This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Submissions to CJEU in Privacy International and LQDN et al.'.

 
Translation  
C-623/17 — 26 
Observations of the Netherlands 
Case C-623/17 * 
Document lodged by:  
Kingdom of the Netherlands 
Usual name of the case:  
PRIVACY INTERNATIONAL 
Date lodged:  
15 February 2018 
 
 
*  Language of the case: English. 
EN   

OBSERVATIONS OF THE NETHERLANDS — CASE C-623/17 
 
Ministry of Foreign Affairs 
Legal Affairs Department 
European Law Division 
P O Box 20061 
2500 EB The Hague 
Netherlands 
 
Reference MinBuZa-2018.314515 
To: 
the Court of Justice of the 
European Union in 
Luxembourg 
WRITTEN OBSERVATIONS 
of the Netherlands Government,  
submitted pursuant to the second paragraph of Article 23(2) of the Protocol 
on the Statute of the Court of Justice of the European Union, 
 
in Case C-623/17, Privacy International 
 
In  the  abovementioned  case  the  Netherlands  Government,  represented  by  Mielle 
Bulterman  and  Charlotte  Schillemans,  respectively  head  and  official  of  the 
European Law Section of the Legal Affairs Directorate of the Ministry of Foreign 
Affairs in The Hague, has the honour of bringing the following observations to the 
attention of the Court. 
I. 
Introduction 

By  order  for  reference  of  18 October  2017,  the  United  Kingdom  Investigatory 
Powers Tribunal (‘the referring court’) referred questions for a preliminary ruling 
to the Court of Justice under Article 267 TFEU on Article 4(2) TEU and Directive 
2002/58/EC  of  the  European  Parliament  and  the  Council  of  12 July  2002 
concerning  the  processing  of  personal  data  and  the  protection  of  privacy  in  the 
electronic  communications  sector  (Directive  on  privacy  and  electronic 
communications) (OJ 2002 L 201, p. 37; ‘Directive 2002/58’).  

The  questions  have  arisen  in  the  context  of  proceedings  between  Privacy 
International,  a  non-governmental  organisation  working  in  the  field  of  the 
protection  of  human  rights,  and  the  United  Kingdom  Government,  including  the 
security  and  intelligence  agencies  GCHQ,  MI5  and  MI6.  At  the  heart  of  the 
dispute, as far as the referring court is  concerned, is  the lawfulness  of a national 
measure on the basis of which an electronic communications network provider is 

 

PRIVACY INTERNATIONAL 
required  to  provide  bulk  communications  data  to  the  security  and  intelligence 
agencies.  

That bulk communications data includes traffic and location data which provides 
information  on  social,  commercial  and  financial  activities  and  travel.  The  bulk 
communications  data  to  be  supplied  under  the  measure  does  not  include  the 
content of such communications. The bulk communications data, once acquired, is 
stored securely and used by the security and intelligence agencies.  

Privacy  International  has  claimed  that  the  acquisition  and  use  of  the  bulk 
communications data by the national security and intelligence agencies is contrary 
to  EU  law,  as  interpreted  in  the  judgment  of  the  Court  of  21 December  2016, 
Tele2Sverige and  Watson, Joined Cases C-203/15 and C-698/15, EU:C:2016:970 
(‘the Tele2 and Watson judgment’).  

In  that  context,  the  referring  court  poses  the  question  to  the  Court  of  Justice 
whether  EU  law,  and  in  particular  Directive  2002/58,  is  applicable  to  a  national 
measure such as the one at issue here. If EU law and the directive are applicable, 
the Court is requested to clarify whether the conditions laid down in the Tele2 and 
Watson judgment apply also to such a measure, which enables the acquisition and 
use  of  bulk  communications  data  by  the  national  security  and  intelligence 
agencies. 

For a more detailed exposition of the facts and legal framework, the Netherlands 
Government refers to the order for reference. 
II. 
Position of the Netherlands Government 

The  Netherlands  Government  will  now  explain  that  a  national  measure  which  is 
used for the acquisition of data by the national security and intelligence agencies 
does  not,  in  its  opinion, fall  under  EU  law.  The  second  question  would  then  not 
need  to  be  answered.  Only  in  the  alternative  will  the  Netherlands  Government 
argue,  with  regard  to  the  second  question,  that  the  situation  in  the  Tele2  and 
Watson case was fundamentally different from that in the present case. Therefore, 
the  conditions  formulated  by  the  Court  in  that  case  cannot,  by  definition,  be 
applied. 
First question referred 

As  already  stated,  by  its  first  question  the  referring  court  wishes  to  ascertain 
whether, having regard to Article 4(2) TEU and Article 1(3) of Directive 2002/58, 
a requirement in a direction by a Secretary of State to a provider of an electronic 
communications  network  that  it  must  provide  bulk  communications  data  to  the 
security and intelligence agencies of a Member State falls within the scope of EU 
law and of that directive. 


