Ceci est une version HTML d'une pièce jointe de la demande d'accès à l'information 'Request for meeting information'.







A GREEN DEAL ON STEEL  Ref. Ares(2020)1148390 - 24/02/2020
Ref. Ares(2020)4264192 - 14/08/2020
PRIORITIES FOR TRANSITIONING THE EU TO CARBON 
NEUTRALITY AND CIRCULARITY  

February 2020
A GREEN DEAL ON STEEL  
PRIORITIES FOR TRANSITIONING THE EU TO CARBON NEUTRALITY AND CIRCULARITY 
Europe has the opportunity before it to lead the transformation of its economy to a future in which 
it is carbon-lean, environmentally responsible, circular and able to compete internationally. Steel is 
central to the EU economy, and it underpins the development of major manufacturing sectors right 
along the value chain. 
With supportive conditions in place, notably the right infrastructure and a supportive regulatory 
framework, the European steel industry will be empowered and fully committed to the EU’s climate 
objectives and sustainable growth targets. The sector would be able to develop, upscale and roll-
out new technologies that could reduce EU steel production’s CO2 emissions by 30% by 2030 and 
by 80 to 95% by 2050, while contributing to greenhouse gas mitigation across all sectors. 
COMBINED POLICY SOLUTIONS 
A Green Deal on Steel is not a single policy. Rather it combines existing EU policy fields and updates 
them  to  provide  specific  objectives,  alongside  how  to  field-test  best  practice  in  low-carbon 
steelmaking
. These Green Deal on Steel actions need to be compatible with, and inclusive of, the 
various facets of the EU’s broader Green Deal climate policy; the Green Deal will have a wide and 
varied impact across all EU industries, thus it must be coherently constructed and deployed. The 
success of the Green Deal depends on the horizontal, cross sectoral integration of an industrial 
strategy and needs to be implemented throughout the full value chain.  
The policy recommendations below are, in EUROFER’s view, essential to succeeding in the aims of 
ensuring the EU steel industry remains on track to meet its emissions reductions targets (i.e. 30% 
by 2030 and 80-95% by 2050) whilst also remaining competitive globally and finding a sustainable 
market for its green steel products. 
 
 
 
 
EUROFER AISBL • Avenue de Cortenbergh, 172 • B-1000 Brussels • Belgium 
+32 3 738 79 20 • xxxx@xxxxxxx.xx • www.eurofer.eu • EU Transparency Register: ID  93038071152-83 
 


POLICIES FOR A SUCCESSFUL GREEN DEAL ON STEEL 
 
POLICIES FOR A SUCCESSFUL GREEN DEAL ON STEEL 
RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT & INNOVATION 
Deploying breakthrough technologies 

The  most  promising  breakthrough  technologies  need  to  be  tested  and  implemented  on  an 
industrial scale between 2020 to 2030, and beyond. These include Carbon Direct Avoidance (CDA: 
hydrogen- and electricity-based metallurgy), and Smart Carbon Usage (SCU: Process integration 
and Carbon Valorisation, CV, or Carbon Capture and Usage, CCU). 
A European Partnership for Clean Steel 
  Adopt  the  European  Commission  proposal  for  a  ‘Clean  Steel’  European  partnership  under 
Horizon Europe and support the demonstration of breakthrough technologies in steelmaking 
(Carbon Direct Avoidance and Smart Carbon Usage).  
 
Synergies and sequencing among different financing schemes 
  Ensure synergies between various financing programs, e.g. between the EU ETS Innovation 
Fund  and  Important  Projects  of  Common  European  Interest  (IPCEIs)  and  a  ‘sequencing 
mechanism’ for continuation of successful projects under Horizon Europe.  
 
ENERGY POLICY 
Low- or CO2-neutral steel transition energy requirements
 
The EU steel industry will require approximately 400TWh of CO2-free electricity every year by 2050 
(including for the production and use of hydrogen). The reliable availability and abundant supply 
of low- or CO2-neutral energy (mainly electricity and hydrogen) at economically viable, affordable 
cost levels is a necessary pre-condition for the successful transformation of the steel sector in the 
coming decade and beyond. 
Infrastructure investment planning 
  For investment planning, map current and future requirements of EU energy infrastructure. 
Regulatory framework for EU energy network 
  Adopt and implement a common European hydrogen strategy.  
  Foster  the  development  of  green  electricity  while  maintaining  the  international 
competitiveness of energy-intensive sectors that participate in global markets. 
  Support the development of electrolysis plants and distribution networks to scale-up green 
hydrogen production. 
State Aid rules 
  Enable  state  aid  to  adjust  the  price  of  green  electricity  and  hydrogen  to  an  internationally 
competitive level. This would provide a reliable and viable cost basis for investment decisions 
in CO2-lean steel plants. 
CLIMATE CHANGE POLICY 
Ensuring international competitiveness throughout the transition and beyond
 
