Ceci est une version HTML d'une pièce jointe de la demande d'accès à l'information 'Request for meeting information'.





Ref. Ares(2020)3607940 - 08/07/2020
Ref. Ares(2020)4264192 - 14/08/2020
AM 1: compensation for the use of industrial gases in eligible sectors  
Current text  
Proposed amendment 
Paragraphs 12 and 13  
Paragraphs 12 and 13 
 
 
(12) ‘actual electricity consumption’, in MWh, 
(12) ‘actual electricity consumption’, in MWh, 
means the actual electricity consumption at the 
means the actual electricity consumption at the 
installation (including electricity consumption 
installation (including electricity consumption 
for the production of out-sourced products 
for the production of out-sourced products 
eligible for aid) in year t, determined ex post in 
eligible for aid and electricity consumption for 
year t+1; 
producing industrial gases consumed for the 
 
production of products eligible for aid) in year 
(13) ‘electricity consumption efficiency 
t, determined ex post in year t+1;  
benchmark’, in MWh/tonne of output and 
 
defined at Prodcom 8 level9, means the 
(13) ‘electricity consumption efficiency 
product-specific electricity consumption per 
benchmark’, in MWh/tonne of output and 
tonne of output achieved by the most 
defined at Prodcom 8 level9, means the 
electricity-efficient methods of production for 
product-specific electricity consumption per 
the product considered. The electricity 
tonne of output achieved by the most 
consumption efficiency benchmark update shall 
electricity-efficient methods of production for 
be consistent with Article 10a(2) of the EU ETS 
the product considered. It includes electricity 
Directive. For products within the eligible 
consumption for producing industrial gases 
sectors for which fuel and electricity 
consumed for the production of products 
exchangeability has been established in section 
eligible for aid. The electricity consumption 
2 of Annex I to Commission Delegated 
efficiency benchmark update shall be consistent 
Regulation (EU) 2019/33110, the definition of 
with Article 10a(2) of the EU ETS Directive. For 
electricity consumption efficiency benchmarks is  products within the eligible sectors for which 
made within the same system boundaries, 

fuel and electricity exchangeability has been 
taking into account only the share of electricity 
established in section 2 of Annex I to 
for the determination of the aid amount. The 
Commission Delegated Regulation (EU) 
corresponding electricity consumption 
2019/33110, the definition of electricity 
benchmarks for products covered by eligible 
consumption efficiency benchmarks is made 
sectors are listed in Annex II to these Guidelines;  within the same system boundaries, taking into 
account only the share of electricity for the 
determination of the aid amount. The 
corresponding electricity consumption 
benchmarks for products covered by eligible 
sectors are listed in Annex II to these Guidelines; 

Justification 
Several  eligible  industrial  sectors  such  as  steel,  non-ferrous  and  refineries  use  for  unavoidable 
purposes  significant  amounts  of  industrial  gases  such  as  oxygen  which  have  an  important 
electricity consumption embedded. Such industrial gases are also linked to the energy balance, as 
they often contribute to reducing  the  consumption of other fuels and/or electricity.  The lack of 
compensation for the indirect costs linked to industrial gases further exposes the eligible sectors 
to  carbon  leakage  risk.  Therefore,  similarly  to  the  allocation  of  free  allowances  to  the  heat 
consumer  under  the  rules  on  free  allocation  for  the  direct  emissions,  the  consumption  of 
industrial gases should also be considered as eligible for financial compensation when it occurs in 
a sector that is exposed to indirect carbon leakage and state aid should be granted to the exposed 
sector. 
 
