Dies ist eine HTML Version eines Anhanges der Informationsfreiheitsanfrage 'Request for meeting information'.







ANNEX TO THE PUBLIC CONSULTATION 
Ref. Ares(2020)3607717 - 08/07/2020
Ref. Ares(2020)4264192 - 14/08/2020
ON DRAFT EU ETS STATE AID GUIDELINES 
 
THE EU STEEL INDUSTRY IS AT HIGH RISK OF CARBON LEAKAGE 
Even though the steel sector (NACE 2410) is included in Annex I of the draft Guidelines as eligible for 
compensation, the study by ADE and Compass Lexecon (consultants’ study) at page 33 classifies the 
sector only at medium risk. As we do not have access to the underlying data of this classification, we 
would  like  to  make  the  following  remarks,  which  indicate  that  also  the  steel  sector  should  be 
considered at high risk: 
•  The indirect emission intensity (indirect emissions/Gross Value Added) of the steel sector (which 
in the consultants’ study is defined as more relevant than trade intensity) is higher than three out 
of four sectors defined at medium-high risk (leather clothes, inorganic chemicals and pulp). 
•  Since the steel industry is very labour intensive, the GVA is highly affected by the labour costs. If 
labour costs are excluded from the calculation (i.e. the GVA is replaced by GOS), the steel sector 
has the third highest indirect carbon leakage indicator among the 8 eligible sectors. 
•  Among the 8 eligible sectors, the steel industry has the second lowest profitability indicator Gross 
Operating Surplus on Turnover) according to Eurostat. 
•  Steel is one of the most traded goods worldwide and, at the same time, the one where the large 
majority of anti-dumping investigations have been initiated by G20 countries1. This is a clear sign 
of the fact that the sector is suffering from trade distortions at global level. 
•  As a result of the combined effect of increasing imports and decreasing exports, the EU became 
net importer in terms of quantities in 2013 and in terms of value in 2015. In 2014, the EU imported 
26,3 million tonnes of steel while, in 2019 the imports were 34,7 million tonnes. 
•  The  large  number  of anti-dumping  and  anti-subsidies  cases clearly  indicates that  the  EU  steel 
sector is a price taker as the EU market price is inevitably affected by dumped imports even if 
there is no significant trading in official international exchanges.  
•  The anti-dumping and anti-subsidy measures are punctual measures limited to one product at the 
time and per country. They address unfair trade practices and aim only at re-establishing a level 
playing field but do not prevent those countries from exporting large quantities to the EU.  
•  Given the massive global overcapacities in the steel sector, once the injurious imports from a 
country are limited thanks to the anti-dumping and/or anti-subsidy measures, other countries can 
easily replace them (as widely occurred recently). 
•  In adopting ex officio the EU steel safeguard measures in reaction to the US 232 tariffs, the EU 
has  recognised  that  anti-dumping  and  anti-subsidy  measures  were  not  enough  to  tackle  the 
massive trade diversion deriving from US tariffs.  
•  However, the EU steel safeguard are exceptional, temporary measures to expire on 1 July 2021 
(hence, they are not relevant for the EU ETS phase 4 under discussion in this assessment). They 
aim at mitigating the risk that trade flows are diverted from the US to the EU. 
•  Unfortunately,  due  to  the  design  of  the  mechanism  (i.e.  reference  volume  of  imports, 
liberalisation,  carry  over,  etc.),  in  2019  the  EU  steel  safeguard  measures  have  not  prevented 
multiple,  severe,  market  disruptions  in  the  EU.  Weak  steel  demand,  increased  protectionism 
worldwide (leading to trade diversion) and worsening overcapacities caused more than 15,000 
jobs redundancies in 2019. 
•  The steel industry is highly affected the fuel-electricity exchangeability which causes the risk of 
increasing direct emissions (both within the EU and internationally) if indirect costs compensation 
is not effective.  
•  A study by NERA Consulting commissioned by EUROFER has clearly concluded that due to the 
market characteristics, the steel sector cannot pass through unilateral carbon costs without loss 
of market shares.  
 
