Esta es la versión HTML de un fichero adjunto a una solicitud de acceso a la información 'Reports on Passenger Name Record Directive'.


 
  
 
 
 

Council of the 
 
 

 European Union 
   
 
Brussels, 28 July 2020 
(OR. en) 
    9954/20 
 
 
 
 
 
 
IXIM 77 

JAI 619 
 
 
ENFOPOL 187 
AVIATION 148 
CT 60 
 
COVER NOTE 
From: 
Secretary-General of the European Commission, 
signed by Mr Jordi AYET PUIGARNAU, Director 
date of receipt: 
24 July 2020 
To: 
Mr Jeppe TRANHOLM-MIKKELSEN, Secretary-General of the Council of 
the European Union 
No. Cion doc.: 
COM(2020) 305 final 
Subject: 
REPORT FROM THE COMMISSION TO THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT 
AND THE COUNCIL On the review of Directive 2016/681 on the use of 
passenger name record (PNR) data for the prevention, detection, 
investigation and prosecution of terrorist offences and serious crime 
 
 
Delegations will find attached document COM(2020) 305 final. 
 
Encl.: COM(2020) 305 final 
 
9954/20  
 
GB/mr 
 
 
JAI.1 
 
EN 
 


  
 
EUROPEAN 
  COMMISSION 
 
Brussels, 24.7.2020  
COM(2020) 305 final 
 
REPORT FROM THE COMMISSION TO THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND 
THE COUNCIL 
On the review of Directive 2016/681 on the use of passenger name record (PNR) data for 
the prevention, detection, investigation and prosecution of terrorist offences and serious 
crime 
 
{SWD(2020) 128 final} 
 
EN 
 
  EN 

 
REPORT FROM THE COMMISSION TO THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND 
THE COUNCIL 
On the review of Directive 2016/681 on the use of passenger name record (PNR) data 
for the prevention, detection, investigation and prosecution of terrorist offences and 
serious crime 
 
1.  THE REVIEW  SCOPE AND PROCESS 
Directive  2016/681  on  the  use  of  passenger  name  record  (PNR)  data  for  the  prevention, 
detection,  investigation  and  prosecution  of  terrorist  offences  and  serious  crime  (henceforth 
‘the PNR Directive’)1 was adopted by the European Parliament and the Council on 27 April 
2016.  The  Directive  regulates  the  collection,  processing  and  retention  of  PNR  data  in  the 
European Union and lays down important safeguards for the protection of fundamental rights, 
in  particular  the  rights  to  privacy  and  the  protection  of  personal  data.  The  deadline  for  the 
Member States to transpose the Directive into their national law was 25 May 2018.  
This report is in response to the obligation of the Commission under Article 19 of the PNR 
Directive  to  conduct  a  review  by  25  May  2020  of  all  the  elements  of  the  Directive  and  to 
submit  that  report  to  the  European  Parliament  and  the  Council.  The  report  sets  the  PNR 
Directive  in  its  general  context  and  presents  the  Commission’s  findings  in  reviewing  its 
application  two  years  from  the  transposition  deadline.  As  required  by  Article  19  of  the 
Directive, the review covers all the elements of the Directive, with a particular focus on the 
compliance  with  the  applicable  standards  of  protection  of  personal  data,  the  necessity  and 
proportionality of collecting and processing PNR data for each of the purposes set out in the 
Directive,  the  length  of  the  data  retention  period,  the  effectiveness  of  the  exchange  of 
information  between  the  Member  States  and  the  quality  of  the  assessments  including  with 
regard  to  the  statistical  information  gathered  pursuant  to  Article  20.  It  also  draws  a 
preliminary  analysis  of  the  necessity,  proportionality  and  effectiveness  of  extending  the 
mandatory  collection  of  PNR  data  to  intra-EU  flights  and  the  necessity  of  including  non-
carrier economic operators within the scope of the Directive. In addition, the review describes 
                                                           
1  
Directive (EU) 2016/681 of the European Parliament and of the  Council of 27 April 2016 on the  use of 
passenger name record (PNR) data for the prevention, detection, investigation and prosecution of terrorist 
offences and serious crime, OJ L 119, 4.5.2016, p. 132.  