 

AM 2: clarifying that possibility for compensating beyond 75% is open to all eligible sectors 
Current text  
Proposed amendment 
Paragraphs 30 and 31  
Paragraphs 30 and 31 
 
 
30. Given that for some sectors the aid intensity  30. Given that for some undertakings or sites 
of 75 % might not be sufficient to ensure that 

the aid intensity of 75 % might not be sufficient 
there is adequate protection against the risk of 
to ensure that there is adequate protection 
carbon leakage, when needed, Member States 
against the risk of carbon leakage, when 
may limit the amount of the indirect costs to be 
needed, Member States may limit the amount 
paid at undertaking level to […] % of the gross 
of the indirect costs to be paid at undertaking 
value added of the undertaking concerned in 
or, where appropriate, site level to 0.5 % of the 
year t. The gross value added of the 
gross value added of the undertaking or site 
undertaking must be calculated as turnover, 
concerned in year t. The gross value added of 
plus capitalised production, plus other 
the undertaking or site must be calculated as 
operating income, plus or minus changes in 
turnover, plus capitalised production, plus other 
stocks, minus purchases of goods and services 
operating income, plus or minus changes in 
(which shall not include personnel costs), minus 
stocks, minus purchases of goods and services 
other taxes on products that are linked to 
(which shall not include personnel costs), minus 
turnover but not deductible, minus duties and 
other taxes on products that are linked to 
taxes linked to production. Alternatively, it can 
turnover but not deductible, minus duties and 
be calculated from gross operating surplus by 
taxes linked to production. Alternatively, it can 
adding personnel costs. Income and 
be calculated from gross operating surplus by 
expenditure classified as financial or 
adding personnel costs. Income and 
extraordinary in company accounts is excluded 
expenditure classified as financial or 
from value added. Value added at factor costs is  extraordinary in company accounts is excluded 
calculated at gross level, as value adjustments 

from value added. Value added at factor costs is 
(such as depreciation) are not subtracted. 
calculated at gross level, as value adjustments 
 
(such as depreciation) are not subtracted. 
31. When Member States decide to limit the 
 
amount of the indirect costs to be paid at 
31. When Member States decide to limit the 
undertaking level to […] % of gross value added,  amount of the indirect costs to be paid at 
that limitation must apply to all eligible 

undertaking or site level to 0.5 % of gross value 
undertakings in the relevant sector. If Member 
added, that limitation must apply to all eligible 
States decide to apply the limitation of […] % of 
undertakings or sites in the relevant sector. If 
gross value added only to some of the sectors 
Member States decide to apply the limitation 
listed in Annex I, the choice of sectors must be 
of […] % of gross value added only to some of 
made on the basis of objective, non-
the sectors listed in Annex I, the choice of 
discriminatory and transparent criteria. 
sectors must be made on the basis of 
objective, non-discriminatory and transparent 
criteria.
 

Justification 
The additional compensation should be set so that indirect costs are capped at 0.5% of the GVA. 
This possibility should be open to all eligible sectors and not restricted only to some of them. The 
GVA  of  companies  is  highly  dependent  on  their  structure,  including  the  configuration  of  the 
production steps where the  higher  share of value  added is generated. Hence, a site assessment 
would also be necessary where appropriate. 
 
 
 

 
AM 3: deletion of conditionality criteria (since the incentive effect is secured by the benchmarks) 
Current text  
Proposed amendment 
Paragraph 54 
Paragraph 54 
 
 
54. Member States also commit to monitoring 
Deleted 
that beneficiaries covered by the obligation to 
 
conduct an energy audit under Article 8(4) of 
the Energy Efficiency Directive will: 
(a) implement recommendations of the audit 
report, to the extent that the pay-back time 
for the relevant investments does not exceed 
[5] years and that the costs of their 
investments is proportionate; or alternatively 
 
(b) reduce the carbon footprint of their 
electricity consumption, for example, through 
installing an on-site renewable energy 
generation facility (covering at least 50% of 
their electricity needs), through a carbon-free 
power purchase agreement; or alternatively 
 
(c) invest a significant share of at least 80% of 
the aid amount in projects that lead to 
substantial reductions of the installation’s 
greenhouse gas emissions and well below the 
applicable benchmark used for free allocation 
in the EU Emissions Trading System.
 
