This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Submissions to CJEU in Privacy International and LQDN et al.'.

 
Translation  
C-623/17 - 12 
Observations of the Czech Republic 
Case C-623/17 * 
Document lodged by:  
Czech Republic 
Usual name of the case:  
PRIVACY INTERNATIONAL 
Date lodged:  
13 February 2018 
 
Ministerstvo zahraničních věcí České republiky 
(Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Czech Republic) 
Loretánské  nám.  5,  118  00  Prague  1,  tel.  +420  224  182  310,  fax  +420  224  183 
029, email xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxx.xx 
Prague, 13 February 2018 
WRITTEN OBSERVATIONS 
submitted in accordance with Article 23 of the Protocol on the Statute of the Court 
of Justice of the European Union by the 
CZECH REPUBLIC 
represented by Martin Smolek, Jiří Vláčil and Ondřej Serdula 
in Case C-623/17 
Privacy International 
concerning  a  request  for  a  preliminary  ruling  submitted  to  the  Court  of  Justice 
pursuant to Article 267 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union by 
the Investigatory Powers Tribunal, United Kingdom, on 31 October 2017. 
 
*  Language of the case: English. 
EN   

OBSERVATIONS OF THE CZECH REPUBLIC – CASE C-623/17 
 
The  Czech  Republic  submits  the  following  written  observations  on  the  above 
case: 

Facts of the case and proceedings before the national court 

For  details  of  the  dispute,  the  Czech  Republic  refers  to  the  text  of  the  order  for 
reference. 

Relevant provisions of national and EU law 

The Czech Republic refers to  the relevant  provisions of national  and EU law set 
out in the order for reference. 

Questions referred to the Court of Justice for a preliminary ruling 

The following questions have been referred to the Court of Justice: 
[In circumstances where: 
a. 
the  capabilities  [of  the  Security  and  Intelligence  Agencies  (SIAs)]  to  use 
[Bulk  Communications  Data  (BCD)]  supplied  to  them  are  essential  to  the 
protection of the national security of the United Kingdom, including in the fields 
of counter-terrorism, counter-espionage and counter-nuclear proliferation; 

b. 
a fundamental feature of the SIAs’ use of the BCD is to discover previously 
unknown  threats  to  national  security  by  means  of  non-targeted  bulk  techniques 
which  are  reliant  upon  the  aggregation  of  the  BCD  in  one  place.  Its  principal 
utility  lies  in  swift  target  identification  and  development,  as  well  as  providing  a 
basis for action in the face of imminent threat; 

c. 
the  provider  of  an  electronic  communications  network  is  not  thereafter 
required  to  retain  the  BCD  (beyond  the  period  of  their  ordinary  business 
requirements), which is retained by the State (the SIAs) alone; 

d. 
the  national  court  has  found  (subject  to  certain  reserved  issues)  that  the 
safeguards  surrounding  the  use  of  BCD  by  the  SIAs  are  consistent  with  the 
requirements of the ECHR; and 

e. 
the  national  court  has  found  that  the  imposition  of  the  requirements 
specified in §§119-125 of the judgment [of 21 December 2016, Tele2 Sverige and 
Watson  and  Others,  C-203/15  and  C-698/15  (EU:C:2016:970)]  (‘the  Watson 
Requirements’),  if  applicable,  would  frustrate  the  measures  taken  to  safeguard 
national security by the SIAs, and thereby put the national security of the United 
Kingdom at risk;] 


 

PRIVACY INTERNATIONAL 
1.  Having regard to Article 4 TEU and Article 1(3) of Directive 2002/58/EC 
on  privacy  and  electronic  communications  (the  ‘e-Privacy  Directive’), 
does a requirement in a direction by a Secretary of State to a provider of 
an  electronic  communications  network  that  it  must  provide  bulk 
communications data to the Security and Intelligence Agencies (‘SIAs’) of 
a  Member  State  fall  within  the  scope  of  Union  law  and  of  the  e-Privacy 
Directive? 
 

2.  If the answer to Question (1) is ‘yes’, do any of the Watson Requirements, 
or  any  other  requirements  in  addition  to  those  imposed  by  the  ECHR, 
apply  to  such  a  direction  by  a  Secretary  of  State?  And,  if  so,  how  and  to 
what extent do those requirements apply, taking into account the essential 
necessity  of  the  SIAs  to  use  bulk  acquisition  and  automated  processing 
techniques  to  protect  national  security  and  the  extent  to  which  such 
capabilities,  if  otherwise  compliant  with  the  ECHR,  may  be  critically 
impeded by the imposition of such requirements? 


