This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Submissions to CJEU in Privacy International and LQDN et al.'.

      
Translation  
C-623/17 - 15 
Written observations of Germany 
Case C-623/17 * 
Document lodged by:  
Federal Republic of Germany 
Usual name of the case:  
PRIVACY INTERNATIONAL 
Date lodged:  
13 February 2018 
 
 
*  Language of the case: English. 
EN   

WRITTEN OBSERVATIONS OF THE FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF GERMANY – CASE C-623/17 
 
Federal Republic of Germany 
Berlin, 13 February 2018 
 
 
 
Thomas Henze 
David Klebs 

 
Agents of the Government 
of the Federal Republic of Germany 
Court of Justice of the European Union 

ADDRESS FOR SERVICE 
 Registry – 
Preferably via e-Curia, or to: 
2925 Luxembourg 
Federal Ministry of  
 
Economic Affairs and Energy 
Via e-Curia 
Department EA5 
Scharnhorststr. 34 - 37 
10115 Berlin 
Germany 
Fax: +49 30 18615 - 5334 
 
EA5 – 81202/001#564 
 
Written observations 
In Case C-623/17 
concerning  the  reference  to  the  Court  of  Justice  of  the  European  Union  by  the 
Investigatory  Powers  Tribunal  (United  Kingdom)  for  a  preliminary  ruling  made 
by order of 18 October 2017 in the proceedings pending before that court between 
Privacy International 
and 
Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs and Others, 
we  submit  the  following  observations  on  behalf  of  and  with  the  authorisation  of 
the Government of the Federal Republic of Germany: 

 

PRIVACY INTERNATIONAL 
 
Table of contents 
A. 
INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................... 4 
B. 
LEGAL CONTEXT .................................................................................................. 5 
I. 
Treaty on European Union ....................................................................................... 5 
II.  Directive 2002/58 ..................................................................................................... 5 
C  THE FACTS AND QUESTIONS REFERRED FOR A PRELIMINARY 
RULING ............................................................................................................................. 6 
D. 
LEGAL ASSESSMENT ........................................................................................... 8 
I. 
First question referred .............................................................................................. 8 
1. Interpretation of the relevant provisions regarding the scope of EU law. ................... 8 
(a) Directive 2002/58 and Directive 95/46 ...................................................................... 8 
2. Conferral under primary law and limits in respect of action of the European 
Union, in particular in Article 4(2) TEU........................................................................ 11 
(a) No legal basis for conferring power on the European Union to regulate the 
activities of security and intelligence agencies .............................................................. 12 
(b) Reservation of national security to the Member States (Article 4(2) TEU) ............. 13 
(c) The term ‘national security’ in the case-law of the ECtHR ..................................... 14 
(d) Interpretation of EU law by the Bundesverfassungsgericht (Federal 
Constitutional Court) ..................................................................................................... 15 
3. Conclusions for the present case ................................................................................ 16 
II. No answer to the second question referred – in the alternative: consequences of 
transferring the Tele2 case-law to the activity of intelligence agencies ........................ 17 
1. Activity of the intelligence agencies in Germany ...................................................... 17 
2. Consequences of transferring the requirements of the Tele2 Sverige and Watson 
judgment to the activity of the intelligence services ...................................................... 20 
3. No reduction in the level of protection of fundamental rights if 
Directive 2002/58 and the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the EU were not 
applied ............................................................................................................................ 21 
E. 
CONCLUSION ....................................................................................................... 21 
 


WRITTEN OBSERVATIONS OF THE FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF GERMANY – CASE C-623/17 

 
A. 
INTRODUCTION 

The main proceedings concern rules regarding the collection and analysis of 
bulk  communications  data  by  the  security  and  intelligence  agencies  of  the 
United  Kingdom.  This  is  data  that  provides  information  about  the  ‘who, 
when, where, how and with whom’ of telephone and internet use, including 
the location of the communication devices. It does not  cover the content of 
communications. 

By  the  first  question  referred,  the  Investigatory  Powers  Tribunal  seeks 
clarification as to whether the national measure in dispute comes within the 
scope  of  EU  law,  such  that,  in  particular,  the  requirements  of  Directive 
2002/58/EC of 12 July 2002 concerning the processing of personal data and 
the  protection  of  privacy  in  the  electronic  communications  sector 1 
(hereinafter  Directive  2002/58)  and  Articles  7  and  8  of  the  Charter  of 
Fundamental Rights of the EU must be complied with. 

The  Federal  Government  takes  the  view  that  it  follows  from 
Article 4(2) TEU that the activities of the security and intelligence agencies 
of  the  Member  States  in  relation  to  national  defence  and  national  security 
come within the sole responsibility and therefore rules of the Member States. 
The  Member  States  and  their  security  and  intelligence  agencies,  however, 
remain subject to the provisions of the ECHR and of national constitutional 
law. 

The Federal Government does not consider the findings of the Court in the 
Tele2 and  Watson 2 judgment  to  be transferable to the present  case, as that 
judgment  does  not  relate  to  the  activity  of  the  national  security  and 
intelligence  agencies,  but  rather  relates  to  the  processing  of  data  by 
providers  of  communications  services  in  public  communications  networks. 
Therefore, there is also no need to answer the second question referred. 

Moreover,  the  Federal  Government  agrees  with  the  referring  tribunal’s 
findings that applying the requirements that the Court imposed on operators 
of  electronic  communications  services  in  the  Tele2  and  Watson  judgment 
would  make  it  very  difficult  for  national  security  and  intelligence  agencies 
to  safeguard  national  security.  This  would  have  significant  repercussions, 
particularly for the combating of terrorist threats, espionage and comparable 
threats,  as  will  be  explained  by  the  Federal  Government  below  in  the 
example  of  the  possible  effects  on  the  activity  of  the  security  and 
intelligence agencies in Germany. 
 
1  
OJ 2002 L 201, p. 37. 
2  
Judgment  of  21 December  2016,  Tele2  Sverige  and  Watson  and  Others,  C-203/15  and 
C-698/15, EU:C:2016:970. 

 

PRIVACY INTERNATIONAL 
B. 
LEGAL CONTEXT 
I. 
Treaty on European Union 

Article 4(2) TEU provides: 
‘The Union shall respect the equality of Member States before the Treaties 
as  well  as  their  national  identities,  inherent  in  their  fundamental  structures, 
political and constitutional, inclusive of regional and local self-government. 
It  shall  respect  their  essential  State  functions,  including  ensuring  the 
territorial integrity of the State, maintaining law and order and safeguarding 
national  security.  In  particular,  national  security  remains  the  sole 
responsibility of each Member State.’ 
II. 
Directive 2002/58 

Article 1 [Scope and aim] (1) and (3) reads: 
‘1. 
This  Directive  provides  for  the  harmonisation  of  the  national 
provisions  required  to  ensure  an  equivalent  level  of  protection  of 
fundamental  rights  and freedoms, and in  particular the  right  to  privacy  and 
confidentiality,  with  respect  to  the  processing  of  personal  data  in  the 
electronic  communication  sector  and  to  ensure  the  free  movement  of  such 
data  and  of  electronic  communication  equipment  and  services  in  the 
Community. 
 