1    Report on G20 Trade and Investment measures, OECD, November 2019 
http://www.oecd.org/daf/inv/investment-policy/22nd-Report-on-G20-Trade-and-Investment-Measures.pdf 
 
 
EUROFER AISBL • Avenue de Cortenbergh, 172 • B-1000 Brussels • Belgium 
 
+32 3 738 79 20 • xxxx@xxxxxxx.xx • www.eurofer.eu • EU Transparency Register: ID  93038071152-83 
 


 
1.  Introduction  
The EU ETS Guidelines are an essential element of the legal framework that aims at preventing the 
risk  of  carbon  leakage.  In  previous  publications  of  the  European  Commission  (e.g.  2015  Impact 
Assessment accompanying the post 2020 EU ETS Directive proposal, and  
2018 
Impact 
assessment accompanying the Communication “A Clean Planet for All”), the steel sector had been 
identified at highest risk of carbon leakage. 
Financial compensation of indirect costs is essential for both the electric arc furnace (EAF), which 
has very high electro-intensity because it uses large amount of electricity to melt and recycle scrap, 
and the integrated route, which consumes electricity produced from the combustion of recovered 
waste gases generated unavoidably by the steel making process. Financial compensation for this 
case is explicitly mentioned in recital 13 of the post 2020 EU ETS Directive in order to preserve the 
incentive to recover waste gases, since free allocation is granted only partially for waste gases’ 
emissions.  
2.  Indirect carbon leakage indicator and indirect costs’ impact without 
labour costs 
For consistency with the free allocation rules and the ETS Directive, the indirect carbon leakage 
assessment  indicator  (ICLI)  is  based  on  the  multiplication  between  trade  intensity  and  indirect 
emissions intensity (kg CO2 indirect emissions/ € GVA). In this assessment, the steel sector (NACE 
2410)  has  the  second  last  value,  which  is  then  reflected  also  in  the  red-amber-green  (RAG) 
assessment in the consultants’ study.  
 Indirect emission 
Indirect carbon 
 Trade 
Sectors
intensity                           
RAG rating
leakage indicator 
intensity
[kg CO2 / EUR GVA]
NACE
2013-2015
2013-2015
2013-2015
1411
Manufacture of leather clothes
1,148
83,00%
1,383
Medium-high
2442
Aluminium production
1,060
35,20%
3,011
Medium-high
2013
Other inorganic basic chemicals
0,734
54,00%
1,359
Medium-high
2443
Lead, zinc and tin production
0,620
30,60%
2,025
Medium-high
1711
Manufacture of pulp
0,522
48,10%
1,085
Medium-high
1712
Paper and paperboard
0,412
27,80%
1,482
Medium 
2410
Basic iron and steel and of ferro-alloys0,363
25,70%
1,414
Medium 
1920
Refined petroleum products
0,266
25,80%
1,031
Medium 
 
Source: consultants’ study  
This  assessment  is  highly  influenced  by  the  use  of  the  GVA  in  the  denominator  of  the  indirect 
emission intensity. Since the steel industry is very labour intensive, the GVA is affected significantly 
by the labour costs. If labour costs are excluded from the calculation (i.e. the GVA is replaced by 
GOS),  the  steel  sector  has  the  third  highest  indirect  carbon  leakage  indicator  and  the  second 
highest indirect emissions intensity among the 8 eligible sectors. 
 




  
Indirect carbon 
 Indirect emission 
 Trade 
Sectors
leakage indicator                       
intensity                                 
intensity
(GOS instead of GVA)
[kg CO2 / EUR GOS]
NACE
2013-2015
2013-2015
2013-2015
2442
Aluminium production
3,045
35,20%
8,649
1411
Manufacture of leather clothes
3,029
83,00%
3,650
2410
Basic iron and steel and of ferro-alloys 1,763
25,70%
6,859
2013
Other inorganic basic chemicals
1,543
54,00%
2,858
2443
Lead, zinc and tin production
1,437
30,60%
4,696
1711
Manufacture of pulp
0,980
48,10%
2,037
1712
Paper and paperboard
0,955
27,80%
3,436
1920
Refined petroleum products
0,641
25,80%
2,483
 
