This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Banasevic employment authorisation'.


 
EUROPEAN COMMISSION 
 
 
Brussels, 23.3.2022 
C(2022) 1946 final 
 
Ms Margarida Da Silva  
Rue d'Edimbourg 26, 
1050 Brussels 
Belgium 
DECISION OF THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION PURSUANT TO ARTICLE 4 OF THE 
IMPLEMENTING RULES TO REGULATION NO (EC) 1049/20011 
Subject: 
Your confirmatory application for access to documents under 
Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 - GESTDEM 2021/5927 

Dear Ms Da Silva, 
I  refer  to  your  email  of  12  December  2021,  registered  on  the  same  day,  in  which  you 
submit a confirmatory application in accordance with Article 7(2) of Regulation (EC) No 
1049/2001  regarding  public  access  to  European  Parliament,  Council  and  Commission 
documents2 (hereafter 'Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001').  
1. 
SCOPE OF YOUR REQUEST 
In  your  initial  application  of  7  October  2021,  addressed  to  the  Directorate-General  for 
Human  Resources  and  Security,  you  requested  access  to,  I  quote:  ‘documents  which 
relate to any article 16, article 12B and article 40 (staff regulations) applications made by 
X3.’ In particular, you requested ‘a note of all X's job titles at the Commission including 
dates held; copies of any application(s) that he has made under article 12b, 16 and 40 to 
undertake  a  new  professional  activity;  and  all  documents(correspondence,  emails, 
meeting notes etc) related to the authorisation of the new role or role.’ 
                                                 

Official Journal L 345, 29.12.2001, p. 94. 
2   Official Journal L 145, 31.5.2001, p. 43. 
3   In  your  initial  application,  you  refer  to  the  identified  individual  (a  staff  member  of  the  European 
Commission  not  holding  any  senior  management  position).  The  name  of  that  individual  has  been 
replaced by ‘X’ in this decision. 
 
Commission européenne/Europese Commissie, 1049 Bruxelles/Brussel, BELGIQUE/BELGIË - Tel. +32 22991111 
 

On 22 November 2021, the Directorate-General for Human Resources and Security sent 
you  a  negative  initial  reply  based  on  the  exception  of  Article  4(1)(b)  (protection  of 
privacy and the integrity of the individual) of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001. 
In  your  confirmatory  application,  you  request  a  review  of  this  position.  You  underpin 
your request with detailed arguments, which I will address in the corresponding sections 
below. 
2. 
ASSESSMENT AND CONCLUSIONS UNDER REGULATION (EC) NO 1049/2001 
When  assessing  a  confirmatory  application  for  access  to  documents  submitted  pursuant 
to Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001, the Secretariat-General conducts a review of the reply 
given by the Directorate-General concerned at the initial stage. 
Following this review, I regret to inform you that I have to confirm the initial decision of 
the Directorate-General for Human Resources and Security as the European Commission 
is not in a position to identify the documents falling within the scope of your application 
without interfering with  the right  to  privacy and  data protection based on the exception 
laid  down  in  Article  4(1)(b)  of  Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001,  for  the  reasons  set  out 
below. 
2.1.  Protection of privacy and the integrity of the individual 
Article  4(1)(b)  of  Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001  provides  that  ‘[t]he  institutions  shall 
refuse  access  to  a  document  where  disclosure  would  undermine  the  protection  of  […] 
privacy and the integrity of the individual, in  particular in  accordance  with  Community 
legislation regarding the protection of personal data’. 
In  its  judgment  in  Case  C-28/08  P  (Bavarian  Lager)4,  the  Court  of  Justice  ruled  that 
when  a  request  is  made  for  access  to  documents  containing  personal  data,  Regulation 
(EC) No 45/2001 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 18 December 2000 
on  the  protection  of  individuals  with  regard  to  the  processing  of  personal  data  by  the 
Community  institutions  and  bodies  and  on  the  free  movement  of  such  data5  (hereafter 
‘Regulation (EC) No 45/2001’) becomes fully applicable.  
Please  note  that,  as  from  11  December  2018,  Regulation  (EC)  No  45/2001  has  been 
repealed by Regulation (EU) 2018/1725 of the European Parliament and of the Council 
of 23 October 2018 on the protection of natural persons with regard to the processing of 
personal  data  by  the  Union  institutions,  bodies,  offices  and  agencies  and  on  the  free 
movement  of  such  data,  and  repealing  Regulation  (EC)  No  45/2001  and  Decision  No 
1247/2002/EC6 (hereafter ‘Regulation (EU) 2018/1725’). 
                                                 