[…] 
3. 
This  Directive  shall  not  apply  to  activities  which  fall  outside  the 
scope  of  the  Treaty  establishing  the  European  Community,  such  as  those 
covered  by  Titles  V  and  VI  of  the  Treaty  on  European  Union,  and  in  any 
case  to  activities  concerning  public  security,  defence,  State  security 
(including the economic well-being of the State when the activities relate to 
State  security  matters)  and  the  activities  of  the  State  in  areas  of  criminal 
law.’ 

Article  15  [Application  of  certain  provisions  of  Directive  95/46/EC]  (1)  of 
Directive 2002/58 reads: 
‘Member States may adopt legislative measures to restrict the scope of the 
rights  and obligations provided for in Article 5, Article 6, Article 8(1), (2), 
(3) and (4), and Article 9 of this Directive when such restriction constitutes a 
necessary,  appropriate  and  proportionate  measure  within  a  democratic 
society  to  safeguard  national  security  (i.e.  State  security),  defence,  public 
security,  and  the  prevention,  investigation,  detection  and  prosecution  of 
criminal  offences  or  of  unauthorised  use  of  the  electronic  communication 


WRITTEN OBSERVATIONS OF THE FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF GERMANY – CASE C-623/17 
system,  as  referred  to  in  Article  13(1)  of  Directive  95/46/EC.  To  this  end, 
Member States may, inter alia, adopt legislative measures providing for the 
retention  of  data  for  a  limited  period  justified  on  the  grounds  laid  down  in 
this  paragraph.  All  the  measures  referred  to  in  this  paragraph  shall  be  in 
accordance  with  the  general  principles  of  Community  law,  including  those 
referred to in Article 6(1) and (2) of the Treaty on European Union. 
 
[…]’ 

Recital 11 of Directive 2002/58 reads as follows: 
‘Like  Directive  95/46/EC,  this  Directive  does  not  address  issues  of 
protection of fundamental rights and freedoms related to activities which are 
not  governed  by  Community  law.  Therefore  it  does  not  alter  the  existing 
balance  between  the  individual’s  right  to  privacy  and  the  possibility  for 
Member  States  to  take  the  measures  referred  to  in  Article  15(1)  of  this 
Directive,  necessary  for  the  protection  of  public  security,  defence,  State 
security (including the economic well-being of the State when the activities 
relate  to  State  security  matters)  and  the  enforcement  of  criminal  law. 
Consequently, this Directive does not affect the ability of Member States to 
carry  out  lawful  interception  of  electronic  communications,  or  take  other 
measures, if necessary for any of these purposes and in accordance with the 
European Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental 
Freedoms,  as  interpreted  by  the  rulings  of  the  European  Court  of  Human 
Rights.  Such  measures  must  be  appropriate,  strictly  proportionate  to  the 
intended  purpose  and  necessary  within  a  democratic  society  and  should  be 
subject to adequate safeguards in accordance with the European Convention 
for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms.’ 

THE FACTS AND QUESTIONS REFERRED FOR A PRELIMINARY 
RULING 

10 
The  applicant  is  a  non-governmental  organisation  that  works  to  defend 
human  rights  at  national  and  international  levels.  The  defendants  are  the 
Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs,  the Secretary of 
State  for  the  Home  Department  and  the  three  security  and  intelligence 
agencies of the United Kingdom, namely the Government Communications 
Headquarters  (GCHQ),  the  Security  Service  (MI5)  and  the  Secret 
Intelligence Service (MI6). 
11 
The  action  before  the  Investigatory  Powers  Tribunal  is  directed,  for  no 
specific  reason,  against  a  provision  of  the  Telecommunications  Act  1984 
(hereinafter:  the  1984  Act).  Pursuant  to  section  94  of  the  1984  Act,  the 
Secretary  of  State  may  give  the  operator  of  a  public  electronic 
communications network such general or specific directions as appear to the 
Secretary of State to be necessary in the interests of national security. On the 
basis  of  such  a  direction,  the  security  and  intelligence  agencies  have 

 

PRIVACY INTERNATIONAL 
acquired  bulk  communications  data  (traffic  and  location  data)  from  the 
network  operators  and  protect  it  from  unauthorised  access  by  third  parties. 
The data is evaluated by the agencies using special, non-targeted techniques 
(e.g. filters and comparisons). 
12 
The Investigatory Powers Tribunal has asked the Court of Justice to answer 
the following questions: 
‘In circumstances where: 
a. 
the  security  and  intelligence  agencies’  capabilities  to  use  bulk 
communications  data  supplied  to  them  are  essential  to  the 
protection of the national security of the United Kingdom, including 
in  the  fields  of  counter-terrorism,  counter-espionage  and  counter-
nuclear proliferation; 
b. 
 a fundamental feature of the security and intelligence agencies’ use 
of the bulk communications data is to discover previously unknown 
threats  to  national  security  by  means  of  non-targeted  bulk 
techniques  which  are  reliant  upon  the  aggregation  of  the  bulk 
communications data  in  one place.  Its  principal utility lies in  swift 
target  identification  and  development,  as  well  as  providing  a  basis 
for action in the face of imminent threat; 
 
c. 
 the  provider  of  an  electronic  communications  network  is  not 
thereafter required to retain the bulk communications data (beyond 
the  period  of  their  ordinary  business  requirements),  which  is 
retained by the State (the security and intelligence agencies) alone; 
 
d. 
 the national court has found (subject to certain reserved issues) that 
the safeguards surrounding the use of bulk communications data by 
the  security  and  intelligence  agencies  are  consistent  with  the 
requirements of the ECHR; and 
 
e. 
 the national court has found that the imposition of the requirements 
specified in § § 119-125 of the judgment of the Grand Chamber in 
joined cases C-203/15  and C-698/15,  Tele2 Sverige AB v Post-och 
telestyrelsen  and  Secretary  of  State  for  the  Home  Department  v 
Watson and Others
 […] (‘the Watson Requirements’), if applicable, 
would frustrate the measures taken to safeguard national security by 
the security and intelligence agencies, and thereby put the national 
security of the United Kingdom at risk; 
1. 
Having  regard  to  Article  4  TEU  and  Article  1(3)  of  Directive 
2002/58/EC  on  privacy  and  electronic  communications  […],  does  a 
requirement  in  a  direction  by  a  Secretary  of  State  to  a  provider  of  an 
electronic  communications  network  that  it  must  provide  bulk 
communications data to the Security and Intelligence Agencies (SIAs) 


