Dies ist eine HTML Version eines Anhanges der Informationsfreiheitsanfrage 'Compromise amendments A high common level of cybersecurity'.

21/09/2021.v03
Draft compromises - LIBE opinion on the NIS2 Directive
Rapporteur: Lukas MANDL
Chapters III - VII
RECITALS 27-84
CA28
Covers  AMs  14  (rapp),  15  (rapp),  16  (rapp),  17  (rapp),  18  (rapp),  19  (rapp),  20
(rapp), 21 (rapp), 22 (rapp), 23 (rapp), 24 (rapp), 25 (rapp), 26 (rapp), 27 (rapp), 28
(rapp), 102 (S&D), 103 (S&D), 104 (RE), 105 (RE), 107 (S&D), 110 (Left), 112
(ECR), 114part (Greens), 115 (Greens), 116 (Left), 117 (RE), 118 (Greens), 119
(S&D), 120part (S&D), 124 (RE), 132 (S&D), 135 (S&D), 136 (Left)
Fall: AMs 28 (rapp), 106 (ECR), 109 (ECR), 111 (ECR), 113 (ECR), 121 (S&D),
122 (ECR), 123 (ECR), 125 (Greens), 126 (Greens), 127 (Greens), 128 (Greens),
129 (ECR), 130 (Greens), 131 (Greens), 133 (ECR),
(27)
In  accordance  with  the  Annex  to  Commission Recommendation  (EU)
2017/1548 on Coordinated Response to  Large Scale Cybersecurity  Incidents and
Crises  (‘Blueprint’)20 ,  a  large-scale  incident  should  mean  an  incident  with  a
significant  impact  on  at  least  two  Member  States  or  whose  disruption  exceeds  a
Member  State’s  capacity  to  respond  to  it.  Depending  on  their  cause  and  impact,
large-scale incidents may  escalate and turn into  fully-fledged  crises not  allowing
the proper functioning of the internal market or posing serious public security risks
in several Member States or the Union as a whole
. Given the wide-ranging scope
and, in most cases, the cross-border nature of such incidents, Member States and
relevant  Union  institutions,  bodies  and  agencies  should  cooperate  at  technical,
operational and political level to properly coordinate the response across the Union.
Member  States  should  monitor  the  way  in  which  EU  rules  are  implemented,
support each other in the event of any cross-border problems, establish a more
structured dialogue with the private sector and cooperate on security risks and
the threats associated with new technologies, as was the case with 5G technology.
(AM 14, 102, 103)

(28) - (32) [...] COM proposal
(33) When  developing  guidance  documents,  the  Cooperation  Group  should
consistently: map national and sectoral solutions and experiences, assess the impact
of  Cooperation  Group  deliverables  on  national and  sectoral approaches,  discuss
implementation  challenges  and  formulate  specific  recommendations  to  be
addressed through better implementation of existing rules. (AM 15)
(34)
The Cooperation Group should remain a flexible forum and be able to react
to changing and new policy priorities and challenges while taking into account the
availability  of  resources.  It  should  organize  regular  joint  meetings  with  relevant
private stakeholders from across the Union to discuss activities carried out by the
Group  and  gather  input  on  emerging  policy  challenges.  In  order  to  enhance
cooperation  at  Union  level,  the  Group  should invite  relevant Union  bodies  and
agencies involved in cybersecurity policy, notably Europol, the European Union
Aviation  Safety  Agency  (EASA)  and  the  European  Union  Agency  for  Space
Programme (EUSPA) to participate in its work. (AM 16)
(35) [...] COM proposal
1

21/09/2021.v03
(36)    The Union should, where appropriate, conclude international agreements, in
accordance  with  Article  218  TFEU,  with  third  countries  or  international
organisations, allowing and organising their participation in some activities of the
Cooperation Group and the CSIRTs network. To the extent that personal data is
transferred  to  a  third  country  or  international  organisation,  Chapter  V  of
Regulation (EU) 2016/679 
should apply. (AM 17, 104)
(37)
Member  States  should  contribute  to  the  establishment  of  the  EU
Cybersecurity  Crisis  Response  Framework  set  out  in  Recommendation  (EU)
2017/1584  through  the  existing  cooperation  networks,  notably  the  Cyber  Crisis
Liaison  Organisation  Network  (EU-CyCLONe),  CSIRTs  network  and  the
Cooperation Group. EU-CyCLONe and the CSIRTs network should cooperate on
the basis of procedural  arrangements defining the modalities of that cooperation.
The  EU-CyCLONe’s  rules  of  procedures  should  further  specify  the  modalities
through  which  the  network  should  function,  including  but  not  limited  to  roles,
cooperation  modes,  interactions  with  other  relevant  actors  and  templates  for
information sharing, as well as means of communication. For crisis management at
Union level, relevant parties should rely on the Integrated Political Crisis Response
(IPCR) arrangements. The Commission should use the ARGUS high-level cross-
sectoral crisis coordination process for this purpose. If the crisis concerns two or
more Member States and is suspected to be of criminal nature, the activation of
the EU Law Enforcement Emergency Response Protocol should be considered.
If the crisis 
entails an important external or Common Security and Defence Policy
(CSDP) dimension, the European External Action Service (EEAS) Crisis Response
Mechanism (CRM) should be activated.
(38)-(44)
[...] COM proposal
(45) Entities  should  also  address  cybersecurity  risks  stemming  from  their
interactions and relationships with other stakeholders within a broader ecosystem.
In  particular,  entities  should  take  appropriate  measures  to  ensure  that  their
cooperation with academic and research institutions takes place in line with their
cybersecurity  policies  and  follows  good  practices  as  regards  secure  access  and
dissemination of information in general and the protection of intellectual property
in particular. Similarly, given the importance and value of data for the activities of
the entities, when relying on data transformation and data analytics services from
third  parties,  the  entities  should  take  all  appropriate  cybersecurity  measures and
report any cyber attacks that they identify
. (AM 107)
(46) [...] COM proposal (AM 109 falls).
(46a) Particular  consideration  should  be  given to  the  fact  that  ICT  services,
systems or products subject to specific requirements in the country of origin that
might represent an obstacle to compliance with EU privacy and data protection
law. Where appropriate, the EDPB should be consulted in the framework of such
risk assessments. Free and open source software as well as open source hardware
could  bring  huge  benefits  in  terms  of  cybersecurity,  in  particular  as  regards
transparency and verifiability of features. As this could help address and mitigate
specific supply chain risks, their use should be preferred where feasible in line
with Opinion 5/2021 of the EDPS1. (AMs 108, 110, 114)

Opinion 5/2021 of the European Data Protection Supervisor on the Cybersecurity Strategy and the NIS 2.0
Directive, 11 March 2021

2

21/09/2021.v03
(47) The  supply  chain  risk  assessments,  in  light  of  the  features  of  the  sector
concerned,  should  take  into  account  both  technical  and,  where  relevant,  non-
technical factors that should be further specified by the Coordination Group, and
which include 
those defined in Recommendation (EU) 2019/534, in the EU wide
coordinated risk assessment of 5G networks security and in the EU Toolbox on 5G
cybersecurity agreed by the Cooperation Group. To identify the supply chains that
should be subject to a coordinated risk assessment, the following criteria should be
taken into account: (i) the extent to which essential and important entities use and
rely  on  specific  critical  ICT  services,  systems  or  products;  (ii)  the  relevance  of
specific  critical  ICT  services,  systems  or  products  for  performing  critical  or
sensitive functions, including the processing of personal data; (iii) the availability
of alternative  ICT services, systems or products; (iv) the resilience of the overall
supply chain of ICT services, systems or products against disruptive events and (v)
for emerging ICT services, systems or products, their potential future significance
for the entities’ activities. (AM 18)
(48) [...] COM proposal
(48a) Small  and  medium-sized  enterprises  (SMEs)  often  lack  the  scale  and
resources  to  fulfil  a broad  and  growing  range  of  cybersecurity  needs  in  an
interconnected  world  with  an  increase  of  remote  work.  Member  States  should
therefore address in their national cybersecurity strategies guidance and support
for SMEs. (AM 112)

(49) [...] COM proposal
(50)
Given  the  growing  importance  of  number-independent  interpersonal
communications services, it is necessary to ensure that such services are also subject
to appropriate security requirements in view of their specific nature and economic
importance.  Providers of  such  services  should  thus  also  ensure  a  level  of
cybersecurity  appropriate  to  the  risk  posed.  Given  that  providers  of  number-
independent interpersonal communications services normally do not exercise actual
control over the transmission of signals over networks, the degree of risk for such
services  can  be  considered  in  some  respects  to  be  lower  than  for  traditional
electronic  communications  services.  The  same  applies  to  interpersonal
communications services which make use of numbers and which do not exercise
actual control over signal transmission. (AM 19)
(51) [...] COM proposal (AM 113 falls)
(52) Where appropriate, entities should be enabled to inform their service recipients
of particular and significant threats and of measures they can take to mitigate the
resulting  risk  to  themselves.  The  requirement  to  inform  those  recipients  of  such
threats  should  not  discharge  entities  from  the  obligation  to  take,  at  their  own
expense,  appropriate  and  immediate  measures  to  prevent  or  remedy  any  cyber
threats and restore the normal security level of the service. The provision of such
information about security threats to the recipients should be free of charge. (AM
20)
(53) In  particular,  providers  of  public  electronic  communications  networks  or
publicly available electronic communications services, should implement security
by  design  and  by  default  and be  enabled  to 
inform  the  service  recipients  of
particular and significant cyber threats and of measures they can take to protect the
security of their devices and communications, for instance by using specific types
of software or encryption technologies. To increase the security of hardware and
3

