This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Submissions to CJEU in Privacy International and LQDN et al.'.

 
Translation  
C-623/17 — 20 
Observations of Latvia 
Case C-623/17 * 
Document lodged by:  
Republic of Latvia 
Usual name of the case:  
PRIVACY INTERNATIONAL 
Date lodged:  
14 February 2018 
 
TO THE PRESIDENT AND THE MEMBERS OF THE COURT OF 
JUSTICE OF THE EUROPEAN UNION 
WRITTEN OBSERVATIONS OF THE REPUBLIC OF LATVIA 
In  accordance  with  Article 23,  second  paragraph,  of  the  Statute  of  the  Court  of 
Justice (the Court), the Republic of Latvia, represented by Irēna Kūciņa, assistant 
in charge of jurisdictional issues on behalf of Secretary of State at the Ministry of 
Justice and Viktorija Soņeca, lawyer at the office of the Agent of the Republic of 
Latvia, submits written observations in  connection with  the present  request for  a 
preliminary  ruling  in  which,  pursuant  to  Article 267  TFEU,  questions  were 
referred by the Investigatory Powers Tribunal (‘the UK Tribunal’) on 31 October 
2017. 
C-623/17 
Privacy International 
The Republic of Latvia accepts delivery of documents in the present case: (a) by 
letter to the following addressed: Ministry of Justice of the Republic of Latvia — 
Office  of  the  Representative  of  the  Republic  of  Latvia  to  the  Court  of  Justice 
(address);  (b)  by  fax:  00 371 670369211;  (c)  by  email  to  the  address 
xxxxxxxxxx@xx.xxx.xx or (d) by e-Curia.  
 
*  Language of the case: English. 
EN   

link to page 3 link to page 3 link to page 3 link to page 6 link to page 6 link to page 10 OBSERVATIONS OF LATVIA — CASE C-623/17 
 
Table of contents 
I. LEGAL PROVISIONS RELEVANT TO THE CASE ........................................ 3 
I.1. Provisions of European Union and International Law .................................. 3 
I.2 The provisions of Latvian law ........................................................................ 3 
II.  LEGAL ARGUMENTS CONCERNING THE QUESTIONS REFERRED 
BY THE UNITED KINGDOM COURT................................................................. 6 

III. ANSWERS TO THE QUESTIONS POSED BY THE UK TRIBUNAL ....... 10 
 

 

PRIVACY INTERNATIONAL 
 
I. LEGAL PROVISIONS RELEVANT TO THE CASE 
I.1. Provisions of European Union and International Law 

The Treaty on the European Union (‘the TEU’) Articles 4, 5 and 6; 1 

The Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union (‘the TFEU’), Article 16; 2 

The Charter of the Fundamental Rights (‘the Charter’), Articles 7, 8 and 51; 3 

Directive  2002/58/EC  of  the  European  Parliament  and  of  the  Council  of  12 July 
2002 concerning the processing of personal data and the protection of privacy in 
the  electronic  communications  sector  (Directive  on  privacy  and  electronic 
communications) (Directive 2002/58/EC’), recital 11, Articles 1 and 15; 4 

Directive 95/46/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 24 October 
1995  on  the  protection  of  individuals  with  regard  to  the  processing  of  personal 
data and on the free movement of such data (‘Directive 95/46/EC’), recital 13 and 
Article 3; 5 

The  European  Convention  on  the  Protection  of  Human  Rights  and  Fundamental 
Freedoms (‘the ECHR’), Article 8. 
I.2 The provisions of Latvian law 

Article 71(1) of the Law on electronic communications 6 
Data  that  must  be  retained  shall  be  retained  and  transferred  to  the  authorities 
responsible  for  preliminary  investigations,  operational  agents,  national  security 
services,  prosecutors  and  courts  in  order  to  safeguard  national  security  and 
public safety or to conduct criminal investigations, criminal prosecutions and the 
adjudication of criminal cases and to the Competition Council for the purposes of 
investigations  regarding  infringements  of  competition  law  taking  the  form  of 
prohibited cartels’. 

 

OJ 2010, C 83, p. 13. 

OJ 2010, C 83, p. 47. 

OJ 2010, C 83, p. 389. 

OJ 2002, L 201, p. 37. 

OJ 1195, L 281, p. 31. 

Latvijas  Vēstnesis  (Official  Journal),  17 November  2004,  No 183.  Available  at: 
https://likumi.lv!doc.php?id= 96611. 