Position of the Czech Republic on the questions referred 

By the questions referred, the referring court essentially asks whether the transfer 
of  traffic  and  location  data  by  the  provider  of  an  electronic  communications 
service  to  the  intelligence  services,  so  that  they  may  perform  their  tasks  in  the 
national security field, falls within the scope of EU law. If so, the referring court 
asks whether the criteria applied in the assessment of the proportionality of such a 
breach  of  the  rights  to  privacy  and  to  the  protection  of  personal  data  correspond 
with those which the European Court of Human Rights (‘ECtHR’) has defined in 
this  connection  in  the  interpretation  of  Article  8  of  the  Convention  for  the 
Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, or whether some of the 
conditions which the Court of Justice defined in Tele2 Sverige 1 apply. 

Should  the  Court  of  Justice  consider  the  processing  concerned  to  fall  within  the 
ambit  of  EU  law,  the  Czech  Republic  hereby  sets  out  its  answer  to  the  second 
question referred.  
4.1  The  criteria  applied  in  the  assessment  of  the  proportionality  of  the  data 
transfer  


Were  the  Court  of  Justice  to  hold  that  EU  law  applies  in  the  present  case,  the 
Czech  Republic  takes  the  view  that  the  criteria  applied  to  assess  the 
proportionality  of  the  breach  of  the  rights  to  privacy  and  to  the  protection  of 
personal data must be distinguished from those which the Court of Justice set out 
in  Tele2  Sverige.  The  proportionality  or  not  of  processing  personal  data  for  the 
 
1  
Judgement of 21 December 2016, Tele2 Sverige v Watson and Others, Joined Cases C-203/15 
and C-698/15, EU:C:2016:970. 


OBSERVATIONS OF THE CZECH REPUBLIC – CASE C-623/17 
purposes of safeguarding national security cannot be assessed on the basis of the 
same criteria as those relied on in cases concerning criminal investigations. 

First,  it  is  always  necessary  to  analyse  the  proportionality  of  the  breach  of  the 
right  to  privacy  and  protection  of  personal  data  having  regard  to  the  specific 
purpose of the data-processing. Thus certain purposes for which data is processed 
may justify a greater breach of fundamental rights than others. In this connection, 
it  is  necessary,  according  to  the  Czech  Republic,  to  take  into  consideration  both 
the  nature  and  the  seriousness  of  the  threat  which  such  data-processing  is 
supposed to avert, and the possibility of combatting that threat by other means. 

Secondly, threats to national security (in the case in question namely international 
terrorism,  counter-espionage  and  counter-nuclear  proliferation)  2  in  general  pose 
the highest degree of danger to society, even in comparison to serious crime, the 
investigation  of  which  was  the  subject  of  the  Court  of  Justice’s  assessment  in 
Tele2 Sverige. Threats to  national  security are characterised by the fact  that they 
are  very  difficult  to  combat  without  the  use  of  modern  methods  such  as,  for 
example the analysis of traffic and location data. For those reasons, in paragraph 
119  of  the  judgment  in  Tele2  Sverige  the  Court  of  Justice  moreover  expressly 
conceded, in  connection  with  restricting  access  to personal  data for  the purposes 
of  combatting  crime,  that  if  vital  national  security  interests  are  threatened  no 
judicial limitations need be applied.  

Accordingly,  it  must  be noted  that,  unlike in  criminal  cases,  in  cases  concerning 
national  security  even  the  actual  identification  of  a  threat  is  extremely  difficult. 
That  is  because  those  threats  change  continuously  and  the  expansion  of 
communication  technologies  is  contributing  greatly  to  the  speed  of  such 
development. Thus, in cases where there is a threat to national security, there is no 
list of crimes posing a more-or-less clearly identified danger to society which may 
be balanced against the potential breach of fundamental rights. 
10  For  those  reasons,  in  cases  concerning  the  security  services  the  method  of 
handling personal data must also differ considerably from the method used by the 
competent  bodies  in  criminal  proceedings.  Whereas  in  criminal  proceedings 
personal  data  is  generally  processed  ex  post  (after  the  commission  of  a  criminal 
offence), in  safeguarding national  security it is  of critical  importance that  threats 
may  primarily  be  identified  ex  ante,  enabling  preventative  action  to  be  taken 
where  necessary.  Therefore,  the  possibility  to  analyse  data  in  bulk  form  is 
absolutely key to the security services’ successful performance of their tasks. 
11  Furthermore,  the  State  bodies  in  that  field  are  not  always  opposed  by  mere 
individuals or small groups of persons engaged in criminal activity, but in general 
by  enemy  non-State  or  even  State  actors,  frequently  operating  on  a  global  scale, 
whose  potential  to  target  the  fundamental  interests  of  the  State  is 
disproportionately greater than that of a normal criminal. 
 