Source: recalculations based on consultants’ study (GOS figures from Eurostat) 
Similarly, the section 3.1.1 on aid intensity and degressivity of the consultants’ study assesses the 
impact of indirect costs (with a carbon price of 25€/t) after 75% compensation taking into account 
the GVA. In such assessment, among the 8 eligible sectors, the steel industry has around the fourth 
indirect costs impact (after 75% compensation), which is comparable to the sectors with the lower 
impact (blue bars below). Yet, if labour costs are excluded from the denominator (i.e. the GVA is 
replaced by GOS), the steel sector have very clearly the second highest impact (orange bars below), 
with a large difference above the remaining sectors.  
 
Source: recalculations based on consultants’ study (GOS figures from Eurostat) 
The above analysis is even more relevant if one considers the profitability of the eligible sectors. In 
fact,  the  steel  sector  shows  the  second  lowest  profitability  indicator  (Gross  Operating 
Surplus/Turnover) among the 8 eligible sectors. 
 





 
 
 
Source: Eurostat 
3.  Overcapacities: a structural problem of the steel industry 
Faced with an unprecedented crisis generated by the trade spill overs of Chinese excess capacity, 
the EU activated its trade defence tools to defend EU industry from unfair trade for a total of 25 
trade  defence  measures.  However,  these  efforts  address  the  effects  of  global  overcapacity  on 
trade – not its root causes. 
To  that  effect,  the  EU  led  the  December  2016  creation  of  the  Global  Forum  on  Steel  Excess 
Capacity
, bringing together 33 economies – all G20 members plus interested OECD countries.  
The global surplus in steelmaking capacity has slightly decreased since the Forum's creation but in 
2018 is still more than 500 million metric tonnes, an alarmingly high-level equivalent to one quarter 
of  the  world's  total  capacity.  This  structural  surplus  floods  world  markets  as  soon  as  there  is  a 
cyclical  downturn  –  with  yet  again  a  damaging  impact  on  the  steel  sector,  as  well  as  related 
industries and jobs.  
 
Source: OECD 
On 26 October 2019, the Ministerial meeting of the Global Forum on Steel Excess Capacity had to 
take a decision on the renewal of the Global Forum’s three-year mandate. On that occasion, there 
was an overwhelming support by members to continue working to address the persistent global 
excess capacity plaguing the global steel sector. However, China was the only country that chose 
not to join the consensus and hence decided to step out of the Forum. The Global Forum welcomed 
China's efforts to reduce capacity, but equally identified the need for further reductions and the 
elimination  of  subsidies  causing  overcapacity,  underlining  that  these  actions  are  essential  to 
prevent another major global steel crisis. Despite China leaving, the platform remains open to all 
interested  OECD  and  G20  members,  which  continue  to  be  invited  to  join  discussions.  However, 
without China – producing more than half of the world’s steel - the effectiveness of the Global 
Forum is seriously undermined.  

The latest available information (as of 31 December 2018) suggests that global steelmaking capacity 
(in nominal crude terms) remained nearly unchanged in 2018, following declines in 2016 and 2017. 
However, information on announced investment projects suggests that, globally, 87.8mmt of gross 
capacity  additions  are  currently  underway  (mainly  in  Asia  and  middle  East)  and  could  come  on 
 






  
stream  during  the  three-year  period  of  2019-21.  An  additional  22.4  million  tonnes  of  capacity 
additions are currently in the planning stages for possible start-up during the same time period. 
 