The steel sector is the most exposed to carbon leakage of all energy intensive industries. During 
and  beyond  the  transition  towards  production  of  CO2-lean  steel,  a  supportive  regulatory 
framework that ensures a level playing field with third country competitors is required. To this end, 
steel  products  sold  on  the  EU  market,  whether  produced  in  the  EU  or  imported  from  third 
countries,  and  steel  exported  from  the  EU  to  third  countries  need  to  have  similar  CO2  cost 
constraints. 
 



POLICIES FOR A SUCCESSFUL GREEN DEAL ON STEEL  
Short-term  regulatory  framework:  improve  carbon  leakage  protection  with  a  Carbon  Border 
Measure
 
  Introduce, for a transitional period, a WTO-compatible Carbon Border Measure that factors in 
both direct and indirect emissions. This measure needs to be set at an effective level to avoid 
carbon leakage via imported products; the measure also needs to be introduced in addition to 
existing carbon leakage provisions on free allocation and indirect cost compensation within the 
existing EU ETS. Introducing Carbon Border Measure and removing free allocation would not 
prevent carbon leakage; it would almost certainly be detrimental to steel production in Europe. 
Short and mid-term: Create lead markets for low carbon products with demand-side measures  
  Introduce incentives for steel users (such as automotive, among others) to use ‘green steel’. 
The EU regulation on passenger cars should apply a more holistic approach towards Life-Cycle 
Thinking  through  CO2  credits  for  the  use  of  ‘green  materials’,  such  as  ‘green  steel’.  The 
implementing  act  which  to  date  limits  ‘Eco-innovation’  credits  (for  CO2 savings  of  up  to  7  g 
CO2/km)  to  the  ‘efficient  operation’  of  the  vehicle  should  be  extended  to  include  ‘green 
materials’. 
  Promote low carbon products in public procurement. 
  Facilitate CCS and CCU options to support the steel industry in decarbonising. 
Mid- and long-term: enhanced measures 
  A methodology for calculating the CO2 footprint (through the value chain, including scope 3) as 
a basis of future regulatory solutions. 
  Introduce, as a complement to the Carbon Border Measure, a minimum CO2 standard, based 
on the footprint calculation that must be met by all steel products sold on the EU market in 
order to ban the dirtiest steel from the market. 
  Carbon-added tax that functions similarly to VAT 
  Measures  and  incentives to  keep ferrous scrap in the  EU  for  its  subsequent  treatment  and 
quality  improvement,  helping  to  deliver  on  the  EU’s  circular  economy  and  CO2  reduction 
objectives.  
 
SUSTAINABLE  PRODUCTS  AND  ‘ALTERNATIVE’  MATERIALS  FOR  THE  CIRCULAR 
ECONOMY 
Steel is a highly versatile, sustainable product, and it contributes to making society as a whole 
more sustainable 

The circular economy policy field is broad and encompasses a range of EU regulatory measures and 
initiatives.  As  a  result,  in  enacting  the  Green  Deal,  care  must  be  taken  to  align  it  with  existing 
principles in the EU’s circular economy policy, most notably the Circular Economy action plan (e.g. 
the  next  climate  policy,  toxic-free/zero-pollution  and  chemicals  strategies  and  the  Industrial 
Emissions Directive). 
Steel is a permanent material – it is reusable and endlessly recyclable. Steel scrap generated in the 
EU should be considered as a strategic resource insofar as its use is essential to the completion of 
the EU’s circular economy – in addition to recycling supporting the EU’s CO2 reduction objectives.  
Scrap has, embedded within it, a considerable energy use and CO2 reduction potential that is lost 
by EU economy when it is exported to third countries – of which 18 million tonnes are exported net 
every year. Annually, the steel sector generates – alongside its 165 million tonnes of finished steel 
products  -  around  40  million  tonnes  of  other  materials  which  are  used  as  alternatives  (i.e.  as 
secondary raw materials), thereby replacing virgin resources in numerous downstream sectors. 
 