21/09/2021.v03
software, providers should be encouraged to use open source and open hardware.
(AM 21)
(54)
In order to safeguard the security of electronic communications networks
and services as well as the fundamental rights to data protection and privacy, the
use of encryption, and in particular end-to-end encryption, should be promoted and,
where necessary, should be mandatory for providers of such services and networks
in accordance with the principles of security and privacy by default and by design
for  the  purposes  of  Article  18.  The  use  of  end-to-end  encryption  should  be
reconciled with the Member State’ responsibility to ensure the protection of their
essential  security  interests  and  public  security,  and  to  permit  the prevention,
detection  and  prosecution  of  criminal  offences  in  compliance  with  Union and
national 
law. Solutions for lawful access to information in end-to-end encrypted
communications  should  maintain  the  effectiveness  of  encryption  in  protecting
privacy and  security  of  communications. Nothing  in  this  Regulation  should  be
viewed  as  an  effort  to  weaken 
end-to-end  encryption through  "backdoors"  or
similar 
solutions, as  encryption  shortfalls  may  be  exploited  for  malicious
purposes
Any  measure  aimed  at  weakening  encryption  or  circumventing  the
technology’s architecture may incur significant risks to the effective protection
capabilities  it  entails,.  Any  unauthorised  decryption, reverse  engineering  of
encryption codes or monitoring of electronic communications other than by legal
authorities should be prohibited to ensure the effectiveness of the technology and
its  wider  use.  It  is  important/essential  that  Member  States  address  problems
encountered by legal authorities and vulnerability researchers. In some Member
States  entities  and  natural  persons  researching  vulnerabilities  are  exposed  to
criminal  and  civil  liability;  Member  States  are  therefore  encouraged  to  issue
guidelines  for  non-prosecution  and  non-liability  of  information  security
research. 
(AM 22, 116, 117, 118, 119, 120part)
(55) This Directive lays down a two-stage approach to incident reporting in order
to  strike  the  right  balance  between,  on  the  one  hand,  swift  reporting  that  helps
mitigate the potential spread of incidents and allows entities to seek support, and,
on the other hand, in-depth reporting that draws valuable lessons from individual
incidents  and  improves  over  time  the  resilience  to  cyber  threats  of  individual
companies  and  entire  sectors.  Where  entities  become  aware  of  an  incident,  they
should be required to submit an initial notification within 24 hours, followed by a
final  report  not  later  than  one  month  after.  The  initial  notification  should  only
include the information strictly necessary to make the competent authorities aware
of the incident and allow the entity to seek assistance, if required. Such notification,
where  applicable,  should  indicate  whether  the  incident  is  presumably  caused  by
unlawful or malicious action. Member States should ensure that the requirement to
submit this initial notification does not divert the reporting entity’s resources from
activities related to incident handling that should be prioritised. To further prevent
that  incident  reporting  obligations  either  divert  resources  from  incident  response
handling or may otherwise compromise the entities efforts in that respect, Member
States should also provide that, in duly justified cases and in agreement with the
competent  authorities  or  the  CSIRT,  the  entity  concerned  can  deviate  from  the
deadlines of 24 hours for the initial notification and one month for the final report.
(AM 23)
(56) Essential  and  important  entities  are  often  in  a  situation  where  a  particular
incident,  because  of  its  features,  needs  to  be  reported  to  various  authorities  as  a
4

21/09/2021.v03
result of notification obligations included in various legal instruments. Such cases
create  additional  burdens  and  may  also  lead  to  uncertainties  with  regard to  the
format and procedures of such notifications. In view of this and, for the purposes of
simplifying the  reporting of security incidents, Member States should establish a
single entry point required under this Directive and also under other Union law such
as  Regulation  (EU)  2016/679  and  Directive  2002/58/EC.  ENISA,  in  cooperation
with  the  Cooperation  Group and  the  European  Data  Protection  Board, should
develop common notification templates by means of guidelines that would simplify
and streamline the reporting information requested by Union law and decrease the
burdens for companies. (AM 24)
(57) Where it is suspected that an incident is related to serious criminal activities
under  Union  or  national  law,  essential  and  important  entities,  on  the  basis  of
applicable criminal proceedings rules in compliance with Union law, should report
incidents  of  a  suspected  serious  criminal  nature  to  the  relevant  law  enforcement
authorities. Where appropriate, and without prejudice to the personal data protection
rules applying  to  Europol,  it  is  desirable  that  coordination  between  competent
authorities  and  law  enforcement  authorities  of  different  Member  States  be
facilitated  by  the European  Cybercrime  Centre  (EC3)  of  Europol and  ENISA.
(AM 25, 124)
(58) Personal data are in many cases compromised as a result of incidents. In this
context, competent authorities should cooperate  and exchange information on all
relevant  matters  with  data  protection  authorities  and  the  supervisory  authorities
pursuant to Regulation (EU) 2016/679 and Directive 2002/58/EC. (AM 26)
(59)
Maintaining accurate  and  complete  databases  of  domain  names  and
registration data (so called ‘WHOIS data’) and providing lawful access to such data
is essential to ensure the security, stability and resilience of the DNS, which in turn
contributes  to  a  high  common  level  of  cybersecurity  within  the  Union.  Where
processing  includes  personal  data  such  processing  shall  comply  with applicable
Union data protection law. (AM 27)
(60) [...] COM proposal. (AM 28 falls)
The availability and timely accessibility of these data to public authorities, including
competent authorities under Union or national law for the prevention, investigation
or prosecution of criminal offences, CERTs, (CSIRTs, and as regards the data of
their clients to providers of electronic communications networks and services and
providers  of  cybersecurity  technologies  and  services  acting  on  behalf  of  those
clients, is essential to prevent and combat Domain Name System abuse, in particular
to  prevent,  detect  and  respond  to  cybersecurity  incidents.  Such  access  should
comply with Union data protection law insofar as it is related to personal data. (AM
28)
(61) [...] COM proposal. (AM 127 falls)
(62) To comply with a legal obligation in terms of Article 6(1)(c) and Article 6(3)
of  Regulation  (EU)  2016/679, 
TLD  registries  and  the  entities  providing  domain
name registration services for them should make publicly available certain domain
name registration data specified in the Member State law to which they are subject,
such as the domain name and the name of the legal person. TLD registries and the
entities providing domain name registration services for the TLD should also enable
lawful access to specific domain name registration data concerning natural persons
to legitimate access seekers, notably to competent authorities under this Directive
5

21/09/2021.v03
or  supervisory  authorities  under  Regulation  (EU)  2016/679 in  accordance  with
their  powers. Member  States  should  ensure  that  TLD  registries  and  the  entities
providing  domain  name  registration  services  for  them  should  respond  without
undue  delay  to lawful  and  duly  justified requests  from public  authorities,
including competent authorities under this Directive, competent authorities under
Union or national law for the prevention, investigation or prosecution of criminal
offences
or  supervisory  authorities  under  Regulation  (EU)  2016/679, for  the
disclosure  of  domain  name  registration  data.  TLD  registries  and  the  entities
providing domain name registration services for them should establish policies and
procedures for the publication and disclosure of registration data, including service
level agreements to deal with requests for access from legitimate access  seekers.
The  access  procedure  may  also  include  the  use  of  an  interface,  portal  or  other
technical  tool  to  provide  an  efficient  system  for  requesting  and  accessing
registration data. With a view to promoting harmonised practices across the internal
market,  the  Commission  may  adopt  guidelines  on  such  procedures  without
prejudice to the competences of the European Data Protection Board. (AM 29)
(63) Fur the purposes of this Directive, all essential and important entities under
this  Directive  should fall  under  the  jurisdiction  of  the  Member  State  where  they
provide  their  services.  If  the  entity  provides  services  in  more  than  one  Member
State, it should fall under the separate and concurrent jurisdiction of each of these
Member States. The competent authorities of these Member States should agree on
constituent classifications, 
cooperate wherever possible, provide real time mutual
assistance to each other and where appropriate, carry out joint supervisory actions.
(AM 30)
(64)
In  order  to  take  account of  the  cross-border  nature  of  the  services  and
operations  of  DNS  service  providers,  TLD  name registries, content  delivery
network  providers, cloud  computing  service  providers,  data centre  service
providers  and  digital  providers,  only  one  Member  State  should  have  jurisdiction
over  these  entities. For  the  purposes  of  this  Directive, jurisdiction should  be
attributed  to  the  Member  State  in  which  the  respective  entity  has  its  main
establishment in the Union. The criterion of establishment for the purposes of this
Directive implies the effective exercise of activity through stable arrangements. The
legal form of such arrangements, whether through a branch or a subsidiary with a
legal personality, is not the determining factor in that respect. Whether this criterion
is fulfilled should not depend on whether the network and information systems are
physically located in a given place; the presence and use of such systems do not, in
themselves,  constitute  such  main  establishment and  are  therefore  not  decisive
criteria for determining the main establishment. The main establishment should be
the  place  where  the  decisions  related  to  the  cybersecurity  risk  management
measures are taken in the Union. This will typically correspond to the place of the
companies’ central administration in the Union. If such decisions are not taken in
the Union, the main establishment should be deemed to be in the Member States
where the entity has an establishment with the highest number of employees in the
Union. Where  the  services  are  carried  out  by  a  group  of  undertakings,  the  main
establishment of the controlling undertaking should be considered to be the main
establishment of the group of undertakings. (AM 31)
(65) [...] COM proposal (AM 130 falls)
(66) [...] COM proposal
(67) [...] COM proposal
6