OBSERVATIONS OF THE NETHERLANDS — CASE C-623/17 

According to the Netherlands Government, it appears from Article 4(2) TEU and 
Article 1(3) of Directive 2002/58 that a national measure such as the one at issue 
here  does  not  fall  under  EU  law  (and  therefore  not  under  the  directive,  either). 
This will be explained below. First, Article 4(2) TEU will be examined, followed 
by  Directive  2002/58,  and  it  will  last  be  concluded  that  the  Charter  is  not 
applicable in a case such as the present, either.  
(a) 
Article 4(2)  TEU:  national  security  the  sole  responsibility  of  the  Member 
States 
10  Article 4(2)  TEU  provides  that  the  European  Union  is  to  respect  essential  State 
functions, including ensuring the territorial integrity of the State, maintaining law 
and  order  and  safeguarding  national  security.  It  is  explicitly  stated,  in  particular, 
that national security remains the sole responsibility of each Member State.  
11  That  article  constitutes  a  guarantee  against  action  by  the  European  Union  and 
must  be  regarded,  in  the  context  of  the  principle  of  conferral,  as  one  of  the 
fundamental  principles  of  EU  law  (Article 5(1)  TEU).  Under  that  principle,  the 
Union is to act only within the limits of the competences conferred upon it by the 
Member States in the Treaties to attain the objectives set out therein. Competences 
not  conferred  upon  the  Union  in  the  Treaties  remain  with  the  Member  States 
(Article 5(2) and Article 4(1) TEU). 
12  Under  the  TEU  and  TFEU,  the  Union  does  not  have  the  competence  to  regulate 
the  activities  of  the  national  security  and  intelligence  agencies.  According  to  the 
Netherlands Government, it is also clear from the designation of national security 
as  the  sole  responsibility  of  each  Member  State  that  the  competences  relating  to 
national  security  and,  specifically,  the  regulation  of  the  activities  of  the  national 
security and intelligence agencies, have not been transferred to the Union. This is 
also  explained  by  the  fact  that  the  responsibility  of  a  Member  State  for  the 
protection  of  its  national  security  relates  to  the  essence  of  the  sovereignty  of  a 
State, the essential elements  of which the Member States have not  transferred to 
the Union.  
13  According  to  the  Netherlands  Government,  a  measure  for  acquiring  bulk 
communications data — data which, as the referring court explains, is essential for 
carrying  out  the  activities  of  the  national  security  and  intelligence  agencies — 
must regarded as the core of the sole responsibility of each  Member State for its 
national security, in which the Union may not intervene. 
14  It already follows from the foregoing that, having regard to Article 4(2) TEU, the 
competences  relating  to  national  security  and,  specifically,  the  activities  of  the 
national  security  and  intelligence  agencies,  such  as  those  for  the  acquisition  of 
bulk  communications  data,  do  not  fall  under  EU  law.  Since  a  directive  cannot 
detract  from  a  provision  of  the  TEU,  it  is  essentially  unnecessary  to  discuss 
Directive 2002/58. Nevertheless, the Netherlands Government notes the following 
in that regard. 

 

PRIVACY INTERNATIONAL 
(b)  Directive 2002/58 not applicable  
15  Directive  2002/58  is  aimed  at  the  protection  of  personal  data  in  the  electronic 
communications sector. It applies to the processing of personal data in connection 
with  the  provision  of  publicly  available  electronic  communications  services 
(Article 3(1) of the directive).  
16  Article 1(3)  of  Directive  2002/58 —  just  like  Article 4(2)  TEU —  makes  it  clear 
that  the  directive  does  not  apply  to  activities  which  fall  outside  the  scope  of  EU 
law, such as those of the national security and intelligence agencies in the context 
of State security: 
This  Directive  shall  not  apply  to  activities  which  fall  outside  the  scope  of  the 
Treaty  establishing  the  European  Community,  such  as  those  covered  by  Titles  V 
and VI of the Treaty on European Union, and in any case to activities concerning 
public security, defence,  State security (including the economic well-being of the 
State when the activities relate to State security matters) and the activities of the 
State in areas of criminal law.
 
