This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Access to Documents related to the Hydrogen strategy July 2020'.




Ref. Ares(2020)5233507 - 05/10/2020
 
 

 
 
CCS and the 
EU COVID-19 
Recovery Plan 

 
  The positive economic impact 
of a European CCS ecosystem 
A memorandum by the Northern 
Lights Project of Common Interest 
(PCI), consisting of projects from: 

MAY 2020 
Acorn, Air Liquide, ArcelorMittal, 
 
Borg CO2, Equinor, Ervia, Eyde 
 
 

Cluster, Fortum, Fluxys, H2 
Northern Lights PCI 
Eemshaven, HeidelbergCement, Net 
 https://northernlightsccs.com 
Zero Teesside, Nordland CO2 Hub, 
 
Port of Antwerp, Preem, Shell, 
 
Stockholm Exergi and Total 
 

 

What this memorandum aims at demonstrating: 
CCS is a proven technology, necessary to decarbonise and safeguard European industry and 
 
jobs in a low-carbon economy 
The industrial projects that together make up the Northern Lights PCI have an extraordinary 
potential to reduce Europe’s CO2 emissions and create and protect thousands of jobs 
The Northern Lights PCI partners are ready to quickly move into execution, given the right 
political and financial framework – we can do it with your help
CCS has a key role to play in Europe’s green 
economic recovery 
Europe is facing an unprecedented socio-economic crisis due to the COVID-19 outbreak, whose real impact is still to unfold. 
As the EU seeks solutions to reboot the economy and lead Europe out of the recession, we are presented with a unique 
opportunity to put the fight against climate change at the centre of the economic strategy. Carbon Capture and Storage 
(CCS) projects that can rapidly move into implementation should be considered in any economic recovery plan
, due to 
their capacity to deliver quickly in terms of jobs and economic growth while delivering on the EU emission reduction targets. 
CCS is a proven technology, necessary to achieve the EU’s 2050 climate neutrality objective 
CCS has great emissions reduction potential, as it prevents CO2 from being released into the atmosphere. Analysis by the 
most prominent international bodies, including the IEA and the IPCC, have consistently shown that CCS is an essential part 
of the lowest cost path towards meeting the Paris Agreement goals. Similarly, in the EU’s Clean Planet for All1, CCS is listed 
as one of the strategic building blocks to achieve climate neutrality. Moreover, when paired with bioenergy used for power 
generation or biofuel production, it is one of the few technologies that can deliver negative CO2 emissions. 
CCS technologies are proven and commercially available today; they have been in operation since the 1970s with 19 large-
scale CCS facilities currently operating globally. Geological permanent storage is safe and secure, with over 260 Mt of CO2 
emissions from human activity already captured and stored2. Global estimates show that there are vast geological storage 
resources to meet the highest requirements for CCS to achieve climate change targets, including within Europe3. 
CCS can help safeguard existing industrial activity and jobs while decarbonising the economy 
According  to  a  2018  Endrava  report,  emissions  from  power  and  heat  plants,  industrial  sites  and  waste  management 
installations in Europe account for two thirds of all CO2 emissions4. Decarbonising these sectors with renewables and energy 
efficiency alone will not suffice, as energy-intensive industries require high-temperature heat that cannot be easily or cost-
effectively electrified and sectors such as cement or steel emit CO2 as part of their manufacturing process. CCS can play a 
crucial  role  in  decarbonising  European  industry  while  maintaining  its  productivity,  both  through  the  capturing  of  CO2 
emitted by industries and through the manufacturing of clean hydrogen for transport, heat and power

Estimates show that European jobs linked directly and indirectly to the emergence of a market for CCS can reach 150,000 
in 20505. However, and crucially, by far the largest job and value creation effect of CCS is that it enables a successful and 
just  transformation  of  existing  industrial  activity  into  a  low-carbon  industry
,  avoiding  ‘carbon  leakage’  and  therefore 
protecting existing jobs. CCS can enable industrial regions in Europe to transform into low carbon regions, also with cleaner 
air and improved health. These reinvigorated regions will also attract new, low-carbon industries and the associated jobs 
and be central in the transition to a zero emissions economy. 
 