Source: OECD, Latest developments in steelmaking capacity, July 2019 
https://www.oecd.org/industry/ind/recent-developments-steelmaking-capacity-2019.pdf  
4.  Trade defence measures 
According  to  the  last  OECD  Report  on  G20  Trade  and  Investment  Measures,  since  2017,  metal 
products  accounted  for  the  largest  share  of  initiations  (by  G20  members)  of  anti-dumping  and 
countervailing investigations across the reporting periods (July-December 2017; January-June 2018; 
July-December 2018 and January-June 2019).  
The metal’s sector accounted for a total of 102 anti-dumping initiations from the second half of 2017 
to the first half of 2019. Overall, steel products (HS chapters 72 and 73) accounted for the large 
majority of these investigations (76 out of 102) –75%2. 
While steel is a highly-trade good, it is also the one which is subject to the highest amount of anti-
dumping measures, clearly showing that the sector is suffering from trade distorting practices. 
The large number of anti-dumping and anti-subsidies cases clearly indicates that the EU steel sector 
is  a  price  taker  as  the  EU  market  price  is  inevitably  affected  by  dumped  imports.  This  is  also 
confirmed by the close relationship between steel prices in the EU and in other regions (see graphs 
below).  Most  importantly,  such  relationship  remains  very  close  also  when  trade  measures  are 
adopted, clearly indicating that the EU steel market is constantly affected by the global dynamics. 
Re-bars: domestic prices in different regions 
 
Source: SBB; Indices on Re-Bars, domestic markets; qualities normalised to B500B/C/similar; ex-works/-stocks 
 
2Reports on G20 Trade and Investment measures, OECD, November 2019 
http://www.oecd.org/daf/inv/investment-policy/22nd-Report-on-G20-Trade-and-Investment-Measures.pdf  
 






 
Re-bars: monthly variations of domestic prices in different regions 
  
Source: SBB; Indices on Re-Bars, domestic markets; qualities normalised to B500B/C/similar; ex-works/-stocks 
Hot rolled coils: domestic prices in different regions 
 
Source: SBB; Indices on HRC, domestic markets; qualities normalised to B500B/C/similar; ex-works/-stocks 
Hot rolled coils: monthly variations of domestic prices in different regions 
 
Source: SBB; Indices on HRC, domestic markets; qualities normalised to B500B/C/similar; ex-works/-stocks 
 
 
 




  
a.  Anti-dumping  and  anti-subsidy  duties:  a  punctual  reaction  to 
unfair trade practices 
While the massive overcapacities in the steel sector are clearly a structural issue which will not be 
solved in the short term (especially with China stepping out of the Global Forum), trade defence 
measures are punctual, specific measures, which are limited to a precise product scope and to some 
specific countries.  
Anti-dumping/anti-subsidy measures can be put on imports of specific products if the Commission's 
investigation justifies it. When it comes to anti-dumping, the Commission’s investigation checks if: 
1.  There is dumping by the producers in the country/countries concerned; 
2.  The European industry concerned suffers 'material injury'; 
3.  There is a causal link between dumping and injury; 
4.  Putting measures in place is not against the European interest (hereafter Union interest). 
It is only when all four conditions are met that the Commission may put anti-dumping measures in 
place. As mentioned in point 4, in its evaluation, the Commission assesses whether measures in 
place don’t harm the European interest. This is not a mandatory provision under the WTO  Anti-
Dumping Agreement. In fact, the European Union’s legislation contains certain provisions which 
could  be  defined  as  “WTO  plus”,  meaning  that  they  are  not  mandatory  under  WTO  law.  Two 
examples are: the Union interest and the lesser duty rule (LDR). With regards to the LDR, it is worth 
noting that the jurisdictions which apply it can decide to impose duties lower than the margin of 
dumping when these are sufficient to remove injury. 
For the above-mentioned reasons, it seems clear that trade defence measures are last resort tools. 
The aim of the European Commission is always to struck a balance between domestic industry, 
importers and users. The reason  why the EU imposes those measures is simply to seek a level 
playing field and tackle unfair trade practices, while considering the interest of the EU as a whole.  