17  Recital 11 of the directive explicitly states the following in that regard: 
Like  Directive  95/46/EC,  this  directive  does  not  address  issues  of  protection  of 
fundamental rights and freedoms related to  activities which are not  governed by 
Community  law.  ...  Consequently,  this  Directive  does  not  affect  the  ability  of 
Member States to  carry out  lawful  interception of  electronic communications, or 
take  other  measures,  if  necessary  for  any  of  these  purposes  and  in  accordance 
with  the  European  Convention  for  the  Protection  of  Human  Rights  and 
Fundamental  Freedoms,  as  interpreted  by  the  rulings  of  the  European  Court  of 
Human Rights. ...
’  
18  Recital  11  includes  reference  to  Directive  95/46. 1  That  directive  adopts  a 
comparable  approach  whereby  the  provision  of  data  to  the  national  security  and 
intelligence agencies and the processing of that data by them does not fall within 
the scope of EU law. Directive 95/46 is concerned with the processing of data as 
such  (regardless  of  whether  it  is  carried  out  by  the  national  security  and 
intelligence  agencies).  Article 3(2),  first  indent,  of  that  directive  provides  that 
processing  operations  concerning  public  security,  ...,  State  security’  are  not 
covered by that directive. 
19  That  delimitation  of  the  scope  of  Directive  2002/58  (and  Directive  95/46)  is  in 
accordance  with  the  provisions  of  the  TEU  on  national  security  as  the  sole 
responsibility  of  the  Member  State.  The  directive  must  therefore  also  be 
 

Directive 95/46/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council  of 24 October 1995 on the 
protection  of  individuals  with  regard  to  the  processing  of  personal  data  and  on  the  free 
movement of such data (OJ 1995 L 281, p. 31).  


OBSERVATIONS OF THE NETHERLANDS — CASE C-623/17 
interpreted in that context. After all, a provision in a directive cannot detract from 
a provision of the TEU. 
20  With  regard  to  Article 15  of  Directive  2002/58,  on  which  the  Court  of  Justice 
ruled  in  the  Tele2  and  Watson  judgment,  the  Netherlands  Government  notes  the 
following. 
21  The  Netherlands  Government  submits  that  the  present  case  differs  emphatically 
from  that  of  Tele2  and  Watson.  The  judgment  in  that  case  concerned  a  measure 
whereby  an  electronic  communications  network  provider  was  directed  to  retain 
traffic and location data, with a view to giving access to that data to the national 
authorities  charged  with  combating  crime  and  detecting  and  prosecuting  serious 
criminal offences. 
22  In  that  case,  the  Court  did  not  rule  on  a  measure  for  the  provision  of  bulk 
communications  data  to  the  national  security  and  intelligence  agencies  with  a 
view to the protection of national security. Unlike the combating of crime and the 
detection  of  criminal  offences,  national  security  is  explicitly  mentioned  in 
Article 4(2) TEU  as the being the sole  responsibility of each Member State. The 
Netherlands  Government  submits  that  that  guarantee  in  respect  of  national 
security  in  Article 4(2)  TEU  means  that,  where  measures  in  the  area  of  national 
security  are  concerned,  such  as  those  in  the  present  case,  no  significance  can 
attach to Article 15 of Directive 2002/58. 
23  On  the  basis  of  the  foregoing,  the  Netherlands  Government  concludes  that  a 
measure such as that at issue in the main proceedings, which involves the exercise 
of  the  competences  and  activities  of  the  national  security  and  intelligence 
agencies, does not fall within the scope of Directive 2002/58. 
(c) 
Charter not applicable 
24  For  the  sake  of  completeness,  the  Netherlands  Government  notes  that  it  follows 
from the foregoing that the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union 
(‘the Charter’) is not applicable to a national measure such as that at issue here, 
either. After all, the provisions of the Charter are addressed to the Member States 
only in those situations in which they are implementing EU law (Article 51 of the 
Charter). 
Conclusion with regard to the first question referred 
25  With regard to the first question referred for a preliminary ruling, the Netherlands 
Government  concludes  on  the  basis  of  the  foregoing  that,  having  regard  to 
Article 4(2)  TEU,  a  national  measure  aimed  at  the  acquisition  of  data  by  the 
national  security  and  intelligence  agencies  does  not  fall  under  EU  law,  and  in 
particular, under Directive 2002/58. 
Second question referred 

 