21/09/2021.v03
(68) [...] COM proposal
(69) The  processing  of  personal  data,  to  the  extent  strictly  necessary  and
proportionate  for  the  purposes  of  ensuring  network  and  information  security  by
entities, public authorities, CERTs, CSIRTs, and providers of security technologies
and  services is  necessary  for  compliance  with  their  legal  obligations  under
national  law  transposing  this  Directive,  and  is  therefore  covered  by  Articles
6(1)(c) and 6(3) of Regulation (EU) 2016/679. Moreover, such processing 
should
constitute  a  legitimate  interest  of  the  data  controller  concerned,  as  referred  to  in
Article 6(1)(f) of Regulation (EU) 2016/679. That should include measures related
to the prevention, detection, analysis and response to incidents, measures to raise
awareness  in  relation  to  specific  cyber  threats,  exchange  of  information  in  the
context  of  vulnerability  remediation  and  coordinated  disclosure,  as  well  as  the
voluntary exchange of information on those incidents, as well as cyber threats and
vulnerabilities,  indicators  of  compromise,  tactics,  techniques  and  procedures,
cybersecurity  alerts  and  configuration  tools. In  many  cases,  personal  data  are
compromised following cyber incidents and, therefore, the competent authorities
and  data  protection  authorities  of  EU  Member  States  should  cooperate  and
exchange information on all relevant matters in order to tackle any personal data
breaches. 
Such  measures  may  require  the  processing  of certain  categories of
personal data, including IP addresses, uniform resources locators (URLs), domain
names, and email addresses. (AM 32, 132)
(70) [...] COM proposal (AM 133 falls)
(71)
In  order  to  make  enforcement  effective,  a  minimum  list  of  administrative
sanctions for breach of the cybersecurity risk management and reporting obligations
provided by this Directive should be laid down, setting up a clear and consistent
framework for such sanctions across the Union. Due regard should be given to the
seriousness and duration of the infringement, the actual damage caused or losses
incurred or potential damage or losses that could have been triggered, any relevant
previous infringements, the manner in which the infringement became known to
the competent authority
, the intentional or negligent character of the infringement,
actions taken to prevent or mitigate the damage and/or losses suffered, the degree
of responsibility or any relevant previous infringements, the degree of cooperation
with the competent authority and any other aggravating or mitigating factor. The
penalties imposed, including administrative fines should be subject to appropriate
procedural safeguards in accordance with the general principles of Union law and
the  Charter  of  Fundamental  Rights  of  the  European  Union,  including  effective
judicial protection and due process.
(72) [...] COM proposal.
(73) [...] COM proposal.
(74)
Member States should be able to lay down the rules on criminal penalties for
infringements  of  the  national  rules  transposing  this  Directive.  Those  criminal
penalties  may  also  allow  for the  deprivation  of  the  profits  obtained  through
infringements of this Regulation
. However, the imposition of criminal  penalties
for  infringements  of  such  national  rules  and  of  related  administrative  penalties
should not lead to a breach of the principle of ne bis in idem, as interpreted by the
Court of Justice. (AM 34)
(75) [...] COM proposal
7

21/09/2021.v03
(76)
In  order  to  further  strengthen  the  effectiveness  and  dissuasiveness  of  the
penalties  applicable  to  infringements  of  obligations  laid  down  pursuant  to  this
Directive,  the  competent  authorities  should  be  empowered  to  apply  sanctions
consisting of the suspension of a certification or authorisation concerning part or all
the services provided by an essential entity. Given their seriousness and impact on
the entities’ activities and ultimately on their consumers, such sanctions should only
be applied proportionally to the severity of the infringement and taking account of
the  specific  circumstances  of  each  case,  including  the  intentional  or  negligent
character  of  the  infringement,  actions  taken  to  prevent  or  mitigate  the  damage
and/or  losses  suffered.  Such  sanctions  should  only  be  applied  as  ultima  ratio,
meaning  only  after  the  other  relevant  enforcement  actions  laid  down  by  this
Directive have been exhausted, and only for the time until the entities to which they
apply  take  the  necessary  action  to  remedy  the  deficiencies  or  comply  with  the
requirements of the competent authority for which such sanctions were applied. The
imposition of such sanctions shall be subject to appropriate procedural safeguards
in  accordance  with  the  general  principles  of  Union  law  and  the  Charter  of
Fundamental Rights of the European Union, including effective judicial remedies,
due process, presumption of innocence and right of defence. (AM 35)
(77) This  Directive  should  establish  cooperation  rules  between  the  competent
authorities under  this  Directive and  the  supervisory under Regulation  (EU)
2016/679 to deal with infringements related to personal data. (AM 36)
(78)This  Directive  should  aim at  ensuring  a  high  level  of  responsibility  for  the
cybersecurity risk management measures and reporting obligations at the level of
the organisations. For these reasons, the management bodies of the entities falling
within the scope of this Directive should approve the cybersecurity risk measures
and supervise their implementation.
(79) A peer-review mechanism should be introduced, allowing the assessment by
experts designated by the Member States of the  implementation of cybersecurity
policies, including the level of Member States’ capabilities and available resources.
The  EU  should  facilitate a  coordinated  response  to  large-scale  cyber incidents
and  crises  and offer  assistance  in  order  to aid recovery  following  such  cyber
attacks. (AM 135)

(80) [...] COM proposal
(81) [...] COM proposal
(82) [...] COM proposal
(82a) This  Directive does  not  apply  to  Union  institutions,  offices,  bodies  and
agencies.  However,  Union  bodies  could  be  considered  essential  or  important
entities  under  this  Directive. To  achieve  a  uniform  level  of  protection  through
consistent and homogeneous rules, the Commission should publish a legislative
proposal to include Union institutions, offices, bodies and agencies in the EU-
wide cybersecurity framework by 31 December 2022. (AM 136)

(83) [...] COM proposal
(84) This Directive respects the fundamental rights, and observes the principles,
recognised  by  the  Charter  of  Fundamental  Rights  of  the  European  Union,  in
particular the right to respect for private life and communications, the protection of
personal data, the freedom to conduct a business, the right to property, the right to
an effective remedy before a court and the right to be heard. This Directive should
be implemented in accordance with those rights and principles, principles, and in
8

21/09/2021.v03
full  compliance  with  existing  Union  legislation  regulating  these  issues.  Any
processing  of  personal  data  under  this  Directive  is  subject  to  Regulation  (EU)
2016/679  and  Directive  2002/58/EC,  in  their  respective  scope  of  application,
including  the  tasks  and  powers  of  the  supervisory  authorities  competent  to
monitor compliance with those legal instruments. (AM 37)

