This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Submissions to CJEU in Privacy International and LQDN et al.'.


 
EUROPEAN COMMISSION 
 
 
LEGAL SERVICE 
  The Director-General 
 
Brussels, 10 December 2020 
By email 
 
Dr TJ McIntyre 
Associate Professor 
UCD Sutherland School of Law 
Belfield, Dublin 4 
Ireland 
 
ask+request-8688-
xxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxx.xxx 

 
Subject: 
Request for access to documents 
Ref.: 
Your request of 22 October 2020, registered on 28 October 2020, under reference: 
GestDem 2020/6376 
Dear Dr McIntyre, 
I  refer  to  your  above-referenced  request,  under  Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001  regarding 
public access to documents1, concerning “all written submissions made to the Court in Case 
C-623/17 and Joined Cases C-511/18, C-512/18 and C-520/18
.”  
In accordance with the fair solution proposal2 agreed upon by email of 28 October 2020, the 
Legal Service has registered your request to the written submissions made: 
-  by all the parties in Case C-623/17, Privacy International3
-  by  Ireland  in  Joined  Cases  C-511/18,  La  Quadrature  du  Net  and  C-512/18  French  Data 
Network and in Case C-520/18, Ordre des barreaux francophones et germanophone 4
Please  be  informed  that  Cases  C-511/18  and  C-512/18  were  joined  for  the  purpose  of  the 
written  and  the  oral  procedures  and  for  the  judgment.  Case  C-520/18  was  joined  to  Cases     
C-511/18 and C-512/18 for the purpose of the judgment only.  
                                                 
  Regulation  (EC)  No 1049/2001 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 30 May 2001 regarding 
public access to European Parliament, Council and Commission documents (OJ L 145, 31.05.2001, page 43). 
2   Reference Ares(2020)6031914. 
3  Judgment  of  the  Court  of  Justice  of  6  October  2020,  Case  C-623/17,  Privacy  International  v  Secretary  of 
State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs and Others, ECLI:EU:C:2020:790.  
4  Judgment  of  the  Court  of  Justice  of  6  October  2020,  Joined  Cases  C-511/18,  C-512/18  and  C-520/18,  La 
Quadrature du Net and Others v Premier ministre and Others, ECLI:EU:C:2020:791.  
 
European Commission, B-1049 Brussels / Europese Commissie, B-1049 Brussel - Belgium. Telephone: (32-2) 299 11 11. 
Office: BERL 1/80. Telephone: direct line (32-2) 29-61386. Fax: (32-2) 295 24 87. 
E-mail: xxxxxx.xxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xx.xxxxxx.xx 

 
1.  IDENTIFICATION OF THE DOCUMENTS 
The written observations of the following parties have been identified as matching the terms 
of your request: 
Case C-623/17 
1. 
European Commission; 
2. 
Belgian Government; 
3. 
Cypriot Government;  
4. 
Czech Government; 
5. 
Estonian Government; 
6. 
French Government; 
7. 
German Government; 
8. 
Hungarian Government; 
9. 
Irish Government; 
10.  Latvian Government; 
11.  Norwegian Government; 
12.  Polish Government; 
13.  Portuguese Government; 
14.  Spanish Government; 
15.  Swedish Government; 
16.  The Netherlands Government; 
17.  United Kingdom Government; 
Joined Cases C-511/18 and C-512/18  
18.  Irish Government; 
Case C-520/18 
19.  Irish Government. 
2.  WRITTEN OBSERVATIONS SUBMITTED BY THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION (DOCUMENT 1) 
The Commission’s  written  observations in  Case C-623/17  have been disclosed by the Legal 
Service following a previous request for access under Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001. They 
are publicly available on the Legal Service’s website following the link:  
https://ec.europa.eu/dgs/legal_service/submissions_cour_en.htm 
Although  not  concerned  by  the  request,  I  would  like  to  inform  you  that  the  Commission’s 
written  observations  in  Joined Cases C-511/18 and C-512/18 and in Case C-520/18 are also 
available on the Legal Service’s web mentioned above.  
You may reuse those documents free of charge provided that the source is acknowledged and that 
you do not distort their original meaning or message. Please note that the Commission does not 
assume liability stemming from the reuse.  
3.  WRITTEN OBSERVATIONS SUBMITTED BY THE OTHER PARTIES (DOCUMENTS 2 TO 19) 
As  far  as  the  written  observations  of  the  other  parties  are  concerned,  the  Commission  has 
consulted  the  authors  of  the  respective  documents  on  their  disclosure,  in  accordance  with 
Article 4(4) of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001. 
 


