Esta es la versión HTML de un fichero adjunto a una solicitud de acceso a la información 'Request for meeting information'.









Ref. Ares(2020)3607717 - 08/07/2020
Ref. Ares(2020)4264192 - 14/08/2020
 
 
 
 
 
 
March 2020 
Draft ETS State Aid Guidelines  
This document represents the input of the sectors deemed eligible for compensation under the draft ETS 
State Aid Guidelines. The EU ETS Guidelines are an essential element of the legal framework that aims at 
preventing the risk of carbon and investment leakage. In line with the spirit and wording of the EU ETS 
Directive, both free allocation and indirect costs compensation should ensure that the best performers do 
not face undue direct and indirect carbon costs. With EU ETS prices higher than in Phase III and expected 
to further rise in Phase IV, the impact of electricity prices (“indirect ETS costs”) will increase substantially 
as electricity producers pass the carbon price on via the electricity price. Thus, it is essential that the new 
ETS Guidelines provide an adequate carbon leakage protection against rising indirect carbon costs Phase 
IV.  In this paper, we comment on the following areas of the draft ETS Guidelines; 1) conditionality, 2) level 
of Aid, 3) regional pass-through factors and 4) benchmarks. 

1.  Conditionality  
Given our energy-intensive nature and the fact that we face global competition, the sectors eligible for 
compensation  have  the  strongest  incentive  to  be  as  energy  efficient  as  possible.  Thus,  compensation 
should  not  be  made  conditional  on  additional  requirements.  Since  the  eligible  sectors  are  already 
acknowledged as being at a risk of carbon leakage, these additional conditionality conditions only serve 
to increase the risk of carbon and investment leakage. 
In fact, compensation for the indirect costs of the EU ETS aims at reimbursing partially electro-intensive 
consumers for the indirect carbon costs passed on in their bill. If compensation is made conditional on 
additional measures to be taken by a company such as investments in energy efficiency and emissions 
reduction  or  a  carbon  free  power  purchase  agreement,  de  facto  it  no  longer  represents  a  (partial) 
reimbursement of incurred costs since it requires additional expenditure to the company.  
Elsewhere, it should be noted that compensation of indirect costs does not distort incentives for energy 
efficiency investments because it is still based on very strict benchmarks reflecting the best performance 
in the sector. Furthermore, the “incentive effect” is also preserved by the fact that the benchmarks will 
be  updated  during  the  phase  4,  so  that  companies  have  further  interest  to  constantly  improve  their 
performance. (Such 
mid-term 
update 
was 
not 
applied 
in 
phase 
3).  
 
Furthermore, the proposed conditionality requirements  are actually linked to the  implementation and 
enforcement of other pieces  of legislation (notably the  Energy Efficiency Directive and the Renewable 
Energy Directive).  However,  Member  States  retain  the  possibility of  adopting different  instruments  to 
promote  energy  efficiency  and  renewables  in  order  to  achieve  the  targets  set  in  such  legislation. 
Therefore,  the  conditionality  requirements  would  overlap  and  possibly  collide  with  different  national 
measures.  

 





 
With regards, the three proposed conditionality requirements outlined in paragraph 54 we wish to share 
the following input;  
a)  The energy efficiency investments with a payback period of 5 years do not reflect the reality of 
business decisions in our sectors, which are bound to a significantly shorter period. Furthermore, 
the  draft  text  does  not  take  into  account  early  actions  such  as  recent  energy  efficiency 
investments.  
b)  The requirement to install an onsite renewable energy generation facility covering at least 50% of 
the electricity needs does not match with the very large energy consumption of industrial sites 
and the physical limits of such on-site generation.  Considering the land requirements and also 
the  regulatory  restrictions  to  the  installment  of  wind  turbines,  for  some  eligible  sectors,  this 
conditionality requirement is not technically nor financially feasible, hence it cannot be achieved 
realistically.  
c)  The requirement to invest at least 80% of the received state aid into investments to reduce direct 
emissions of the installation is not consistent with the scope of the Guidelines which are targeting 
indirect costs.  
 
