when  scheduling  an  evaluation.  Details  on  organisation  should  be  provided  (e.g. 
use  of  a reading room, copies  provided  to  evaluators, reading  of tenders required  prior  to 
the meeting, with or without individual assessment sheets…).  
- A meeting may also be organised by the authorising officer to provide details (e.g. difference 
between selection and award criteria, criteria cannot be modified, tenders must be assessed 
against  the  tender  specifications  but  not  compared  with  each  other,  etc.),  answer  any 
questions  the  evaluators  may  have  and  clarify  their  availability  and  deadlines  for 
evaluation.  
- Evaluators may evaluate the technical offer without having access to the financial offer, in 
order not to be influenced by the price in the technical award criteria.  
- When tenders are evaluated by a committee (see Chapter 4.7.2), there should be no specific 
role of the members of the evaluation committee (president, secretary, voting/non-voting…) 
since this is not foreseen in the legislation. 
123 

 
-  Individual  assessment  sheets  may  be  provided  to  ease  and  frame  the  work  of  the 
evaluators. These should be considered as working documents only. They are not part of the 
evaluation report and should not be attached to it.  
- Information on the use of marks should be clarified ex ante as this element depends very 
much on the education system the evaluator grew up with (some evaluators would use the 
whole  range  of  marks,  others  not,  the  same  mark  does  not  have  the  same  value  for  all 
evaluators, and this is unavoidable in an international institution). 
-  Evaluation  should  start  with  agreeing  comments  on  each  criterion  of  each  tender,  and 
marks  will  follow.  It  is  always  easier  to  accept  a  modification  of  initial  comments  than 
initial marks. 
-  The  discussion  between  evaluators  should  enable  to  reach  a  consensus  opinion  on  each 
criterion of each tender (no voting, no average!). 
-  The  evaluation  report  should  be  drafted  during  the  evaluation  meetings  to  ensure 
consensus on the comments. The text should also be checked to  ensure the use of neutral 
language and the full coherence of the comments and marks for each tender and between 
the tenders.  
4.7.2. Evaluation committee 
For all contracts with a value as from the Directive thresholds, tenders are evaluated by an 
evaluation committee appointed by the responsible authorising officer (Art. 150(2) FR).
 
 
 
 
  
  
  
  
 
 
 
The responsible authorising officer may decide that the evaluation committee is to evaluate 
only the award criteria and that the exclusion and selection criteria are to be evaluated by 
other  appropriate  means  (e.g.  one  or  two  persons)  guaranteeing  the  absence  of  conflict  of 
interest.  It  is  recommended  to  use  this  set  up  because  it  alleviates  the  workload  of  the 
evaluation committee and ensures strict separation between selection and award criteria. In 
this  case,  the  evaluation  committee  will  not  evaluate  the  requests  to  participate  in  a 
procedure in two steps. 
The evaluation committee is appointed by formal decision of the authorising officer using the 
model for Appointment of opening / evaluation committee. 
The evaluation committee must be made up of at least “three persons representing at least 
two organisational entities of the Union institutions with no hierarchical link between them, 
at  least  one  of  which  does  not  come  under  the  authorising  officer  responsible”.  The  use  of 
“persons” here rather than “officials or other servants” means that seconded national experts 
or  contract  agents  can  be  members  of  the  evaluation  committee.  In  principle,  people  on 
contracts  from  temporary  agencies  ("intérimaires")  can  be  members  too  but  this  is  not 
recommended because they are normally within the Commission for a limited period of time 
and  often  for  menial  tasks,  so  this  may  cause  problems  of  continuity  in  the  service 
(evaluations  are  sometimes  long)  and  level  of  expertise.  In  addition,  they  are  often  in  fact 
directly employed by private companies, and as such they, as representatives of an external 
private party, would have access to internal evaluation procedures. 
124 

link to page 6  
Members  of  the  committee  can  be  chosen  from  within  the  same  directorate,  provided  they 
belong to different units and responsible authorising officer for the contract is at unit's level. 
The main thing is that the two entities must be independent of each other and that one of 
them  at  least  must  be  independent  of  the  authorising  officer.  The  members  can  also  come 
from different institutions, not necessarily from the institution carrying out the procurement 
procedure.  This  can  be  a  useful  way  to  find  experts  on  the  subject  and  should  be  used  for 
appointment  of  evaluation  committee  members  on  top  of  the  minimum  requirements 
required by the FR on the committee composition .  
In  cases  where    there  are  no  separate  entities  (e.g.  in  representations,  delegations,  unit 
isolated  in  a  Member  States,  etc.),  the  obligation  to  use  organisational  entities  with  no 
hierarchical link between them does not apply. 
In the case of interinstitutional procurement, the evaluation committee will be appointed by 
the authorising officer from the institution responsible for the procedure and its composition 
will reflect, as far as possible, the interinstitutional character of the procedure. 
The evaluation committee may be made up of the same members as the opening committee 
(if  any).  However,  it  is  not  recommended  because  the  evaluation  requires  expertise  in  the 
subject  of  the  purchase,  whereas  opening  of  tenders  is  a  formal  procedure  requiring  no 
particular expertise.  
In order to prevent any conflict of interest, the evaluation committee members are bound by 
the obligations set out in Article 61 FR. Accordingly, each member should sign a declaration 
before  evaluating  the  tenders  (see  the  declaration  of  absence  of  conflict  of  interest  and 
confidentiality)
.  
The  authorising  officer  must  ensure  appropriate  means  guaranteeing  the  absence  of  any 
conflict of interest to evaluate the exclusion and selection criteria if that responsibility was 
not given to the evaluation committee. In practice the evaluators designated should also sign 
the declaration of absence of conflict of interest and confidentiality. 
There may be other persons present at the meetings of the committee such as an observer 
who checks that the procedure is followed according to the rules. This function of observer is 
part of management supervision to ensure that the implementation of activities is running 
efficiently  and  effectively  while  complying  with  applicable  provisions  (see  Internal  Control 
Principle 10)
. An observer is not appointed as member of the evaluation committee and does 
not  evaluate  tenders.  Additionally,  the  observer's  activities  are  not  documented  in  the 
evaluation  report  but  reported  in  the  context  of  internal  control  activities.  Other 
administrative support staff (handling correspondence with tenderers, preparing evaluation 
documents, helping on formal aspects of the evaluation, etc.) are not evaluators as such and 
should not be appointed as members either.  
The  committee  gives  an  advisory  opinion,  and  it  is  for  the  authorising  officer  to  take  the 
decision. If the decision diverges from the committee’s opinion, the exclusion, selection and 
award criteria must still be complied with. 
For further information on conflict of interest see Chapter 1.6. 
4.7.3. External experts in evaluation 
External experts are persons not working for the contracting authority that may assist with 
the  evaluation.  They  are  appointed  ad  personam  by  decision  of  the  authorising  officer 
responsible. They must therefore be natural persons (see Chapter 1.5.3).  
It  is  however  possible  to  contract  the  services  of  external  experts  under  a  framework 
contract, provided the framework contract covers this type of tasks. The experts may be staff 
of  the  contractor  or  sub-contractors.  It  does  not  matter  whether  the  experts  providing 
services  under  existing  contracts  are  delivering  them  extra  muros  or  intra  muros,  because 
they  are  considered  as  outside  experts  in  the  meaning  that  they  are  not  employed  by  the 
contracting authority. 
When  external  experts'  services  are  contracted  under  a  framework  contract,  the  tasks  are 
performed under the responsibility of the contractor and the payment of the services is made 
125 