 
Following these consultations, I would like to inform you that: 
– 
the  Governments  of  Belgium,  the  Czech  Republic,  Estonia,  Germany,  Latvia,  Poland, 
Portugal, Sweden, The Netherlands and the United Kingdom (documents 2, 4, 5, 7, 10, 
12, 13, 15, 16 and 17) have agreed to the disclosure of their written observations.  
Please  note  however  that  some  personal  data  mentioned  in  document  17  has  been 
redacted, as will be explained in point 3.1.1 below; 
– 
the Governments of Cyprus, France, Hungary, Ireland and Spain (documents 3, 6, 8, 9, 
14,  18  and  19)  have  informed  the  Commission  that  they  refuse  access  to  their  written 
observations, considering that they are covered by the exception provided for in Article 
4(2),  second  indent,  of  Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001  (“protection  of  court 
proceedings
”), as explained in point 3.2 below. 
– 
the  Government  of  Norway  (document  11)  has  not  replied  to  the  Commission's 
consultation. 
3.1.  Disclosure of the written observations submitted by the Governments of Belgium, 
the  Czech  Republic,  Estonia,  Germany,  Latvia,  Norway,  Poland,  Portugal, 
Sweden, The Netherlands and the United Kingdom  

As  stated  above,  the  Governments  of  Belgium,  the  Czech  Republic,  Estonia,  Germany, 
Latvia, Poland, Portugal, Sweden, The Netherlands and the United Kingdom (documents 2, 4, 
5, 7, 10, 12, 13, 15, 16 and 17) have agreed to the disclosure of their written observations. 
Regarding  the  Norwegian  submission  for  which  the  Commission  has  not  received  a  reply 
(document  11),  I  would  like  to  inform  you  that  access  can  be  granted  in  accordance  with 
Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001.  
In  fact,  the  Court  of  Justice  has  recognised  in  its  judgment  in  Joined  Cases  C-514/07P,         
C-528/07P  and  C-532/07P  that,  in  cases  where  the  proceedings  have  been  closed  by  a 
decision  of  the  Court,  there  are  no  longer  grounds  for  presuming  that  disclosure  of  the 
pleadings would undermine those proceedings5.  
Since Case C-623/17 is now closed, and in the absence of an objection from the Norwegian 
authorities, I conclude that access can be granted to the relevant document in accordance with 
Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001,  with  the  exception  of  some  personal  data,  as  will  be 
explained below in point 3.1.1. 
Accordingly,  please  find  attached  the  redacted  original  versions  of  documents  11  and  17  in 
English, as well as the English translation of documents 2, 4, 5, 7, 10, 12, 13, 15 and 16, made 
by the services of the Court of Justice6
The  disclosed  documents  were  transmitted  by  the  Court  of  Justice  to  the  Commission  in  its 
capacity  as  participant  in  the  court  proceedings.  Access  to  them  is  granted  for  information 
only  and  they  cannot  be  re-used  without  the  agreement  of  the  originators,  who  hold  the 
copyright on them. They do not reflect the position of the Commission and cannot be quoted 
as such. 
                                                 
5   Judgment  of  the  Court  of  Justice  of  21  September  2010,  Joined  Cases  C-514/07P,  C-528/07P  and  to                
C-532/07P, Sweden and Others v API and Commission, ECLI:EU:C:2010:541, paragraphs 130 and 131. 
6   The original documents being in French, Dutch, Czech, Estonian, German, Latvian, Polish, Portuguese and 
Swedish, respectively. 
 


 
3.1.1. 
Refusal of personal data  
As  mentioned  above,  some  personal  data  has  been  redacted  in  documents  11  and  17  since 
covered  by  the  exception  provided  for  in  Article  4  (l)(b)  of  Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001 
("protection of personal data")7, in accordance with the European Union legislation regarding 
the protection of personal data. This information is the following: 
– 
the phone numbers and handwritten signatures of the agents representing the Norwegian 
Government (first and last page of document 11);  
– 
the name and handwritten signature of the Court’s official (first page of document 11); 
– 
the handwritten signature of the agent representing the Government of United Kingdom 
(last page of document 17). 
 