CHAPTER III - Cooperation
CA8
ARTICLE 12 - Cooperation Group
Covers AMs 48 (rapp), 49 (rapp), 190 (RE), 191 (RE), 192 (Left)
Fall: AMs 189 (Left), 193 (Left)
1.
In order to support and to facilitate strategic cooperation and the exchange of
information  among  Member  States  in  the  field  of  application  of  the  Directive,  a
Cooperation Group is established.
2. The Cooperation Group shall carry out its tasks on the basis of biennial work
programmes referred to in paragraph 6.
3. The Cooperation Group shall be composed of representatives of Member States,
the Commission and ENISA. The European External Action Service, the European
Cybercrime  Centre  at  Europol and  the  European  Data  Protection  Board 
shall
participate in the activities of the Cooperation Group as an observer. The European
Supervisory Authorities (ESAs) in accordance with Article 17(5)(c) of Regulation
(EU) XXXX/XXXX [the DORA Regulation] may participate in the activities of the
Cooperation Group. Where relevant for the performance of its tasksappropriate,
the  Cooperation  Group shallmay invite  representatives  of  relevant  stakeholders,
including academia and civil society, to participate in its work and the European
Parliament to  participate as observer
.  The  Commission  shall  provide  the
secretariat. (AM 48, 190, 191, 192)
4.
The Cooperation Group shall have the following tasks:
(a) providing guidance to competent authorities in relation to the transposition and
implementation of this Directive;
(b)
exchanging best practices and information in relation to the implementation
of  this  Directive,  including  in  relation  to  cyber  threats,  incidents,  vulnerabilities,
near misses, awareness-raising initiatives, trainings, exercises and skills, building
capacity as well as standards and technical specifications;
(c)
exchanging  advice  and  cooperating  with  the  Commission  on  emerging
cybersecurity policy initiatives;
(d) exchanging advice and cooperating with the Commission on draft Commission
implementing or delegated acts adopted pursuant to this Directive;
(e)
exchanging best practices and information with relevant Union institutions,
bodies, offices and agencies;
(f)
discussing reports on the peer review referred to in Article 16(7);
(g)
discussing  results  from joint-supervisory  activities  in  cross-border  cases  as
referred to in Article 34;
(h)
providing  strategic  guidance  to  the  CSIRTs  network  on  specific  emerging
issues;
9

21/09/2021.v03
(i)
contributing to cybersecurity capabilities across the Union by facilitating the
exchange  of  national  officials  through  a  capacity  building  programme  involving
staff from the Member States’ competent authorities or CSIRTs;
(j)
organising regular joint meetings with relevant private interested parties from
across the Union to discuss activities carried out by the Group and gather input on
emerging policy challenges;
(k) discussing the work undertaken in relation to cybersecurity exercises, including
the work done by ENISA.
5. The Cooperation Group may request from the CSIRT network a technical report
on selected topics.
6.
By … 24 months after the date of entry into force of this Directive and every
two years thereafter, the Cooperation Group shall establish a work programme in
respect  of  actions  to  be  undertaken  to  implement  its  objectives and  tasks.  The
timeframe of the first programme adopted under this Directive shall be aligned with
the timeframe of the last programme adopted under Directive (EU) 2016/1148.
7.
The  Commission  may  adopt  implementing  acts  laying  down  procedural
arrangements  necessary  for  the  functioning  of  the  Cooperation  Group.  Those
implementing acts shall be adopted in accordance with the examination procedure
referred to in Article 37(2).
8. The Cooperation Group shall meet regularly and at least twice a year with the
Critical Entities Resilience Group established under Directive (EU) XXXX/XXXX
[Resilience of Critical Entities Directive] to facilitate strategic cooperation and real
time 
information exchange. (AM 49)
CA9
Article 13 - CSIRT network
Covers AM 194 (RE)
1.
In order to contribute to the development of confidence and trust and to promote
swift and effective operational cooperation among Member States, a network of the
national CSIRTs is established.
2.
The  CSIRTs  network  shall  be  composed  of  representatives  of  the  Member
States’ CSIRTs and CERT–EU. The Commission and the European Cybercrime
Centre at Europol 
shall participate in the CSIRTs network as an observer. ENISA
shall  provide  the  secretariat  and  shall  actively  support  cooperation  among  the
CSIRTs. (AM 194)
3.
The CSIRTs network shall have the following tasks:
(a)
exchanging information on CSIRTs’ capabilities;
(b) exchanging relevant information on incidents, near misses, cyber threats, risks
and vulnerabilities;
(c) at the request of a representative of the CSIRT network potentially affected by
an incident, exchanging and discussing information in relation to that incident and
associated cyber threats, risks and vulnerabilities;
(d)
at the request of a representative of the CSIRT network, discussing and, where
possible,  implementing  a  coordinated  response  to  an  incident  that  has  been
identified within the jurisdiction of that Member State;
10

21/09/2021.v03
(e)
providing  Member  States  with  support  in  addressing  cross–border
incidents pursuant to this Directive;
(f)
cooperating and  providing assistance to designated CSIRTs referred to in
Article  6 with  regard  to  the  management  of  multiparty  coordinated  disclosure  of
vulnerabilities affecting multiple manufacturers or providers of ICT products, ICT
services and ICT processes established in different Member States;
(g)
discussing and identifying further forms of operational cooperation, including
in relation to:
(i)
categories of cyber threats and incidents;
(ii)
early warnings;
(iii)
mutual assistance;
(iv)
principles and modalities for coordination in response to cross–border risks
and incidents;
(v)
contribution  to  the national  cybersecurity  incident  and  crisis  response
plan referred to in Article 7 (3);
(h)
informing the Cooperation Group of its activities and of the further forms of
operational  cooperation  discussed  pursuant  to  point  (g),  where  necessary,
requesting guidance in that regard;
(i)
taking stock from cybersecurity exercises, including from those organised by
ENISA;
(j)
at  the  request  of  an  individual  CSIRT,  discussing  the  capabilities  and
preparedness of that CSIRT;
(k)
cooperating  and  exchanging  information  with  regional  and  Union-level
Security  Operations  Centres  (SOCs)  in  order  to  improve  common  situational
awareness on incidents and threats across the Union;
(l)
discussing the peer-review reports referred to in Article 16(7);
(m)
issuing  guidelines  in  order  to  facilitate  the  convergence  of  operational
practices with regard to the application of the provisions of this Article concerning
operational cooperation.
4.
For the purpose of the review referred to in Article 35 and by 24 months after
the  date  of  entry  into  force  of  this  Directive,  and  every  two  years  thereafter,  the
CSIRTs network shall assess the progress made with the operational cooperation
and  produce  a  report.  The  report  shall, in  particular,  draw  conclusions  on  the
outcomes  of  the  peer  reviews  referred  to  in  Article  16  carried  out  in  relation  to
national CSIRTs, including conclusions and recommendations, pursued under this
Article. That report shall also be submitted to the Cooperation Group.
5.
The CSIRTs network shall adopt its own rules of procedure.
CA10
ARTICLE 14 - The European cyber crises liaison organisation network (EU -
CyCLONe)

Covers AM 195 (RE), 197 (RE)
Falls: AM 196 (ECR)
1.
In order to support the coordinated management of large-scale  cybersecurity
incidents  and  crises  at  operational  level  and  to  ensure  the  regular  exchange  of
11

21/09/2021.v03
information  among  Member  States  and  Union  institutions,  bodies  and  agencies,
the European  Cyber  Crises  Liaison  Organisation  Network  (EU - CyCLONe) is
hereby established.
2. EU-CyCLONe shall be composed of the representatives of Member States’ crisis
management authorities designated in accordance with Article 7, the Commission
and ENISA. The European Cybercrime Centre at Europol shall participate in the
activities of EU-CyCLONe as an observer. 
ENISA shall provide the secretariat of
the network and support the secure exchange of information. (AM 195)
3. EU-CyCLONe shall have the following tasks:
(a) increasing the level of preparedness of the management of large scale incidents
and crises;
(b)
developing a shared situational awareness of relevant cybersecurity events;
(c)
coordinating  large  scale  incidents  and  crisis  management  and  supporting
decision-making at political level in relation to such incidents and crisis;
(d)
discussing national cybersecurity incident and response plans referred to in
Article 7(2).
4. EU-CyCLONe shall adopt its rules of procedure.
5. EU-CyCLONe shall regularly report to the Cooperation Group on cyber threats,
incidents  and  trends,  focusing  in  particular  on  their  impact  on  essential  and
important entities.
6. EU-CyCLONe shall cooperate with the CSIRTs network on the basis of agreed
procedural arrangements, and with law enforcement in the framework of the EU
Law Enforcement Emergency Response Protocol
. (AM 197)
CA11
ARTICLE 15 - Report on the state of cybersecurity in the Union
Covers: AMs 50 (rapp), 51 (rapp), 198 (Greens), 199 (ID), 200 (Greens)
Fall: AMs
1. ENISA shall issue, in cooperation with the Commission, an annual report on the
state  of  cybersecurity  in  the  Union.  The  report  shall be  delivered  in  machine-
readable format and 
in particular include an assessment of the following: (AMs 50,
198, 199)
(a) the development of cybersecurity capabilities across the Union;
(b) the technical, financial and human resources available to competent authorities
and  cybersecurity  policies,  and  the  implementation  of  supervisory  measures  and
enforcement actions in light of the outcomes of peer reviews referred to in Article
16;
(c) a cybersecurity index providing for an aggregated assessment of the maturity
level of cybersecurity capabilities
(ca) the impact of cybersecurity incidents on the protection of personal data in
the Union
. (AM 51)
(ca)
an  overview  of  the  general level of  cybersecurity  awareness  and  use  of
cybersecurity measures amongst citizens as well as on the general level of security
of  consumer-oriented  connected  devices  put  on  the  market  in  the  Union.  (AM
200)