WRITTEN OBSERVATIONS OF THE FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF GERMANY – CASE C-623/17 
of  a  Member  State  fall  within  the  scope  of  Union  law  and  of  the  e-
Privacy Directive? 
2. 
If  the  answer  to  Question  (1)  is  ‘yes’,  do  any  of  the  Watson 
Requirements, or any other requirements in addition to those imposed 
by the ECHR, apply to such a direction by a Secretary of State? And, if 
so,  how  and  to  what  extent  do  those  requirements  apply,  taking  into 
account the essential necessity of the SIAs to use bulk acquisition and 
automated  processing  techniques  to  protect  national  security  and  the 
extent  to  which  such  capabilities,  if  otherwise  compliant  with  the 
ECHR,  may  be  critically  impeded  by  the  imposition  of  such 
requirements?’ 
D. 
LEGAL ASSESSMENT 
I. 
First question referred 
13 
By  the  first  question  referred,  the  Investigatory  Powers  Tribunal  seeks 
clarification  as  to  whether  a  direction  from  the  public  authorities  to  an 
operator  of  an  electronic  communications  network  to  provide  bulk 
communications  data  to  the  security  and  intelligence  agencies  under  the 
circumstances set out in the question referred comes within the scope of EU 
law, in particular Directive 2002/58. 
14 
As can be seen from the  grounds for the order for reference, this raises the 
question of whether the collection and described use – which the direction at 
issue is intended to enable - of the bulk communications data by the security 
and intelligence agencies  for the purposes of safeguarding national security 
also  come  within  the  scope  of  EU  law.  The  Federal  Government  takes  the 
view that this is not the case, as Article 1(3) of Directive 2002/58 excludes 
the activities of such agencies from the scope of the directive in accordance 
with the provisions of Article 4(2) TEU. 
1.  Interpretation  of  the  relevant  provisions  regarding  the  scope  of  EU 
law. 

(a) Directive 2002/58 and Directive 95/46 
15 
Pursuant  to  Article 3  of  Directive  2002/58,  the  Directive  is  to  apply  to  the 
processing  of  personal  data  in  connection  with  the  provision  of  publicly 
available  electronic  communications  services  in  public  communications 
networks in the Community. 
16 
Pursuant  to  Article 1(3)  of  Directive  2002/58,  activities  which  fall  outside 
the scope of the Treaty establishing the European Community are excluded. 

 

PRIVACY INTERNATIONAL 
The  Directive  is  not  to  apply  in  any  case  to  activities  concerning  public 
security,  defence  and  State  security.  This  is  also  confirmed,  in  essence,  by 
recital 11 of the Directive. 
17 
As also mentioned by the aforementioned recital, this definition of the scope 
of  Directive  2002/58  follows  on  from  the  identical  wording  in  the  first 
indent of Article 3(2) of Directive 95/46/EC of the European Parliament and 
of  the  Council  of  24 October  1995  on  the  protection  of  individuals  with 
regard to the processing of personal data and on the free movement of such 
data. 3  As  Directive  2002/58  particularises  and  complements  Directive 
95/46, 4 it would seem natural that the directives correspond in terms of their 
material  scope.  The  General  Data  Protection  Regulation, 5  which  will 
replace  Directive  95/46  on  25 May 2018,  also  does  not  apply  to  activities 
that fall outside the scope of Union law, such as activities relating to national 
security for instance (Article 2(2)(a) in conjunction with recital 16). 
18 
Pursuant  to  Article  15(1)  of  Directive 2002/58,  Member  States  may  adopt 
legislative  measures  to  restrict  the  scope  of  certain  rights  and  obligations 
provided for in the Directive when such restriction constitutes a ‘necessary, 
appropriate  and  proportionate  measure  […]  to  safeguard  national  security 
(i.e. State security), defence, public security’, among other things, pursuant 
to Article 13(1) of Directive 95/46. The national legislative measures may in 
particular  provide  for  exceptions  from  the  obligations  laid  down  in 
Articles 5,  6  and  9  of  the  Directive,  in  relation  to  the  protection  of  the 
confidentiality of communications and resulting traffic and location data. 
19 
These  measures  must  be  in  accordance  with  the  general  principles  of  [EU] 
law,  including  those  ‘referred  to  in  Article  6(1)  and  (2)  of  the  Treaty  on 
European Union’. According to established case-law, this reference includes 
in  particular  the  fundamental  rights  now  guaranteed  by  the  Charter  of 
Fundamental Rights of the EU, with the result that Article 15(1) of Directive 
2002/58 must be interpreted in the light of those fundamental rights. 6 
 
3  OJ 1995 L 281, p. 31, last amended by Regulation (EC) No 1882/2003 of the European Parliament 
and of the Council of 29 September 2003 adapting to Council Decision 1999/468/EC the provisions 
relating to committees which assist the Commission in the exercise of its implementing powers laid 
down in instruments subject to the procedure referred to in Article 251 of the EC Treaty, OJ 2003 
L 284, p. 1. 
4  Cf.  Judgment  of  21 December  2016,  Tele2  Sverige  and  Watson  and  Others,  C-203/15  and 
C-698/15, EU:C:2016:970, paragraph 82. 
5  Regulation (EU) 2016/679 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 27 April 2016 on the 
protection  of  natural  persons  with  regard  to  the  processing  of  personal  data  and  on  the  free 
movement  of  such  data,  and  repealing  Directive  95/46/EC  (General  Data  Protection  Regulation), 
(OJ 2016 L 119, p. 1). 
6  Cf.  Tele2  Sverige  and  Watson  and  Others  judgment,  C-203/15  and  C-698/15,  EU:C:2016:970, 
paragraph 91 with further references. 


WRITTEN OBSERVATIONS OF THE FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF GERMANY – CASE C-623/17 
20 
At first  glance, Article 1(3) and Article 15(1) of Directive 2002/58 conflict 
with one another. Whereas Article 1(3) excludes activities that serve specific 
objectives from the scope of the Directive, Article 15(1) allows a restriction 
of the rights and obligations set out in the Directive by measures that serve 
the same purposes as those specified in Article 1(3). In this respect, Article 
15(1) sets specific conditions for such restrictions, in particular compliance 
with the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the EU, yet this requires that the 
scope of the Directive or of EU law be widened for such measures. 
21 
The  Court  acknowledged  this  conflict  in  its  Tele2  Sverige  and  Watson 
judgment  and  resolved  it  in  respect  of  the  national  legislation  at  issue  in 
those proceedings in favour of a widening of the scope of Directive 2002/58 
and compliance with the requirements of Article 15(1) thereof and with the 
fundamental  rights  protected  in  Articles  7,  8  and  11  of  the  Charter  of 
Fundamental Rights of the EU. 7 
22 
However,  the  proceedings  concerned  a  government  authority’s  order  that 
obliged  operators  of  communications  services  to  retain  traffic  and  location 
data  for  law-enforcement  purposes.  In  this  connection,  the  Court 
emphasised, making reference to Article 1(3) of Directive 2002/58, that the 
latter excludes from its scope ‘activities of the State’ in specified fields. 8 In 
relation  to  Article  3  of  Directive  2002/58,  it  states,  by  contrast,  that  the 
Directive  governs  the  activities  of  providers  of  electronic  communications 
services in publicly available communications networks. 9 
23 
The Federal Government takes the view that the statements of the Court are 
therefore based on the distinction as to whether the data processing affected 
by  the  national  measure  is  carried  out  by  the  national  security  authorities 
themselves in relation to the objectives specified in Article 1(3) of Directive 
2002/58  or  whether  the  State  imposes  on  the  providers  of  communications 
services  the  obligation  to  retain  data  to  achieve  the  similarly  worded 
objectives in Article 15(1) of Directive 2002/58. In the former scenario, EU 
law  and  Directive  2002/58  are  not  applicable,  but  the  latter  scenario  falls 
within the scope of EU law and therefore also the directive. 
24 
The Court had already drawn this distinction in the Ireland v Parliament and 
Council
 judgment. 10 In this judgment, it distinguished the data retention that 
 