 
to  the  contractor  according  to  the  provisions  of  the  contract.  The  authorising  officer 
responsible  must  ensure  that  these  external  experts  satisfy  the  obligations  concerning 
conflict of interests and confidentiality. For this purpose, each external expert must sign a 
declaration of non-conflict of interests as well as a code of conduct. These must be attached to 
the  specific  contract  concluded  with  the  contractor  under  a  framework  contract  or  to  the 
expert's contract if there is no framework contract involved.  
The models are available in Annex II and III of the  model contract for external experts on 
Budgweb. 
External  experts  are  not  members  of  the  evaluation  committee.  Therefore  they  should  not 
participate  in  the  meetings  of  the  committee  (except  on  request  of  the  evaluators  for 
clarifying their opinion if necessary) and cannot be involved in the drafting of the evaluation 
report. The role of external experts is to provide an opinion in writing about all the tenders 
received,  but  limiting  their  opinion  to  their  field  of  expertise.  External  experts  do  not  sign 
the evaluation report including the award recommendation by the committee.  
For further information see the Circular on external experts.  
4.7.4. Contacts with tenderers 
After  the  tenders  have  been  opened,  contacts  with  tenderers  must  remain  exceptional  and 
can be made only on the initiative of the contracting authority. Such contacts can take place 
only in the following circumstances:  
-  if  obvious  clerical  errors  in  the  drafting  of  the  tender  need  to  be  corrected  or  specific  or 
technical elements require confirmation;  
- to request additional information or documents  on exclusion or selection criteria. 
If the tenderers contact the contracting authority, they should be reminded that they are not 
allowed  to  do  so  as  indicated  in  the  invitation  to  tender,  and  no  information  on  the 
evaluation results or timeline should be given. If the contact at the initiative of the tenderer 
was not made in writing, it should be documented in a note to the procurement file. 
In the above-mentioned situations the authorising officer or the evaluation committee should 
take  the  initiative  of  contacting  the  tenderer  in  writing  exclusively,  but  any  such  contact 
must in no way alter the terms of the tender. For any contact which does not take place in 
writing, a “note for the file” must be produced when the contact takes place. 
These contacts are laid down in Article 169 FR.  
In line with good administration, it is obligatory to contact the candidates or tenderers to ask 
for missing information or documents in relation to exclusion or selection criteria or missing 
signatures. The absence of contact in these cases must be duly justified and documented by 
note in the procurement file (Article 150 FR).  
For obvious clerical errors in the tender itself, the contracting authority cannot correct them 
on behalf of the tenderer without its prior written consent. The principle of equal treatment 
demands  that  if  one  tenderer  is  asked  to  provide  missing  information  or  documents  or 
clarifications or to correct obvious clerical errors, the same must apply to all tenderers in the 
same situation. In order to avoid any problems, questions or requests sent to a tenderer must 
be  very  precise:  they  must  be  purely  factual  (e.g.  request  specific  missing  documents  by 
referring to the tender specifications, request confirmation about the correction of a clerical 
error  in  wording  or  calculation).  Tenderers  should  not  be  given  an  opportunity  to  provide 
extra  information  that  may  modify  the  technical  offer  or  the  price.  Such  contacts  should 
leave a reasonable time limit for response, which should be short (e.g. 2 or 3 working days) 
since all information was supposed to be included in the initial tender and the correction of 
errors requires only confirmation of an obvious mistake. 
The  request  should  remind  the  tenderer  that  the  tender  submitted  cannot  be  altered. 
Requests for “clarification” must not lead to any amendment of the terms of the tender. This 
means  that  tenderers’  replies  must  serve  solely  to  provide  the  contracting  authority  with 
clarification of the elements already mentioned in the tender, without altering the content of 
126 

link to page 70 link to page 59 link to page 6 link to page 28 link to page 66  
the tender. It should be borne in mind at this point that most doubts could be removed if the 
tender  documents  contained  clear  instructions  for  tenderers,  in  particular  a  detailed 
summary  of  the  different  documents  required  for  evaluation  of  the  tenders  against  the 
criteria and, if applicable, a clear price schedule for the presentation of the financial offer. 
There can be no negotiation of the tenders, except in procedures where negotiation is allowed 
(see Chapter 4.8). In all cases, there can be no negotiation of the procurement documents. 
4.7.5. Reasons for rejection 
In the opening phase, tenders are to be considered irregular and therefore rejected if they do 
not comply with the requirements for submission (see Chapter 4.6.3). 
In the evaluation phase, tenders must be rejected in the following cases: 
Unsuitable tender 
-   The tender is irrelevant to the subject of the contract; 
-   The tenderer is in an exclusion situation under Article 136(1) FR; 
-   The tenderer does not meet the selection criteria. 
Irregular tender 
-   The tender does not comply with the minimum requirements specified in the procurement 
documents (this includes the case of incomplete 
 