 



POLICIES FOR A SUCCESSFUL GREEN DEAL ON STEEL 
 
Enhancing  circularity  requires  a  holistic  EU  Products  and  Secondary  Raw  Materials  Policy  by 
developing and applying: 

  Life-cycle assessment (LCA) and 
  Product indicators such as:  
o  A Circular Footprint Formula (CFF)  
o  Circular product requirements (e.g. re-usability, high quality recyclability, durability and 
disassembly), and  
o  Co-products/residues use 
  Recognition and integration of the EU Product Policy as an 'enabler’ of climate and resource 
efficiency goals. 
  Extension of the scope of the Eco-Design Directive, focusing on sustainable products and on 
product design requirements.  
  Prioritising the use of ‘alternative’ materials, (such as by-products, end-of-waste and waste) 
over virgin materials, irrespective of their legal status in public procurement and tender. 
  EU-wide criteria for by-products and end-of-waste materials. 
  The use of ‘alternative’ materials, which must meet the same standard specifications used for 
virgin materials. 
  A  toxic-free  strategy  that  focuses  on  reducing  the  actual  risk  of  exposure,  and  not  on  the 
theoretical  content  of  hazardous  substances;  This  would  further  facilitate  and  enable 
circularity. 
FINANCING THE TRANSITION 
Transition to the low-carbon future will require a range of financing mechanism 

EU  steel  producers  face  not  only  the  compliance  costs  of  the  EU  ETS  (€25  per  tonne  of  CO2  in 
October 2019), but the full abatement costs. These costs can be more than ten times the current 
compliance  cost  per  tonne  of  CO2  abated.  Steel  markets  will  not  tolerate  respective  cost  pass-
through and therefore an overall legal framework needs to address both issues. 
The new technologies would result in additional production costs for the EU steel industry of at 
least €20 billion per year compared to the retrofitting of existing plants (i.e. upgrading of existing 
plants with best available techniques), of which at least 80% Operating Expenses (OPEX) mainly 
due  to  prices  for  CO2  lean  energy.  Public  financial  support  for  R&D&I  and  up-scaling  to  initial 
industrial demonstrators remains crucial. The cost per tonne of primary steel would likely increase 
by 35% to 100% compared to the current baseline.   
EU and national financial support schemes  
  Support  private  capital  with  a  consistent  and  coordinated  framework  of  public  funding 
opportunities at EU, national and regional level: 
o  de-risking facility with zero or low-interest loans over very long maturities,  
o  EU-wide  programs,  e.g.  Private-Public-Partnerships  (PPP)  and  Important  Projects  of 
Common European Interest (IPCEI) 
o  CO2 grants, and  
o  other forms of ‘contracts of difference’. 
SUSTAINABLE FINANCE  
Ensuring access to sustainable finance 

Massive transformative investments are needed for the development, demonstration and scaling 
up  of  new  CO2-low  technologies  over  a  relatively  short  time  period.  The  sustainable  finance 
taxonomy  should  maintain  a  flexible  approach  that  prevents  prescriptive  and  rigid  categories 
which do not take the dynamic evolution of technology into account. 
 



  
Taxonomy Regulation/Technical Screening Criteria 
  Enable industrial activities in transition towards a low-carbon and energy efficient society to 
access financing at competitive conditions. 
  ETS  benchmarks  are  not  suitable  as  thresholds  for  sustainable  finance.  GHG  performance 
assessment should be performed on entire value chains and full life cycle analysis (LCA). Instead 
of the ETS benchmarks, a European Standard EN 19694 should be used. 
FAIR INTERNATIONAL TRADE FOR INDUSTRY 
The EU steel industry stands for fair international trade, which must be based on global rules that 
are effective and enforceable, ensuring a level playing field for all.
  