12

21/09/2021.v03
2. The  report  shall  include  particular  policy  recommendations  for  increasing  the
level  of  cybersecurity  across  the  Union  and  a  summary  of  the  findings  for  the
particular period from the Agency’s EU Cybersecurity Technical Situation Reports
issued by ENISA in accordance with Article 7(6) of Regulation (EU) 2019/881.
Article 16 - Peer reviews (no AMs tabled = COM text)
CHAPTER IV - Cybersecurity risk management and reporting obligations
SECTION I - Cybersecurity risk management and reporting
CA12
ARTICLE 17 - Governance
Covers AMs 52 (rapp), 202 (RE)
Fall: AM 201 (ECR)
1.  Member  States  shall  ensure  that  the  management  bodies  of  essential  and
important  entities  approve  the  cybersecurity  risk  management  measures taken  by
those entities in order to comply with Article 18, supervise its implementation and
be accountable  for the non-compliance by the entities with the obligations under
this Article.
2. Member  States  shall  ensure  that  members  of  the  management  body and
responsible  specialists  for  cybersecurity 
follow  specific  trainings,  on  a  regular
basis,  to  gain  sufficient  knowledge  and  skills  in  order  to  apprehend  and  assess
evolving cybersecurity  risks  and  management  practices  and  their  impact  on  the
operations of the entity. (AM 52, 20)
CA13
ARTICLE 18 - Cybersecurity risk management measures
Covers AMs 53 (rapp), 54 (rapp), 203 (RE), 205 (Greens), 206 (ID), 207 (Greens)
Fall: AM 204 (ECR)
1.  Member  States  shall  ensure  that  essential  and  important  entities  shall  take
appropriate and proportionate technical and organisational measures to manage the
risks posed to the cybersecurity of network and information systems used for the
provision of their services, and in view of assuring the continuity of these services,
and to mitigate the risks posed to the rights of individuals when their personal
data are processed
. Having regard to the state of the art, those measures shall ensure
a level of cybersecurity of network and information systems appropriate to the risk
presented. (AM 53, 203)
2.The measures referred to in paragraph 1 shall include at least the following:
(a) risk analysis and information system security policies;
(b) incident handling (prevention, detection, and response to incidents);
(c) business continuity and crisis management;
13

21/09/2021.v03
(d) supply  chain  security  including  security-related  aspects  concerning  the
relationships  between  each  entity  and  its  suppliers  or  service  providers  such  as
providers of data storage and processing services or managed security services;
(e) security  in  network  and  information  systems  acquisition,  development  and
maintenance, including vulnerability handling and disclosure;
(f) policies  and  procedures  (testing  and  auditing)  to  assess  the  effectiveness  of
cybersecurity risk management measures;
(g) the use of cryptography and strong encryption. (AM 205)
3.  Member  States  shall  ensure  that,  where  considering  appropriate and
proportionate 
measures referred to in point (d) of paragraph 2, entities shall take
into account the vulnerabilities specific to each supplier and service provider and
the  overall  quality  of  products  and  cybersecurity  practices  of  their  suppliers  and
service  providers,  including  their  secure  development  procedures. Competent
authorities shall provide guidance to entities on the practical and proportionate
application. (AM 54, 206)

4. Member States shall ensure that where an entity finds that respectively its services
or tasks are not in compliance with the requirements laid down in paragraph 2, it
shall,  without  undue  delay,  take  all  necessary  corrective  measures  to  bring  the
service concerned into compliance.
5. The Commission may adopt implementing acts in order to lay down the technical
and the methodological specifications of the elements referred to in paragraph 2.
Where preparing those acts, the Commission shall proceed in accordance with the
examination procedure referred to in Article 37(2) and follow, to the greatest extent
possible,  international  and  European  standards,  as  well  as  relevant  technical
specifications.
6. The  Commission  is  empowered  to  adopt  delegated  acts  in  accordance  with
Article 36 to supplement the elements laid down in paragraph 2 to take account of
new cyber threats, technological developments or sectorial specificities.
6a.  Member  States  shall  give  the  user  of  a  network  and  information  system
provided  by  an  essential  or  important  entity  the  right  to  obtain  from  the  entity
information on the technical and organisational measures in place to mitigate the
risks posed to the security of network and information systems. Member States
shall define the limitations to that right. (AM 207)

CA14
ARTICLE 19 - EU coordinated risk assessments of critical supply chains
Covers AM 208 (Greens)
Fall: AM 209 (RE), 210 (Greens)
1. The Cooperation Group, in cooperation with the Commission and ENISA, shall
carry  out  coordinated  security  risk  assessments  of  specific  critical  ICT  services,
systems  or  products  supply  chains,  taking  into  account  technical  and,  where
relevant, non-technical risk factors. (AM 208)
2.The Commission, after consulting with the Cooperation Group and ENISA, shall
identify the specific critical ICT services, systems or products that may be subject to
the coordinated risk assessment referred to in paragraph 1. (AM 210)
CA15
ARTICLE 20 - Reporting obligations
14

21/09/2021.v03
Covers AMs 55 (rapp), 56 (rapp), 57 (rapp), 58 (rapp), 59 (rapp), 211 (Greens), 212
(RE), 213 (ECR), 217 (RE)
Fall: AM 214 (ID), 215 (ECR), 216 (Greens), 218 (Greens)
1.  Member States shall ensure that essential and important entities notify, without
undue  delay and  in  any  event  within  24  hours, the  competent  authorities  or  the
CSIRT in accordance with paragraphs 3 and 4 of any incident having a significant
impact  on  the  provision  of  their  services,  and  the  competent  law  enforcement
authorities  if  the  incident  is  of  a  suspected  or  known  malicious  nature
Those
entities shall notify, without undue delay, and in any event within 24 hours, the
recipients  of  their  services  of  incidents  that  are  likely  to  adversely  affect  the
provision  of  that  service and provide  information  that  would  enable  them  to
mitigate the adverse effects of the cyberattacks. By way of exception, where public
disclosure  could  trigger  further  cyberattacks, those essential  and  important
entities may delay the notification
. Member States shall ensure that those entities
report,  among  others,  any  information  enabling  the  competent  authorities  or  the
CSIRT to determine any cross-border impact of the incident. (AMs 211, 212, 213)
2. Member  States  shall ensure that  essential  and  important  entities are  able  to
notify the competent authorities or the CSIRT of any significant cyber threat that
those entities identify that could have potentially resulted in a significant incident.
(AM 55)
Where applicable, those  entities shall be allowed to notify the recipients of their
services that are potentially affected by a significant cyber threat of any measures
or remedies that those recipients can take in  response to that threat. Where such
notification is provided, 
the entities shall also notify those recipients of the threat
itself.  The  notification  shall  not  make  the  notifying  entity  subject  to  increased
liability. (AM 56)
3. An incident shall be considered significant if:
(a) the  incident  has  caused  or  has  the  potential  to  cause  substantial operational
disruption or financial losses for the entity concerned;
(b) the  incident  has  affected  or  has  the  potential  to  affect  other  natural  or  legal
persons by causing considerable material or non-material losses.
4. Member  States  shall  ensure  that,  for  the  purpose  of  the  notification  under
paragraph 1, the entities concerned shall submit to the competent authorities or the
CSIRT:
(a) without  undue  delay  and  in  any  event  within 24 hours  after  having  become
aware of the incident, an initial notification, which, where applicable, shall indicate
whether the incident is presumably caused by unlawful or malicious action;
(b) upon the request of a competent authority or a CSIRT, an intermediate report
on relevant status updates;
(c) a comprehensive report not later than one month after the submission of the
report under point (a), including at least the following: (AM 58)
(i) a detailed description of the incident, its severity and impact;
(ii) the type of cyber threat or root cause that likely triggered the incident; (AM 59)
(iii) applied and ongoing mitigation measures or remedies. (AM 60)
Member States shall provide that in duly justified cases and in agreement with the
competent  authorities  or  the  CSIRT,  the  entity  concerned  can  deviate  from  the
deadlines laid down in points (a) and (c).
15