The  applicable  legislation  in  this  field  is  Regulation  (EU)  2018/1725  of  the  European 
Parliament and of the Council of 23 October 2018  on the protection of natural persons with 
regard  to  the  processing  of  personal  data  by  the  Union  institutions,  bodies,  offices  and 
agencies and on the free movement of such data, and repealing Regulation (EC) No 45/2001 
and Decision No 1247/2002/EC8 (‘Regulation (EU) 2018/1725’). 
Article 3(1) of Regulation (EU) 2018/1725 provides that personal data ‘means any information 
relating to an identified or identifiable natural person […]
’. The Court of Justice has specified 
that any information, which by reason of its content, purpose or effect, is linked to a particular 
person is to be considered as personal data.9 
In  its  judgment  in  Case  C-28/08P  (Bavarian  Lager)10,  the  Court  of  Justice  ruled  that  when  a 
request is made for access to documents containing personal data, the Data Protection Regulation 
becomes fully applicable11. Furthermore, in its judgment in Joined Cases C-465/00, C-138/01 
and  C-139/01  the  Court  has  recognized  that  “there  is  no  reason  of  principle  to  justify 
excluding activities of a professional nature […] from the notion of private life”
12.  
On this basis, the phone numbers of the agents representing the Norwegian Government and 
the  handwritten  signatures  of  both  the  Norwegian  and  United  Kingdom  agents  have  been 
deleted in documents 11 and 17 since they constitute personal data in the meaning of Article 
3(1) of Regulation (EU) 2018/1725.  
 
                                                 
7   "The institutions shall refuse access to a document where disclosure would undermine the protection of: […] 
(b)  privacy  and  the  integrity  of  the  individual,  in  particular  in  accordance  with  Community  legislation 
regarding the protection of personal data
". 
8  OJ L 205 of 21.11.2018, page 39. 
9  Judgment  of  the  Court  of  Justice  of  20  December  2017,  Case  C-434/16,  Peter  Nowak  v  Data  Protection 
Commissioner, ECLI:EU:C:2017:994, paragraphs 33-35. 
10  Judgment of the Court of Justice of 29 June 2010, Case C-28/08 P, European Commission v The Bavarian 
Lager Co. Ltd, ECLI:EU:C:2010:378, paragraph 59.  
11  Bavarian Lager judgment, paragraph 63. Whereas this judgment specifically related to Regulation (EC) No 
45/2001  of  the  European  Parliament  and  of  the  Council  of  18  December  2000  on  the  protection  of 
individuals with regard to the processing of personal data by the Community institutions and bodies and on 
the  free  movement  of  such  data,  the  principles  set  out  therein  are  also  applicable  under  the  new  data 
protection regime established by Regulation (EU) 2018/1725.  
12  Judgment  of  the  Court  of  Justice  of  20  May  2003,  Joined  Cases  C-465/00,  C-138/01  and  C-139/01, 
Rechnungschof and Others v Österreichischer Rundfunk, ECLI:EU:C:2003:294, paragraph 73. 
 


 
As  regards  the  personal  data  of  the  officials  of  the  institutions,  the  General  Court  has 
confirmed  in  its  judgment  in  Case  T-39/17  that  the  information  such  as  names,  signatures, 
functions, telephone numbers and other information pertaining to staff members of an institution 
fall within the notion of "private life", regardless of whether this data is registered in the context 
of a professional activity or not. Therefore, the name and handwritten signature of the Court’s 
official has been deleted in document 11, since this information also constitutes personal data in 
the meaning of Article 3(1) of Regulation (EU) 2018/172513
Pursuant  to  Article  9(1)(b)  of  Regulation  (EU)  2018/1725,  “personal  data  shall  only  be 
transmitted  to  recipients  established  in  the  Union  other  than  Union  institutions  and  bodies  if 
‘[t]he recipient establishes that it is necessary to have the data transmitted for a specific purpose 
in  the  public  interest  and  the  controller,  where  there  is  any  reason  to  assume  that  the  data 
subject’s legitimate interests might be prejudiced, establishes that it is proportionate to transmit 
the  personal  data  for  that  specific  purpose  after  having  demonstrably  weighed  the  various 
competing interests”