  
-   The  tenderer  has  misrepresented  or  failed  to  supply  the  information  required  as  a 
condition to participate in the procurement procedure (Article 141(1)(b) FR); 
-   The  tenderer  was  previously  involved  in  the  preparation  of  the  procurement  documents 
where  this  entails  distortion  of  competition  that  cannot  be  remedied  otherwise  (Article 
141(1)(c)  FR).  Prior  to  such  exclusion,  the  economic  operator  must  be  given  the 
opportunity  to  prove  that  its  prior  involvement  is  not  capable  of  distorting  competition 
(see Chapter 1.6 and Chapter 4.3.1.2).  
-   The price of the tender is abnormally low (see Chapter 4.7.5.1). 
Unacceptable tender 
The price of the tender exceeds the maximum amount set in the procurement documents or 
the  contracting  authority's  maximum  budget  as  determined  and  documented18    prior  to 
the launching of the procedure; 
-   The  tender  fails  to  meet  the  minimum  quality  levels  for  award  criteria;
 
 
 
Depending  on  the  order  of  evaluation  of  the  three  categories  of  criteria,  the  tenderer  will 
receive  feedback  on  all  criteria  evaluated  before  the  rejection  stage  (principle  of 
transparency).  For  instance,  if  the  selection  criteria  have  been  evaluated  after  the  award 
criteria and the tenderer is to be rejected because it does not meet the selection criteria, it 
will  be  informed  of  the  ground  for  rejection  (unsuitable  tender:  tenderer  not  meeting  the 
selection criteria) and will receive feedback on the evaluation of the award criteria.  
In cases where the ground for rejection of the tender is not linked to the award criteria (e.g. 
non-compliance with  minimum  requirements) there  is  no  evaluation  of  the  tender  as such. 
The tenderer will be informed of the ground for rejection without being given feedback on the 
content of the tender other than on the elements justifying the rejection. 
Tenders may be rejected if tenderers do not accept the terms of contract or other conditions 
contained  in  the  procurement  documents  and  seek  to  impose  their  own,  but  only  after  the 
contracting authority has contacted them in writing to warn them that this is a ground for 
rejection. 
                                                
18 Option applicable only when the maximum budget is published. 
127 

link to page 64  
A  tender  which  does  not  fall  under  any  of  the  above  defined  grounds  for  rejection  is 
admissible,  i.e.  it  is  ranked  according  to  the  formula  announced  in  the  procurement 
documents. 
 
To sum up: 
 
Definition 
Annex 1 FR 
Reason 
Unsuitable 
Point 11.2 
- Irrelevant tender 
- Exclusion under Article 136(1) FR 
- Non-selection 
Irregular 
Point 12.2 
- Non-compliant with minimum requirements 
- Received late 
- Rejected  under Article 141(1)(b) and (c) FR 
(misrepresentation and distortion of competition) 
- Abnormally low 
Unacceptable 
Point 12.3 
- Price above maximum 
- Minimum quality level not reached 
Admissible 
Point 29.3 
- Suitable 
- Not irregular 
- Not unacceptable 
 
The above reasons for rejection and their respective legal grounds apply to all procurement 
procedures. 
Tenders cannot be rejected if: 
  missing  information  or  documents  relating  to  the  exclusion  or  selection  criteria  can  be 
requested, or obvious clerical errors can be corrected  without going beyond the contacts 
authorised (see Chapter 4.7.4); 
  they contain the information requested, but not on the standard form(s); 
  the  price  exceeds  the  estimated  amount  indicated,  without  being  of  a  significantly 
different magnitude;  
   they  are  submitted  as  the  basic  tender,  complying  with  the  tender  specifications, 
together with unauthorised variants (which must be rejected). 
4.7.5.1. Abnormally low tenders 
If the price or cost of a tender appears to be abnormally low, before rejecting tenders for this 
reason  alone,  the  contracting  authority  must  request  in  writing  whatever  explanations  it 
considers appropriate on the components of the tender and check, taking due account of the 
reasons given by the tenderer, whether the tender can be considered regular (Point 23 Annex 
1 FR). 
The explanations requested and observations provided by the tenderer could relate to: 
(a)  the  economics  of  the  manufacturing  process,  of  the  provision  of  services  or  of  the 
construction process; 
(b)  the technical solutions chosen or exceptionally favourable conditions available to the 
tenderer; 
(c)  the originality of the tender; 
128 

link to page 65  
(d) compliance of the tenderer with applicable obligations in the fields of environmental, 
social and labour law; 
(e)  compliance  of  subcontractors  with  applicable  obligations  in  the  fields  of 
environmental, social and labour law; 
(f)  the possibility of the tenderer obtaining State aid in compliance with applicable rules. 
The tender may be rejected only where the evidence supplied does not satisfactorily account 
for the low level of price or cost offered. 
The  tender  must  be  rejected  where  the  contracting  authority  has  established  that  it  is 
abnormally  low  because  it  does  not  comply  with  applicable  obligations  in  the  field  of 
environmental, social and labour law. 
The  tender  may  be  rejected  where  the  contracting  authority  has  established  that  it  is 
abnormally low because the tenderer has obtained State aid, only if the tenderer is unable to 
prove,  within  a  sufficient  time  limit  fixed  by  the  contracting  authority,  that  the  aid  in 
question was compatible with the internal market within the meaning of Article 107 TFUE. 
4.7.5.2. Non admissible tenders 
A tender is not admissible if it is unsuitable, irregular or unacceptable (see Chapter 4.7.5).  
Grounds  must  be  given  for  any  decision  to  reject  a  tender.  As  such  a,  decision  may  be 
challenged it is important to define all the conditions clearly in the procurement documents. 
If  no  tender  is  admissible,  the  procedure  should  be  closed  and,  if  necessary,  restarted. 
Provided  the  original  procurement  documents  are  not  substantially  altered,  the  following 
procedures without prior publication of a contract notice may be used: 
-   a negotiated procedure where no suitable tenders were received in the initial procedure 
(Point 11.1 (a) Annex 1 FR); 
-   a  competitive  procedure  with  negotiation  where  no  regular  or  acceptable  tenders  were 
received  in  the  initial  procedure  if  it  includes  all  and  only  the  tenderers  of  the  initial 
procedure who satisfy the exclusion and selection criteria, except those who submitted a 
tender declared to be abnormally low (Points 12.1 (a) and 12.4 Annex 1 FR).  
See also Chapter 3.5 and Chapter 3.8. 
4.7.5.3. Non-selection of tenderers 
The  non-selection  of  tenderers  requires  some  caution.  First,  it  is  possible  to  eliminate 
tenderers on  this  basis  if  the selection  criteria  themselves  are  very clear (for  transparency 
and  equal  treatment  reasons).  Second,  it  is  compulsory  for  the  contracting  authority  to 
contact  the  tenderer  to  ask  for  missing  information  or  documents  (e.g.  CVs,  financial 
statements…)  before  rejection  (Article  151  FR).  This  is  for  reasons  of  proportionality 
(eliminating  a  tender  because  a  document  is  missing  would  be  disproportionate)  and  good 
administration. Indeed after leaving a few extra days to provide the missing information, it 
will be difficult for the tenderer to contest the rejection. If the contracting authority decides 
to  reject  on  the  grounds  of  selection  without  having  contacted  the  tenderer,  it  must  duly 
justify it in the procurement file.  
4.7.5.4.  Professional conflicting interest 
The contracting authority may reject tenderers under the selection criteria for the technical 
and  professional  capacity  in  case  of  professional  conflicting  interest  that  may  affect  the 
performance  of  the  contract,  provided  this  was  clearly  announced  in  the  tender 
specifications.  Typical  examples  would  be  an  audit  firm  that  would  audit  a  company  for 
which  it  has  certified  the  accounts,  or  a  contractor  which  carries  out  the  evaluation  of  a 
project which it has itself carried out. In these cases, the contracting authority may decide to 
reject the  tender,  considering  that  for  the contract in  question,  the tenderer  does  not  have 
the professional capacity to perform according to the expected quality standards.  
129 