The effectiveness of anti-dumping and anti-subsidy duties can be undermined by the fact that if the 
imports of a certain product from a certain country decrease following the imposition of the duties, 
it is not always the case that EU producers will benefit from it.  In fact, in a situation of massive 
overcapacities, the market share that China (and/or other countries whose products are subject to 
trade defence measures) used to hold has often been replaced by other exporting countries.  
Some examples can be found below:  
•  Hot Rolled Flat (HRF): The recent surge of Turkish imports is higher than that of Chinese 
HRF imports back in 2015-2016 when the EU imposed dumping duties on Chinese based on 
a threat of injury.  
 Source: Eurostat 
 






 
•  Hot Rolled Flat (HRF): similarly, the imposition of AD duties on Ukraine, Russia, China, Iran 
and Brazil was followed by a surge of imports from other countries, notably Turkey, India, 
South Korea, Egypt and Taiwan.  
 Source: Eurostat 
•  Cold Rolled Flat: if imports from Russia and China sharply decreased after the imposition of 
anti-dumping duties, new countries (which were not exporting significant volumes back in 
2015) have increased their exports to the EU after 2016.  
 Source: Eurostat 
•  A similar consideration can be made for Stainless Cold-Rolled Flat and Rebars.  
 Source: Eurostat 
 





  
 Source: Eurostat 
•  The import market share of all finished steel products in 2018 was higher than in 2016. 
 Source: Eurostat 
 
b.  EU  Steel  Safeguard  Measures:  a  temporary  solution  to  exceptional 
circumstances 
The  EU  has  reacted  to  U.S.  232  measures  by  introducing  safeguard  measures  to  defend  the 
domestic  industry  by  imposing  provisional  measures  in  July  2018  and  definitive  measures  in 
February 2019: in doing so, the Commission assessed that anti-dumping and anti-subsidy measures 
were not sufficient to address the huge import increase deriving from trade diversion.  
The safeguards are a justified trade policy response to import surges caused by external factors. 
The definitive measures cover 26 steel product categories and are expected to remain in force for 
three  years,  hence
  till  1  July  2021.  Hence,  they  are  not  relevant  for  the  EU  ETS  phase  4  under 
discussion in this assessment.
 
When imposing the EU steel safeguard measures, the Commission recognized that the EU steel 
industry “is still in a fragile and vulnerable position” and considered that traditional import flows 
should have been maintained as far as possible. The measures are indeed aimed at tackling the 
trade diversion following the imposition of the US measures, not to close the EU market. While the 
 



 
US imposed a 25% tariff from the first tonne without granting duty-free volumes to the European 
Union, the Commission decided to apply the 25% duty only to imported quantities above a reference 
historical level because it considered that, with safeguard measures established under the form of 
Tariff Rate Quota, effective competition between imports and the Union industry would have 
been maintained, and that the risk of general price increases and of any shortage would have been 
avoided  (Recital  136  of  Commission  Implementing  Regulation  (EU)  2019/159  of  31  January  2019 
imposing definitive safeguard measures against imports of certain steel products).  
How does the EU steel safeguard work?  
▪  The quota of imports without the 25% duty is based on the average volume data from 2015-
2017.  This  quota  increased  by  5%  in  February  2019,  3%  in  July  2019  and  is  scheduled  to 
increase by another 3% in July 2020. This expansion of the quota size is independent of the 
growth of the overall EU steel market. 

The  quota  structure  takes  the  form  of  a  set  of  tariff-rate  quotas,  based  on  the  average 
volume  of  traditional  imports  over  2015-17  plus  5%.  It  is  important  to  stress  that  this  5% 
increase which occurred in February 2019 is an adjustment the EU has foreseen, but which 
is  not  mandatory  under  WTO  rules  (unlike  the  liberalisation).  The  key  assumptions 
underlying the 5% increase in quota volumes in February 2019 were that consumption was 
likely  to  experience  double  digit  growth  and  that,  accordingly,  the  Union  industry  was 
unlikely  to  suffer  serious  harm  if  imports  increased  by  slightly  more  than  4%.  This 
assumption of buoyant demand and growing consumption was based on a claim by users 
that EUROFER thought unrealistic at the time. Unfortunately for the sector, users’ claims 
were unfounded and the market has not grown at all as EUROFER had expected since the 
beginning of 2019: 
EU 
Real 
Steel 
Q3 2019 
Q4 2019 
Q1 2020 
Q2 2020 
Consumption 
(% 
year–on–year) 
January 20203
 