Only if these conditions are met and the processing constitutes lawful processing in accordance 
with  the  requirements  of  Article  5  of  Regulation  (EU)  2018/1725,  can  the  transmission  of 
personal data occur. 
According  to  Article  9(1)(b)  of  Regulation  (EU)  2018/1725,  the  European  Commission  has  to 
examine the further conditions for a lawful processing of personal data only if the first condition 
is fulfilled, namely if the recipient has established that it is necessary to have the data transmitted 
for a specific purpose in the public interest. It is only in this case that the European Commission 
has  to  examine  whether  there  is  a  reason  to  assume  that  the  data  subject’s  legitimate  interests 
might be prejudiced and, in the affirmative, establish the proportionality of the transmission of the 
personal data for that specific purpose after having demonstrably weighed the various competing 
interests. 
In your request, you do not put forward any arguments to establish the necessity to have the data 
transmitted  for  a  specific  purpose  in  the  public  interest.  Therefore,  the  European  Commission 
does not have to examine whether there is a reason to assume that the data subject’s legitimate 
interests might be prejudiced. 
Notwithstanding  the  above,  please  note  that  there  are  reasons  to  assume  that  the  legitimate 
interests of the data subjects concerned would be prejudiced by disclosure of the personal data 
reflected in the documents, as there is a real and non-hypothetical risk that such public disclosure 
would harm their privacy and subject them to unsolicited external contacts.  
Consequently,  I  conclude  that,  pursuant  to  Article  4(1)(b)  of  Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001, 
access cannot be granted to personal data, as the need to obtain access thereto for a purpose in the 
public  interest  has  not  been  substantiated  and  there  is  no  reason  to  think  that  the  legitimate 
interests of the individuals concerned would not be prejudiced by disclosure of the personal data 
concerned. 
 
                                                 
13   Judgment of the General Court of 19 September 2018, Case T-39/17, Chambre de commerce and d'industrie 
métropolitaine Bretagne-Ouest (port de Brest) v Commission, ECLI:EU:T:2018:560, paragraphs 37, 38 and 
43. 
 


 
3.2.  Refusal of the written observations submitted by the Governments of Cyprus, France, 
Hungary, Ireland and Spain 
As  indicated  above,  the  Governments  of  Cyprus,  France,  Hungary,  Ireland  and  Spain 
(documents 3, 6, 8, 9, 14, 18 and 19) informed the Commission that they oppose disclosure of 
their written observations for considering that they are covered by the exception provided for 
in  Article  4(2),  second  indent,  of  Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001  ("protection  of  court 
proceedings
")14
The  purpose  of  the  exception  for  the  protection  of  court  proceedings  is  to  maintain  the 
independence of the European Union’s institutions in their dealing with the courts, to protect 
the integrity of court proceedings and to ensure the proper course of justice. 
In this sense, the Court of Justice has recognised in its judgment in Joined Cases C-514/07P,    
C-528/07P and C-532/07P, that disclosure of pleadings lodged before the Court of Justice in 
pending court proceedings is presumed to undermine the protection of these proceedings15.  
The Court has furthermore stated that with the closure of the proceedings there are no longer 
grounds to presume that disclosure of the pleadings would undermine the judicial activities of 
the  Court.  However,  the  Court  has  admitted  the  possibility  that  disclosure  of  pleadings 
relating  to  court  proceedings,  which  are  closed  but  connected  to  other  proceedings  which 
remain pending, may create a risk that the later proceedings might be undermined16
In response to the Commission’s consultation, the Cypriot authorities argue that their written 
observations  in  Case  C-623/17  are  intrinsically  linked  to  the  written  submissions  that  the 
Republic  of  Cyprus  has  submitted  in  Case  C-140/2017,  a  request  for  a  preliminary  ruling 
which  is  presently  pending  before  the  Court  of Justice.  Those cases  form part  of a series of 
preliminary references from various national courts, concerning the compatibility of national 
data  retention  legislation  with  EU  law  in  light  of  the  Court  of  Justice  judgment  in  Joined 
Cases C-203/15 and C-698/1518.  Consequently, they consider that disclosure of their written 
observations would undermine the pending court proceedings.  
The French authorities invoke the fact that the main proceedings are still pending before the 
British courts. Moreover, they argue that Case C-623/17 is linked to Case C-511/1819, which 
must also be regarded as still pending since the Conseil d’Etat (France) has not yet rendered 
its decision. In the light of this, they consider that their pleading in Case C-623/17 cannot be 
disclosed. 
For  their  part,  the  Hungarian  authorities  invoke  that  disclosing  their  written  observations 
would negatively affect several similar ongoing court proceedings in which Hungary did not 
lodge written observations but, according to the rules of procedure of the European Court of 
Justice,  it  has  still  the  possibility  to  participate  in  the  hearing  to  present  its  legal  position. 
Under  those  circumstances,  disclosure  of  the  written  observations  in  Case  C-623/17  may 
                                                 