 

 
the main issues and challenges encountered in the implementation and practical application of 
the Directive. 
In  preparing  the  review,  the  Commission  gathered  information  and  feedback  through  a 
variety of sources and targeted consultation activities. These include the deliverables of the 
compliance assessment of the PNR Directive, based on the analysis of national transposition 
measures; discussions with the national authorities responsible for the implementation of the 
Directive  and  with  the  travel  industry  within  the  framework  of  regular  meetings  and 
dedicated workshops; statistical data submitted by the Member States pursuant to Article 20 
of the Directive; and field visits to six Member States.2 In order to illustrate how PNR data 
are used in practice to combat terrorism and serious crime, where possible, the report refers to 
real life examples provided by national authorities drawing on their operational experience. 
The  accompanying  Staff  Working  Document  provides  more  detailed  information  and  a 
comprehensive analysis of all the matters covered by this report. 
2.  GENERAL CONTEXT  
In recent years, an increasing number of countries – not limited to the Member States – and 
international organisations have recognised the value of using PNR data as a law enforcement 
tool. The establishment of a PNR mechanism and the implementation of the PNR Directive 
should be seen against the background of this broader international trend.  
The  use  of  PNR  data  has  been  an  important  element  of  the  EU’s  international  cooperation 
against terrorism and serious crime for almost twenty years. The 2010 Communication on the 
global  approach  established  a  set  of  general  criteria  which  were  to  be  fulfilled  by  future 
bilateral PNR agreements, including, in particular, a number of data protection principles and 
safeguards.3  These  formed  the  basis  of  the  renegotiations  of  the  PNR  agreements  with 
Australia,  Canada  and  the  U.S.,  leading  to  the  conclusion  of  new  PNR  agreements  with 
Australia4 and the U.S.5  
                                                           
2  
Belgium, Bulgaria, France, Germany, Latvia and the Netherlands.  
3  
COM(2010) 492 final of 21 September 2010.  
4  
Agreement between the European Union and Australia on the processing and transfer of Passenger Name 
Record  (PNR)  data  by  air  carriers  to  the  Australian  Customs  and  Border  Protection  Service,  OJ  L  186, 
14.7.2012, p. 4. The joint review and evaluation of this agreement are currently ongoing. 

 

 
Further to a request by the European Parliament, on 26 July 2017 the Court of Justice of the 
EU  issued  an  Opinion  declaring  that  the  envisaged  agreement  with  Canada  could  not  be 
concluded in its intended form because some of its provisions did not meet the requirements 
stemming from the Charter of Fundamental Rights.6 To address the Court’s concerns, the EU 
and  Canada  proceeded  to  renegotiate  the  agreement.  These  negotiations  concluded  at  the 
technical  level  in  March  2019  and  the  finalisation  of  the  agreement  is  currently  pending 
Canada’s  legal  review  and  political  endorsement  of  the  text.7  In  addition,  on  18  February 
2020  the  Council  authorised  the  Commission  to  open  negotiations  with  Japan  for  the 
conclusion  of  an  agreement  on  the  transfer  of  PNR  data.8  The  negotiations  with  Mexico, 
launched in July 2015, are currently at a standstill.  
At  EU  level,  the  adoption  of  the  PNR  Directive  in  April  2016  constituted  an  important 
milestone  in  the  internal  policy  on  PNR.  As  indicated  above,  the  Directive  lays  down  a 
harmonised  framework  for  the  processing  of  PNR  data  transferred  by  air  carriers  to  the 
Member  States.  The  Commission  has  supported  the  Member  States  in  implementing  the 
Directive  by  coordinating  regular  meetings,  facilitating  the  exchange  of  best  practices  and 
peer-to-peer  support,  and  providing  financial  assistance.  In  particular,  the  Budgetary 
Authority reinforced the 2017 Union budget  with EUR 70 million  for the  Internal  Security 
Fund-Police  (ISF-Police),  specifically  for  PNR-related  actions.9  The  Commission  has  also 
funded four PNR-related projects under the Union Actions of the ISF-Police. These projects 
aimed  to  ensure  that  Passenger  Information  Units  of  the  Member  States  developed  the 
capabilities  needed  to  exchange  PNR  data  or  the  results  of  processing  such  data  with  each 
other and with Europol.  
In 2016, the EU also modernised its legislation on the protection of personal data through the 
adoption of Regulation (EU) 2016/679 (the General Data Protection Regulation or GDPR)10 
                                                                                                                                                                                     