4   Judgment of the Court of Justice of 29 June 2010, European Commission v The Bavarian Lager Co. 
Ltd  (hereafter  referred  to  as  ‘European  Commission  v  The  Bavarian  Lager  judgment’)  C-28/08 P, 
EU:C:2010:378, paragraph 59. 
5   Official Journal L 8, 12.1.2001, p. 1. 
6   Official Journal L 295, 21.11.2018, p. 39. 


However,  the  case  law  issued  with  regard  to  Regulation  (EC)  No  45/2001  remains 
relevant for the interpretation of Regulation (EU) 2018/1725. 
In  the  above-mentioned  judgment,  the  Court  stated  that  Article  4(1)(b)  of  Regulation  
(EC)  No  1049/2001  ‘requires  that  any  undermining  of  privacy  and  the  integrity  of  the 
individual  must  always  be  examined  and  assessed  in  conformity  with  the  legislation  of 
the  Union  concerning  the  protection  of  personal  data,  and  in  particular  with  […]  [the 
Data Protection] Regulation’7. 
Article  3(1)  of  Regulation  (EU)  2018/1725  provides  that  personal  data  ‘means  any 
information relating to an identified or identifiable natural person […]’. 
As the Court of Justice confirmed in Case C-465/00 (Rechnungshof), ‘there is no reason 
of principle to justify excluding activities of a professional […] nature from the notion of 
private life’8. 
In  the  VG  v  Commission  judgment,  the  General  Court  ruled  that  even  anonymised  data 
should  be  considered  as  personal  data,  if  it  would  be  possible  to  link  them  to  an 
identifiable natural person through additional information9. 
In  the  present  case,  a  clear  link  to  an  identifiable  person  remains,  since  your  request 
focuses  on  an  identified  natural  person.  Therefore,  it  is  clear  that  even  the  mere 
identification of the documents requested implies the processing of personal data and the 
information  about  the  existence  of  documents  would  constitute  processing  of  personal 
data, as this information cannot be disassociated from the natural person it concerns. 
The identified natural person mentioned in your request does not form part of the senior 
management of the European Commission in the context of your request. 
In your confirmatory request, you challenge this by saying that ‘European Commission 
considers senior officials to include Directors-General or Deputy Directors-General, Hors 
Classe  Advisors,  Directors,  Principal  Advisers  and  Heads  of  Cabinet.  This  includes 
officials  that  were  ‘called  upon  to  occupy  temporarily  such  posts  in  accordance  with 
Article 7(2) of the Staff Regulations and having exercised either of these functions at any 
time  during  the  last  3  years  before  leaving  the  service.  In  May  2021  X  had  reportedly 
become  the  acting  director  of  directorate  C  (Markets  and  cases  II  Information, 
Communication  and  Media).  X  must  then  be  understood  to  fall  in  the  senior  official 
category and thus any application for post-public office employment made by him must 
be subject to extra layers of transparency as per article 16 of the EU Staff Regulations.’  
 
 
                                                 
7   European Commission v The Bavarian Lager judgment, cited above, paragraph 59. 
8   Judgment  of  the  Court  of  Justice  of  20  May  2003,  Rechnungshof  and  Others  v  Österreichischer 
Rundfunk, Joined Cases C-465/00, C-138/01 and C-139/01, EU:C:2003:294, paragraph 73. 
9   Judgment of the General Court of 27 November 2018, VG v Commission, Joined Cases T‑314/16 and 
T‑435/16, EU:T:2018:841, paragraph 74. 