OBSERVATIONS OF LATVIA — CASE C-623/17 

The  Law  on  the  national  security  services,  Article 6,  Article 19(1)(8)  and 
Article 26(1) and (4) 7 
Article 6 of the Law on the national security services: 
If a person  considers that the national security services have, by their conduct, 
infringed  his  rights  and  freedoms  enshrined  by  the  Law,  that  person  shall  be 
entitled  to  lodge  a  complaint  with  the  prosecutor  who,  after  investigating  that 
complaint, shall issue an opinion as to the legality of the conduct of the agent of 
the State security services, or shall institute proceedings (before a court).’ 

Article 19(1)(8) of the Law on the national security services 
‘The agents of the national security services are entitled, within the scope of their 
competence,  to  receive,  free  of  charge,  information,  documents  and  other 
necessary  evidence  relating  to  services  supplied  to  individuals,  including 
information  from  the  holders  of  information  resources  and  technical  resources 
concerning the communications of individuals by post, telegraph, communications 
networks and data transmission’. 

Article 26(1) of the Law on the national security services 
‘The  Prosecutor  General  and  prosecutors  specially  authorised  by  him  shall 
oversee the procedure for operational activities, espionage and counter-espionage 
by  the  national  security  services  and  the  system  of  protection  of  ‘State  secrecy’. 
When  they  carry  out  that  supervision,  they  are  authorised  to  access  the 
documents, evidence and information which are in the possession of the national 
security  services.  The  identity  of  sources  of  information  is  to  be  revealed  only
 
where they are directly involved in the commission of a criminal offence, and only 
to the Prosecutor General and it shall be disclosed only to prosecutors specially 
authorised by him after authorisation by the head of the authority responsible for 
State security; the disclosure of the identity of sources of information in the course 
of surveillance procedure shall be prohibited.’ 

Article 26(4) of the Law on the national security services 
‘The  national  security  services  shall  be  subject  to  judicial  supervision  in  the 
situations and according to the procedures laid down by the Law on operational 
activities’


Article 1 of the Law on national security 8 
 
7  
Latvijas 
Vēstnesis 
(Official 
Journal), 
19 May 
1994, 
No 59. 
Available 
at: 
https://likumi.lv!doc.php?id= 57256. 
8  
Latvijas  Vēstnesis  (Official  Journal),  29 December  2000,  No 473/476  (2384/2387).  Available 
at: https://likumi.lv!doc.php?id= 14011. 

 

PRIVACY INTERNATIONAL 
‘1. 
National security is the result of joint and targeted measures implemented 
by the State and society, by which the independence of the State, its constitutional 
order,  its  territorial  integrity,  the  possibility  for  society  to  develop  without 
constraint, well-being and stability are guaranteed. 

2. 
Guaranteeing national security is a fundamental obligation of the State’. 
10  Article 9(5),  Article 35(1) and Article 38 and point 7 of the transitional measures 
of the Law on operational activities 9 
‘The acquisition of operational data from electronic communications operators — 
that  is  to  say  the  acquisition  of  data  in  respect  of  which  protection  is  legally 
provided for operators (data which must be retained) — shall be carried out with 
the  consent  of  the  person  in  charge  of  (head)  of  the  body  responsible  for 
operational activities or an agent authorised by him, when he requests data from 
an electronic communications operator. If the data to be retained which relates to 
a person identified in a specific operational activity are requested for a period of 
more  than  30  days  in  total,  the  body  responsible  for  operational  activities  shall 
obtain the consent of the judge specially authorised by the Present of the District 
Court (of the city).’ 

Article 35(1) of the Law on operational activities 
‘The Prosecutor General  and the prosecutors specially authorised shall  oversee 
the procedures for operational activities. By  overseeing those activities, they are 
themselves authorised to access information, documents and other evidence which 
is available to the body responsible for operational activities’. 

Article 38(1) of the Law on operational activities 
‘When an opinion is issued on a complaint concerning the legality of the conduct 
of  an  operations  agent,  the  prosecutor  shall  inform  the  complainant  of  the 
completion  of  the  investigation  and  shall  indicate  (without  further  details) 
whether,  during  the  investigation,  illegal  interference  with  the  legal  rights  and 
freedoms  of  that  person  has  been  established.  The  prosecutor  shall  also  inform 
him of his rights of appeal. 

(2)  Further  information  shall  be  provided  in  the  communication  relating  to  the 
oversight of the conduct of the operations agent only if notification to the person 
concerned is permitted under the conditions laid down by Article 24.1 of this Law, 
which  authorises  a  person  to  be  notified  that  an  operational  action  was  carried 
out in respect of him. 