link to page 6 link to page 33 link to page 33 link to page 6 link to page 28 link to page 28  
This  conflicting  interest  is  different  from  the  situation  where  contractor  involved  in  the 
preparation of procurement documents can be rejected from the subsequent procedure if its 
participation entails a distortion of competition  that cannot be remedied otherwise (Article 
141(1)(c) FR).  
For more information on conflict of interests in procurement see Chapter 1.6. 
4.7.5.5. Rejection from a given procedure 
A contract for a given procedure may not be awarded to economic operators who: 
–   are in one of the situations leading to exclusion defined in (Article 136 FR) (see Chapter 
4.3.1.9 Exclusion criteria). 
–  have misrepresented the information required by the contracting authority as a condition 
for participating in the procedure or failed to supply this information; 
–  were previously involved in the preparation of procurement documents where this entails 
distortion of competition that cannot be remedied otherwise (see Chapter 1.6 and Chapter 
4.3.1.2)
.   
In  the  case  of  misrepresentation  in  supplying  the  required  information,  the  candidate  or 
tenderer  is  not  required  to  submit  any  specific  evidence.  The  authorising  officer  or  the 
evaluation  committee must  check  that  the  information  provided  is  complete  in  the  light  of 
the requirements of the procedure and, if necessary, identify any false statements. Rejection 
from  the  given  procedure  on  this  ground  may  have  serious  consequences  for  the  operators 
concerned  as  it  may  result  in  administrative  and  financial  penalties  based  on  grave 
professional misconduct (Article 136(1)(c)(i) FR). 
4.7.6. Consultation of the early detection and exclusion system 
The  contracting  authority  is  required  to  consult  the  early  detection  and  exclusion  system 
(EDES) when checking exclusion criteria, before taking an award decision and before signing 
a contract.  
The check in the EDES must cover intended contractors, the legal entities involved in a joint 
tender  and  possibly  envisaged  subcontractors  depending  on  the  risk  assessment  connected 
with  subcontracting  (taking  into  account,  for  example,  the  value  of  the  part  to  be 
subcontracted  and  the  principal/ancillary  character  of  the  services/supplies/works).  It  also 
applies  to  the  decision  on  authorisation  of  the  subcontracting  to  be  taken  during 
implementation  of  the  contract.  The  obligation  to  consult  the  EDES  may  also  extend  to 
natural persons with powers of representation, decision-making or control over the entities 
concerned, particularly in case of doubt on one of these persons.  
In addition, any natural or legal person, group or entity listed in accordance with a Council 
Regulation  imposing  financial  restrictions  relating  to  the  common  foreign  and  security 
policy19  must  be  excluded  from  the  contract  award  as  well.  The  list  is  not  automatically 
included in the EDES, thus, in case the contract is to be awarded to  an economic operator 
from outside of the EU it is necessary to check the Consolidated list of persons, groups and 
entities  subject  to  EU  financial  sanctions  at  http://eeas.europa.eu/cfsp/sanctions/consol-
list_en.htm;
 advice can be obtained from the Foreign Policy Instrument Service (FPI):  
Functional mailbox: FPI RELEX SANCTIONS (xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xx.xxxxxx.xx) 
Tel: +32 (0)2-29-58829 
For more information see https://myintracomm.ec.testa.eu/budgweb/EN/imp/edes/Pages/edes.aspx. 
4.7.7. Evaluation report  
A report on the evaluation of exclusion, selection and award criteria and ranking of tenders 
must  be drawn  up,  dated  and  signed  by  all  the  evaluators  if  no  evaluation  committee  was 
                                                
19  E.g.  Council  Regulation  (EC)  No  881/2002  of  27  May  2002,  OJ  L  139,  29.9.2002,  p.  9,  plus  the 
amendments and updates thereto. 
130 