PRIVACY INTERNATIONAL 
26  By  its  second  question,  should  the  answer  to  the  first  question  be  in  the 
affirmative,  the  referring  court  wishes  to  ascertain  whether,  in  addition  to  the 
requirements  imposed  by  the  ECHR,  those  formulated  in  the  Tele2  and  Watson 
judgment or any other requirements apply to a national measure such as the one at 
issue  in  the  case  at  hand.  If  that  question  is  answered  in  the  affirmative,  the 
referring  court  wishes  to  ascertain  how  and  to  what  extent  those  requirements 
apply,  taking  into  account  the  essential  necessity  of  the  security  and  intelligence 
agencies  to  use  bulk  acquisition  and  automated  processing  techniques  to  protect 
national security and the extent to which such capabilities, if otherwise compliant 
with  the  ECHR,  may  be  critically  impeded  by  the  imposition  of  such 
requirements. 
27  Given its answer to the first question referred, the Netherlands Government is of 
the view that the second question does not require an answer. Only to the extent 
that  the  Court  of  Justice  might  conclude  that  EU  law  and  Directive  2002/58  are 
applicable  to  a  measure  on  the  basis  of  which  an  electronic  communications 
network provider is directed to provide bulk communications data to the security 
and intelligence agencies, the Netherlands Government notes the following. 
28  The Netherlands Government takes the position that the conditions formulated by 
the  Court  of  Justice  in  the  context  of  Article 15(1)  of  Directive  2002/58  in  the 
Tele2 and Watson judgment cannot be applied to a measure for the acquisition of 
bulk  communications  data  for  the  purposes  of  protecting  national  security. 
Namely, those purposes must be treated differently  from the purposes relating to 
the  combating  of  crime  and  the  detection  and  prosecution  of  serious  criminal 
offences  which  were  at  issue  in  the  Tele2  and  Watson  judgment.  The  essential 
differences between, on the one hand, activities in the interests of national security 
and,  on  the  other  hand,  the  detection  of  criminal  offences,  will  be  set  out  in 
paragraphs 29  to  33  below.  The  Netherlands  Government  will  then  explain  that 
the Tele2 and  Watson judgment  leaves room for  a different  approach to  national 
security  other  than  one  based  on  detection,  room  which  must  be  utilised 
(paragraphs 34-39  below).  The  Netherlands  Government  concludes  with  the 
remark that, for measures for the acquisition of bulk communications data by the 
national security and intelligence agencies, no conditions other than those arising 
from  the  ECHR  should  apply,  including  those  under  Article 15  of  Directive 
2002/58 in conjunction with Article 7 of the Charter (paragraphs 40 to 43 below). 
(a) 
National security versus detection of criminal offences 
29  As already stated, there are essential differences between the activities of the State 
to protect its national security and the activities of national authorities to combat 
crime  and  detect  and  prosecute  criminal  offences.  The  latter  activities  are 
concrete,  in  the  sense  that  there  is  a  concrete  reason  for  the  action  taken:  the 
planning or  commission  of a criminal  offence. What  is  to  be  deemed criminal  is 
determined in advance and by law. The criminal offence is followed by detection 
and  prosecution  of  one  or  more  suspects.  The  activities  in  the  area  of  detection 