–1.6% 
–2.5% 
–2.2% 
–0.7% 
▪  Only once the quota is exceeded, a 25% tariff applies to other imported products, with major 
traditional steel importers retaining their own country-specific quotas.  
▪  All other countries are assigned to a product-specific, ‘residual quota’ pool. In contrast to 
the country specific quotas, this residual quota is divided into quarters.  
▪  Developing countries that have less than 3% import share are excluded from the measures 
while their volumes are counted in the average 2015-17 quota levels and are available to the 
included countries and thus artificially increase the quota even further). 
Imports  of  stainless-steel  flat  products  from  Indonesia  were  originally  exempted  from 
measures as Indonesia is considered a “developing country”, and imports were below the 
3%  threshold.  This  however  changed  quickly.  At  the  time  the  Commission’s  definitive 
regulation was published, Indonesia had already largely exceeded by far the 3% threshold 
(28.5% for SSHR and 9% for SSCR). In the future, the same situation might occur with other 
countries which have declared themselves as “developing”. 
▪  When a quarterly quota is under-utilised, the volume is rolled over into the next quarter to 
avoid shortages. Hence, in the context of stagnating demand, historical volumes can be 
 
3  
EUROFER Economic and Steel Market Outlook 2020-2021, January 2020, 
http://www.eurofer.org/Issues%26Positions/Economic%20Development%20%26%20Steel%20Market/REPORT%20-
%20Economic%20and%20Steel%20Market%20Outlook%20-%20Quarter%201,%202020.pdf  
  
 
10 




  
easily shifted and used by importers as soon as EU demand resumes, thus gaining further 
market shares. 
Despite  the  presence  of  the  EU  steel  safeguard  measures,  multiple  market  disruptions  and 
production cuts have occurred in 2019 in European facilities, as indicated below:  
▪  EU crude steel production in 2019 decreased by 9.8 million tonnes compared to 2018 ( -6% 
y-o-y).  From  January  to  June  2019  the  decrease  was  -2.8  million  tonnes  (averaging  -465 
thousand  tonnes/month,  -3%  y-o-y).  From  July  to  December  the  decrease  was  -7  million 
tonnes (averaging -1.2 million tonnes per month, -9% y-o-y). 
 
Source: EUROFER 
 
▪  Steel production cuts have occurred throughout the EU market in 2019:  
 Source: EUROFER 
5.  Increased protectionism worldwide 
Third countries’ trade restrictions have increased since the imposition of the EU definitive 
safeguard  measures,  increasing  the  risk  of  trade  diversion  to  the  weakened  European 
market:  
▪  Threats of the U.S. President to double again the 25% tariff on Turkish steel imports 
illustrates  the  extreme  volatility  in  the  implementation  of  the  Section  232  policy  on 
 