link to page 68 link to page 65  
appointed or all members of the evaluation committee (and persons evaluating the exclusion 
and selection criteria if those roles are separate). It  must be kept for future reference. For 
procedures  in  two  steps,  a  separate  evaluation  report  will  be  drawn  at  the  stage  of  the 
evaluation of respectively the requests to participate and the tenders.  
The evaluation should contain at least the: 
–  working method of the evaluation (e.g. date of meetings);  
–  name and address of the contracting authority;  
–  the subject of the contract or framework contract;  
–  names of candidates or tenderers rejected from the procedure based on Article 141 FR (see 
Chapter 4.7.5.5) or by reference to the selection criteria ; 
–  tenders rejected and the reasons for their rejection by reference to:  
  (i)  non-compliance  with  the  minimum  requirements  set  in  the  procurement 
documents;  
  (ii) not meeting the minimum quality levels;  
  (iii) tenders found to be abnormally low; 
–  names of the candidates and tenderers that passed the exclusion criteria; 
–  names of the candidates and tenderers selected; 
–  tenders to be ranked with the scores obtained and their justification; 
–  name of the contractor proposed and reasons for this choice and, if known, the proportion 
of the (framework) contract that the contractor intends to subcontract;  
–  value of the contract or maximum value of the framework contract.  
In the case of a joint tender or request to participate, the report must indicate the name of 
each participating entity. 
As  the  record  serves  as  a  reference  for  the  subsequent  stages  of  the  procedure  and  in  the 
event of a dispute, its content should be exhaustive and provide all relevant details. Indeed, 
the  final  evaluation  report  signed  by  all  members  of  the  committee  is  the  only  document 
providing grounds for the outcome of the evaluation and justifying the award decision by the 
responsible  authorising  officer.  No  other  justification  can  be  provided  a  posteriori.  In 
particular, precise and adequately developed arguments must be set out for cases of rejection 
(see Chapter 4.7.5) and for the marks and comments given for the technical quality of each 
tender when quality award criteria are applied (including when quality thresholds have been 
set and were not reached). 
For  the  comments  on  the  award  criteria,  which  will  be  the  only  feedback  provided  to 
tenderers, it is recommended to:  
–  not just describe the tender, but actually comment on the quality of the content;  
–  make  factual  and  precise  reference  to  parts  of  the  tenders  where  relevant  and  in 
particular  for  cases  leading  to  rejection  of  the  tender  (e.g.  non-compliance  with  the 
minimum requirements or quality below the minimum level set);  
–  pay attention to the relevance of comments (e.g. no confusion between selection and award 
criteria,  comments  relating  only  to  aspects  covered  by  the  criteria);  for  instance  avoid 
using words such as "CVs, profile, qualification, skill, experience, expertise, knowledge of 
the subject, technical capacity, reference to previous projects…" since these clearly refer to 
selection criteria; also avoid inappropriate or irrelevant comments such as appreciation of 
the performance of previous contracts; 
–  cross-check  the  consistency  of  comments  and  marks  not  only  for  each  tender  but  also 
across different tenders (guarantee of equal treatment);  
–  if  individual  evaluation  sheets  have  been  used,  these  should  not  be  kept  after  the 
evaluation is concluded and in any case not attached to the evaluation report, because the 
report  is  based  only  on  the  consensus  of  the  evaluation  committee,  and  individual 
members may change their mind during the evaluation process.  
131 

link to page 74 link to page 71  
The  evaluation  report  is  a  document  accessible  to  the  public  after  the  signature  of  the 
contract (see Chapter 4.12). For this reason too, special attention should be given to careful 
preparation of the report.  
In  some  cases  the content  of  the  evaluation  report  and the  award  decision  may  be  merged 
into a single document signed by the responsible authorising officer (see Chapter 4.9). 
 
See the model evaluation report.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
132 

link to page 68  
4.9. Award decision 
After the evaluation has been completed and the evaluation  report has been produced, the 
authorising  officer  responsible  draws  up  the  reasoned  award  decision  (Point  30.3  Annex  1 
FR).  
The award decision must contain at least: 
-  an approval of the evaluation report (see Chapter 4.7.7);  
-   the name of the chosen contractor and the reasons for that choice by reference to the pre-
announced selection and award criteria, including where appropriate the reasons for not 
following the recommendation provided in the evaluation report;  
-   value of the contract or maximum value of the framework contract;  
-   circumstances justifying the use of a competitive procedure with negotiation, a negotiated 
procedure  without  prior  publication  of  a  contract  notice  or  a  competitive  dialogue;  in 
particular, the award decision must duly justify the use of the negotiated procedure for a 
contract that can be awarded only to a particular economic operator (Point 11.1 (b) Annex 
1  FR)  (see  Chapter  3.8),  since  the  award  of  the  contract  may  be  challenged  if  the 
conditions are not fulfilled;20 
-   where  appropriate,  the  reasons  why  the  contracting  authority  has  decided  not  to  award 
the contract. 
The  award  decision  is  a  formal  instrument  (see  the  Model  award  decision)  by  which  the 
authorising  officer  takes  responsibility  for  the  choice  of  contractor,  following  the 
recommendation indicated in the evaluation report, whatever the value of the contract. If, for 
duly  justified  reasons,  the  authorising  officer  does  not  follow  the  recommendation  of  the 
evaluation  committee,  he/she  must  decide  how  to  proceed  further  (request  the  evaluation 
committee to review its recommendation, appoint a new evaluation committee, etc.). 
In the case of an inter-institutional procurement procedure, the award decision is taken by 
the contracting authority responsible for the procedure. 
In the case of contracts with lots, the award decision may cover all lots or only some of them, 
if some of the lots have been evaluated faster. Also, if one lot has been cancelled, this can be 
done independently from the pursuit of the procedure for other lots.  
The  responsible  authorising  officer  may  merge  the  content  of  the  evaluation  report  and 
award decision into a single document and sign it in the following cases: 
-   for procedures for contracts of a value below the Directive thresholds where only one 
tender was received; 
-   when  reopening  of  competition  within  a  framework  contract  where  no  evaluation 
committee was nominated; 
-   for  the  following  cases  of  negotiated  procedures  without  prior  publication  of  a  contract 
notice where no evaluation committee was nominated: 
- extreme urgency (Point 11.1 (c) Annex 1 FR) 
- repetition of similar services or works (Point 11.1 (e) Annex 1 FR). 
- additional supplies (Point 11.1 (f)(i) Annex 1 FR) 
- supplies quoted and purchased on a commodity market (Point 11.1 (f)(iii) Annex 1 FR) 
- legal services (Point 11.1 (h) Annex 1 FR) 
 
                                                
20 See case Fastweb C-19/13: 
http://curia.europa.eu/juris/document/document.jsf;jsessionid=9ea7d0f130d5d04849dfa8a34e96917
1e13b38db2c83.e34KaxiLc3eQc40LaxqMbN4ObN8Te0?text=&docid=157520&pageIndex=0&doclan
g=EN&mode=lst&dir=&occ=first&part=1&cid=540588 