I would like to point out that, before leaving the Commission, X was deputising the role 
of  the  Director  (‘acting’  Director)10  and  was  not  acting  as  an  ‘ad  interim’  Director. 
Acting  or  deputising  Director  is  not  a  senior  management  position,  unlike  ‘ad  interim’ 
Director.  
Deputising function is  based on  Article 27 of the Commission  Decision of 24 February 
2010  amending  Rules  of  Procedure11.  It  can  be  automatic  and  it  does  not  imply  any 
financial advantage. On the other hand, the legal basis for the ad interim figure is Article 
7(2)  of  the  Staff  Regulations12  and  it  always  requires  a  decision  of  the  Appointing 
Authority.  The  granting  of  the  interim  may  lead  to  the  payment  of  a  differential 
allowance. 
This  is  the  reason  why  X’s  request  for  post  service  employment  did  not  figure  in  the 
annual Report that the Commission publishes under Article 16(4) of the Staff Regulation, 
which  includes  all  activities  from  former  senior  managers13.  The  report  includes  a 
definition  of  the  categories  concerned  and  the  definition  of  Directors  states:  ‘Directors 
(including  officials  that  have  been  called  upon  to  occupy  temporarily  such  post  in 
accordance  with  Article  7(2)  of  the  Staff  Regulations)  and  Principal  Advisers,  having 
exercised either of these functions at any time during the last 3 years before leaving the 
service’. 
In  the  Nowak  judgment14,  the  Court  of  Justice  has  acknowledged  that  ‘[t]he  use  of  the 
expression “any information” in the definition of the concept of “personal data”, within 
Article  2(a)  of  Directive  95/46,  reflects  the  aim  of  the  EU  legislature  to  assign  a  wide 
scope  to  that  concept,  which  is  not  restricted  to  information  that  is  sensitive  or  private, 
but  potentially  encompasses  all  kinds  of  information,  not  only  objective  but  also 
subjective, in the form of opinions and assessments, provided that it “relates” to the data 
subject’. As regards the latter condition, it is satisfied where the information, by reason of 
its content, purpose or effect, is linked to a particular person (emphasis added). 
In  your  confirmatory request,  you ask for the partial  access  to  the requested documents 
by stating that ‘it should be completely feasible for the European Commission to protect 
special  categories  of  personal  data  while  also  releasing  parts  of  the  documents  covered 
within the scope of my request’. 
 
 
                                                 
10   Or deputising or ‘faisant fonction’ in French.  
11     https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/PDF/?uri=CELEX:32010D0138&from=en  
12    https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/PDF/?uri=CELEX:01962R0031-20140501&from=EN  
13    The annual reports on the occupational activities of senior official after leaving the service are publicly 
available 
on 
https://ec.europa.eu/info/publications/occupational-activities-former-senior-officials-
annual-report_en  
14     Judgment of the Court of Justice of 20 December 2017, Peter Nowak v Data Protection Commissioner 
(Request for a preliminary ruling from the Supreme Court), C-434/16, EU:C:2017:994, paragraphs 34-
35. 