21/09/2021.v03
5. The competent national authorities or the CSIRT shall provide, within 24 hours
after  receiving  the  initial  notification  referred  to  in  point  (a)  of  paragraph  4,  a
response to the notifying entity, including initial feedback on the incident and, upon
request  of  the  entity,  guidance  on  the  implementation  of  possible  mitigation
measures. Where the CSIRT did not receive the notification referred to in paragraph
1 , the guidance shall be provided by the competent authority in collaboration with
the CSIRT. The CSIRT shall provide additional technical support if the concerned
entity  so  requests.  Where  the  incident  is  suspected  to  be  of  criminal  nature, the
competent  national  authorities  or  the  CSIRT  shall  also  provide  guidance  on
reporting the incident to law enforcement authorities.
6. Where appropriate, and in particular where the incident referred to in paragraph
1 concerns two or more Member States, the competent authority or the CSIRT shall
inform the other affected Member States and ENISA of the incident. If the incident
concerns two or more Member States and is suspected to be of criminal nature,
the competent authority or the CSIRT shall inform EUROPOL
. In so doing, the
competent authorities, CSIRTs and single points of contact shall, in accordance with
Union law or national legislation that complies with Union law, preserve the entity’s
security  and  commercial  interests  as  well  as  the  confidentiality  of  the
information provided. (AM 217)
7. Where public awareness is necessary to prevent an incident or to deal with an
ongoing  incident,  or  where  disclosure  of  the  incident  is  otherwise  in  the  public
interest,  the  competent  authority  or  the  CSIRT,  and  where  appropriate  the
authorities or the CSIRTs of other Member States concerned may, after consulting
the entity concerned, inform the public about the incident or require the entity to do
so.
8. At  the  request  of  the  competent  authority  or  the  CSIRT, the  single  point  of
contact shall forward notifications received pursuant to paragraphs 1 and 2 to the
single points of contact of other affected Member States.
9. The single point of contact shall submit to ENISA on a monthly basis a summary
report  including  anonymised  and  aggregated  data on  incidents,  significant  cyber
threats  and  near  misses  notified  in  accordance  with  paragraphs  1  and  2  and  in
accordance with Article 27. In order to contribute to the provision of comparable
information,  ENISA  may  issue technical  guidance  on  the  parameters  of  the
information included in the summary report.
10. Competent  authorities  shall  provide  to  the  competent  authorities  designated
pursuant to Directive (EU) XXXX/XXXX [Resilience of Critical Entities Directive]
information on incidents and cyber threats notified in accordance with paragraphs
1 and 2 by essential entities identified as critical entities, or as entities equivalent to
critical entities, pursuant to Directive (EU) XXXX/XXXX [Resilience of Critical
Entities Directive].
11. The Commission, may adopt implementing acts further specifying the type of
information, the format and the procedure of a notification submitted pursuant to
paragraphs 1 and 2. The Commission may also adopt implementing acts to further
specify the cases in which an incident shall be considered significant as referred to
in paragraph 3. Those implementing acts shall be adopted in accordance with the
examination procedure referred to in Article 37(2).
ARTICLE 21 - Use of European cybersecurity certification schemes
16

21/09/2021.v03
No compromise - AM 220 (ECR) as a consequential AM should fall
CA16
ARTICLE 22 - Standardisation
Covers AMs 221 (Greens), 222 (RE)
1.    In  order  to  promote  the  convergent  implementation  of  Article 18(1)  and  (2),
Member States shall, without imposing or discriminating in favour of the use of a
particular  type  of  technology,  encourage  the  use  of  European  or  internationally
accepted  standards  and  specifications  relevant  to  the  security  of  network  and
information systems.
2. ENISA, after having consulted the EDPB and in collaboration with Member
States,  shall  draw  up  advice  and  guidelines  regarding  the  technical  areas  to  be
considered in relation to paragraph 1 as well as regarding already existing standards,
including Member States' national standards, which would allow for those areas to
be covered. (AMs 221, 222)
CA17
ARTICLE 23 - Databases of domain names and registration data
Covers AMs 62 (rapp), 63 (rapp), 64 (rapp), 65 (rapp), 224 (Left), 225 (Left), 226
(Left), 227 (RE)
Fall: AMs 223 (Greens)
1.
For the purpose of contributing to the security, stability and resilience of the
DNS, Member States shall ensure that TLD have policies and procedures in place
to  ensure  that 
accurate  and  complete  domain  name  registration  data is  collected
and maintained 
in a dedicated database facility in accordance with to Union data
protection law as regards data which are personal data. Member States shall ensure
that such policies and procedures are made publicly available. (AM 62, 224)

2. Member States shall ensure that the databases of domain name registration data
referred to in paragraph 1 contain the information necessary to identify and contact
the  holders  of  the  domain  names,  namely  their  name,  their  physical  and  e-mail
address as well as their telephone number, 
and the points of contact administering
the domain names under the TLDs. (AMs 63, 225)
3. Member States shall ensure that the TLD registries and the entities providing
domain  name  registration  services  for  the  TLD  have  policies  and  procedures  in
place  to  ensure  that  the  databases  include  accurate  and  complete  information.
Member  States  shall  ensure  that  such  policies  and  procedures  are  made  publicly
available. (AM 64)
4. Member States shall ensure that the TLD registries and the entities providing
domain name registration services for the TLD publish, in accordance with Article
6(1)(c)  and  Article  6(3)  of  Regulation  (EU)  2016/679  and 
without  undue  delay
after the registration of a domain name, certain domain name registration data, such
as the domain name and the name of the legal person. 
(AM 65)
5. Member States shall ensure that the TLD registries and the entities providing
domain name registration services for the TLD provide access to specific domain
name registration data upon lawful and duly justified requests of public authorities,
including competent authorities under this Directive, competent authorities under
Union or national law for the prevention, investigation or prosecution of criminal
offences
or  supervisory  authorities  under  Regulation  (EU)  2016/679,  in
17

21/09/2021.v03
compliance  with  Union  data  protection  law.  Member  States  shall  ensure  that  the
TLD registries and the entities providing domain name registration services for the
TLD reply without undue delay to all lawful and duly justified requests for access.
Member States shall ensure that policies and procedures to disclose such data are
made publicly available. (AM 66, 226, 227)
Section II - Jurisdiction and Registration
CA18
ARTICLE 24 - Jurisdiction and territoriality
Covers AM 67 (rapp)
Fall: AMs 228 (Greens)
1. DNS service providers, TLD name registries, cloud computing service providers,
data centre service providers and content delivery network providers referred to in
point 8 of Annex I, as well as digital providers referred to in point 6 of Annex II
shall be deemed to be under the jurisdiction of the Member State in which they have
their main establishment in the Union.
2. For the purposes of this Directive, entities referred to in paragraph 1 shall be
deemed to have their main establishment in the Union in the Member State where
the decisions related to the cybersecurity risk management measures are taken. If
such  decisions  are  not  taken  in  any  establishment  in  the  Union,  the  main
establishment shall be deemed to be in the Member State where the entities have
the establishment with the highest number of employees in the Union.
3. If an entity referred to in paragraph 1 is not established in the Union, but offers
services  within  the  Union,  it  shall  designate  a  representative  in  the  Union.  The
representative shall be established in one of those Member States where the services
are offered. Without prejudice to the competences of the supervisory authorities
under  Regulation  (EU)  2016/679, 
such  entity  shall  be  deemed  to  be  under  the
jurisdiction  of  the  Member  State  where  the  representative is  established.  In  the
absence  of  a  designated  representative  within  the  Union  under  this  Article,  any
Member State in which the entity provides services may take legal actions against
the entity for non-compliance with the obligations under this Directive. (AM 67)
4. The designation of a representative by an entity referred to in paragraph 1 shall
be  without  prejudice  to  legal  actions,  which  could  be  initiated  against  the  entity
itself.
CA19
ARTICLE 25 - Registry for essential and important entities
Covers AM 229 (Greens)
1.  ENISA shall create and maintain a secure registry for essential and important
entities  referred  to  in  Article  24(1).  The  entities  shall  submit  the  following
information to ENISA by [12 months after entering into force of the Directive at the
latest]: (AM 229)
(a) the name of the entity;
(b) the address of its main establishment and its other legal establishments in the
Union or, if not established in the Union, of its representative designated pursuant
to Article 24(3);
18

21/09/2021.v03
(c) up-to-date contact details, including email addresses and telephone numbers of
the entities.
2. The entities referred to in paragraph 1 shall notify ENISA about any changes to
the details they submitted under paragraph 1 without delay, and in any event, within
three months from the date on which the change took effect.
3. Upon receipt of the information under paragraph 1, ENISA shall forward it to
the  single  points  of  contact  depending  on  the  indicated  location  of  each  entity’s
main  establishment  or,  if  it is  not  established  in  the  Union,  of  its  designated
representative.  Where  an  entity  referred  to  in  paragraph  1  has  besides  its  main
establishment in the Union further establishments in other Member States, ENISA
shall also inform the single points of contact of those Member States.
4. Where an entity fails to register its activity or to provide the relevant information
within  the  deadline  set  out  in  paragraph  1,  any  Member  State  where  the  entity
provides  services  shall  be  competent  to  ensure  that  entity’s compliance  with  the
obligations laid down in this Directive.
CHAPTER V - Information sharing
CA20
ARTICLE 26 - Cybersecurity information-sharing arrangements
Covers AMs 68 (rapp), 230 (ID)
Fall: AMs 231 (ECR), 232 (ECR), 233 (ECR)
1.      Without  prejudice  to  Regulation  (EU)  2016/679 or  Directive  2002/58/EC,
Member  States  shall  ensure  that  essential  and  important  entities  may  exchange
relevant  cybersecurity  information  among  themselvesincluding  information
relating  to  cyber  threats, vulnerabilities,  indicators  of  compromise,  tactics,
techniques  and  procedures,  cybersecurity  alerts  and  configuration  tools and  the
location or identity of the attacker
, where such information sharing: (AM 68, 230)
(a)
aims at preventing, detecting, responding to or mitigating incidents;
(b) enhances the level of cybersecurity, in particular through raising awareness in
relation  to  cyber  threats,  limiting  or  impeding  such  threats  ‘ability  to  spread,
supporting  a  range  of  defensive  capabilities,  vulnerability  remediation  and
disclosure,  threat  detection  techniques,  mitigation  strategies,  or  response  and
recovery stages.
2. Member States shall ensure that the exchange of information takes place within
trusted  communities  of  essential  and  important  entities.  Such  exchange  shall  be
implemented through information sharing arrangements in respect of the potentially
sensitive nature of the information shared and in compliance with the rules of Union
law referred to in paragraph 1.
3. Member States shall set out rules specifying the procedure, operational elements
(including  the  use  of  dedicated  ICT  platforms),  content  and  conditions  of  the
information sharing arrangements referred to in paragraph 2. Such rules shall also
lay down the details of the involvement of public authorities in such arrangements,
as  well  as  operational  elements,  including  the  use  of  dedicated  IT  platforms.
Member  States  shall  offer  support  to  the  application  of  such  arrangements  in
accordance with their policies referred to in Article 5(2) (g).
4.
Essential and important entities shall notify the competent authorities of their
participation  in  the  information-sharing  arrangements  referred  to  in  paragraph  2,
19