1 COM (2018) 773 – A Clean Planet for All: A European strategic long-term vision for a prosperous, modern, competitive and climate neutral economy 
2 2019 Global Status of CCS Report, Global CCS Institute, 2019. 
3 The potential for CCS and CCU in Europe. Report to the thirty second meeting of the European Gas Regulatory Forum, IOGP, 2019  
4 Cauchois, G., Rambech, E., Vandenbussche, V. (2018). Potential for CCS in Europe: Report for NOROG. Endrava report 2018.  
5 Størset, S. Ø., Tangen, G., Wolfgang, O. and Sand, G. (2018). Industrial opportunities and employment prospects in large-scale CO2 management in Norway. SINTEF Report 
2018:00450. Accesible here  

 


CCS supports a clean hydrogen and circular economy 
Decarbonisation  of  key sectors  such  as  electricity  generation,  transport  (particularly  heavy-duty vehicles)  and  industrial 
processes that use high-grade heat and hydrogen as chemical feedstock will require the use of hydrogen in large quantities. 
Today,  around  70%  of  hydrogen  production  comes  from  natural  gas;  if  decarbonised  with  CCS,  it  will  accelerate  the 
establishment of clean hydrogen value chains. Such a development would create a new low-carbon industry and jobs, with 
the potential to account for 24% of final energy demand and 5.4m jobs by 20506.
 
As renewable electricity capacity continues to grow, electricity grids will have to be equipped to cope with intermittent 
generation and effectively meet rising electricity demand.  Hydrogen with CCS or CCGT with CCS, allows for low-carbon 
production of energy and can be easily stored to provide reliable clean power 

Finally, the development of CO2 capture facilities and transport solutions can speed up the industrial re-use of carbon, thus 
acting as an enabler of carbon capture and utilisation (CCU) to deliver a circular economy, since the deployment of these 
services is mutually beneficial for both CCS and CCU and will help bring costs down and create even more jobs. 
A European CCS value chain to drive 
CCS development and industrial 
success 
The  Northern  Lights  Project  of  Common  Interest  (PCI)  is  a  CO2  cross-border 
transport  connection  project  where  CO2  captured  from  industrial  sites  in 
Europe  will  be  collected  by  ship  and  transported  to  the  Norwegian 
Continental  Shelf  for  permanent  storage  subsea,  resulting  in  a  full-
scale CCS value  chain.  Equinor, Shell and Total  announced  on  15 
May 2020 that they have decided to invest in the Northern Lights 
transport and storage solution.
 The investment decision is subject 
to final investment decision by Norwegian authorities and approval 
from EFTA Surveillance Authority (ESA). 
The development of a European CCS ecosystem 
can be a powerful driver for carbon capture in Europe and globally  

It is only after providing a secure and reliable CO2 transportation and storage network that European industries can start 
considering capturing their carbon. By offering an open source CO2 transport and storage network, Northern Lights opens 
the possibility for any industrial site interested in capturing its CO2, to permanently store it safely
. Furthermore, the ship 
transport  solution provides flexibility to reach multiple carbon emission points across Europe. This will enable the first 
European full-scale CCS value chain, paving the way for cost reductions and a scale-up of CCS
. Northern Lights could also 
act as a reciprocal storage alternative to other CCS projects in Europe, making a European CCS network more robust and 
flexible. The Northern Lights PCI includes three projects with ambition to develop storage, in addition to the one in Norway: 
Acorn, Ervia and Net Zero Teesside. 
Northern Lights can rapidly move into execution, delivering jobs, growth and emission 
reductions across Europe 

Cross-border collaboration is one of the strongest assets of Northern Lights. Given positive investment decisions, the value 
chain could be operational in 2024, establishing an ‘open source’ network for transport and storage of CO2, protecting and 
creating jobs while capturing emissions. As it will be shown in the next section, the Northern Lights PCI is maturing several 
projects in many industries across Europe. The project is also in dialogue with around 15 additional European companies in 
different sectors and countries that also are exploring the option of having their CO2 stored. 
 
6 Hydrogen Roadmap Europe: A sustainable pathway for the European Energy Transition. FCH JU Report 2019. Accessible here.  