5  
Agreement  between  the  United  States  of  America  and  the  European  Union  on  the  use  and  transfer  of 
passenger name records to the United States Department of Homeland Security, OJ L 215, 11.8.2012, p. 5. 
The joint evaluation of this agreement is currently ongoing. 
6  
Opinion 1/15 of the Court (Grand Chamber), ECLI:EU:C:2017:592. 
7  
EU-Canada Summit joint declaration, Montreal 17-18 July 2019.  
8  
Council  Decision  authorising  the  opening  of  negotiations  with  Japan  for  an  agreement  between  the 
European Union and Japan on the transfer and use of Passenger Name Record (PNR) data to prevent and 
combat terrorism and serious transnational crime, Council document 5378/20.  
9  
This  financial  assistance  has  been  distributed  among  the  Member  States  according  to  the  ISF-Police 
standard distribution key – i.e. 30% in relation to population, 10% in relation to territory, 15% in relation 
to number of sea and air passengers, 10% tons of cargo (air and sea), 35% as inverse proportion to GDP. 
10   Regulation  (EU)  2016/679  of  the  European  Parliament  and  of  the  Council  of  27  April  2016  on  the 
protection of natural persons with regard to the processing of personal data and on the free movement of 
 

 

 
and Directive (EU) 2016/680 (the Directive on data protection in the law enforcement sector, 
also known as the Law Enforcement Directive).11 On 24 June 2020, the Commission adopted 
a  Communication  on  aligning  the  former  third  pillar  instruments  with  the  data  protection 
rules12 and published the results of the first review and evaluation of the GDPR.13 
In  the  context  of  this  review,  it  should  be  noted  that  the  Belgian  Constitutional  Court  has 
made  a  reference  for  a  preliminary  ruling  to  the  Court  of  Justice  on  the  Directive’s 
compliance  with  the  Charter  of  Fundamental  Rights  and  the  Treaty.14  More  recently,  the 
Cologne  District  Court  also  made  a  request  for  a  preliminary  ruling  relating  to  the  PNR 
Directive.15 The Commission has submitted observations in the first of these proceedings and 
will do the same in the second in due course.  
At  the  global  level,  in  December  2017  the  United  Nations  adopted  Security  Council 
Resolution  2396  requiring  all  UN  States  to  develop  the  capability  to  collect,  process  and 
analyse PNR data and to ensure PNR data are used by and shared with  all their competent 
national  authorities.16 To support States in  developing such capabilities, in March 2019 the 
International  Civil  Aviation  Organisation  (ICAO)  launched  the  process  to  draft  new  PNR 
standards. These standards, which will be binding on all ICAO member countries unless they 
file a difference, were adopted by the ICAO Council on 23 June 2020. The Commission has 
actively  engaged  in  this  process,  as  an  observer  representing  the  EU,  to  ensure  the 
compatibility of these standards with the EU legal requirements, so that they can contribute to 
facilitate transfers of PNR data. 
3.  MAIN FINDINGS  
The main findings of the review process can be summarised as follows:  
                                                                                                                                                                                     