21/09/2021.v03
upon entering into such arrangements, or, as applicable, of their withdrawal from
such arrangements, once the withdrawal takes effect.
5.
In  compliance  with  Union  law,  ENISA  shall  support  the  establishment  of
cybersecurity  information-sharing  arrangements  referred  to  in  paragraph  2  by
providing best practices and guidance.
ARTICLE 27 - Voluntary notification of relevant information
No compromise proposal as no AMs tabled
CHAPTER VI - Supervision and enforcement
CA21
ARTICLE 28 - General aspects concerning supervision and enforcement
Covers AMs 69 (rapp), 234 (Greens)
1. Member States shall ensure that competent authorities effectively monitor and
take the measures necessary to ensure compliance with this Directive, in particular
the obligations laid down in Articles 18 and 20.
2.
Competent  authorities  shall  work  in  close cooperation  with supervisory
authorities when addressing incidents resulting in personal data breaches without
prejudice  to  the  competences,  tasks  and  powers  of  supervisory  authorities
pursuant to Regulation (EU) 2016/679
To this end, competent authorities and
supervisory authorities shall exchange information relevant for their respective
area of competence. Moreover, competent authorities shall, upon request of the
competent supervisory authorities, provide them with all information obtained in
the  context  of  any  audits  and  investigations  that  relate  to  the  processing  of
personal data. (AM 69, 234)

CA22
ARTICLE 29 - Supervision and enforcement for essential entities
Covers  AMs  70  (rapp),  71  (rapp),  72  (rapp),  73  (rapp),  74  (rapp),  75  (rapp),  76
(rapp), 77 (rapp), 78 (rapp)
1.     Member States shall ensure that the measures of supervision or enforcement
imposed on essential entities in respect of the obligations set out in this Directive
are effective, proportionate and dissuasive, taking into account the circumstances
of each individual case.
2.    Member States shall ensure that competent authorities, where exercising their
supervisory tasks in relation to essential entities, have the power to subject those
entities to:
(a) on-site inspections and off-site supervision, including random checks;
(b) regular audits;
(c) targeted  security  audits  based  on  risk  assessments  or  risk-related  available
information;
(d) security scans based on objective, non-discriminatory, fair and transparent risk
assessment criteria;
(e) requests of information necessary to assess the cybersecurity measures adopted
by the entity, including documented cybersecurity policies, as well as compliance
with the obligation to notify the ENISA pursuant to Article 25 (1) and (2);
20

21/09/2021.v03
(f)
requests  to  access  data,  documents  or  any  information  necessary  for  the
performance of their supervisory tasks;
(g) requests for evidence of implementation of cybersecurity policies, such as the
results  of  security  audits  carried  out  by  a  qualified  auditor  and  the  respective
underlying evidence.
3.
Where  exercising  their  powers  under  points  (e)  to  (g)  of  paragraph  2,  the
competent  authorities  shall  state  the  purpose  of  the  request  and  specify  the
information requested.
4. Member States shall ensure that competent authorities, where exercising their
enforcement powers in relation to essential entities, have the power to:
(a) issue warnings on the entities’ non-compliance with the obligations laid down
in this Directive;
(b)
issue binding instructions or an order requiring those entities to remedy the
deficiencies  identified  or  the  infringements  of  the  obligations  laid  down  in  this
Directive;
(c) order those entities to cease conduct that is non-compliant with the obligations
laid down in this Directive and desist from repeating that conduct;
(d) order those entities to bring their risk management measures and/or reporting
obligations in compliance with the obligations laid down in Articles 18 and 20 in a
specified manner and within a specified period;
(e) order  those  entities  to  inform the  natural  or  legal  person(s)  to  whom  they
provide services or activities which are potentially affected by a significant cyber
threat of any possible protective or remedial measures which can be taken by those
natural or legal person(s) in response to that threat;
(f) order those entities to implement the recommendations provided as a result of
a security audit within a reasonable deadline;
(g) designate a monitoring officer with well-defined tasks over a determined period
of time to oversee the compliance with their obligations provided for by Articles 18
and 20;
(h)
order  those  entities  to  make  public  aspects  of  non-compliance  with  the
obligations laid down in this Directive in a specified manner; (AM 70)
(i)
make  a  public  statement  which  identifies  the  legal  and  natural  person(s)
responsible for the infringement of an obligation laid down in this Directive and the
nature of that infringement;
(j) impose or request the imposition by the relevant bodies or courts according to
national  laws  of  an  administrative  fine  pursuant  to  Article  31 in  addition  to,  or
instead of, the measures referred to in points (a) to (i) of this paragraph, depending
on the circumstances of each individual case.
5. Where  enforcement actions  adopted  pursuant  to  points  (a)  to  (d)  and  (f)  of
paragraph  (4)  prove  ineffective,  Member  States  shall  ensure  that  competent
authorities have the power to establish a deadline within which the essential entity
is requested to take the necessary action to remedy the deficiencies or comply with
the requirements of those authorities. If the requested action is not taken within the
deadline  set,  Member  States  shall  ensure  that  the  competent  authorities  have  the
power to:
21

21/09/2021.v03
(a) suspend or request a certification or authorisation body to suspend a certification
or authorisation  concerning  part  or  all  the  services  or  activities  provided  by  an
essential entity;
(b) impose or request the imposition by the relevant bodies or courts according to
national  laws of  a  temporary  ban  against  any  person  discharging  managerial
responsibilities  at  chief  executive  officer  or  legal  representative  level  in  that
essential  entity,  and  of  any  other  natural  person  held  responsible  for  the  breach,
from exercising managerial functions in that entity. (AM 71)
This  sanction shall  be  applied  only  until  the  entity  takes  the  necessary  action  to
remedy the deficiencies or comply with the requirements of the competent authority
for which such sanctions were applied. (AM 72)
6. Member States shall ensure that any natural person responsible for or acting as a
representative of an  essential entity on the basis  of the power to represent it, the
authority to take decisions on its behalf or the authority to exercise control of it has
the  powers  to  ensure  its  compliance  with  the  obligations  laid  down  in  this
Directive. Member States shall ensure that those natural persons may be held liable
for breach of their duties to ensure compliance with the obligations laid down in
this Directive.
7. Where taking any of the enforcement actions or applying any sanctions pursuant
to paragraphs 4 and 5, the competent authorities shall comply with the rights of the
defence  and  take  account  of  the  circumstances  of  each  individual  case  and,  as  a
minimum, take due account of:
(a)
the  seriousness  of  the  infringement  and  the  importance  of the  provisions
breached. Among the infringements that should be considered as serious: repeated
violations, failure to notify or remedy incidents with a significant disruptive effect,
failure  to  remedy  deficiencies  following  binding  instructions  from  competent
authorities obstruction of audits or monitoring activities ordered by the competent
authority  following  the  finding  of  an  infringement,  providing  false  or  grossly
inaccurate  information  in  relation  to  risk  management  requirements  or  reporting
obligations set out in Articles 18 and 20.
(b)
the  duration  of  the  infringement,  including  the  element  of  repeated
infringements;
(c)
the  actual material  or  non-material damage  caused  or  losses  incurred or
potential damage or losses that could have been triggered, insofar as they can be
determined. Where evaluating this aspect, account shall be taken, amongst others,
of actual or potential financial or economic losses, effects on other services, number
of users affected or potentially affected; (AM 73)
(ca)
any relevant previous infringements by the entity concerned; (AM 74)
(cb)
the manner in which the  infringement  became  known to  the  competent
authority, in particular whether, and if so to what extent, the entity notified the
infringement; 
(AM 75)
(d) the intentional or negligent character of the infringement;
(e) measures taken by the entity to prevent or mitigate the damage and/or losses;
(f) adherence to approved codes of conduct or approved certification mechanisms;
(g) the level of cooperation with the competent authorities in order to remedy the
infringement and mitigate possible adverse effects of the infringements; 
(AM 76)
22