 

CCS projects to kick-start European industrial 
decarbonisation 

This section demonstrates how the Northern Lights PCI can contribute to Europe’s economic recovery and accelerate the 
just transition to a net-zero future economy. It provides best available estimates of the effects that can arise from positive 
investment decisions in these CCS projects in the form of climate mitigation, timing of project phases, and job creation in 
each of the phases.  
Climate mitigation and job creation potential 
As can be observed in the table on the next page, most of the projects are estimated to create around 1200 – 1500 full-
time equivalents (FTEs) in total each over a 3-4 years period during the most job-intensive phase, 
the detailed engineering 
and construction phase. The Ervia power/industrial cluster projects in Ireland  may possibly create as much as 3500 FTEs 
jobs and the Net Zero Teesside cluster in England around 5500. This in turn will create new permanent jobs ranging from 
50 to 350 in each of the CCS operations
. The analysis shows that the transport and storage solution project, and the two 
most mature CO2 capture projects within the Northern Lights  PCI network, Fortum Oslo Varme and Heidelberg Cement 
Norcem, are ready to move into the job-intensive detailed engineering and construction phase which follows immediately 
after positive investment decisions, which then would enable the start of operations as soon as 2024.  
Crucially, the analysis demonstrates that there is a wave of CO2 capture projects in several European countries and several 
sectors which are being matured to start detailed engineering and construction in 2022 – 2025, thereby becoming ready to 
start operations in 2025-28. These projects can provide considerable climate mitigation effects with annual CO2 emission 
reductions  ranging between 500  – 6000 kilotonnes of CO2 per annum
. Several of the  projects plan to capture CO2 of 
biogenic origin, thereby providing negative emissions.  
Together, all the projects for which values have been provided, are estimated to be able to provide CO2 reductions of up 
to 15 000 kilotonnes per annum, to create around 18 600 full time equivalents (FTEs) jobs in total over the development 
period  and  around  1140  permanent  positions  when  in  operation
.  The  job  creation  estimates  focus  solely  on  the  jobs 
created in the specific projects. Many of these jobs (e.g. civil engineering) will be local/regional in nature, while others (e.g. 
studies and fabrication) will be relevant for the broader European industry. 
Seven  of  the  projects  plan  to  be  operational  already  in  2024-25,  with  the  detailed  engineering  and  construction  phase 
starting about three years earlier, in 2021-22. The other five projects plan to be operational by 2028, also starting the job-
intensive detailed engineering and construction phase about three years earlier, in 2024-25.   
Further benefits 
Most importantly, these projects enable a successful transformation of existing industrial activity and  tens, potentially 
hundreds of thousands of jobs into low carbon activity and jobs,
 enabling a zero and low-carbon industry.  
The  estimations  of  employment  creation  above  do  not  include  the  multiple  jobs  that  will  be  created  through  the 
construction of equipment and technologies, such as   those for capture, intermediate storage and ships. Furthermore, 
the large number of jobs will also generate consumption effects
, resulting from the employed people's and companies’ 
consumption, payment of taxes, etc. These are not estimated in the table above.  In case there are any Competition Law 
concerns,  costs  and  the  levels  of  public  support  required  are  not  included  here.  Such  estimates  are,  however,  being 
developed by the individual projects and can be communicated separately.  
As can be seen in the PCI map on the previous page, there are also a few additional projects in the Northern Lights CCS PCI 
that are not  presented here. Some of these are being developed with timelines that are equally ambitious as the ones 
presented and can be communicated by the individual projects. 
 

 

Some of the projects being developed within the Northern Lights CCS network and PCI 
Transport & 
Reciprocal Storage / 
 
 
CO2 capture projects  
storage 
 Full-chain projects 
Equinor, 
Arcelor 
Borg 
Stockholm 
Pale Blue 
Net Zero 
TOTAL 
Company 
Fortum 
Heidelberg Cement 
Ervia 
Shell, Total 
Mittal 
CO2 
Exergi 
Dot 
Teesside 
Northern 
Cementa 
CBR 
Gent 
 
Project 
Oslo 
Norcem 
Hannover 
Borg 
Clusters 
Stockholm 
Acorn 
Clusters 
Lights 
Slite 
Lixhe 
Carbalyst 
Country 
Norway 
Norway 
Norway 
Sweden 
Germany 
Belgium 
Belgium 
Norway 
Ireland 
Sweden 
Scotland 
England 
 