OBSERVATIONS OF THE NETHERLANDS — CASE C-623/17 
and  prosecution  of  criminal  offences  are  therefore  a  targeted  and  delineated 
process. 
30  The activities of the State in the context of national security are different in nature 
and have a different purpose. Taking care of national security involves, inter alia, 
investigating organisations and persons who, by the aims they pursue or by their 
activities may constitute a danger to the survival of the democratic legal order or 
to  security  or  to  other  important  interests  of  the  State  (also,  for  example,  to 
interests  relating  to  defence).  In  that  regard,  it  is  irrelevant  whether  criminal 
offences are planned or committed; in the Netherlands, for  example, the security 
and intelligence agencies thus do not have detection competences as defined under 
criminal law. 
31  As  also  recognised  by  the  ECtHR,  threats  to  national  security  can  vary  in 
character and are by their nature difficult to identify in advance (case of Kennedy 
The United Kingdom, 26839/05 [2010]). As an example of a diffuse threat, the 
Netherlands  Government  refers  to  cyber  threats,  by  which  attempts  are  made  to 
influence  democratic  processes,  including,  for  example,  the  influencing  of 
elections by hacks.  
32  In  order  to  be  effective,  the  investigation  carried  out  by  the  security  and 
intelligence  agencies  is,  in  principle,  secret  in  nature.  If  the  subjects  of  the 
investigation  by  the  security  and  intelligence  agencies  knew  they  were  being 
investigated, they could adapt their behaviour accordingly and thus remain under 
the radar of the security  and intelligence agencies.  In addition, the investigations 
by the security and intelligence agencies  are often necessarily long.  They in  fact 
involve  continuous  search  for,  monitoring  of  and  bringing  under  control  of 
activities which may pose a danger to national security. 
33  It is essential in that regard that the security and intelligence agencies can have the 
information necessary for that purpose. To that end, they need to have — as is at 
issue  in  the  present  case —  far-reaching  competences  for  the  acquisition  and 
further  processing  of  data,  which  must  be  provided  by  law.  It  may  involve  the 
processing  of  information  which  relates  very  specifically  to  a  particular  subject 
under  investigation.  However,  the  possibility  of  acquiring  and  processing  large 
data  files  (such  as  bulk  communications  data)  is  also  necessary  for  the  proper 
performance of duties. The analysis of such files, whether or not  in  combination 
with  each  other,  makes  it  possible  to  compile  threat  profiles  and  to  search  for 
patterns.  In  addition,  on  the  basis  of  historical  traffic  and  location  data,  it  is 
possible to make a reconstruction of activities which (may) constitute or may have 
constituted a threat. In that manner, it may be possible to gain an insight into, for 
example, the  (terrorist) network behind  an attack  or  cyber  threat. Furthermore, it 
may  be  possible  on  that  basis  to  develop  a  timely  awareness  of  (previously-
unknown) present threats, so that effective action may be taken to protect national 
security.  
(b)  Tele2 and Watson judgment not for national security  

 

PRIVACY INTERNATIONAL 
34  The  Netherlands  Government  submits  that,  in  the  light  of  the  foregoing,  the 
conditions formulated in the Tele2 and Watson judgment pursuant to Article 15(1) 
of  Directive  2002/58  for  a  measure  relating  to  detection  cannot  be  applied  to  a 
measure such as that at issue in the present case, which is taken in the context of 
actions  for  the  purpose  of  protecting  national  security.  If  those  conditions  were 
fully  applied,  Member  States —  which  bear  the  sole  responsibility  for  national 
security — would be severely hindered in carrying out that responsibility. 
35  In  that  regard,  the  Netherlands  wishes  to  point  out  that  the  Tele2  and  Watson 
judgment  also  leaves  room  for  a  different  approach  in  the  interests  of  national 
security and to promote the effectiveness of measures. For example, the Court of 
Justice considered in paragraph 119 of the judgment: 
However,  in  particular  situations,  where  for  example  vital  national  security, 
defence or public security interests are threatened by terrorist activities, access to 
the data of other persons might also be granted where there is objective evidence 
from  which  it  can  be  deduced  that  that  data  might,  in  a  specific  case,  make  an 
effective contribution to combating such activities.
 
36  It  follows  from  paragraph 121  of  that  judgment  that  the  effectiveness  of  the 
measures is a relevant factor: 
Likewise, the competent national authorities to whom access to the retained data 
has been granted must notify the persons affected, under the applicable national 
procedures,  as  soon  as  that  notification  is  no  longer  liable  to  jeopardise  the 
investigations being undertaken by those authorities.
 
37  The impracticality of the conditions, as inferred from paragraphs 119 to 125 of the 
Tele2  and  Watson  judgment,  for  any  investigation  by  the  national  security  and 
intelligence  agencies,  is  apparent,  in  particular,  in  the  condition  limiting  non-
targeted  access  to  bulk  communications  data  (paragraph 119  of  the  Tele2  and 
Watson judgment). It is in fact essential that the security and intelligence agencies 
should be able to scrutinise such data (certain defined sets of traffic and location 
data)  in  order  to  safeguard  national  security.  As  threat  is  diffuse  and  difficult  to 
identify in advance, it is important to be able to search broadly and to look back in 
time. Based on historical traffic and location data, connections can be established 
in  (terrorist)  networks,  thus  making  it  possible  to  identify  (in  a  timely  manner) 
threats to national security (cf. also paragraph 31 above and paragraphs 3 and 4 of 
the order for reference). 
38  Furthermore, an obligation to give prior notification to the relevant subjects of an 
investigation  (paragraph 121  of  the  Tele2  and  Watson  judgment)  could  do  great 
harm  to  an  investigation  by  the  security  and  intelligence  agencies.  As  already 
stated, such an investigation is, in principle, secret in nature and must indeed be so 
in order to be effective (see paragraph 32 above; also recognised in the judgment 
of the ECtHR in the case Klass and others v Germany, 5029/71 [1978]). 