14   "[T]he  institutions  shall  refuse  access  to  a  document  where  disclosure  would  undermine  the  protection  of 
[...] court proceedings [...] unless there is an overriding public interest in disclosure". 
15   Op. cit, paragraph 94.  
16  Ibid, paragraphs 130, 131 and 132. 
17   http://curia.europa.eu/juris/liste.jsf?language=en&num=C-140/20 
18   Judgment of the Court of Justice of 21 December 2016, Joined Cases C-203/15 and C-698/15, Tele2 Sverige 
AB  v  Post-  och  telestyrelsen  and  Secretary  of  State  for  the  Home  Department  v  Tom  Watson  and  Others
ECLI:EU:C:2016:970. 
19   See footnote 4. 
 


 
result in an undue interference on the pending court proceedings and can negatively influence 
their outcome. In fact, they consider that, on the one part, it could have a detrimental effect on 
the  reasoning  of  the  parties  having  a  similar  legal  position  as  Hungary  had  in  the 
abovementioned  case.  On  the  other  part,  their  opponents  having  access  to  the  submission 
requested may be able to exploit to their advantage the legal reasoning it contains. 
The Irish authorities indicate that they could only consent to the release of their submissions 
in  Case C-623/17,  in  Joined Cases C-511/18, C-512/18 and in Case C-520/18 subject to the 
associated  domestic  proceedings  being  concluded.  In  the  meantime,  the  three  documents 
requested must to be refused in their entirety in accordance with the second indent of Article 
4(2) of Regulation 1049/2001.  
With regard to the written observations in Joined Cases C-511/18 and C-512/18 and in Case 
C-520/18, the Irish authorities argue that those pleadings made extensive reference to an Irish 
case,  Graham  Dwyer  v.  Commissioner  of  An  Garda  Síochána  &  Others,  where  domestic 
proceedings remain extant before the Irish Supreme Court and where a preliminary reference 
remains pending before the Court of Justice in Case C-140/20. Accordingly, Ireland objects to 
their disclosure.  
Finally, the Spanish authorities argue that judicial proceedings where similar issues arise are 
still pending before the Court of Justice, namely Joined Cases C-793/19 and C-794/1920 and 
Case C-140/20. They consider that disclosure of their written observations in Case C-623/17 
would  be  detrimental  to  the  parties'  right  of  defence  as  well  as  to  the  proper  course  of  the 
legal proceedings mentioned without being subject to external interferences. 
Consequently,  the  third  parties  consider  that,  for  as  long  as  those  proceedings  are  pending, 
their  written  observations  are  entirely  covered  by  the  exception  mentioned  above  and  they 
cannot be made publicly available. 
In  the  light  of  the  foregoing,  the  Commission  is  unable  to  grant  access  to  the  written 
observations submitted by the Governments of Cyprus, France, Hungary, Ireland and Spain.  
4.  OVERRIDING PUBLIC INTEREST IN DISCLOSURE 
Pursuant  to  Article  4(2)  of  Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001,  the  exception  to  the  right  of 
access  must  be  waived  if  there  is  an  overriding  public  interest  in  disclosing  the  requested 
document(s).  In  order  for  an  overriding  public  interest  in  disclosure  to  exist,  this  interest, 
firstly, has to be public and, secondly, overriding, i.e. in this case it must outweigh the interest 
protected under Article 4(2), second indent. In the present case, I see no elements capable of 
showing  the  existence  of  an  overriding  public  interest  in  the  disclosure  of  written 
observations submitted by the parties mentioned in point 3.2 above that would outweigh the 
public interest in the protection of the pending court proceedings. 
 
Please  note  that  the  exception  of  Article  4(1)(b)  has  an  absolute  character  and  does  not 
envisage the possibility of demonstrating the existence of an overriding public interest. 
5.  MEANS OF REDRESS 
Should you wish this position to be reconsidered, you should present in writing, within fifteen 
working  days  from  receipt  of  this  letter,  a  confirmatory  application  to  the  Commission's 
Secretariat-General at the address below: 
                                                 
20   http://curia.europa.eu/juris/liste.jsf?language=en&num=C-793/19 
 


 
European Commission 
Secretariat-General 
 
Transparency, Document Management & Access to Documents (SG.C.1)    
BERL 7/076   
B-1049 Brussels 
or by email to: xxxxxxxxxx@xx.xxxxxx.xx  
Yours sincerely, 
 
 
 
 
 
[signed electronically
 
Daniel CALLEJA-CRESPO 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Attachments:  11