7  Tele2  Sverige  and  Watson  and  Others  judgment,  C-203/15  and  C-698/15,  EU:C:2016:970, 
paragraph 78. 
8  Tele2  Sverige  and  Watson  and  Others  judgment,  C-203/15  and  C-698/15,  EU:C:2016:970, 
paragraph 69. 
9  Tele2  Sverige  and  Watson  and  Others  judgment,  C-203/15  and  C-698/15,  EU:C:2016:970, 
paragraphs 70 and 74. 
10  Judgment  of  10 February  2009,  Ireland  v  Parliament  and  Council,  C-301/06,  EU:C:2009:68, 
paragraph 91. 
10 
 

PRIVACY INTERNATIONAL 
Directive  2006/24/EC 11  obliged  providers  of  electronic  communications 
services  to  carry  out  from  the  transfer  of  passenger  data  that  takes  place 
within  a  framework  instituted  by  the  public  authorities  in  order  to  ensure 
public security. 12 
25 
In  the  Tele2  Sverige  and  Watson  judgment,  the  Court  emphasised  that  the 
provision  of  Article  15(1)  of  Directive  2002/58  must,  as  an  exception,  be 
interpreted  strictly,  as  it  enables  the  scope  of  the  Directive’s  obligation  of 
principle to ensure the confidentiality of communications and related traffic 
data to be restricted. 13 
26 
In  the  context  in  the  present  case,  the  question  of  whether  an  activity  is 
governed by EU law must be objectively determined on the basis of whether 
the Member States have conferred on the European Union the corresponding 
competences  in  the  Treaties  to  attain  the  objectives  set  out  therein  (Article 
5(1) and (2) TEU). 
27 
The  European  Union  does  not  have  legislative  power  in  respect  of 
legislation that falls outside the scope of EU law. The scope of the clarifying 
addition that the Directive is not to apply in any case to activities concerning 
public  security,  defence,  State  security  (including  the  economic  well-being 
of  the  State  when  the  activities  relate  to  State  security  matters)  and  the 
activities of the State in areas of criminal law must also be determined on the 
basis of the power conferred on the European Union under primary law and 
its limits. 
2.  Conferral  under  primary  law  and  limits  in  respect  of  action  of  the 
European Union, in particular in Article 4(2) TEU 

28 
The  Federal  Government  takes  the  view  that  there  is  no  legal  basis  for 
conferring on the European Union the power to  regulate the activity of the 
security  and  intelligence  agencies  in  order  to  safeguard  national  security. 
Article  4(2)  TEU  expressly  leaves  sole  responsibility  in  this  area  to  the 
Member  States.  As  EU  law  is  not  being  implemented,  the  Charter  of 
Fundamental  Rights  of the EU also  does not  apply to  such activities of the 
national  security  and  intelligence  agencies  pursuant  to  the  first  sentence  of 
Article 51(1) of the Charter. 
 
11  Directive  2006/24/EC  of  the  European  Parliament  and  of  the  Council  of  15 March  2006  on  the 
retention  of  data  generated  or  processed  in  connection  with  the  provision  of  publicly  available 
electronic communications services or of public communications networks and amending Directive 
2002/58/EC (OJ 2006 L 105, p. 54), annulled by judgment of 8 April 2014, Digital Rights Ireland 
and Others
, C-293/12 and C-594/12, EU:C:2014:238. 
12  See, in this respect, judgment of 30 May 2006, Parliament v Council and Commission, C-317/04 
and C-318/04, EU:C:2006:346, paragraph 56 et seq.  
13  Tele2 Sverige and Watson judgment, C-203/15 and C-698/15, EU:C:2016:970, paragraph 89. 
11 

WRITTEN OBSERVATIONS OF THE FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF GERMANY – CASE C-623/17 
(a)  No  legal  basis  for  conferring  power  on  the  European  Union  to 
regulate the activities of security and intelligence agencies 

29 
Directive  2002/58  was  based  on  Article  95  EC  (now  Article  114  TFEU). 
Aside  from  the  protection  of  fundamental  rights,  it  serves  to  ensure  the 
functioning of the internal market, as is clear from recital 8 thereof: 
‘Legal,  regulatory  and  technical  provisions  adopted  by  the  Member  States 
concerning  the  protection  of  personal  data,  privacy  and  the  legitimate 
interest  of legal  persons, in  the electronic  communication sector, should  be 
harmonised in order to avoid obstacles to the internal market  for electronic 
communication in accordance with Article 14 of the Treaty. Harmonisation 
should be limited to requirements necessary to guarantee that the promotion 
and  development  of  new  electronic  communications  services  and  networks 
between Member States are not hindered.’ 
30 
However,  a  connection  with  the  internal  market  is  ruled  out  if  national 
provisions  relating  to  the  safeguarding  of  national  security  within  the 
meaning  of  the  third  sentence  of  Article 4(2) TEU  govern  the  specific 
activity  of  national  security  and  intelligence  agencies.  Article  114  TFEU 
therefore  cannot  be  used  as  a  legal  basis  for  the  harmonisation  of  such 
provisions. The distinction made by the Tele2 Sverige and Watson judgment 
between  requirements  for  activities  of  the  State,  on  the  one  hand,  and 
requirements  for  activities  of  the  provider  of  electronic  communications 
services, on the other hand, reflects  the scope of the conferral  of power  on 
the  European  Union  to  lay  down  rules  on  harmonisation  in  the  internal 
market. 
31 
Nor is there a legal basis elsewhere in the FEU Treaty for the regulation of 
national  security  within  the  meaning  of  the  third  sentence  of 
Article 4(2) TEU. 
32 
Accordingly, Article 16(2) TFEU confers on the European Union the power 
to lay down rules relating to the protection of individuals with regard to the 
processing  of  personal  data  by  Member  States  only  when  the  latter  are 
carrying out activities which come within the scope of EU law. 
33 
Although  there  is  shared  competence  between  the  European  Union  and  the 
Member States for rules relating to the area of freedom, security and justice 
pursuant to Article 4(2)(j) TFEU, the specific legal bases in Title V of Part 
Three  of  the  FEU  Treaty  do  not  establish  competence  for  the  European 
Union  to  regulate  the  specific  activity  of  the  security  and  intelligence 
agencies  of  the  Member  States  in  relation  to  the  safeguarding  of  national 
security. 
34 
As  competences  have  not  been  conferred  upon  the  European  Union, 
responsibility  in  this  area  remains  with  the  Member  States  (Article  4(1) 
12 
 