OBSERVATIONS OF THE NETHERLANDS — CASE C-623/17 
39  The  Netherlands  Government  submits  that,  in  the  light  of  the  foregoing,  to  the 
extent  that  a  measure  relating  to  national  security  falls  under  Article 15  of 
Directive  2002/58,  conditions  other  than  those  formulated  in  the  Tele2  and 
Watson judgment must be laid down. As will be explained below, the determining 
factor in that regard is the level of protection that stems from the ECHR. 
(c) 
Measures for national security purposes and the level of protection under the 
ECHR  
40  As  the  referring  court  recognises  in  the  second  question  referred,  a  measure  for 
national security purposes such as that at issue in the present case must also satisfy 
the  conditions  that  follow  from  the  ECHR  (as  interpreted  in  the  case-law  of  the 
ECtHR). The relevant provision in that regard is Article 8 ECHR, which — within 
the framework of EU law — corresponds to Article 7 of the Charter. 
41  In the context of activities which limit the  right to respect for private and family 
life  as  laid  down  in  Article 8  ECHR,  the  following  requirements  should  be 
satisfied: the measures of the Member States for the purpose of protecting national 
security  must  have  their  basis  in  law,  they  must  be  necessary  in  a  democratic 
society in the interests of national security, they must satisfy the requirements of 
accessibility  and  foreseeability  and  they  must  offer  adequate  safeguards  against 
the  abuse  of  power  (see,  for  example,  the  ECtHR  case  Kennedy  v  United 
Kingdom
, previously cited, paragraphs 151 to 153).  
42  Where  the  measure  concerned  satisfies  those  requirements,  there  is —  as  the 
ECtHR  held —  a  suitable  balance  between  the  right  to  respect  for  private  and 
family life and the possibility for the State to take the measures necessary for the 
protection of (inter  alia)  national  security.  It  is  clear from recital  11 of Directive 
2002/58  that  that  balance  cannot  under  any  circumstances  be  altered  by  the 
directive. 
43  The  Netherlands  Government  therefore  submits  that,  also  in  the  context  of 
Article 15  of  Directive  2002/58  in  conjunction  with  Article 7  of  the  Charter,  no 
conditions may be imposed on a measure such as that at issue in the present case 
other than those arising from the ECHR. 
In the alternative: Conclusion with regard to the second question referred 
44  In  so  far  as  the  Court  feels  obliged  to  answer  the  second  question  referred,  the 
Netherlands Government concludes in its answer thereto that the conditions which 
the Court formulated in the Tele2 and Watson judgment cannot be applied to the 
acquisition of communication data for the purpose of protecting national security. 
A  national  measure  such  as  that  at  issue  in  the  main  proceedings  must,  in  the 
context  of  Article 15  of  Directive  2002/58  in  conjunction  with  Article 7  of  the 
Charter, satisfy the level of protection arising from the ECHR.  
10 
 

PRIVACY INTERNATIONAL 
III. 
Conclusion 
45  In the light of the foregoing, the Netherlands Government proposes that the Court 
of Justice answer the first question as follows: 
1.  In  the  light  of  Article 4(2)  TEU,  a  national  measure  which  is  used  for  the 
acquisition of data by the national security and intelligence agencies does not fall 
under EU law, in particular, Directive 2002/58.
 
46  In so far as the Court feels obliged to answer the second question, the Netherlands 
Government proposes suggests that the Court answer that question as follows: 
2. The conditions formulated by the Court of Justice pursuant to Article 15(1) of 
Directive  2002/58  in  the  
Tele2  and  Watson  judgment  cannot  be  applied  to  the 
acquisition  of  communications  data  for  the  purposes  of  protecting  national 
security. A national measure such as that at issue in the main proceedings must, in 
the context of Article 15 of Directive 2002/58 in conjunction with Article 7 of the 
Charter,  satisfy  the  conditions  arising  from  the  ECHR. The  measures  of  the 
Member States relating to the protection of national security must therefore have 
their basis in law, they must be necessary in a democratic society in the interests 
of  national  security,  they  must  satisfy  the  requirements  of  accessibility  and 
foreseeability  and  they  must  offer  adequate  safeguards  against  the  abuse  of 
power.
’  
Mielle Bulterman 
 
 
 
Charlotte Schillemans 
Agents 
The Hague, 15 February 2018 
11