2 See page 2 of the summary of the order for reference.  

 

PRIVACY INTERNATIONAL 
12  That  field  is  also  characterised  by  the  fact  that  revealing  the  methods  and 
procedures  used by the intelligence services in  one particular  case may  critically 
hinder or obstruct the execution of their activities in the future. There is therefore 
a  much  greater  emphasis  on  concealing  the  activities  and  methods  used  by  the 
intelligence  services,  which  sometimes  continues  decades  after  a  specific  data 
breach.  The  procedural  arrangements  governing  breaches  of  fundamental  rights 
and  freedoms  (for  example,  in  relation  to  the  requirements  to  inform  the  data-
subject or the review of the activities of the intelligence services) must usually be 
more  flexible,  precisely  because  of  the  essentially  hidden  character  of  the 
activities of the intelligence services, which is necessary in the interest of ensuring 
such activities are effective. 
13  It thus follows from the above that the threats to national security are continuously 
evolving  in  line  with  the  dynamics  of  international  relations  and  the  security 
environment,  and  the  consequences  of  any  disturbance  of  the  protected  interests 
are  difficult  to  quantify.  It  is  also  true  that  those  wishing  to  create  threats  now 
have considerably greater resources available to them, such resources often being 
comparable to the capacities of the States defending themselves against the threat. 
14  Third,  it  must  further  be  stated  that  there  is  a  less  of  a  breach  of  fundamental 
rights  where  personal  data  is  processed  by  the  intelligence  services  than  in  the 
field of criminal investigations. Thus, in the case of a criminal investigation, there 
can in principle be only two consequences of the use of information acquired by a 
breach of fundamental rights and freedoms – either the information is relevant for 
the  decision  on  guilt  or  innocence,  and  is  used  for  that  purpose  (that  is  to  say, 
resulting in a further restriction on rights and freedoms, for example in the form of 
a prison sentence), or it is not relevant, and is therefore destroyed or restored. On 
the  other  hand,  even  where  information  is  used  with  success  for  the  purposes  of 
the  security  and  fundamental  interests  of  the  State,  that  usually  does  not  impact 
directly  on  the  fundamental  rights  and  freedoms  of  persons  in  the  above  sense 
(such use may, for example, be purely for analytical purposes, or be such that its 
impact on the individual in personal terms is much less serious – for example the 
refusal of a visa). 
15  It  follows  from  the  above  that  the  test  for  assessing  the  proportionality  of  data-
processing  in  connection  with  combatting  threats  to  national  security  must  be 
more flexible than that applied in the field of criminal investigations. The criteria 
applied  to  assess  proportionality  must  therefore  be  distinguished  from  those 
defined  by  the  Court  of  Justice  in  Tele2  Sverige.  Having  regard  to  the  fact  that 
there is an established line of case-law which has been developed by the ECtHR in 
this field, which reflects the abovementioned matters, the Czech Republic submits 
that the criteria applied to assess the proportionality of any data-processing should 
correspond with the test defined by the ECtHR in this field.  


OBSERVATIONS OF THE CZECH REPUBLIC – CASE C-623/17 
 

Answer proposed to the Court of Justice by the Czech Republic 
The criteria defined in the judgment in Joined Cases C-203/15 and C-698/15 
Tele2  Sverige  v  Watson  and  Others
  are  not  to  be  applied  to  the  transfer  of 
traffic  and  location  data  by  the  provider  of  an  electronic  communications 
service to the intelligence services, so that the latter may perform their tasks 
in the national security field. 

The criteria applied to assess the proportionality of the transfer of traffic and 
location  data  by  the  providers  of  electronic  communications  services  to  the 
intelligence services, so that the latter may perform their tasks in the national 
security  field,  are  to  correspond  to  those  which  the  European  Court  of 
Human Rights have defined in this connection in the interpretation of Article 
8  of  the  Convention  for  the  Protection  of  Human  Rights  and  Fundamental 
Freedoms. 

 
   
 
 
 
 
[signature] 
 
Ondřej Serdula 
 
 
 
Jiří Vláčil 
Agent for the Czech Republic before 
Agent of the Czech Republic before the 
Court of Justice of the EU  the Court of Justice of the EU 
 
Martin Smolek 
Government Agent of the Czech Republic before the Court of Justice of the EU