21/09/2021.v03
(ga)
any other aggravating or mitigating factor applicable to the circumstances
of  the  case,  such  as  financial  benefits  gained  or  losses  avoided,  directly  or
indirectly, from the infringement. 
(AM 77)
8. The competent authorities shall set out a detailed reasoning for their enforcement
decisions. Before taking such decisions, the competent authorities shall notify the
entities  concerned  of  their  preliminary  findings and  allow  a  reasonable  time  for
those entities to submit observations.
9. Member States shall ensure that their competent authorities inform in real time
the  relevant  competent  authorities  of all Member States designated  pursuant  to
Directive  (EU)  XXXX/XXXX  [Resilience  of  Critical  Entities  Directive]  when
exercising their supervisory and enforcement powers aimed at ensuring compliance
of  an  essential  entity  identified  as  critical,  or  as  an  entity  equivalent  to  a  critical
entity,  under  Directive  (EU)  XXXX/XXXX  [Resilience  of  Critical  Entities
Directive]  with  the  obligations  pursuant  to  this  Directive.  Upon  request  of
competent authorities under Directive (EU) XXXX/XXXX [Resilience of Critical
Entities  Directive],  competent  authorities  may  exercise  their  supervisory  and
enforcement powers on an essential entity identified as critical or equivalent. (AM
78)
CA23
ARTICLE 30 - Supervision and enforcement for important entities
Covers AMs 79 (rapp), 80 (rapp)
Falls: AM 235 (ECR)
1.     When provided with evidence or indication that an important entity is not in
compliance  with  the  obligations  laid  down  in  this  Directive,  and  in  particular  in
Articles 18 and 20, Member States shall ensure that the competent authorities take
action, where necessary, through ex post supervisory measures.
2.
Member  States  shall  ensure  that  the  competent  authorities,  where  exercising
their supervisory tasks in relation to important entities, have the power to subject
those entities to:
(a) on-site inspections and off-site ex post supervision;
(b)
targeted  security  audits  based  on  risk  assessments  or risk-related  available
information;
(c) security scans based on objective, fair and transparent risk assessment criteria;
(d) requests  for  any  information  necessary  to  assess  ex-post  the  cybersecurity
measures, including documented cybersecurity policies, as well as compliance with
the obligation to notify ENISA pursuant to Article 25(1) and (2);
(e)
requests  to  access  data,  documents  and/or  information  necessary  for  the
performance of the supervisory tasks.
3.
Where exercising their powers pursuant to points (d) or (e) of paragraph 2, the
competent  authorities  shall  state  the  purpose  of  the  request  and  specify  the
information requested.
4.
Member  States  shall  ensure  that  the  competent  authorities,  where  exercising
their enforcement powers in relation to important entities, have the power to:
(a)
issue warnings on the entities’ non-compliance with the obligations laid down
in this Directive;
23

21/09/2021.v03
(b)
issue binding instructions or an order requiring those entities to remedy the
deficiencies  identified  or  the  infringement  of  the obligations  laid  down  in  this
Directive;
(c)
order  those  entities  to  cease  conduct  that  is  in  non-compliant  with  the
obligations laid down in this Directive and desist from repeating that conduct;
(d)
order those entities to bring their risk management measures or the reporting
obligations in compliance with the obligations laid down in Articles 18 and 20 in a
specified manner and within a specified period;
(e) order  those  entities  to  inform  the  natural  or  legal  person(s)  to  whom  they
provide services or activities which are potentially affected by a significant cyber
threat of any possible protective or remedial measures which can be taken by those
natural or legal person(s) in response to that threat;
(f) order those entities to implement the recommendations provided as a result of
a security audit within a reasonable deadline;
(g)
order  those  entities  to  make  public  aspects  of  non-compliance  with  their
obligations laid down in this Directive in a specified manner; (AM 79)
(h)
make  a  public  statement which  identifies  the  legal and  natural person(s)
responsible for the infringement of an obligation laid down in this Directive and the
nature of that infringement; (AM 80)
(i) impose or request the imposition by the relevant bodies or courts according to
national laws  of  an  administrative  fine  pursuant  to  Article  31 in  addition  to,  or
instead of, the measures referred to in points (a) to (h) of this paragraph, depending
on the circumstances of each individual case.
5. Article 29 (6) to (8) shall also apply to the supervisory and enforcement measures
provided for in this Article for the important entities listed in Annex II.
CA24
ARTICLE  31- General  conditions  for  imposing  administrative  fines  on
essential and important entities

Covers AMs 81(rapp), 82 (rapp)
Fall: AMs 237 (ECR), 238 (ECR)
1.
Member  States  shall  ensure  that  the  imposition  of  administrative  fines  on
essential and important entities pursuant to this Article in respect of infringements
of the obligations laid down in this Directive are, in each individual case, effective,
proportionate and dissuasive.
2. Administrative  fines  shall  be  imposed  in  addition  to,  or  instead  of,  measures
referred to in points (a) to (i) of Article 29(4), Article 29(5) and points (a) to (h) of
Article 30(4), depending on the circumstances of each individual case. (AM 81)
3.
Deciding  whether  to  impose  an  administrative  fine shall  depend  on  the
circumstances of each individual case, and when deciding on its amount in each
individual case due regard shall be given, as a minimum, to the elements provided
for in Article 29(7). (AM 82)
4. Member States shall ensure that infringements of the obligations laid down in
Article 18 or Article 20 shall, in accordance with paragraphs 2 and 3 of this Article,
be subject to administrative fines of a maximum of at least 10 000 000 EUR or up
to  2%  of  the  total  worldwide  annual  turnover  of  the  undertaking  to  which  the
24

21/09/2021.v03
essential or important entity belongs in the preceding financial year, whichever is
higher.
5. Member States may provide for the power to impose periodic penalty payments
in  order  to  compel  an  essential  or  important  entity  to  cease  an  infringement  in
accordance with a prior decision of the competent authority.
6. Without prejudice to the powers of competent authorities pursuant to Articles
29 and 30, each Member State may lay down the rules on whether and to what extent
administrative fines may be imposed on public administration entities referred to in
Article 4(23) subject to the obligations provided for by this Directive.
CA25
ARTICLE 32 - Infringements entailing a personal data breach
Covers AMs 84 (rapp), 240 (RE), 241 (Greens), 242 (Greens)
Fall: AMs 239 (ECR)
1.  Where  the  competent  authorities  have  indications  that  the  infringement  by  an
essential  or  important  entity  of  the  obligations  laid  down  in  Articles  18  and  20
entails  a  personal  data  breach,  as  defined  by  Article  4(12)  of  Regulation  (EU)
2016/679  which  shall  be  notified  pursuant  to  Article  33  of  that  Regulation,  they
shall inform the supervisory authorities competent pursuant to Articles 55 and 56
of that Regulation without undue delay, and in any case within 24 hours. (AM 84,
240, 241)
2. Where the supervisory authorities competent in accordance with Articles 55 and
56 of Regulation (EU) 2016/679 decide to exercise their powers pursuant to Article
58(i) of that Regulation and impose an administrative fine, the competent authorities
shall not impose an administrative fine for the same infringement under Article 31
of this Directive. The competent authorities may, however, apply the enforcement
actions or exercise the sanctioning powers provided for in points (a) to (i) of Article
29 (4), Article 29 (5), and points (a) to (h) of Article 30 (4) of this Directive.
3.  Where  the  supervisory  authority  competent  pursuant  to  Regulation  (EU)
2016/679 is established in another Member State than the competent authority, the
competent authority shall inform the supervisory authority established in the same
Member State. (AM 242)
ARTICLE 33 - Penalties
ARTICLE 34 - Mutual assistance
No compromise as no AMs were tabled
CHAPTER VII - Transitional and final provisions
CA26
ARTICLE 35 - Review
Covers AMs 244 (RE), 245 (Greens)
The Commission shall review the functioning of this Directive every 3 years, and
report to the European Parliament and to the Council. The report shall in particular
assess to what extent the Directive has contributed to ensuring a high common
25

21/09/2021.v03
level of security and integrity of network and information systems, while giving
an  optimal  protection  to  private  life  and  personal  data,  and 
the  relevance  of
sectors, subsectors, size and type of entities referred to in Annexes I and II for the
functioning of the economy and society in relation to cybersecurity. For this purpose
and with a view to further advancing the strategic and operational cooperation, the
Commission shall take into account the reports of the Cooperation Group and the
CSIRTs network on the experience gained at a strategic and operational level. The
first report shall be submitted by… [36 months after the date of entry into force of
this Directive]. (AM 244, 245)
ARTICLE 36-40
No compromises as no AMs were tabled
AMs 243, 246 and 247 (Greens) concerning articles 34a, 40 and 40a respectively should be
voted separately.
26