However, as mentioned, even the mere identification of the documents requested would 
lead  to  the  identification  of  the  individual  person.  Establishing  a  list  of  requested 
documents would constitute processing of personal data, thus undermining the protection 
of  privacy  and  the  integrity  of  the  data  subject  concerned.  The  stage  where  the 
Commission could eventually consider granting partially access to identified documents 
is therefore not even reached in this case. 
The names of the persons concerned as well as other data from which their identity can 
be  deduced  undoubtedly  constitute  personal  data  in  the  meaning  of  Article  3(1)  of 
Regulation  (EU)  2018/172515.  Applications  under  Article  12b  and  authorisations  under 
Article 16 are part of the personal file of the staff member and are accordingly covered 
by the confidentiality under Article 26 of the Staff regulations. 
In this regard, the Secretariat-General would like to emphasise that  your request targets 
personal  data  that  go  beyond  the  data  subject’s  name,  surname  and  function  as  you 
requested  documents  that  relate  to  ‘all  X's  job  titles  at  the  Commission  including  dates 
held;  copies  of  any  application(s)  that  he  has  made  under  article  12b,  16  and  40  to 
undertake  a  new  professional  activity;  and  all  documents(correspondence,  emails, 
meeting notes etc) related to the authorisation of the new role or role.’ 
Pursuant  to  Article  9(1)(b)  of  Regulation  (EU)  2018/1725,  ‘personal  data  shall  only  be 
transmitted to recipients established in the Union other than Union institutions and bodies 
if ‘[t]he recipient establishes that it is necessary to have the data transmitted for a specific 
purpose in the public interest and the controller, where there is any reason to assume that 
the  data  subject’s  legitimate  interests  might  be  prejudiced,  establishes  that  it  is 
proportionate  to  transmit  the  personal  data  for  that  specific  purpose  after  having 
demonstrably weighed the various competing interests’. 
Only if these conditions are fulfilled and the processing constitutes lawful processing in 
accordance  with  the  requirements  of  Article  5  of  Regulation  (EU)  2018/1725,  can  the 
transmission of personal data occur. 
In Case C-615/13 P (ClientEarth), the Court of Justice ruled that the institution does not 
have to examine by itself the existence of a need for transferring personal data16. This is 
also  clear  from  Article  9(1)(b)  of  Regulation  (EU)  2018/1725,  which  requires  that  the 
necessity to have the personal data transmitted must be established by the recipient. 
According to  Article 9(1)(b) of Regulation  (EU)  2018/1725,  the European Commission 
has to  examine the  further conditions  for the lawful processing of personal  data only if 
the  first  condition  is  fulfilled,  namely  if  the  recipient  establishes  that  it  is  necessary  to 
have  the  data  transmitted  for  a  specific  purpose  in  the  public  interest.  It  is  only  in  this 
case that the European Commission has to examine whether there is a reason to assume 
that  the  data  subject’s  legitimate  interests  might  be  prejudiced  and,  in  the  affirmative, 
                                                 
15  European Commission v The Bavarian Lager judgment, cited above, paragraph 68. 
16   Judgment of the Court of Justice of 16 July 2015, ClientEarth v European Food Safety Authority, C-
615/13 P, EU:C:2015:489, paragraph 47. 


establish  the  proportionality  of  the  transmission  of  the  personal  data  for  that  specific 
purpose after having demonstrably weighed the various competing interests. 
To establish the necessity to have the data transmitted, you argue that, I quote: ‘there is a 
public  interest  in  understanding  how  the  EU  Commission  assessed  and  handled  an 
employment  request  for  such  a  high  level  official.  This  is  especially  true  in  a  case  that 
involves  such  a  high  level  official  taking  up  employment  in  a  private  company  that  is 
active  on  matters  for  which  the  official  had  been  responsible.  Citizens  have  a  right  to 
know  how  the  Institutions  handle  such  cases,  that  transparency  and  accountability  are 
crucial for the proper implementation of these rules.’  
That  argument  cannot  justify  the  transmission  of  the  personal  data  at  stake,  which  may 
fall within the notion of ‘private life’ regardless of whether this data is registered in the 
context of a professional activity17. Following your reasoning, when requesting access to 
documents concerning personal data, all applicants invoking the principle of transparency 
in certain sphere of the European Commission’s political competence would gain access 
to said personal data. 
Moreover,  the  General  Court  confirmed  in  the  Psara  judgment  that  general 
considerations relating to the public interest in the disclosure of personal data regarding 
parliamentary mandate holders in order to guarantee the public right to information and 
transparency  do  not  establish  the  need  for  the  transfer  of  the  personal  data18.  This 
conclusion  applicable  to  parliamentary  mandate  holders  is  all  the  more  relevant  in 
relation  to  natural  persons  who  do  not  form  part  of  the  senior  management  of  the 
European Commission. 
You also  mentioned that the case has drawn media attention as well as criticism on the 
part of the European Parliament MEPs, highlighting the data subject’s seniority. 
First, as explained above, the data subject did not form part of the senior management of 
the  Commission.  In  the  Psara  judgment,  the  General  Court  has  ruled  that  ‘the 
classification  of  the  data  at  issue  as  personal  data  cannot  be  ruled  out  merely  because 
those  data  are  related  to  other  data  which  are  public,  which  is  the  case  irrespective  of 
whether disclosure of those data would undermine the legitimate interests of the persons 
concerned’19.  Similarly,  in  this  case,  the  fact  that  information  is  already  publicly 
available does not mean that identification of requested documents would not constitute 
processing of personal data. 
                                                 