Global  steel  overcapacity  and  related  government  support  measures  continue  to  hinder  the 
financial  and  economic  sustainability  of  the  global  steel  industry.  Steel  is  an  intensively  traded 
product. Global overcapacity was around 440 million tonnes in 2019, equivalent to almost 25% of 
global steel production capacity. 
EU steel imports have increased significantly, up from 18 million tonnes in 2013 to a record 30 million 
tonnes  in  2018.  2019  import  levels  have  remained  high,  and  a  return  to  growth  in  the  EU  steel 
market in 2020 is expected to be accompanied by a return to rising import levels.  
EU steel safeguard 
  Urgently align the EU’s tariff-free steel import quota with market realities and decreased EU 
demand and stabilise import flows  
Fair international trade 
  Counter dumping, governmental subsidisation and other support schemes in third countries by 
improving the application of Trade Defence Instruments (TDI). 
  Modernise the WTO rulebook to more effectively tackle trade distorting practises, in particular 
excessive subsidies to industry. 
  Continue addressing global steel excess capacity at international level.  
  Gain a new leverage at international level by: 
o  Developing effective solutions to promptly react to unilateral protectionist measures. 
o  Upgrading the EU’s Enforcement Regulation to allow the use of sanctions when third 
countries adopt illegal measures. 
o  Reciprocity where third countries deny access to public procurement.  
o  Enforcing screening of Foreign Direct Investment. 
o  Analyse new Free Trade Agreements, and if appropriate revise existing ones, to ensure 
market access and the sustainable development of EU industry. 
ENVIRONMENTAL POLICIES 
Environmental  policies  need  to  be  modern,  based  on  science  and  efficiently  implemented  to 
support the industrial transition. 

  Permits  in  Industrial  Emissions  Directive  (IED)  should  be  updated  and  granted  based  on  a 
technology  driven  analyses  and  a  transparent  and  robust  methodology  to  derive  emission 
limits. 
  Modernise the Water Framework to enable a resilient water system combined with industrial 
and societal development. 
  Introduce a risk-based approach to evaluate environmental and health effects of materials. 
 
 
 



EUROFER POSITION PAPERS 
 
EUROFER POSITION PAPERS  
EUROFER has published a range of papers, studies, and reports that highlight the thinking behind 
its positions. These documents underpin EUROFER’s call for a Green Deal on Steel. 
All of these documents can be downloaded by visiting: 
www.eurofer.be/documents/greendealonsteel  
ENSURE COMPETITIVENESS THROUGHOUT THE CLIMATE TRANSITION AND BEYOND  
  EUROFER Discussion Paper: ‘A Regulatory Framework for CO2-Lean Steel Produced in Europe’ 
  EUROFER/ESTEP  Position  Paper:  ‘The  European  steel  industry  welcomes  the  Commission 
proposal for the ‘Clean Steel - Low Carbon Steelmaking’ European Partnership’  
  EUROFER Vision Paper: ‘Towards carbon neutrality: A European Partnership for Clean Steel’ 
  EUROFER Low Carbon Roadmap: ‘Pathways to a CO2-neutral European Steel Industry’ 
  EUROFER Position Paper: ‘Revision of the Environmental and Energy Aid Guidelines (EEAG)’ 
  EUROFER Fact Sheets: ‘Revision of the Environmental and Energy Aid Guidelines (EEAG)’ 
  EUROFER Position Paper: ‘Compensation of indirect carbon costs in the post 2020 EU ETS’ 
  NERA Economic Consulting Executive Summary: ‘Characteristics of European Steelmaking in the 
Context of Indirect Emissions Costs’ study 
  EUROFER Position Paper: ‘Sustainable Finance Taxonomy Update’ 
  EUROFER Position Paper: ‘On Technical Report on EU Taxonomy of June 2019’ 
FAIR INTERNATIONAL TRADE FOR INDUSTRY 
  EUROFER Position Paper: ‘Global Forum on Steel Excess Capacity’  
  EUROFER Infographic: ‘Safeguarding EU Steel’ 
  AEGIS Europe Position Paper: ‘The reform of the WTO’ 
  AEGIS  Europe  Position  Paper:  ‘A  call  for  a  more  effective  application  of  existing  EU  policy 
instruments and improvements where needed’ 
  AEGIS Europe Position Paper: ‘Public Procurement’ 
SUSTAINABLE PRODUCTS AND THE CIRCULAR ECONOMY 
  EUROFER Position Paper: ‘Policy Options for Product Environmental Footprint (PEF)’ 
  EUROFER Position Paper: ‘Towards an EU Product Policy Framework’ 
  EUROFER Position Paper: ‘The New Circular Economy Roadmap – Summary & Priorities’ 
  EUROFER Input: ‘Consultation on the New Circular Economy’ 
  EUROFER Brochure: ‘Steel and the Circular Economy’