such  data,  and  repealing  Directive  95/46/EC  (General  Data  Protection  Regulation)  (Text  with  EEA 
relevance), OJ L 119, 4.5.2016, p. 1.  
11 
Directive (EU) 2016/680 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 27 April 2016 on the protection 
of natural persons with regard to the processing of personal data by competent authorities for the purposes 
of the prevention, investigation, detection or prosecution of criminal offences or the execution of criminal 
penalties,  and  on  the  free  movement  of  such  data,  and  repealing  Council  Framework  Decision 
2008/977/JHA, OJ L 119, 4.5.2016, p. 89.  
12   COM (2020) 262 final of 24 June 2020.  
13   COM(2020) 264 final of 24 June 2020.  
14 
Request for a preliminary ruling in Case C-817/19 Ligue des droits humains, OJ C 36, 3.2.2020, p. 16–17 
(pending). 
15 
Request for a preliminary ruling in joined Cases C-148/20, C-149/20 and C-150/20 Deutsche Lufthansa
not yet published (pending). 
16   Resolution 2396 (2017) - Adopted by the Security Council at its 8148th meeting, on 21 December 2017.  

 

 
3.1. 
Establishment of an EU wide PNR system  
The Commission  welcomes the efforts  made by  national  authorities to  implement  the PNR 
Directive.  At  the  end  of  the  review  period,  24  out  of  26  Member  States  had  notified  the 
Directive’s  full  transposition  to  the  Commission.  Of  the  two  remaining  Member  States, 
Slovenia has notified partial transposition and Spain, which has not notified any transposition 
measures,  was  referred  to  the  Court  of Justice  on  2 July  2020  for  failure  to  implement  the 
Directive.  The  vast  majority  of  Member  States  established  fully  operational  Passenger 
Information  Units, which are the designated units responsible for collecting and processing 
PNR  data.  These  Passenger  Information  Units  developed  good  levels  of  cooperation  with 
other  relevant  national  authorities  and  the  Passenger  Information  Units  of  other  Member 
States. All the Member States designated their competent authorities entitled to request and 
receive PNR data from their Passenger Information Unit only for the purposes of preventing, 
detecting,  investigating  and  prosecuting  terrorist  offences  and  serious  crime,  such  as  the 
police and other authorities responsible for fighting against crime. 
3.2. 
Compliance with data protection standards in the Directive 
The analysis of national transposition measures points to an overall compliance with the data 
protection requirements of the PNR Directive, even though some Member States have failed 
to  fully  mirror  all  of  them  in  their  national  laws.17  In  addition,  the  overview  of  their 
application confirms the commitment of national authorities to respect these safeguards and 
to implement them in practice. The Commission will continue to encourage the dissemination 
of  best  practices  developed  in  this  regard  through  its  regular  meetings  with  the  Member 
States  and  the  projects  financed  under  the  ISF-P  Union  actions.  At  the  same  time,  the 
Commission  will  not  hesitate  to  use  its  powers  as  guardian  of  the  treaties,  including  by 
launching  infringement  procedures if necessary,  to  ensure that Member  States fully respect 
the requirements set out in the Directive, in particular on the protection of personal data. 
The  data  protection  safeguards  contained  in  the  Directive,  where  implemented  correctly, 
which is the case in the majority of Member States, guarantee the proportionality of PNR data 
                                                           
17   A comprehensive assessment of the completeness and conformity of the national transposing measures and 
their  practical  implementation  has  been  carried  out  in  the  framework  of  the  compliance  assessment, 
conducted  by  an  external  contractor,  under  the  supervision  of  the  Commission.  With  regard  to  the  23 
Member States which had notified full transposition by 10 June 2019, the assessment has been completed. 
With  regard  to  three  Member  States  which  notified  after  this  date,  only  the  initial  assessment  has  been 
concluded. 