11 


 
steel  –  and  the  unpredictability  of  U.S.  trade  policy  (which  is  itself  a  source  of 
deflection). 
▪  Following  Mexico’s  exclusion  from  the  U.S.  import  tariff,  the  U.S.  DOC  has  now 
initiated  a  new  U.S.  anti–dumping  investigation  on  certain  rebar  to  address 
circumvention of existing duties on general rebar. 
▪  In October 2019, the Gulf Cooperation Council initiated a steel safeguard investigation 
covering flat and long carbon steel. 
▪  Mexico extended in September 2019 its temporary import tariff of 15% to last through 
2024. 
▪  Turkey increased certain steel import tariffs from 10% to 30% (April 2019). 
▪  Malaysia  imposed  anti–dumping  duties  on  coated  sheet  from  China  and  Vietnam 
(March 2019). 
▪  Morocco launched a steel safeguard (May 2019). 
▪  India imposed provisional anti–dumping duties on imports of coated flat steel from 
China, South Korea and Vietnam (July 2019). 
▪  Vietnam initiated an anti–dumping investigation on cold–rolled coil imports from China 
(September 2019). 
▪  Indonesia  initiated  an  anti–dumping  investigation  on  imports  of  coated  sheet  from 
China  and  Vietnam  (August  2019)  and  an  anti–dumping  investigation  on  imports  of 
stainless steel cold–rolled flat products from China and Malaysia (October 2019). 
▪  Egypt imposed safeguard tariffs on rebar and wire rod (Oct 2019). 
▪  China imposed anti–dumping duties on imports of stainless steel hot–rolled sheets and 
strips from the EU, Japan, South Korea and Indonesia (July 2019). 
▪  Malaysia imposed definitive antidumping duties on rebars from Singapore and Turkey 
(January 2020). 
▪  Malaysia  imposed  definitive  antidumping  duties  on  cold-rolled  nonalloy  steel  from 
China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam (December 2019).   
▪ 
India initiated a countervailing duty investigation on flat products of stainless steel 
from Indonesia (October 2019). 
▪ 
Thailand  initiated  an  antidumping  investigation  on  HDG  cold-rolled  painted  steel 
(October 2019).  
▪ 
Vietnam imposed definitive antidumping duties on pre-painted steel sheets and strips 
from China and Korea (October 2019). 
▪ 
Canada initiated an anti–dumping investigation on imports of corrosion–resistant flat 
products from Turkey, the United Arab Emirates, and Vietnam (November 2019). 
Moreover,  U.S. steel imports took a nosedive after June 2019. From June 2019 to January 2020, 
imports were 3.0 million tonnes lower than the same period in the previous year, and 6.3 million 
tonnes  lower  than  the  same  period  before  the  imposition  of  the  Section  232  import  tariff.  This 
material  has  to  go  somewhere  –  but  it  is  increasingly  blocked  from  third  countries  by  TDIs. 
Increased exports to the EU are therefore likely. This is a worsening of the situation since the period 
considered in the First Review. 
 
12 



  
 
Source: US International Trade Commission 
6.  Abatement potential and fuel and electricity substitutability  
The last two parameters of the RAG assessment are the abatement potential and the fuel electricity 
substitutability. Due to the high relevance of energy costs, steel production is very energy efficient 
and very close to thermodynamic limits. Hence, it has very limited abatement potential.  
With  regard  to  the  fuel-electricity  substitutability,  the  consultants’  study  (page  77)  states:  “To 
determine the overall RAG rating, we consider first if there is variability between undertakings on fuel 
used for production. If there is no variability, then there is no risk on this criterion. If variability exists, 
the risk on the fuel and electricity substitutability criteria only exists if the sector is included on the 
Carbon Leakage List for Phase IV, i.e. the sector receives compensation for its direct emissions. If the 
RAG score is Red for the fuel and electricity substitutability, then the overall RAG rating performed on 
the  previous  three  criteria  will  be  increased  to  a  higher  score  reflecting  a  higher  risk  of  carbon 
leakage”. 
On this point, table 7 (page 76) of the consultants’ study does not seem fully consistent 
as it attributes a green category to a sector with high substitutability in case compensation was 
granted in the past. In this way, a sector like steel has its RAG assessment downgraded at a lower 
risk. Yet, since this is a forward-looking assessment, it should consider the situation where a sector 
with high substitutability would not receive compensation in the future, in which case its overall 
RAG rating should be increased.  
In the case of steel, the substitutability between fuel and electricity can manifest in different forms, 
notably: 
•  Firstly, within the electric arc furnace (EAF), where fuel-electricity substitutability has been 
recognised  in  the  scope  of  the  carbon  and  high  alloy  steel  ETS  benchmarks.  Insufficient 
compensation  of  indirect  costs  would  risk  increasing  fuel  consumption,  hence  direct 
emissions. 
•  Secondly, between the EAF route and the integrated route, in particular if the international 
dimension is taken into account. Insufficient compensation of indirect costs would undermine 
the competitiveness of EU EAF producers against integrated route producers in third countries 
that still produce long products that in the EU are largely manufactured  in EAF. That would 
cause increase of total emissions at global level.  
 
13