PRIVACY INTERNATIONAL 
TEU).  This  also  follows  from  Article  4(2)  TEU  and  Article 73  TFEU,  as 
will now be explained in more detail. 
(b)  Reservation  of  national  security  to  the  Member  States  (Article 4(2) 
TEU) 

35 
Pursuant to Article 4(2) TEU, the European Union is required to respect the 
essential  State  functions,  including  ensuring  the  territorial  integrity  of  the 
State,  maintaining  law  and  order  and  safeguarding  national  security.  In 
particular, national security remains the sole responsibility of each Member 
State. 
36 
The Court has not yet defined the term ‘national security’ – unlike the term 
‘public  security’,  which  is  used  in  Article  36,  Article  45(3),  Article  52(1) 
and  Article  65(1)(b)  TFEU. 14  In  particular,  the  Promusicae  judgment 15 
does not  contain an interpretation of the term  ‘national security’ within the 
meaning  of  Article 4(2) TEU,  but  instead  merely  repeats  the  definition  of 
‘State security’ in Article 15(1) of Directive 2002/58. 
37 
In  terms  of  a  systematic  interpretation,  the  fact  that  the  provision  in  which 
the term ‘national security’ is located is Article 4(2) TEU is indicative of a 
reservation of powers to the Member States. In a prominent place in Title I – 
Common  Provisions  –  of  the  TEU,  it  is  located  in  Article  4  TEU,  in  the 
provision  that  –  together  with  the  principles  of  conferral,  subsidiarity  and 
(power-limiting)  proportionality  laid down in  Article 5(1) TEU  –  relates to 
the fundamental structure of the European federal system. 
38 
This interpretation is supported by Article 73 TFEU, which likewise uses the 
term  ‘national  security’.  According  to  this  provision,  ‘it  shall  be  open  to 
Member  States  to  organise  between  themselves  and  under  their 
responsibility  such  forms  of  cooperation  and  coordination  as  they  deem 
appropriate  between  the  competent  departments  of  their  administrations 
responsible for safeguarding national security’. This provision is intended to 
guarantee  cooperation  between  the  Member  States  in  the  area  of  internal 
security  outside  the  EU’s  institutional  framework.  It  is  a  primary-law 
reference  to  intergovernmental  cooperation  in  the  area  of  Title  V  of  Part 
Three  of  the  TFEU.  In  accordance  with  the  second  and  third  sentences  of 
Article 4(2) TEU,  therefore,  an extension of the  shared competence for the 
 
14  Cf., in this respect, judgment of 26 October 1999, Sirdar, C-273/97, EU:C:1999:523, paragraph 17; 
judgment  of  11 January 2000,  Kreil,  C-285/98,  EU:C:2000:2,  paragraph  15;  judgment  of 
13 July 2000, Albore, C-423/98, EU:C:2000:401, paragraph 18; judgment of 11 March 2003, Dory
C-186/01, EU:C:2003:146, paragraph 32. 
15  Judgment of 29 January 2008, Promusicae, C-275/06, EU:C:2008:54, paragraph 49. 
13 

WRITTEN OBSERVATIONS OF THE FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF GERMANY – CASE C-623/17 
area of freedom, security and justice to rules relating to the safeguarding of 
national security is implicitly ruled out. 
39 
Article  73  TFEU  clarifies  at  the  same  time  that  the  reservation  of  national 
security  is  directed  in  particular  at  the  activity  of  the  Member  States’ 
security  and  intelligence  agencies  in  this  area  (‘competent  departments  of 
their administrations responsible for safeguarding national security’). 
(c) The term ‘national security’ in the case-law of the ECtHR 
40 
Since,  pursuant  to  Article 6(3)  TEU,  fundamental  rights,  as  guaranteed  by 
the  European  Convention  for  the  Protection  of  Human  Rights  and 
Fundamental  Freedoms  and as they result from  the constitutional  traditions 
common  to  the  Member  States,  are  to  constitute  general  principles  of  the 
European Union’s law, the case-law of the ECtHR in relation to Article 8(2) 
and  Article 10(2)  of  the  ECHR  can  firstly  be  used  to  interpret  the  term 
‘national security’. 
41 
Accordingly,  the  ECtHR  stated  the  following  in  its  Klass  and  Others  v 
Germany judgment: 16 
‘Democratic  societies  nowadays  find  themselves  threatened  by  highly 
sophisticated  forms  of  espionage  and  by  terrorism,  with  the  result  that  the 
State must be able, in order effectively to counter such threats, to undertake 
the  secret  surveillance  of  subversive  elements  operating  within  its 
jurisdiction.  The  Court  has  therefore  to  accept  that  the  existence  of  some 
legislation  granting  powers  of  secret  surveillance  over  the  mail,  post  and 
telecommunications  is,  under  exceptional  conditions,  necessary  in  a 
democratic  society  in  the  interests  of  national  security  and/or  for  the 
prevention of disorder or crime.’ 
42 
Furthermore, in its Observer and Guardian v United Kingdom judgment, 17 
the ECtHR treated secret information of the British Secret Service MI5 as a 
matter of national security within the meaning of Article 10(2) ECHR. 
 
16   ECtHR, judgment of 18 November 1978 - 5029/71 - Klass and Others v. Germany, paragraph 48, 
to  which  the  ECtHR  made  reference  in  its  judgment  of  5 July 2001  -  38321/97  -  Erdem  v. 
Germany
, paragraph 64. 
17   ECtHR, judgment of 26 November 1991 - 13585/88 - Observer and Guardian v. United Kingdom
paragraphs 56, 69. 
14 
 

PRIVACY INTERNATIONAL 
(d) Interpretation of EU law by the Bundesverfassungsgericht (Federal 
Constitutional Court) 