 

 
processing and aim to prevent abuse on the part of national authorities or other actors. The 
purpose  limitation  ensures  that  data  processing  is  only  carried  out  for  the  objectives  of 
fighting  terrorism  and  serious  crime.  The  prohibition  of  the  collection  and  processing  of 
sensitive data constitutes an important safeguard to make sure that PNR will not be used in a 
discriminatory  manner.  The  fact  that  Member  States  maintain  records  of  processing 
operations,  as  required  by  the  Directive,  enhances  transparency  and  allows  to  control  the 
lawfulness  of  data  processing  in  an  effective  manner.  Data  Protection  Officers  can 
independently  control  the  lawfulness  of  data  processing,  in  particular  when  they  are  not 
members of the staff of the Passenger Information Unit and are not subordinated to the Head 
of the Passenger  Information Unit.  In  addition,  their presence in  the Passenger  Information 
Unit ensures that a data protection perspective is embedded in the daily functioning of these 
units.  
On a practical level, the interaction between the Passenger Information Units and their Data 
Protection Officers appears to be working well and the role of the Data Protection Officer is 
seen as adding value to the operations of the Passenger Information Unit. The Data Protection 
Officers  play  a  particularly  important  role  in  monitoring  data  processing  operations, 
approving  and  reviewing  pre-determined  criteria  and  providing  advice  on  data  protection 
matters  to  the  staff  of  the  Passenger  Information  Unit.  In  most  Member  States,  the  Data 
Protection  Officers  have  been  designated  by  law  as  the  contact  point  for  data  subjects  and 
contacting them is also facilitated in practice. 
3.3. 
Other elements of the review 
The necessity and proportionality of collecting and processing PNR data 
The review shows several elements confirming the necessity and proportionality of collecting 
and processing PNR data for the purposes of the PNR Directive. In the limited time since the 
transposition  deadline,  PNR  has  proven  to  be  effective  in  achieving  its  aims,  which 
correspond to an objective of general interest, i.e. to protect public security by ensuring the 
prevention,  detection,  investigation  and  prosecution  of  serious  crime  and  terrorism  in  the 
Union’s area without internal borders.  
According to the Member States, the different means of processing of PNR data available to 
them (i.e. real time, reactive and proactive) have already delivered tangible results in the fight 
against  terrorism  and  crime.  Without  claiming  to  be  exhaustive,  Member  States  have 

 

 
provided the Commission with qualitative evidence18 that illustrates how the comparison of 
PNR data against databases and pre-determined criteria has contributed to the identification 
of  potential  terrorists  or  persons  involved  in  other  serious  criminal  activities,  such  as  drug 
trafficking,  cybercrime,  human  trafficking,  child  sexual  abuse,  child  abduction  and 
participation  in  organised  criminal  groups.  In  some  instances,  the  use  of  PNR  data  has 
resulted in the arrest of persons previously unknown to the police services, or allowed for the 
further  examination  by  the  competent  authorities  of  passengers  who  would  not  have  been 
checked otherwise. The assessment of passengers prior to their departure or arrival has also 
helped  to  prevent  crimes  from  being  committed.  National  authorities  highlight  that  these 
results  could  not  have  been  achieved  without  the  processing  of  PNR  data,  e.g.  by  using 
exclusively other tools such as Advance Passenger Information.  
Under  the  PNR  Directive,  the  processing  of  PNR  data  concerns  all  passengers  on  inbound 
and  outbound  extra-EU  flights.  The  assessment  shows  that  such  broad  coverage  is  strictly 
necessary  to  achieve  the  Directive’s  intended  objectives.  As  to  the  data  collected,  the 
categories  in  Annex  I  reflect  internationally  agreed  standards,  in  particular  at  the  level  of 
ICAO. National authorities have confirmed that the possibility to collect  such categories of 
PNR data corresponds to what is strictly necessary to achieve the objectives pursued. 
Concerning  the  level  of  interference  with  the  fundamental  rights  to  privacy  and  to  the 
protection of personal data, the following considerations are relevant. Importantly, the PNR 
Directive  strictly  prohibits  the  processing  of  sensitive  data.  While  PNR  data  may  reveal 
specific information on a person’s private life, such information is limited to a specific aspect 
of private life, namely, air travel. In addition, the PNR Directive contains strict safeguards to 
further  limit  the  degree  of  interference  to  the  absolute  minimum  and  ensure  the 
proportionality  of  the  methods  of  processing  available  to  national  authorities,  including  as 
regards the performance of automated processing.  As a  result of these safeguards,  only the 
personal data of a very limited number of passengers are transferred to competent authorities 
for further processing. This means that PNR systems deliver targeted results which limit the 
degree of interference with the rights to privacy and the protection of personal data. Finally, 
PNR data are not used to establish an individual profile of everyone, but to establish risk and 
anonymous scenarios or ‘abstract profiles’.  
                                                           