2.  Level of Aid  
As a principle aid intensity should be set at 100% of the benchmark for the best performers in order to be 
in line with the spirit and wording of the ETS Directive. A level of aid less than 100% undermines the spirit 
of  the  ETS  Directive  and  the  effectiveness  of  the  carbon  leakage  provisions  as  there  remains  no 
comparable climate legislation in regions beyond the EU. Moreover, the risk of carbon and investment 
leakage is even greater today, given that we are seeing more higher EU EUA prices compared to what we 
have experience up until 2017.  
Paragraph 26 of the draft Guidelines say that at the sectoral level, the level of compensation would be 
75%  until  2030.  While  aid  should  rather  be  set  at  100%  for  best  performers,  a  system  of  75% 
compensation, provided a GVA limitation is included, is an important step to ensure better protection.  
Degressive aid serves no function and instead, the best way to capture improvements in an installation’s 
performance is to update the benchmark values. Indeed, the Commission explanatory note says that it 
considers that this update of the efficiency benchmarks is better suited to capture any potential efficiency 
gains  in  the  sectors  concerned  than  a  per-se  reduction  of  the  aid  intensity”.  
We  agree  with  the 
Commission’s assessment that aid intensity should be stable throughout the ETS period with a mid-term 
update of the electricity consumption efficiency benchmarks to consider most recent data and production 
processes.  
In addition, paragraph 30 in the draft Guidelines introduce the possibility for Member States to further 
limit the exposure of beneficiaries to indirect costs as a function of their gross value added (“GVA”). This 
possibility is aimed at limiting the exposure of the most electro-intensive companies for whom indirect 
carbon costs, after applying 75% compensation, can make up a disproportionate amount of their GVA. 
The GVA limitation should be capped at 0.5% of GVA. In addition, the possibility should be open to all 
undertakings in the list of eligible sectors provided they reach the agreed threshold.  

 





 
3.  Regional pass through factors & geographical regions  
Paragraph 10 plus Annex III define the maximum regional CO2 emission passthrough factors (tCO2/MWh) 
per geographical area. The draft Guidelines include the proposed geographical areas and a methodology 
for calculating the passthrough factors. The actual applicable factors for each region will be established at 
a later stage. 
The main purpose of the CO2 emission passthrough factor in the Guidelines is to identify the impact of 
CO2  emission  costs  (EUA allowances  price)  on  power  prices  in each market.    The  draft  Guidelines  are 
correctly based on market principles where the emission passthrough factor is delinked from the total 
electricity generation’s greenhouse gas footprint and decided by the marginal price setter  in each  given 
market.  
However, the emission pass through factors and geographical areas are intrinsically interlinked and both 
need to be accurate. The proposal of splitting existing regions in more areas does not provide details on 
the  underlying  evidence  and  contradicts  the  political  objective  of  linking  more  the  national  energy 
markets. Furthermore, the overly strict methodology for defining regional areas (1% price divergence in 
significant number of hours per year) does not capture the reality in certain energy markets where the 
emission pass through is influenced by the emissions pass through neighbouring member states due to 
interconnections.  
For instance, the Nordic countries have been interconnected with a common price setting mechanisms 
the last 20-30 years, and there is sufficient information available to re-establish a single factor for this 
‘Nordic’  region  encompassing  Norway,  Sweden,  Finland  and  Denmark.  Elsewhere,  the  Central  West 
Europe  (CWE)  region  encompassing  France,  Germany,  Belgium,  Netherlands,  Austria  and  Luxembourg 
have also registered a growing convergence over the years and should be re-established as a geographical 
region.   
4.  Benchmarks  
Benchmarks are the best instrument to incentivise energy efficiency and emissions reduction. We support 
that the benchmarks be updated in 2025 to take into account technological developments in the sector 
(as mentioned above, this update as well as the stringency of the benchmarks makes the conditionality 
unnecessary). 
We believe that benchmarks should be based on actual data of the 10% best performers (instead of single 
lowest  installation)  so  that  they  reflect  economic  and  technical  feasibility  within  the  relevant  sector. 
Where appropriate, benchmarks should take into account also relevant energy carriers such as industrial 
gases.  
We support the continuation of current definitions at Prodcom 8 level. We would recommend that the 
European  Commission,  working  in  tandem  with  a  consultancy  company,  collect  electricity  data  at 
Prodcom 8 level with the involvement of respective commodity associations which request them. This 
would be a similar exercise to the process run in 2011/2012.  

 





 
With regards the fallback benchmarks, the 80% value should not be reduced further. Indeed, it should be 
noted that even with this level of aid, installations in the fall back benchmark category will only receive 
60% of the incurred costs (75% of 80% = 60%).