133 

link to page 44 link to page 46 link to page 75 link to page 75  
4.11. Notification of the outcome of the procedure 
4.11.1. Information letter 
The  contracting  authority  must  inform  candidates  and  tenderers,  simultaneously  and 
individually,  by  electronic  means  of  decisions  reached  concerning  the  outcome  of  the 
procedure as soon as possible at the following stages (Art. 170(2) FR and Point 31 Annex 1 
FR): 

after  the  opening  phase  for  requests  to  participate  received  after  the  deadline  for 
procedures in two steps; 

after the opening phase for tenders received after the deadline or received already open 
for procedures in one step;  

after  the  selection  phase  for  candidates  who  failed  to  meet  the  exclusion  and  selection 
criteria for procedures in two steps;  

after  the  award  decision  for  all  procurement  procedures  and  for  the  award  of  specific 
contracts  with  reopening  of  competition,  specifying  in  each  case  the  grounds  for  the 
decision.  
It is recommended to include the full reason motivating the decision (marks and comments 
per  criterion,  final  score  and  ranking  of  the  tender  concerned  exactly  as  written  in  the 
evaluation report) in order to avoid that the tenderer requests more details later on.  
The information provided to the successful tenderer must specify that the decision notified 
does not imply any commitment on the part of the contracting authority.  
As  from  the  Directive  thresholds,  the  notification  letter  should  require  the  successful 
tenderer to submit, within a given time limit, evidence that it is not in exclusion situation 
and  evidence  of  selection  if  not  requested  before,  as  stated  in  the  ESPD  or  declaration  on 
honour  (see  Chapter  4.3.1.18  and  Chapter  4.3.1.19).  The  evidence  submitted  should  be 
checked. 
In order to save time, the draft contract for signature may be attached as a pdf file  to the 
electronic notification, indicating to the future contractor to print it and sign it in two copies 
without making any changes and send them back to the contracting authority (see Chapter 
4.13)
.  At  reception,  the  contracting  authority  should  check  that  the  contract  has  not  been 
modified before signature by the authorising officer. 
 
4.11.2. Standstill period 
The contract cannot be signed for 10 days, counting from the day after simultaneous dispatch 
of the notification by electronic means to all tenderers (successful and unsuccessful) (Article 
175(2) and (3) FR, Point 35.1 (a) Annex 1 FR). Only after the end of this "standstill period" 
may  the  authorising  officer  sign  the  contract.  However  if,  due  to  technical  reasons,  the 
dispatch  is  made  on  paper,  the  standstill  period  is  15  days  (Article  175(3)  FR).  If  the 
electronic  communication  fails,  the  contracting  authority  should  re-send  the  notification 
immediately by post, in which case the 15 day period will apply.  
The standstill period concerns all contracts as from the Directive thresholds. In the case of a 
negotiated  procedure  without  prior  publication  of  a  contract  notice  for  works,  supplies  or 
services  provided  only  by  a  particular  economic  operator  (Point  11.1  (b)  Annex  1  FR),  the 
standstill period of 10 days is applicable and starts the day after the contract award notice is 
published  in  the  OJ S.  It  is  therefore  important  to  take  this  period  into  account  when 
scheduling the procurement procedure. 
It is not necessary to wait for the standstill period before signing the contract in the following 
cases (Point 35.2 Annex 1 FR): 
  any procedure where only one tender has been submitted; 
135 

 
 
 
  negotiated  procedure  without  prior  publication  of  a  contract  notice  under  Point  11.1 
Annex 1 FR (except 11.1 (b) – see above). 
 
4.11.3. Means of redress 
The notification sent to the rejected or unsuccessful candidates or tenderers must refer to the 
possibility of redress, with the type of redress, the body before which it can be brought, and 
the  time  limit  (Article  133(2)  FR).  Candidates  or  tenderers  may  lodge  a  complaint  to  the 
European  Ombudsman  for  maladministration  within  two  years  of  notification  or  bring  an 
action for annulment of the decision under Article 263 TFEU before the General Court of the 
European  Union  within  two  months  of  notification,  as  indicated  in  the  model  notification 
letters.
 
Care  must  be  taken  not  to  generate  legitimate  expectations  on  the  part  of  the  successful 
tenderer. The letter of notification to the successful tenderer must always include a reference 
to the content of Article 171 FR to the effect that the contracting authority may, until such 
time  as  the  contract  has  been  signed,  cancel  the  procurement  procedure  without  the 
successful tenderer being entitled to any compensation.  
Where  appropriate,  contracting  authorities  may  suspend  signing  of  the  contract  for 
additional  examination  if  justified  by  the  requests  or  comments  made  by  unsuccessful 
tenderers during the standstill period or any other relevant information received during that 
period.  In  particular,  if  an  unsuccessful  tenderer  asks  for  comparative  advantages  of  the 
winner and the contracting authority responds only at the end of the standstill period, it is 
recommended  to  delay  contract  signature  a  little  to  ensure  that  the  information  provided 
does not trigger a legitimate complaint (e.g. error in evaluation).  
In  the  event  of  suspension  of  standstill,  all  the  tenderers  must  be  informed  within  three 
working  days  following  the  suspension  decision.  The  authorising  officer  should  take 
appropriate  action.  Depending  on  the  situation,  this  may  consist  in  the  correction  of  the 
award  decision  if  there  was  a  mistake  or  a  new  element  brought  to  the  attention  of  the 
authorising  officer  that  would  prevent  the  award  of  the  contract  to  the  winner,  or 
reconvening  the  evaluation  committee  in  case  of  factual  error  in  the  evaluation,  or  else 
appointing  a  new  committee  if  there  were  serious  irregularities  connected  with  the 
functioning of the previous evaluation committee.  
If the initial award decision needs to be modified following the additional examination, the 
authorising  officer  should  take  a  new  award  decision  and  it  should  be  notified  to  all 
tenderers. This notification starts a new standstill period.  
 
136 

 
4.12. Request for additional information 
Requests from tenderers 
If the contract or framework contract is awarded, the unsuccessful tenderers who are not in 
an exclusion situation (Article 136 FR), who are not rejected from the procurement procedure 
for misrepresentation of information or distortion of competition (Article 141 FR) and whose 
tender  is  compliant  with  the  procurement  documents  may  request  in  writing  information 
about the name of the winner and the characteristics and relative advantages of the winning 
tender.  The  total  price  of  the  winning  tender  or  alternatively  if  appropriate  the  contract 
value as well as the breakdown of quality marks and comments as recorded in the evaluation 
report should be disclosed (Art. 170(3)(a) FR and Point 31.2 Annex 1 FR).  
The contracting authority must provide the above information as soon as possible and in any 
case within 15 days of receiving the request. 
Given that criteria may be applied in no particular order, it is possible to reply to requests 
from tenderers whose selection has not been verified.  
For the specific case of framework contract in cascade, the second ranked in the cascade may 
ask for comparative advantages of the tender ranked first, but not about the tender ranked 
third and so forth if there are more than three contractors in the cascade.  
 