Point 7 of the transitional measures of the Law on operational activities 
 
9  
Latvijas  Vēstnesis  (Official  Journal),  30 December  1993,  No 131.  Available  at: 
https://likumi.lv!doc.php?id= 57573. 


OBSERVATIONS OF LATVIA — CASE C-623/17 
‘The amendments to Article 9(5) of this Law which provide for the acquisition of 
data which must be retained by the consent of the President of the District Court 
(of the city) shall enter into force on 1 January 2020’. 

II. 
LEGAL 
ARGUMENTS 
CONCERNING 
THE 
QUESTIONS 
REFERRED BY THE UNITED KINGDOM COURT 
11  In  answer  to  the  first  question  referred  for  a  preliminary  ruling  by  the  UK 
Tribunal, the Republic of Latvia refers, first of all, to the provisions of Article 4(2) 
TEU,  that  the  European  Union  is  to  respect  the  essential  State  functions.  In 
particular, national security remains the sole responsibility of each Member State. 
Accordingly,  it  follows  from  the  foregoing  that  it  is  for  each  Member  State  to 
adopt the measures necessary to safeguard national security and that the definition 
of national security does not fall within the competence of the European Union. 
12  That argument is also supported by recital 11 in the preamble to Directive 2002/58 
which  states  that  that  directive  does  not  apply  to  issues  of  protection  of 
fundamental  rights  and  freedoms  related  to  activities  which  are  not  governed  by 
Community  law  (now  EU  law),  and  by  the  provisions  of  Article 1(3)  thereof, 
which  provides  that  that  directive  does  not  apply  to  activities  relating  to  State 
security. 
13  At  the  same  time,  the  Republic  of  Latvia  points  out  that  that  conclusion  also 
derives from the case-law of the Court of Justice. The first indent of  Article 3(2) 
of  Directive  95/46 10  excludes  from  the  scope  of  the  directive  the  processing  of 
personal  data  in  the  course  of  an  activity  which  falls  outside  the  scope  of 
Community law (now EU law), such as those provided for by Titles V and VI of 
the  Treaty  on  European  Union  and  in  any  case  to  processing  operations 
concerning public security, defence, State security … 11 
14  The Republic of Latvia submits that, in the European Union, there is no one single 
conception of ‘national security’, and that each Member State defines that notion 
differently.  However,  regardless  of  that  fact,  there  can  be  no  doubt  among 
Member States about the fact that activities directed  against the independence of 
the State, its sovereignty, its territorial integrity, its constitutional order, the power 
of  the  State  and  the  threats  caused  by  espionage,  terrorism,  separatism  and 
extremism, which threaten the territorial integrity of the State by anti-democratic 
means may be regarded as being a threat to national security. 
 
10  
Directive 95/46/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council  of  24 October 1995 on  the 
protection  of  individuals  with  regard  to  the  processing  of  personal  data  and  on  the  free 
movement of such data (OJ 1995, L 281, p. 31). 
11  
Judgment  of  30 May  2006,  Parliament  v  Council  and  Commission  (C-317/0  and  C-318/04, 
EU:C:2006:346), paragraph 54. 

 

PRIVACY INTERNATIONAL 
15  The protection of national security falls within the responsibility of each Member 
State, which is why each Member State is entitled to establish  specifically which 
characteristic  circumstances  and  actions  are  perceived  as  threats  to  national 
security.  Those  are  strongly  influenced  by  the  history  of  the  State  concerned,  its 
geographical  position,  its  geopolitical  situation,  its  economic  development  and 
other factors. 
16  For  example,  in  the  Republic  of  Latvia,  ‘national  security’  is  understood  as 
meaning ‘State security’, a situation which is achieved as the result of unified and 
targeted  measures  implemented  by  the  State  and  by  society,  by  which  the 
independence  of  the  State,  constitutional  order  and  territorial  integrity,  the 
possibility  for  society  to  develop  without  constraint,  well-being  and  stability  are 
guaranteed. Guaranteeing national security is the fundamental duty of the State 12. 
17  In the Republic of  Latvia, the identification and prevention of threats  to  national 
security  are  carried  out  by  the  national  security  services,  namely  the  State 
institutions  which,  in  order  to  carry  out  missions  determined  by  the  national 
security system, are responsible for espionage, counter-espionage and operational 
activities. In the Republic of Latvia, there are three national security services: the 
Office  for  Protection  of  the  Constitution,  the  Security  Police  and  the  Espionage 
and Military Security Service 13 which act within the scope of their powers 14. The 
Office  for  protection  of  the  Constitution  is  in  charge  of  espionage  and  counter-
espionage. The Espionage and Military Security Service is responsible for military 
espionage  and  counter-espionage 15;  and  the  Security  Police  is  the  service 
responsible for counter-espionage and domestic security. 16 
18  The  right  of  the  national  security  services  to  acquire  data  to  be  retained  for  the 
purpose of national security from electronic communications operators is provided 
for by the Law on national security 17 and by the Law on operational activities 18. 
The  Prosecutor  General  and  the  prosecutors  specially  authorised  oversee  the 
procedures  for  operational  activities  of  espionage  and  counter-espionage  by  the 
national security services. 19 
 