17   Judgment  of  the  General  Court  of  19  September  2018,  Case  T-39/17,  Chambre  de  commerce  et 
d’industrie  métropolitaine  Bretagne-Ouest  (port  de  Brest)  v  Commission,  ECLI:EU:T.2018:560, 
paragraphs 37, 38 and 43. 
18   Judgment of the General Court of 25 September 2018, Psara et al. v European Parliament, T-639/15 
to T-666/15 and T-94/16, EU:T:2018:602, paragraphs 73-76. 
19   Judgment of the General Court of 25 September 2018, Psara et al. v European Parliament, T-639/15 
to T-666/15 and T-94/16, EU:T:2018:602, paragraph 53. 


Secondly,  while  the  General  Court  has  indeed  accepted  in  Evropaïki  Dynamiki 
judgment20 that disclosure of certain documents cannot be withheld if similar information 
is also contained in the public domain, the situation is not comparable. The information 
concerned by your request has not been made public either by the European Commission 
or by the data subject concerned.  
Against this background, the Secretariat-General emphasises that the mere identification 
of documents in the context of your request entails the processing of personal data, which 
constitutes  an  interference  with  the  right  to  privacy  and  data  protection  and  is  not 
proportionate and necessary in the public interest. 
Notwithstanding the above, there are reasons to assume that the legitimate interests of the 
data subject concerned would be prejudiced by the processing of the requested personal 
data, as there is a real and non-hypothetical risk that the mere identification of documents 
in  the  context  of  your  request  would  harm  the  privacy  and  subject  the  natural  person 
concerned to unsolicited external contacts.  
Consequently,  the  Secretariat-General  concludes  that,  pursuant  to  Article  4(1)(b)  of 
Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001, the European Commission is not in a position to identify 
the  documents  requested,  as  the  need  to  obtain  access  to  the  personal  data  of  the  data 
subject concerned for a purpose in the public interest has not been substantiated and there 
is no reason to think that the legitimate interests of the individual concerned would not be 
prejudiced by the disclosure of the personal data concerned. 
3. 
OVERRIDING PUBLIC INTEREST IN DISCLOSURE 
Please  note  that  Article  4(1)(b)  of  Regulation  (EC)  No  1049/2001  does  not  include  the 
possibility  for  the  exception  defined  therein  to  be  set  aside  by  an  overriding  public 
interest. 
4. 
PARTIAL ACCESS 
Pursuant to Article 4(6) of Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001, ‘If only parts of the requested 
document  are  covered  by  any  of  the  exceptions,  the  remaining  parts  of  the  document 
shall be released.’ 
However, as the Secretariat-General is not in a position to identify the documents that fall 
within  the  scope  of  your  confirmatory  application  without  undermining  the  interests 
described above, it is  neither in  a position to  consider the possibility of  granting partial 
access to the documents requested. 
 
 
                                                 
20   Judgment  of  the  General  Court  of  6  December  2012,  Evropaïki  Dynamiki  v  Commission,  T-167/10, 
EU:T:2012:651, paragraphs 87-88. 



5. 
MEANS OF REDRESS 
Finally, I draw your attention to the means of redress available against this decision. You 
may  either  bring  proceedings  before  the  General  Court  or  file  a  complaint  with  the 
European  Ombudsman  under  the  conditions  specified  respectively  in  Articles  263  and 
228 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union. 
Yours sincerely, 
 
For the Commission 
Ilze JUHANSONE 
Secretary-General 

 


Document Outline