18   Some of the examples can be found in Sections 5.1 and 5.2 of the Staff Working Document. 

 

 
The length of the data retention period 
The retention of PNR data of all passengers for a period of five years is necessary to achieve 
the objectives of ensuring security and protecting the life and safety of persons by preventing, 
detecting, investigating and prosecuting terrorist offences and serious crime. 
Firstly, the need to retain data for five years stems from the nature of PNR as an analytical 
tool  aimed  not  only  at  identifying  known  threats  but  also  at  uncovering  unknown  risks. 
Travel arrangements recorded as PNR data are used to identify specific behavioural patterns 
and make associations between known and unknown persons. By definition, the identification 
of such patterns and associations calls for the possibility of a long-term analysis. Indeed, such 
an analysis requires that a sufficient pool of data are available to the Passenger Information 
Unit  for  such  a  relatively  long  period.  Such  data  can  then  be  transferred  to  the  competent 
authorities only in response to ‘duly reasoned’ requests, on a case-by-case basis, within the 
framework of criminal investigations.  
Secondly,  the  retention  of  PNR  data  for  five  years  is  needed  to  ensure  the  effective 
investigation  and  prosecution  of  terrorist  offences  and  serious  crime.  Investigating  and 
prosecuting  such  offences  usually  involves  months  and,  often,  years  of  work.  In  this  vein, 
Member  States  have  confirmed  that  the  five-year  retention  period  is  necessary  from  an 
operational point of view. The availability of historical data ensures that, when an individual 
is accused of having committed a serious crime or being involved in terrorist activities, it is 
possible  to  review  the  travel  history  and  see  who  travelled  with  him  or  her,  identifying 
potential accomplices or other members of a criminal group, as well as potential victims.  
In  addition,  the  safeguards  provided  in  the  PNR  Directive  concerning  access  by  the 
competent authorities to the data stored by the Passenger Information Unit and in relation to 
the depersonalisation and re-personalisation of data have shown to be sufficiently robust to 
prevent abuses. 
The Court of Justice examined the time limits for the retention of PNR data in its Opinion 
1/15 on the envisaged EU-Canada PNR agreement and, to address the Court’s concerns, the 
Commission negotiated a new draft agreement with Canada. In this respect, it is important to 
note that the Commission considers the factual and legal circumstances of the PNR Directive 
are different from the ones considered by the Court of Justice in that case. In particular, the 
PNR  Directive  clearly  seeks  the  objective  of  ensuring  security  in  the  Union  and  its  area 

 