43 
Against  the  backdrop  of  the  division  of  competence  between  the  Member 
States  and  the  European  Union  as  described  above,  the  German  Federal 
Constitutional  Court,  for  instance,  also  assumes  that  the  establishment  of  a 
database  for  various  German  security  agencies  to  combat  international 
terrorist  (‘Antiterrordatei’  –  anti-terror  database)  falls  solely  within  the 
competence of the Member States. In its judgment of 24 April 2013, it states 
the following in this regard: 18 
‘The  constitutional  complaint  does  not  give  rise  to  a  need  for  preliminary 
ruling  proceedings  before  the  Court  of  Justice  of  the  European  Union 
pursuant to Article 267 TFEU for the purposes of clarifying the scope of the 
protection of fundamental rights under EU law in relation to data exchange 
between  various  security  agencies  within  a  database,  as  governed  by  the 
Antiterrordateigesetz (Law on the anti-terror database). This is also the case 
with  regard  to  the  fundamental  right  to  the  protection  of  personal  data 
pursuant to Article 8 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European 
Union (Charter, CFR). The reason for this is that the European fundamental 
rights  of  the  Charter  are  not  applicable  to  the  case  here  for  decision.  The 
contested provisions must be assessed against the fundamental rights of the 
Grundgesetz  (Basic  Law)  simply  because  they  are  not  determined  by  EU 
law (…). Consequently, this is also not a case involving the implementation 
of EU law, which is the only situation in which the Member States could be 
bound by the Charter (first sentence of Article 51(1) CFR).’ 
44 
The Federal Constitutional Court also states that it was beyond doubt – and 
also not  in  need of further clarification according to  the criteria of the  acte 
clair
  case-law  of  the  Court  of  Justice 19  –  that  cooperation  between  the 
German  security  agencies  and  intelligence  agencies  in  the  context  of  a 
database did not constitute implementation of EU law within the meaning of 
the  first  sentence  of  Article 51(1)  of  the  Charter  of  Fundamental  Rights  of 
the  EU.  Regarding  Directive  95/46,  this  was  apparent  from  Article  3(2) 
alone, pursuant  to  which  the processing of  data concerning public security, 
State  security  and  the  activities  of  the  State  in  areas  of  criminal  law  was 
expressly excluded from the scope of the directive. 
45 
The  establishment  and  development  of  the  anti-terror  database  was  not 
determined  by  EU  law  in  other  respects  either.  A  merely  indirect  effect  on 
legal  relationships  regulated  under  EU  law  was  not  sufficient  for  an 
 
18  Federal Constitutional Court, judgment  of 24 April  2013 - 1 BvR 1215/07  - (BVerfGE 133, 277, 
313 f., paragraph 88). 
19  Judgment of 6 October 1982, C.I.L.F.I.T, 283/81, EU:C:1982:3351, paragraph 16 et seq. 
15 

WRITTEN OBSERVATIONS OF THE FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF GERMANY – CASE C-623/17 
examination in the light of  EU law. 20 The applicability of the fundamental 
rights of the European Union was therefore excluded from the outset. It was 
directly  apparent  from  both  the  wording  of  Article  51(2)  of  the  Charter  of 
Fundamental  Rights  of  the  European  Union  and  Article  6(1)  TEU  that  the 
Charter did not extend the field of application of EU law beyond the powers 
of  the  European  Union,  and  it  did  not  establish  any  new  power  or  task  for 
the  European  Union,  or  modify  powers  and  tasks  as  defined  in  the 
Treaties. 21 
3. Conclusions for the present case 
46 
The  Federal  Government  takes  the  view  that  the  findings  in  the  Tele2 
Sverige  and  Watson  
judgment  are  not  transferrable  to  the  acquisition  and 
evaluation of bulk communications data by the intelligence services that are 
the subject of the main proceedings. 
47 
The Tele2 Sverige and Watson judgment concerned the question of whether 
and  to  what  extent  there  is  an  obligation  for  private  providers  of 
communications  services  to  retain  communications  data  and,  on  the 
instruction  of  the  authorities,  make  it  available  to  the  State  for  law 
enforcement  purposes,  and  thus  concerned  the  storage  and  transfer  of  data 
by  private  providers  of  communications  services.  The  situation  to  be 
considered in the present case, by contrast, relates to data collection and data 
processing by the intelligence agencies themselves. In particular, the Court’s 
argument  that,  having  regard  to  the  general  structure  of  Directive 2002/58, 
and  for  the  sake  of  its  practical  effectiveness,  it  could  not  be  assumed  that 
the  legislative  measures  referred  to  in  Article  15(1)  of  Directive  2002/58 
were excluded from the scope of that directive, as that provision necessarily 
presupposed  that  Directive 2002/58  was  applicable  to  measures  relating  to 
the retention of data for the purpose of combating crime, is not transferable 
to  the  present  case. 22  The  reason  for  this  is  that  Directive 2002/58  itself 
presupposes compliance with  EU primary law, meaning that  its application 
to  matters  of  national  security  within  the  meaning  of  Article 4(2) TEU, 
which,  moreover,  are  the  sole  responsibility  of  the  Member  States,  is 
necessarily excluded. 
 
20   Here  the  Federal  Constitutional  Court  refers  to  the  judgment  of  18 December  1997,  Annibaldi
C-309/96, EU:C:1997:631, paragraph 22. 
21  Cf. Federal Constitutional Court 133, 277, 315, paragraph 90; cf. also judgment  of 15 November 
2011, Dereci and Others, C-256/11, EU:C:2011:734, paragraph 71; judgment of 8 November 2012, 
Iida, C-40/11, EU:C:2012:691, paragraph 78; judgment of 27 November 2012, Pringle, C-370/12, 
EU:C:2012:756, paragraphs 179 and 180. 
22  Tele2  Sverige  and  Watson  and  Others  judgment,  C-203/15  and  C-698/15,  EU:C:2016:970, 
paragraph 73. 
16 
 

PRIVACY INTERNATIONAL 
48 
The Federal Government takes the view that an obligation on the part of the 
provider  of  a  communications  service  to  make  bulk  communications  data 
available  to  the  security  and  intelligence  agencies  for  the  purposes  of 
safeguarding  national  security  does  not  come  within  the  scope  of 
Directive 2002/58 either if, on the basis of the direction, the provider merely 
provides  a  technical  support  service  so  that  the  intelligence  agencies  can 
perform their duties. 
49 
The provider of a communications service to which a direction can be given 
pursuant  to  section 94  of  the  1984  Act  is  not  obliged  to  retain  data  itself  – 
unlike  in  the  case  according  to  the  legislation  at  issue  in  the  Tele2  Sverige 
and Watson
 cases. 
50 
Another difference vis-à-vis those proceedings is that the data in the present 
case is supposed to be provided for activities of the security and intelligence 
agencies  in  order  to  safeguard  national  security  and  not  for  the  purpose  of 
combating  crime.  Although  Article 1(3)  of  Directive 2002/58  also  restricts 
the  scope  of  the  directive  in  relation  to  the  activity  of  the  State  in  areas  of 
criminal law, the special reservation of competence to the Member States in 
Article 4(2) TEU relates to national security. This reservation must be taken 
into account if a provider of a communications service is obliged to provide 
bulk  communications  data  intended  to  enable  the  public  authorities  to 
identify threats to national security. 
II.  No  answer  to  the  second  question  referred  –  in  the  alternative: 
consequences  of  transferring  the  Tele2  
case-law  to  the  activity  of 
intelligence agencies 