12  
Article 1 of the Law on State security. 
13  
Article 11(1) of the Law on the national security authorities. 
14  
Article 1 of the Law on the Office for the Protection of the Constitution. 
15  
Article 14 of the Law on the national security services. 
16  
Article 15 of the Law on the national security services. 
17  
Article 19(1), point 8, of the Law on the national security services. 
18  
Article 9(5) of the Law on operational activities. 
19  
Article 26(1) of the Law on the national security services. 


OBSERVATIONS OF LATVIA — CASE C-623/17 
19  Operational data from electronic communications operators (data to be retained) is 
acquired  by  the  national  security  services  with  the  consent  of  the  person 
responsible (head) of those services or the officer authorised by the latter and with 
the assent of a judge specially authorised by the President of the District Court (of 
the city) 20. If the acquisition of data has a substantial impact on the right of person 
to privacy, the national security services must always obtain the agreement of the 
judge  and,  in  every  case,  the  Prosecutor  General  oversees  the  legality  of  the 
activities of the national security services. 
20  Therefore, it follows from the foregoing that, in the framework of the legislation, 
the  national  security  services  not  only  have  powers  and  rights,  but  also  the 
obligation to respect the law and human rights. For example, if a person considers 
that,  by  their  conduct,  the  national  security  services  have  infringed  his  legally 
prescribed rights and freedom, that person has the right to lodge a complaint with 
the prosecutor who, after an investigation, issues an opinion on the legality of the 
conduct  of  the  national  security  services  agent  and  may  also  bring  legal 
proceedings 21. 
21  The Republic of Latvia points out that, in the Explanations relating to the Charter 
of  Fundamental  Rights 22,  it  is  stated  that  fundamental  rights  may  be  limited  in 
order  to  attain  objectives  in  the  public  interests.  However,  in  relation  to  the 
foregoing,  it  must  be  observed  that  restrictions  on  fundamental  rights  cannot  be 
disproportionate  or  constitute  unjustified  interference  in  the  substance  of  those 
rights 23. 
22  In the context of the present case, the Republic of Latvia notes that the acquisition 
of bulk communications data does not concern the acquisition of communications 
data to be retained concerning a particular individual, in the traditional sense, and 
which undermines  an individual’s right to privacy, but the acquisition of data on 
communication signals in a particular territory at a given moment. 
23  The national security services use the information acquired for specific purposes, 
specifically to identify and prevent threats to national security. Therefore, the aim 
of  acquiring  data  is  to  localise  and  identify  the  threat  and  not  to  confirm 
suspicions about one or more specific persons, as the law enforcement authorities 
do in the course of criminal proceedings. 
24  As  regards  the  second  question  referred,  the  Republic  of  Latvia  takes  the  view 
that, in the light of its answer to the first question, there is no need to answer the 
 
20  
Article 9(5) of the Law on operational activities. 
21  
Article 4 of the Law on the national security services. 
22 
Explanations relating to the Charter of Fundamental Rights (OJ 2007 C 303, p. 17). Available at 
http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:C:2007:303:0017:0035:en:PDF. 
23  
Judgment of 13 April 2000, Karlsson and Others (C-292/97, EU:C:2000:202), paragraph 45. 