CO2 emissions 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total ktpa 
N.A 
460 
800 
1800 
640 
1200 
390 
700 
3500 
900 
N.A 
6300 
 
Biogenic part 
N.A 
50% 
35% 
12% 
6% 
20% 
100% 
 
5% 
100% 
N.A 
2100 
 
Capture rate 
N.A 
90% 
50% 
 
 
 
90% 
90% 
95% 
80-95% 
N.A 
95% 
 
CO2 avoided 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
emissions, Total 
N.A 
410 
400 
1600 
500 
1000 
350 
630 
3325 
720-860 
N.A 
6000 
≈15 000 
Biogenic 
N.A 
205 
140 
180 
25 
180 
350 
430 
166 
720-860 
N.A 
2000 
ktpa 
Fossil & process 
N.A 
205 
260 
1420 
475 
820 

200 
3160 
Zero 
N.A 
4000 
Direct CCS Jobs 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Early studies,Start 
 
2017 
 
2020 
2021 
2021 
2021 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Months 
15 
36 
24 
24 
24 
FTEs 
19 
15 
FEED study, Start 
2018 
2018 
2018 
2022 
2023 
2022 
2023 
2020-21 
2021 
2021 
2020 
2020 
 
Months 
18 
16 
24 
36 
24 
36 
10 
18 
36 
12-18 
12 
24 
FTEs 
120 
50 
100 
100 
75 
100 
15 
15 
25 
25-35 
80 
20 
Det. eng.&constr, 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Start 
2020 
2021 
2021 
2025 
2025 
2025 
2025 
2022-24 
2024 
2022 
2021 
2022 
Months 
36 
48 
36 
36 
36 
36 
24 
36 
48 
24-36 
36 
36 
FTEs 
1200 
1440 
1050 
1200 
800 
1000 
150 
1000+ 
3500 
1000 
1000 
5500 
Total Development 
1320 
1509 
1150 
1300 
875 
136 
180 
1000+ 
3525 
1025-35 
1080 
5520 
≈18 625 
FTEs 
FTEs 
Operations, Start 
2024 
2024 
2024 
2028 
2028 
2028 
2027 
2025 
2028 
2025 
2024/5 
2025 
 
Months 
240 
120 
240 
240 
240 
240 
300 
120 
240 
Min. 240 
240 
240 
 
Permanent jobs 
90 
56 
20 
60 
60 
60 
16 
 
300 
10-20 
110 
350 
≈1137  
Table 1: Some CO2 capture projects being developed within the Northern Lights CCS network and PCI. The estimates have been made by the companies that are developing the specific projects. 
“FTEs” is Full Time Equivalents, showing the total number of FTEs over the period in question. CO2 emissions are measured in kilotonnes per annum (ktpa). “Biogenic” is CO2 emissions resulting 
from combustion of biomass. The table does not include all the CO2 capture projects that are being developed within the Northern Lights CCS network and PCI. 
 

 

Recommendations 
EU policy can support and incentivise the development of cross-border CO2 transport
and storage networks in Europe, including Northern Lights. Financial support and
grants will be key to achieving early deployment of the CCS value chain in Europe.
Ensuring that CCS projects in Europe are eligible for EU and national public support
and funding schemes should therefore be an important element in the Commission’s
approach to promoting economic recovery.

In addition to financial support, regulatory frameworks such as the Energy System
Integration, EU ETS, and the TEN-E Regulation will provide opportunities to develop the
CCUS value chain in Europe. Under TEN-E, CO2 storage should be integrated into
overall European infrastructure development and permitting procedures. Additional
methods of CO2 transport, such as by ship, should be recognised in key EU legislation
like the EU ETS and TEN-E, in order to facilitate a greater range of CO2 transport
solutions in Europe. 
By creating a cross-border network of open-access CO2 transport
and storage infrastructure, EU industrial plants and clusters can connect their CO2
emissions to shared infrastructure – and this common approach should be supported.
Supporting CCS now will not only stimulate new infrastructure projects and jobs, it will
also help to develop a more optimised energy and industry system, with shared CO2
transport and storage infrastructure connecting different industrial facilities and
processes, all while making significant cuts to European CO2 emissions and helping to
deliver on the Green Deal objectives.

The Northern Lights PCI looks forward to working with EU and national policymakers
to make this vision a reality.