51 
There is no need to answer the second question referred due to the outcome 
of the first question. 
52 
The  referring  tribunal  has  already  explained  the  serious  consequences  that 
application  of  the  requirements  set  out  in  the  Tele2  Sverige  and  Watson 
judgment would have for the work of the security and intelligence agencies 
in the United Kingdom. The Federal Government concurs with the concerns 
expressed  by  the  referring  tribunal  and  would  additionally  like  to 
demonstrate below that  the intelligence  services in Germany  are  dependent 
on  access  to  bulk  communications  data  in  a  comparable  way.  Transferring 
the  requirements  of  the  Tele2  Sverige  and  Watson  judgment  would  also 
make their activities significantly more difficult. 
1. Activity of the intelligence agencies in Germany 
53 
In Germany, in order to obtain intelligence from abroad that is of importance 
to  the  foreign  and  security  policy  of  the  Federal  Republic  of  Germany,  the 
Bundesnachrichtendienst  (Federal  Intelligence  Service,  BND)  collects  the 
17 

WRITTEN OBSERVATIONS OF THE FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF GERMANY – CASE C-623/17 
required information and evaluates it (Paragraph 1(2) of the Gesetz über den 
Bundesnachrichtendienst  (Law  on  the  Federal  Intelligence  Service;  ‘the 
BND  Law’ 23).  The  task  of  the  offices  of  the  Federal  Government  and 
Federal  States  tasked  with  protection  of  the  constitution  is  to  collect  and 
evaluate  information,  in  particular  factual  and  personal  data,  messages  and 
documents regarding efforts directed against the free basic democratic order, 
existence or security of the Federal  Republic  or a  constituent  Federal  Land 
(Paragraph 3(1)  No 1  of  the  Gesetz  über  die  Zusammenarbeit  des  Bundes 
und  der  Länder  in  Angelegenheiten  des  Verfassungsschutzes  und  über  das 
Bundesamt für Verfassungsschutz (Law on cooperation between the Federal 
Government  and  the  Länder  in  matters  relating  to  the  protection  of  the 
constitution  and  on  the  Federal  Office  for  the  Protection  of  the 
Constitution 24). 
54 
The  BND  operates  the  so-called  ‘strategische  Fernmeldeaufklärung’ 
(strategic signals intelligence). This  is  governed in  German law in  both  the 
Gesetz  zur  Beschränkung  des  Brief-,  Post-  und  Fernmeldegeheimnisses 
(Law  on  the  restriction  of  confidentiality  of  correspondence,  mail  and 
telecommunications; ‘the Article 10 Law’) and the BND  Law and refers to 
the  collection  of  data  from  data  flows  (e.g.  data  cables).  Strategic  signals 
intelligence  is  thus  the  umbrella  term  for  so-called  ‘Ausland-Ausland-
Fernmeldeaufklärung’  (‘foreign-foreign  signals  intelligence’)  pursuant  to 
Paragraph  6  of  the  BND  Law,  that  is  to  say,  domestically  gathering 
intelligence on foreign persons located abroad, and for strategic restrictions 
within  the  framework  of  the  Article 10  Law  (Paragraphs  5  and  8  of  the 
Article 10  Law),  which,  unlike  the  ‘foreign-foreign  signals  intelligence’, 
relate  to  the  communication,  protected  by  Article  10  of  the  Basic  Law,  of 
German  nationals,  including  domestic  legal  persons  or  foreign  nationals 
residing in Germany. 
55 
Unlike  in  the  case  of  telecommunications  surveillance,  strategic  signals 
intelligence  does  not  involve  the  surveillance  of  specific  participants,  or 
their  telecommunications,  in  respect  of  whom  there  are  factual  reasons  to 
suspect  that  they  are  planning,  committing  or  have  committed  certain 
offences. Rather, the purpose of the measures  – in line with the task of the 
BND  –  is  to  conduct  advance  surveillance  of  specific  high-risk  situations 
and  to  obtain  intelligence  from  abroad  that  is  of  importance  to  the  foreign 
and  security  policy  of  the  Federal  Republic  of  Germany.  Accordingly,  it 
does  not  involve  an  individualised  or  situation-specific  need  for  the 
intelligence services to collect data due to a particular event. 
 
23  Law  on  the  Federal  Intelligence  Service  of  20 December  1990  (BGBl.  I,  p. 2954,  2979),  last 
amended by Article 4 of the Law of 30 June 2017 (BGBl. (Federal Law Gazette) I, p. 2097). 
24  Bundesverfassungsschutzgesetz (Federal Law on the protection of the constitution) of 20 December 
1990  (BGBl.  I,  p. 2954,  2970),  last  amended  by  Article  2  of  the  Law  of  30 June  2017  (BGBl.  I, 
p. 2097). 
18 
 

PRIVACY INTERNATIONAL 
56 
Pursuant  to  both  the  Article  10  Law  and  Paragraph  6(2)  of  the  BND  Law, 
content  data  regarding  specific  situations  is  collected  only  on  the  basis  of 
appropriate and specific search terms, thus in a targeted manner. The search 
terms  may  lead  to  the  targeted  recording  of  one  of  several  communication 
partners  if,  for  example,  a  telephone  number  is  used  as  a  search  term. 
However,  another  communication  partner  is  either  not  recorded  at  all  or  is 
only recorded in a non-targeted manner, i.e. ‘randomly’, something which is 
technically and practically unavoidable, but also beneficial in terms of being 
able to understand the context of the communication. 
57 
In the case of the ‘foreign-foreign signals  intelligence’ of the BND, traffic 
data  can  also  be  collected  without  the  use  of  search  terms.  Traffic  data 
whose  necessity  for  the  performance  of  the  BND’s  tasks  has  not  yet  been 
specifically  assessed  can  be  stored  by  the  BND  for  up  to  six  months 
(Paragraph  6(6)  of  the  BND  Law).  In  this  case,  the  traffic  data  is  not 
collected in a general  and indiscriminate manner within the meaning of the 
judgment of the Court of Justice in the Tele2 Sverige and Watson cases, but 
merely collected on routes that contain data of relevance to the BND’s tasks. 
58 
In  principle,  data  is  collected  by  the  BND  itself.  In  individual  cases, 
providers of telecommunications services may be obliged to extract data. In 
this case, however, the service provider’s obligation to cooperate is limited 
to  enabling  surveillance  of  the  data  concerned  by  the  BND.  Under  no 
circumstances are providers of telecommunications services obliged to store 
data themselves for such purposes. In this respect, the traffic data storage by 
the BND is not comparable with the so-called data retention by providers of 
telecommunications  services, which was the subject of the judgment of the 
court in the Tele2 Sverige and Watson cases. Rather, the data relevant to the 
intelligence  services  is  not  stored  by  the  telecommunications  service 
providers, but is securely stored by the BND in its own systems. 
59 
The  BND  may  collect  and  process  traffic  data  only  within  the  context  of 
‘foreign-foreign  signals  intelligence’  or  in  the  context  of  restrictions 
pursuant  to  the  Article  10  Law.  Unlike  in  the  case  of  data  retention  by 
private service providers, the statutory provisions that enable the intelligence 
services to store traffic data are directed at public authorities. By contrast, in 
the case of strategic signals intelligence, private service providers are merely 
obliged  to  tolerate  the  collection  of  data  on  their  premises  by  the  BND  by 
means  of  technology  to  be  provided  by  the  latter. 25  Encroachment  on  the 
rights of the persons affected by data traffic storage is therefore attributable 
to  the  BND,  not  private  service  providers.  Obligations  of  providers  of 
 