 
 
 
For  specific  contracts  awarded  following  reopening  of  competition,  the  unsuccessful 
contractors can ask for the name of the winning contractor but not for the characteristics and 
relative advantages of the winning tender and the price paid. The reason is that the receipt 
of  such  information  by  parties  to  the  same  framework  contract  each  time  competition  is 
reopened might prejudice fair competition between them. 
Requests from members of the public 
  On  the  basis  of  the  Code  of  Good  Administrative  Behaviour,  any  person  may  request 
information, only after signature of a contract.  
  On the basis of Regulation 1049/2001 and Commission Decision 2001/937 implementing 
it,  anyone  may  request  access  to  documents  connected  with  a  procurement  procedure, 
only after signature of the contract. 
  On  the  basis  of  Regulation  1367/2006,  anyone  may  request  access  to  environmental 
information related to the procurement procedure only after signature of the contract. 
Requesting parties have no obligation to state the legal basis of the request. 
In all cases, a reply must be provided within 15 days. 
For further information see the explanatory note on access to information and documents related to tender 
procedures. 
 
 
137 

link to page 72  
4.13. Signature of the contract 
Contracts can only be signed after the standstill period has expired, unless standstill is not 
applicable (see Chapter 4.11.2) 
The  standstill  period  does  not  prevent  the  signature  of  the  contract  by  the  successful 
tenderer provided that the contracting authority does not sign before the end of the standstill 
period.  
Signatures  prove  the  agreement  of  the  parties  with  the  content  of  the  contract  including 
reference to other documents (in annex to it or not). This is why contracts must be signed by 
an authorised representative of the contractor and by the responsible authorising officer. The 
signatories  must  be  the  persons  identified  at  the  beginning  of  the  contract.  It  is  therefore 
necessary to check whether the person who signs on behalf of the contractor is authorised to 
do so (Directive 2009/101/EC obliges legal persons to advertise the names of their authorised 
representatives).  The  authorising  officer  must  check  the  identity  of  the  signatory.  These 
authorised representatives may name other persons to sign on their behalf, in which case the 
relevant power of attorney must also be checked.  
Direct  contracts  correspond  to  legal  commitment  and  must  be  preceded  by  a  budgetary 
commitment.  Framework  contracts  do  not  necessitate  a  budgetary  commitment  before 
signature; this only comes before signature of specific contracts or order forms.  
If  the  validity  of  the  tender  has  expired  after  the  award  decision  is  notified  but  before 
contract signature, it is still possible to sign provided the awarded tenderer agrees.  
In order to ascertain the full content of the contract and its integrity for both parties, it is 
recommended  to  send  the  full  contract  with  annexes  for  signature.  If  the  annexes  are 
voluminous, at least the special and the general conditions should be sent and they should 
include  a  full  reference  to  all  the  annexes.  It  is  recommended  to  register  the  full  contract 
with  its  annexes  (tender  specifications)  in  ARES.  The  contractor's  tender  may  be  scanned 
and attached in ARES if this is not too cumbersome, otherwise it is also possible to refer to 
the stored original if  needed.  The  decision  not  to send  back  voluminous  annexes should  be 
based on a risk assessment of the necessity to prove the actual content of the contract in case 
of dispute.  
The following standard signing procedure is recommended: the  contracting authority sends 
the contractor two original copies of the contract (or more because there are as many original 
copies as there are signatories to the contract usually), initialled and accompanied by a cover 
letter (it may be sent together with the award notification letter, to save time). Pages should 
be numbered. Each page must be initialled for security reasons, preferably in a colour other 
than black, so that original pages can be easily identified. The initials are only intended to 
guarantee  integrity  of  the  contract,  not  its  signature,  so  initialling  may  be  carried  out  by 
someone  other  than  the  authorising  officer.  It  is  useful  that  each  page  bear  the  contract 
number, brief contract title and page number. The letter should state that, at this stage, no 
changes  may  be  made  to  the  contract  and  that  the  two  signed  original  copies  should  be 
returned  by  a  set  date,  beyond  which  the  contracting  authority  may  refuse  to  sign  the 
contract  in  question.  The  fact  that  the  contractor  signs  first  provides  the  contracting 
authority with greater legal and financial certainty. 
The  contractor  signs  the  two  original  copies  and  sends  them  to  the  contracting  authority, 
which then signs them, files one original copy and returns the other to the contractor. 
For  practical  reasons  (e.g.  simple  and  non-voluminous  contracts),  it  can  be  envisaged  to 
attach  the  contract  as  a  pdf  file  to  the  electronic  notification,  indicating  to  the  future 
contractor to print it and sign it in two copies without making changes and send them back 
to the contracting authority. At reception, the contracting authority checks that the contract 
has not been modified before signature by the authorising officer. 
In  the  case  of  purchase  orders  for  low  value  contracts  and  order  forms  under  framework 
contracts,  the  authorising  officer  may  sign  first  to  speed  up  delivery.  The  contractor  must 
sign before contract performance starts, for legal and operational reasons, i.e. to avoid being 
138 

 
systematically  in  a  non-compliance  situation,  receiving  invoices  while  having  no  contract 
duly in place, and to ensure that the presumed contractor is indeed available and willing to 
implement  the  order  form  or  purchase  order  as  requested  from  the  set  starting  date.  For 
purchase  orders  for  low  value  contracts,  and  order  forms  or  specific  contracts  under 
framework contracts,  at least an electronic advanced copy of the signed contract  should be 
received  as  soon  as  possible  by  e-mail.  The  original  should  be  received  back  at  the  latest 
together with the invoice since it is the legal commitment which shall give rise to payment. 
In  any  event,  the  date  of  signature  of  the  last  contracting  party  is  necessary.  The  date  of 
signature  of  the  first  contracting  party  is  purely  informative  and  not  opposable  in  law.  If 
there are fewer dates than signatures, it is assumed that some parties signed simultaneously 
and the signature date is that of the last signing party.  
Contracts in ABAC 
ABAC (“Accrual Based ACcounting”) is the information system used by the Commission and 
many agencies for executing and monitoring all budgetary and accounting operations.  
All contracts should be registered into ABAC Contract.  
For further details, see ABAC on BudgWeb.  
Impossibility of concluding a contract with the winning tenderer 
In  cases  where  the  contract  cannot  be  awarded  to  the  successful  tenderer,  the  contracting 
authority may award it to the next best tenderer. 
Entry into force 
Implementation of the contract must not start before the contract is signed.  
Lots 
If several lots are awarded to the same tenderer, a single contract covering all the concerned 
lots may be signed. 
139 

 
4.14. Ex-post publicity 
4.14.1. Publication of an award notice in the Official Journal 
Transparency  obligations  are  laid  down  in  Articles  38  and  163  FR  and  Points  2.3,  2.4,  3.2 
and 3.3 Annex 1 FR. 
Award notice 
An  award  notice  must  be  published  in  the  Official  Journal  for  a  contract  or  framework 
contract as from the Directive thresholds, even if there was no contract notice.  
The award notice must be sent to the Publications Office no later than thirty days after the 
signature of the contract or framework contract. 
 