 

PRIVACY INTERNATIONAL 
second.  However,  the  Republic  of  Latvia  points  out  that,  in  the  Watson 
judgment 24, the Court’s findings related to the investigation of serious crime and 
not the prevention of a threat to national security, which is why the findings in that 
judgment cannot be applied directly to the powers of the national security services 
to accomplish their task and safeguard national security. 
25  The submissions set out above are without prejudice to the obligation of Member 
States to observe the right to privacy of persons guaranteed by the Charter and by 
the European Convention on the protection of human rights. 
26  In  accordance  with  the  case-law  of  the  European  Court  of  Human  Rights,  the 
Member  States  have  broad  discretion  in  order  to  safeguard  national  security, 
which also  includes  means  such  as  the acquisition and processing which  follows 
of  the  bulk  communications  data  and  the  fact  that  such  actions  constitute  an 
interference in the rights of persons to the right to privacy and the confidentiality 
of communications. 
27  In Klass and Others v Germany 25, the European Court of Human Rights held that 
the  secret  interception  of  private  telecommunications  constituted,  without  any 
doubt,  interference  to  the  right  to  privacy  and  the  confidentiality  of 
correspondence. However, the European Court of Human Rights authorises those 
activities  if  they  are  strictly  necessary  for  safeguarding  democracy,  if  they  are 
carried out in  accordance with the law and  have the specific legitimate objective 
of  safeguarding  national  security  or  combatting  terrorism,  and  if  they  are 
proportionate to the objective pursued. In the Klass judgment the European Court 
of Human Rights ruled that combatting terrorism and threats related to espionage 
may  require  the  States  to  adopt  various  modern  and  complex  technological 
solutions,  in  particular,  the  interception  and  surveillance  of  private 
communications.  Nonetheless,  the  Convention  does  not  confer  unlimited  powers 
on the States to interfere with the fundamental rights of persons, regardless of the 
importance  of  the  aim  of  the  interference  and  the  States  must  provide  effective 
procedural guarantees to exclude the arbitrary and ensure proportionality. 
28  The European Court of Human Rights  expanded on those findings in  Weber and 
Saravia v Germany, stating that the supervision of so- called ‘strategic monitoring 
of  communications’  is  carried  out  both  by  a  parliamentary  commission  and  an 
independent committee which receive a monthly report on the measures taken and 
which  have  the  right  to  annul  decisions  which  have  approved  the  specific 
measures for the strategic monitoring of communications. 
29  It  is  also  important  to  note  that  it  is  specifically  the  lack  of  effective  procedural 
guarantees, in particular, the lack of an independent oversight mechanism, was the 
reason for which the European Court of Human Rights held that the provisions of 
 
24  
Judgment 21 December 2016, Tele2 Sverige and Watson and Others (C-203/15 and C-698/15 
25  
Judgment of 6 September 1978, Klass and Others v Germany (Application No 5029/71). 


OBSERVATIONS OF LATVIA — CASE C-623/17 
the  ECHR  had  been  breached  in  Szabó  and  Vissy  v  Hungary 26.  The  European 
Court  of  Human  Rights  stated  that  the  modern  technology  available  to  the 
Hungarian  authorities  had  enabled  the  interception  of  bulk  communications  data 
concerning an unlimited number of persons, including persons outside Hungarian 
territory.  Those  measures  had  been  approved  within  the  strict  framework  of 
executive power and the applicable legislation did not provide for  ex ante and ex 
post
 control mechanisms independent of the institutions. 
30  Therefore, taking account of the foregoing, the Republic of Latvia considers that 
the  obligation  deriving  from  the  Convention  on  Member  States  to  respect  the 
human  rights  of  individuals  do  not  preclude  interference  by  the  State  with  the 
right to privacy and secrecy of correspondence, including the interception of bulk 
communications  data,  if  such  interception  takes  place  in  a  regulatory  framework 
with the objective of safeguarding national security. 
III. ANSWERS TO THE QUESTIONS POSED BY THE UK TRIBUNAL  
In  the  light  of  the  foregoing  considerations,  the  Republic  of  Latvia  suggests  that 
the Court should give the following answer to the UK Tribunal as follows: 
(1)  Having  regard  to  Article 4(2)  TEU  and  Article 1(3)  of  Directive 
2002/58/EC,  measures  such  as  those  examined  in  the  case  in  the  main 
proceedings and the requirement in the instructions given by the Secretary of 
State  to  an  electronic  communications  network  operator  to  supply  bulk 
communications data to  the security and intelligence services of  a  Member 
State  do  not  fall  within  the  scope  of  EU  law  and  Directive  2002/58/EC, 
because they do not fall within the scope of the European Union.  
(2)  Having regard to the answer to the first question, there is no need to answer 
the second. 
Riga, 15 February 2018 
 
26  
Judgment of 29 June 2006, Weber and Saravia v Germany (Application No 54934/00). 
10