25  Cf.  Paragraph  27(3)  of  the Verordnung  über  die  technische und  organisatorische  Umsetzung  von 
Maßnahmen  zur  Überwachung  der  Telekommunikation  (Regulation  on  the  technical  and 
organisational  implementation  of  measures  for  monitoring  telecommunications),  in  the  version 
published  on  11 July  2017  (BGBl.  I,  p. 2316),  which  was  amended  by  Article  16  of  the  Law  of 
17 August 2017 (BGBl. I, p. 3202). 
19 

WRITTEN OBSERVATIONS OF THE FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF GERMANY – CASE C-623/17 
telecommunications  services  that  serve  to  support  the  BND  in  the 
performance  of  its  duties  are  only  governed  in  individual  provisions, 
whereby these obligations to contribute are confined to enabling surveillance 
by  the  BND.  The  provider  of  telecommunications  services  is  also  not 
hindered  in  terms  of  its  business  activity  that  is  relevant  to  the  internal 
market. Accordingly, it does not have to retain any data itself, invest in data 
collection  techniques  or  provide  its  own  staff  to  collect,  hold  or  even 
evaluate telecommunications data. 
60 
By  contrast,  in  the  case  of  the  data  retention  that  was  the  subject  of  the 
judgment  of  the  court  in  the  Tele2  Sverige  and  Watson  cases,  there  is  a 
triangular  relationship  between  law  enforcement  authorities,  providers  of 
telecommunications services and the person concerned: the law enforcement 
authorities  would  like  to  use  the  data  under  certain  conditions.  The  service 
provider retains the data using its own infrastructure of technical and human 
resources  and  releases  it  to  the  law  enforcement  authorities  upon  request. 
The person concerned is exposed to two parties here – unlike in the case of 
traffic data storage by the intelligence services. 
2.  Consequences  of  transferring  the  requirements  of  the  Tele2  Sverige 
and Watson
 judgment to the activity of the intelligence services 
61.  In  the  Tele2  Sverige  and  Watson  judgment,  the  Court  of Justice  imposed  a 
series  of  requirements  on  the  access  of  law  enforcement  and  security 
authorities to traffic data: restriction of access to bulk communications data, 
prior authorisation for the access, obligation to inform the person concerned, 
storage  of  all  data  within  the  EU.  If  these  requirements  were  to  be 
transferred to the activity of the intelligence services, which is of a different 
nature  and  oriented  towards  advance  surveillance,  the  intelligence  services 
would be significantly hindered in the proper performance of their tasks.  
62 
In particular, a restriction of the non-targeted access to bulk communications 
data  so  that  it  is  based  on  ‘special  situations’  and  ‘specific  cases’  is  not 
transferrable  to  the  automated  bulk  processing  of  such  data  by  the  BND. 
This  is  because  non-targeted  access  to  telecommunications  data  serves  to 
identify  initially  unknown  threats  to  national  security  via  the  use  of 
appropriate filter criteria as well as the subsequent identification of networks 
in the case of a threat not identified until a later point. 
63 
A  restriction  of  the  possibility  for  the  intelligence  services  to  collect  data 
would  lead  to  significant  losses  of  information  for  the  BND  and  could  for 
instance prevent the timely identification of accomplices in attacks. If access 
to  this  data  were  restricted,  these  possibilities,  which  are  important  for 
national  security,  would  be  lost  and  it  would  lead  to  significant  losses  of 
intelligence.  If  the  data  protection  acquis  under  EU  law  were  to  be 
applicable whenever providers of telecommunications services are involved 
20 
 

PRIVACY INTERNATIONAL 
in  the  activity  of  the  intelligence  services  in  some  way,  Article  4(2)  TEU 
would  be  impermissibly  restricted  if  an  intelligence  service  has  to  work 
together  with  private  third  parties  in  its  activity  in  the  interests  of  national 
security. 
64 
For  the  requirement  of  prior  authorisation  on  a  case-by-case  basis,  the 
Federal  Government  –  like  the  referring  tribunal  –  also  identifies 
considerable  difficulties  in  determining  the  point  in  time,  as  the  activity  of 
the  intelligence  services  that  is  oriented  towards  the  acquisition  of 
information  from  abroad  is  not  dependent  on  specific  offences  or 
investigative  procedures.  Considerable  practical  problems  can  also  be  seen 
here if a form of general obligation to inform the persons concerned were to 
be  adopted.  Specific  obligations  to  inform  are  already  governed  in  the 
sectoral  laws  for  the  intelligence  services.  The  persons  concerned  are 
regularly  located  abroad;  there  is  often  a  threat  to  national  security 
irrespective  of  the  identity  of  an  individual  person  and  irrespective  of  the 
circumstances of a specific investigative procedure. A general obligation to 
inform  could  therefore  result  in  confidential  information  regarding  the 
methodology  for  obtaining  information  having  to  be  disclosed.  This  would 
have  considerable  consequences  for  the  BND’s  ability  to  acquire 
information  and,  in  a  comparable  manner,  for  the  Federal  Office  for  the 
Protection  of  the  Constitution,  with  the  result  that  important  intelligence 
sources would dry up. 
3.  No  reduction  in  the  level  of  protection  of  fundamental  rights  if 
Directive 2002/58  and  the  Charter  of  Fundamental  Rights  of  the  EU 
were not applied 

65 
Non-application  of  Directive  2002/58  and  of  the  Charter  of  Fundamental 
Rights of the EU will not lead to a reduction in the level of protection for the 
fundamental rights of the telecommunications users affected by measures of 
intelligence  services.  It  is  true  that  reserving  competence  in  matters  of 
national security to the Member States means that the scope of EU law does 
not  include  activities  of  the  security  and  intelligence  services,  and  the 
Charter of Fundamental Rights of the EU is therefore inapplicable pursuant 
to the first sentence of Article 51(1) thereof. 
66 
The  national  (constitutional)  law  of  the  Member  States,  including  the 
fundamental rights guaranteed in that law, applies instead. 
67 
The guarantees of the ECHR also apply. 
E. 
CONCLUSION 
68 
Against  this  background,  the  German  Federal  Government  takes  the  view 
that the first question referred should be answered as follows: 
21 

WRITTEN OBSERVATIONS OF THE FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF GERMANY – CASE C-623/17 
A  direction  by  a  public  authority  to  a  provider  of  an  electronic 
communications  network  that  it  must  provide  bulk  communications 
data to the security and intelligence agencies of a Member State for the 
purposes of safeguarding national security falls, in the light of Article 
4(2)  TEU,  within  the  sole  responsibility  of  each  individual  Member 
State. 
 
[signature] 
 
Henze 
22