 
 
 
The contracting authority must be able to provide evidence of the date of dispatch.  
For transparency and symmetry reasons, it is recommended to publish an award notice for 
contracts  where  a  contract  notice  was  published  on  a  voluntary  basis,  e.g.  when  using  an 
open procedure for middle value contracts. 
In  case  of  cancellation of  the  procedure,  the  contract  award  notice form  must  also  be  used 
(section V.1 for information on non-award). 
The  notice  must  be  drafted  using  the  form  in  the  instruction  on  Drafting  notice.  This 
instruction sets out the arrangements for transmitting the notice to the Publications Office, 
which will have it published in the Official Journal, S series, along with best practices and 
advice  on  completing  the  forms  online  via  eNotices.  All  award  notices  published  are 
accessible in the TED (Tenders Electronic Daily) database at http://ted.europa.eu.  
Exceptions 
-  No award notice is to be published for specific contracts based on a framework contract of 
any type, whatever their value. 
-  Notices relating to contracts based on a dynamic purchasing system may be grouped on a 
quarterly basis. In this case, the award notice must be sent no later than thirty days after 
the end of each quarter.  
-  For buildings contracts  (Point 11.1 (g) Annex 1 FR) and contracts declared secret (Point 
11.1  (i)  Annex  1  FR),  a  list  of  contracts  awarded  with  an  indication  of  the  subject  and 
value must be sent to the budgetary authority no later than 30 June of the following year. 
In  the  case  of  the  Commission,  it  is  annexed  to  the  summary  of  the  annual  activity 
reports. 
-  No  individual  award  notice  is  to  be  published  for  the  following  contracts  as  these  are 
subject to the publication of an annual list on the contracting authority's internet site (see 
Chapter 4.14.2): 
-  legal services under Point 11.1 (h) Annex 1 FR; 
-  financial services or instruments under Point 11.1 (j) and (k) Annex 1 FR; 
-  public communication networks and electronic communication services under Point 11.1 
(l) Annex 1 FR; 
-   services provided by an international organisation under Point 11.1 (m) Annex 1 FR. 
Notice of modification of contract 
In case of modification of a contract or framework contract during its duration (see Chapter 
5.7.3)
 with a value as from the Directive thresholds, a notice of modification of contract must 
be published in the Official Journal. 
140 

 
 
 
 
 
 
4.15. Documentation of the procedure 
The authorising department must keep a full file of all items relating to  each procurement 
procedure. 
A model for this type of file is proposed in the Model public procurement file on BudgWeb. 
Each heading can include the relevant items (records, notes for the file, etc.). 
Supporting  documents  must  be  kept  for  at  least  five  years  following  the  discharge  for  the 
budget  year  in  question.  However,  under  the  Commission’s  internal  rules22  documents 
relating to tender procedures or to the management of contracts have to be archived for at 
least  ten  years  following  signature  of  the  contract  or  following  the  last  payment  by  the 
Commission,  respectively;  as  an  exception,  tenders  and  requests  to  participate  from 
unsuccessful  tenderers  or  candidates  have  to  be  kept  only  for  at  least  five  years  following 
signature of the contract. After this minimum period has elapsed, the documents to be sent 
to  the  historical  archives  of  the  Commission  for  further  conservation  (e.g.  for  25  years  or 
permanently) will be selected. The remaining documents are to be destroyed.  
 
 
                                                
22 Com m on  Com m ission -level r et en t ion  list  for  Com m ission  files  – fir st  r evision  of 17/12/2012 
SE C(2012)713 
 

 
the service-level agreement used in the field of IT). This possibility must be assessed case by 
case and, because of its specific nature, could not be included in the standard contracts. 
If,  following  a  legal  analysis,  the  authorising  department  considers  that  the  contractual 
penalties provided for in its draft contract might be declared unfair, especially before Belgian 
courts, it must reduce them. 
Model letters with means of redress are available on Budgweb.  
5.8.5. Reduction of payment 
When the output of the contract (supply, deliverable, etc.) is of low quality or not delivered at 
all,  the  contracting  authority  is  entitled  to  reduce  payment  in  proportion  to  what  it  has 
actually  received  of  acceptable  quality.  This  is  difficult  to  do  in  practice  unless  the  tender 
specifications or the draft contact provide for details on how this possibility will be used.  
Two main aspects must be taken into account: 
-  the  expected  quality  level  of  the  output  must  be  very  precisely  defined  in  the  tender 
specifications,  otherwise  the  rejection  of  output  for  low  quality  will  be  challenged  by  the 
contractor, leading to long discussions and possibly no reduction of price;  
NB:  If  it  is  required  that  the  quality  level  of  the  output  is  compliant  with  "commonly 
accepted  standards  of  the  profession",  these  accepted  standards  of  the  profession  must  be 
explicitly  defined  in  the  tender  specifications.  In  the  absence  of  an  explicit  definition,  the 
contracting  authority  would  have  to  demonstrate  that  the  notion  of  "commonly  accepted 
standards  of  the  profession"  refers  to  obvious  and  widely  known  practices,  and  cannot  be 
ambiguous, misinterpreted or interpreted in various ways. 
- a breakdown of the price per output is helpful to estimate the reduction of price; this can be 
requested in addition to the global price in a financial tender and should strictly be linked to 
output (i.e. raw data for one country , first interim report covering X topics, etc.) and not to 
input (man-days, time to gather data).  
 
 
 
156 

Document Outline