 
without internal borders, where the Member States share responsibility for public security. In 
addition,  unlike  the  draft  agreement  with  Canada,  the  Directive  does  not  concern  data 
transfers to a third country, but the collection of passenger data on flights to and from the EU 
by  the  Member  States.  In  this  respect,  the  nature  of  the  PNR  Directive  as  secondary  law 
means that it is applied under the control of the national courts of the Member States and, in 
the final instance, of the Court of Justice. Furthermore, national laws implementing the Law 
Enforcement  Directive  also  apply  to  the  processing  of  data  provided  for  in  the  PNR 
Directive, including any subsequent processing by competent authorities.  
The effectiveness of exchange of information between the Member States 
The cooperation and exchange of PNR data between the Passenger Information Units is one 
of  the  most  important  elements  of  the  Directive.  While  the  exchange  of  data  between  the 
Member  States  based  on  duly-reasoned  requests  functions  effectively,  the  possibility  to 
transfer PNR data on the Passenger Information Unit’s own initiative is much less prevalent. 
The information provided by the Member States suggests that law enforcement authorities are 
more willing to  use cooperation procedures based on clear and precise regulations, such as 
those  concerning  transfers  in  response  to  a  request.  In  contrast,  the  broad  and  relatively 
unclear formulation of the Directive’s provision on spontaneous transfers has led to a certain 
reticence in its application.  
The quality of the assessments including with regard to the statistical information gathered 
pursuant to Article 20 
Article 20 of the PNR Directive requires Member States to collect, as a minimum, statistical 
information  on  the  total  number  of  passengers  whose  PNR  data  have  been  collected  and 
exchanged, and the number of passengers identified for further examination. The analysis of 
this  information  shows  that  only  the  data  of  a  very  small  fraction  of  passengers  are 
transferred  to  competent  authorities  for  further  examination.  Thus,  the  statistics  available 
indicate that, overall, PNR systems are working in line with the objective of identifying high 
risk passengers without impinging on bona fide travel flows.  
In this respect, it should be noted that the statistics provided to the Commission are not fully 
standardised and therefore not amenable to hard quantitative analysis. In a similar vein, it is 
also necessary to recall that in most investigations PNR data constitutes a tool, or a piece of 
evidence,  among  others,  and  that  it  is  often  not  possible  to  isolate  and  quantify  the  results 

 

 
attributable specifically to the use of PNR alone. In the present analysis, the Commission has 
mitigated  these  difficulties  by  collecting  various  types  of  evidence  to  establish  a  solid 
evidence base for the review. The Commission will also continue working closely with the 
Member  States  to  improve  the  quality  of  the  statistical  information  collected  under  the 
Directive.  
Feedback from the Member States on the possible extension of the obligations and the use 
of data under the PNR Directive  
All Member States except one have extended the collection of PNR data to intra-EU flights. 
National  authorities  see  the  collection  of  PNR  data  for  intra-EU  (and  in  particular  intra-
Schengen)  flights  as  an  important  law  enforcement  tool  to  track  the  movements  of  known 
suspects  and  to  identify  suspicious  travel  patterns  of  unknown  individuals  who  may  be 
involved  in  criminal/terrorist  activities  travelling  within  the  Schengen  zone.  As  Member 
States  already  effectively  collect  PNR  data  on  intra-EU  flights,  the  Commission  does  not 
consider it essential to make the collection of PNR data in intra-EU flights mandatory at this 
stage.  
The  review  has  shown  that,  from  the  operational  point  of  view,  Member  States  would 
consider information from non-carrier economic operators of crucial added value. Given the 
number  of  reservations  made  by  tour  operators  and  travel  agencies,  an  important  share  of 
passengers’  data  are  currently  not  collected  and  processed  by  the  Passenger  Information 
Units, which creates an  important  security  gap.  The Commission  recognises this challenge. 
Nevertheless,  any  possible  extension  of  the  obligation  to  collect  PNR  data  to  non-carrier 
economic operators will require  a thorough assessment  of the legal,  technical  and financial 
impact of such collection, including a fundamental rights’ check, in particular in the light of 
lack of standardisation of data formats. 
The review has also shown that some Member States collect PNR data from other modes of 
transportation,  such  as  maritime,  rail  and  road  carriers,  on  the  basis  of  their  national  law. 
Despite  the  operational  value  of  collecting  such  data,  this  issue  raises  significant  legal, 
practical and operational questions. Before taking any steps to extend the obligation to collect 
PNR data under the Directive, the Commission will conduct a thorough impact assessment, 
as also recommended by the Council in its conclusions of December 2019, on ‘widening the 
10 
 