Justification 
Compensation  of  indirect  costs  does  not  distort  incentives  for  energy  efficiency  investments 
because  it is still based on very strict  benchmarks reflecting the best performance  in the sector 
(and actually  the  state  aid intensity does  not  even cover the full benchmark but  only  75%of it). 
Furthermore,  the  “incentive  effect”  is  also  preserved  by  the  fact  that  the  benchmarks  will  be 
updated during the phase 4, so that companies have further interest in improving performance, 
where  technically  possible.  Furthermore,  the  proposed  conditionality  requirements  are  actually 
linked to the implementation and enforcement of other pieces of legislation (notably the Energy 
Efficiency  Directive  and  the  Renewable  Energy  Directive).  However,  member  states  retain  the 
possibility  of  adopting  different  instruments  to  promote  energy  efficiency  and  renewables  in 
order  to  achieve  the  targets  set  in  such  legislation.  Therefore,  the  conditionality  requirements 
would overlap and possibly collide with different national measures.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
AM 4 (option 1): maintaining sectors belonging to the steel value chain (mining of iron ores and 
seamless pipes) in the list of eligible sectors 

Current text  
Proposed amendment 
Annex I 
Annex I 
 
 
NACE 24.10: Manufacture of basic iron and 
NACE 24.10: Manufacture of basic iron and 
steel and ferro-alloys 
steel and ferro-alloys, including seamless steel 
pipes 
 
NACE 07.10 Mining of iron ores
 
 

Justification 
The NACE code 0710 (Mining of iron ores), which is eligible for financial compensation in the EU 
ETS  phase  3,  is  very  important  for  the  steel  sector  as  it  is  within  the  same  value  chain.  Even 
though it has a different NACE code than steel making (NACE 2410), actually it covers the activity 
of sintering of iron ores that is performed in the integrated steel sites. Since it contributes to the 
overall  exposure  to  the  indirect  carbon  leakage  risk  of  the  steel  industry,  it  is  important  that  it 
remains eligible for the post 2020 period. 
Furthermore, in the EU ETS phase 3 seamless steel pipes were also included in the list of eligible 
sectors  as  they  are  closely  linked  to  the  steel  sector  because  they  represent  a  very  electro-
intensive  process  similar  to  other  hot/cold  rolling  processes.  Therefore,  they  should  remain 
eligible.  
 
AM 4 (option 2): maintaining sectors belonging to the steel value chain (mining of iron ores and 
seamless pipes) in the list of eligible sectors 

Current text  
Proposed amendment 
Annex I 
Annex I 
 
 
NACE 24.10: Manufacture of basic iron and 
NACE 24.10: Manufacture of basic iron and 
steel and ferro-alloys 
steel and ferro-alloys, including seamless steel 
pipes and agglomeration of iron ores 
 
NACE 07.10 Mining of iron ores
 
 

Justification 
The NACE code 0710 (Mining of iron ores), which is eligible for financial compensation in the EU 
ETS  phase  3,  is  very  important  for  the  steel  sector  as  it  is  within  the  same  value  chain.  Even 
though it has a different NACE code than steel making (NACE 2410), actually it covers the activity 
of sintering of iron ores that is performed in the integrated steel sites. Since it contributes to the 
overall  exposure  to  the  indirect  carbon  leakage  risk  of  the  steel  industry,  it  is  important  that  it 
remains eligible for the post 2020 period. 
Furthermore, in the EU ETS phase 3 seamless steel pipes were also included in the list of eligible 
sectors  as  they  are  closely  linked  to  the  steel  sector  because  they  represent  a  very  electro-
intensive  process  similar  to  other  hot/cold  rolling  processes.  Therefore,  they  should  remain 
eligible.  
 
 

 
AM 5: maintaining the existing areas for Central Western Europe and Nordic region 
Current text  
Proposed amendment 
Paragraph 14(10) 
Paragraph 14(10) 
 