 
scope  of  passenger  name  records  (PNR)  data  legislation  to  transport  forms  other  than  air 
traffic’.19 
While  the  PNR  Directive  only  allows  the  processing  of  PNR  data  for  the  fight  against 
terrorism and serious crime, several Member States have also pointed out that the use PNR 
data  could  constitute  a  valuable  tool  to  protect  public  health  and  prevent  the  spread  of 
infectious diseases, for example by facilitating contact tracing as regards persons who have 
been sitting near  an infected passenger. This  issue has gained even more prominence since 
the emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic, with more Member States indicating that there is 
a need to allow for the use of PNR data to tackle such health-related emergencies.  
3.4. 
Key operational challenges 
The  Commission  takes  stock  of  the  challenges  reported  by  Member  States  based  on  the 
limited experience gained in the application of the PNR Directive over the first two years of 
application.  In  particular,  additional  measures,  such  as  the  mandatory  collection  of  the 
passengers’ date of birth by air carriers, may be necessary to enhance data quality, which is 
important  to  allow  for  an  even  more  targeted  and  efficient  data  processing.  Data  quality 
improvements, as well as a careful reconsideration of the purposes for which PNR data may 
be used, may also be required to better align the PNR Directive with other EU instruments for 
law  enforcement  cooperation.  Any  changes  to  this  effect  to  the  Directive  will  require  a 
thorough impact assessment, in particular as regards their impact on fundamental rights.  
To  avoid  that  air  carriers  are  faced  with  conflict  of  law  situations  preventing  them  from 
transferring PNR data to and from the Member States, ways to allow the transfer of PNR data 
to  third  countries,  in  compliance  with  EU  law  requirements,  will  need  to  continue  to  be 
addressed in the context of the Commission’s external PNR policy.  
4.  CONCLUSIONS  
The Commission’s assessment of the first two years of application of the Directive is overall 
positive. The main conclusion of the review is that the Directive is contributing positively to 
its  key  objective  of  ensuring  the  establishment  of  effective  PNR  systems  in  the  Member 
States,  as  an  instrument  to  combat  terrorism  and  serious  crime.  The  Commission  has 
supported  Member  States  throughout  the  implementation  process  by  coordinating  regular 
                                                           
19   Council document 14746/19, adopted on 2 December 2019. 
11 
 

 
meetings,  facilitating  cooperation  between  national  authorities  and  providing  financial 
assistance.  At  the  same  time,  the  Commission  has  not  hesitated  in  launching  infringement 
proceedings against Member States which failed to transpose the Directive on time. 
The Commission will continue to work closely with the Member States to ensure that all the 
issues  and  challenges  identified  above  are  duly  addressed  so  that  the  EU  PNR  mechanism 
becomes  even  more  efficient,  while  ensuring  full  respect  of  fundamental  rights.  The 
Commission’s monitoring of the implementation of the PNR Directive will continue beyond 
the  completion  of  the  present  review.  This  report,  which  should  not  be  considered  as  a 
definitive  assessment  of  compliance  of  the  national  transposition  measures,  will  facilitate 
dialogue  with  the  Member  States  in  addressing  any  deviations  from  the  Directive’s 
requirements.  In  that  context,  the  necessity  to  launch  infringement  proceedings  for  non-
conform implementation will also be assessed.  
The  Commission  takes  the  view  that  no  amendments  to  the  PNR  Directive  should  be 
proposed  at  this  stage.  After  a  first  period  in  which  the  priority  was  to  achieve  full 
transposition,  it  is  now  time  to  focus  on  ensuring  that  the  Directive  has  been  implemented 
correctly.  Moreover,  some  of  the  issues  arising  from  the  PNR  Directive’s  practical 
application, described above, will require further assessment. This is the case, for example, 
for  the  aspects  related  to  a  possible  extension  in  the  Directive’s  scope.  Such  assessment 
should also take into account the additional evidence stemming from the on-going evaluation 
of  the  Advance  Passenger  Information  Directive.  The  decision  of  whether  to  propose  a 
revision of the PNR Directive will also be informed by the outcome of the preliminary ruling 
requests currently before the Court of Justice.20  
                                                           
20   Referred to above in footnotes 15 and 16. 
12 
 

Document Outline