 
‘CO2 emission factor’, in tCO2/MWh, means the  ‘CO2 emission factor’, in tCO2/MWh, means the 
weighted average of the CO2 intensity of 

weighted average of the CO2 intensity of 
electricity produced from fossil fuels in different  electricity produced from fossil fuels in different 
geographic areas. The weight shall reflect the 

geographic areas. The weight shall reflect the 
production mix of the fossil fuels in the given 
production mix of the fossil fuels in the given 
geographic area. The CO2 factor is the result of 
geographic area. The CO2 factor is the result of 
the division of the CO2 equivalent emission data  the division of the CO2 equivalent emission data 
of the energy industry divided by the gross 

of the energy industry divided by the gross 
electricity generation based on fossil fuels in 
electricity generation based on fossil fuels in 
TWh. For the purposes of these Guidelines, the 
TWh. For the purposes of these Guidelines, the 
areas are defined as geographic zones (a) which  areas are defined as geographic zones (a) which 
consist of submarkets coupled through power 

consist of submarkets coupled through power 
exchanges, or (b) within which no declared 
exchanges, or (b) within which no declared 
congestion exists and, in both cases, hourly day-
congestion exists and, in both cases, where the 
ahead power exchange prices within the zones 
hourly day-ahead power exchange prices within 
showing price divergence in euros (using daily 
the zones showing price divergence in euros 
ECB exchange rates) of maximum 1 % in 
(using daily ECB exchange rates) of maximum 1 
significant number of all hours in a year. Such 
in significant number of all hours in a year, or 
regional differentiation reflects the significance 
c) regions CWE and Nordic, in both cases, 
of fossil fuel plants for the final price set on the 
also if larger price differences are 
wholesale market and their role as marginal 
experienced but  where short term limitations 
plants in the merit order. The mere fact that 
on interconnectors resulting in larger price 
electricity is traded between two Member 
differences or dominance of one market upon 
States does not automatically mean that they 
the other exist as indicated by calculations 
constitute a supranational region. Given the 
of the covariances between areas or Member 
States. 
Such regional differentiation reflects the 

lack of relevant data at sub-national level, the 
significance of fossil fuel plants and for CWE 
geographic areas comprise the entire territory 
and Nordic areas also reflects the impact from 
of one or more Member States. On this basis, 
abroad, for the final price set on the wholesale 
the following geographic areas can be 
market and their role as marginal plants in the 
identified: Nordic (Sweden and Finland), Baltic 
merit order. The mere fact that electricity is 
(Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia), Iberia (Portugal 
traded between two Member States does not 
and Spain), Czechia and Slovakia (Czechia and 
automatically mean that they constitute a 
Slovakia) and all other Member States 
supranational region. Given the lack of relevant 
separately. The corresponding maximum 
data at sub-national level, the geographic areas 
regional CO2 factors are listed in Annex III. In 
comprise the entire territory of one or more 
order to ensure equal treatment of sources of 
Member States. On this basis, the following 
electricity and avoid possible abuses, the same 
geographic areas can be identified: Nordic 
CO2 emission factor applies to all sources of 
(Norway, Denmark, Sweden and Finland), 
electricity supply (auto generation, electricity 
Central-West Europe (Austria, Belgium, 
supply contracts or grid supply) and to all aid 
Luxembourg, France, Germany and 
beneficiaries in the Member State concerned. 
Netherlands), Baltic (Lithuania, Latvia and 
Estonia), Iberia (Portugal and Spain), Czechia 
and Slovakia (Czechia and Slovakia) and all 
other Member States separately. The 


corresponding maximum regional CO2  
factors are listed in Annex III or factors decided 
by using additional analysis based on 
electricity markets models on request from 
Member States and approved by the 
Commission. 
In order to ensure equal treatment 
of sources of electricity and avoid possible 
abuses, the same CO2 emission factor applies to 
all sources of electricity supply (auto 
generation, electricity supply contracts or grid 
supply) and to all aid beneficiaries in the 
Member State concerned; 
 
 
 
Justification 
 
The methodology for defining the marginal emission factor gives inaccurate results not reflecting 
reality if areas are defined unnecessarily too small, especially where the factor is impacted by 
neighboring areas. In addition, such a fragmentation would give a wrong signal and counteract the 
need and goal to comprehensively realize the EU’s internal market also for energy. Therefore, 
electricity market models could be used as additional analysis in cases where the actual pass-
through factor comes from price influence from connected markets and not from domestic 
emission-intensive power generation. This should result in, either, to maintain the geographical 
regions CEW and Nordic or allow to apply individual emission intensities, if one market is 
dominated by another.