This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Correspondence between World Health Organisation & The EU Commission regarding E-cigarettes'.

Ref. Ares(2014)1336783 - 29/04/2014
From: 
 (SANCO) 
Sent: 
28 November 2013 13:35 
To: 
 
Cc: 
 (SANCO); 
 
 
Subject: 
RE: Draft WHO Background Paper on ENDS (comments) and smokeless 
tobacco 
Attachments: 
1_Grana_WHO Ecig Report 10-14-13 RACHEL_v2_KB.doc; 4_Smokeless 
Tob Report for WHO Peer Review 093013_KB.doc 
 
Dear 
 and all, 
 
Sorry for the late input on 2 of the documents.  
 
1)  I would like to provide you with some additional comment on the ENDS paper. I agree that this 
background document is indeed a very good basis for the discussion and would also like to thank 
 for her very pertinent comments, which I support. I just have a couple of additional 
remarks which you will find below or (in specific cases) in the document attached: 
 
• 
Conclusion chapters sometimes present rather a discussion of the literature instead of clear 
conclusions: Moreover, they sometimes contain details of studies that would be better 
placed in the body of the text. 
• 
As pointed out by 
, the presentation of results should be more factual and 
consider the possibility of different interpretations (see specific comment on the 
interpretation of results of the Bullen et al. paper) 
• 
Overall, it would facilitate reading if “conclusion” sections could be specified (“conclusion on 
…”) 
• 
Please consider checking/updating the paper in light of recent publications (e.g. recent 
Review by Pepper & Brewer in Tobacco Control) 
• 
The section on the TPD revision needs a careful revision, in particular as the authors focus to 
a large extent on certain amendments of the European Parliament to the Commission 
proposal, thus focussing on the position of only 1 of the European institutions involved in the 
legislative process. Furthermore, the negotiations by the institutions on the proposal are still 
ongoing. In that context, I was wondering if it is the purpose of the document to comment 
on legislative approaches (see also comments in the text)? 
 
2)  For the document on smokeless tobacco, I introduced a couple of small comments, but didn't 
have the chance for a thorough reading. It is indeed difficult to shorten the document to 50 
pages if you wish that the regional sections should be kept as they are (they alone make up for 
about 50 pages). However, I noted some duplication between the introduction (which contains 
"summary and major conclusions") and the key findings chapter. Also, some of the text in the 
intro chapter already reads a bit like conclusions (see p. 5-8). 
Some suggestions for changes: 
• 
Extract the major conclusions out of the introduction/key findings and make a separate 
"Executive summary" 
• 
Possibly concentrate the regional chapters to major findings and put the rest into an Annex 
(together with all the references). 


 
I will try to take a good look at the other documents before the meeting.  
 
Looking forward to meeting you all next week. 
 
Best regards, 
 
 
 
PS. I will fly to Brazil already tomorrow (to take advantage of the occasion ). 
 
 
Policy Officer, Tobacco Control Team 
  
 
European Commission 
DG SANCO (Health and Consumers) 
Unit D4 - Substances of human origin and Tobacco control 
 
F101 8/86  
B-1049 Bruxelles/Belgium 
 
      
 
  
http://ec.europa.eu/health/tobacco/introduction/index en.htm  
PLEASE NOTE THAT THE CONTENT OF THIS EMAIL INCLUDING ATTACHMENTS IS FOR YOUR PERSONAL USE ONLY 
 
 
 
 
 
From: 
hc-sc.gc.ca]  
Sent: Saturday, November 09, 2013 1:23 AM 
To: 
 
Cc: 
 (SANCO); 
 (SANCO); 
 
 
Subject: Draft WHO Background Paper on ENDS (comments) 
 
Dear 

 
Sorry for the late input. One of my staff, 
, has reviewed the ENDS 
paper.  General comments can be found in this e-mail, below, and more specific ones in the 
attached document. 
 
Regards, 
 
 
_________________________ 
 
GENERAL COMMENTS 

 
Overall, the document is a good start and outlines some important issues. 
 
From a science perspective, I would caution that interpretation of the literature is skewed toward a 
negative view of ecigarettes, and these conclusions are sometimes, but not always justified.  I 
think the science portion of the paper could be strengthened by objectively presenting pros and 
cons of ecigs.  The account of available literature is thorough, although I would suggest adding 
new studies as they emerge since this is quite an active field.  For example, the cytotoxicity paper 
by Farsalinos et al. (Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2013 Oct 16;10(10):5146-62) merits mention 
in the discussion on this topic, but was published after this draft was written. 
 
Much of the paper is opinion-based, and does not represent all possible interpretations.  I am not 
sure if this was the original intention of the document?  Were the authors perhaps asked to 
provide their personal opinions and not a thorough issue analysis? 
 
Although not a 'scientific' point, I note that Canada is not mentioned in the summary of global 
regulation, and it would be beneficial to describe the Canadian situation for completeness.  This 
leads to the point that not all ecigs contain nicotine, and it may be worth factoring this issue into 
the analysis more prominently. 
 
Lastly, I would suggest a thorough edit of this document, as there are several typos, references 
'under review' that will need to be updated, etc. 
 
 
 
(See attached file: WHO Ecig Report 10-14-13 RACHEL_v2_JM comments.doc) 



DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
 
 
In 2009, the WHO Study Group in Tobacco Product Regulation (TobReg) addressed the 
emerging regulatory issues pertaining to e-cigarettes. The committee noted that there was very 
little published scientific evidence on the health effects of e-cigarettes, or their efficacy for 
smoking cessation (stated in TobReg Report 955)(World Health Organization 2009) and that 
there was not sufficient evidence to support the cessation and health claims made by companies 
and those in the public health community who were advocating e-cigarettes for harm reduction. 
The report states (p.7), "In addition to nicotine dependence, the sensory effects of the product, 
social and marketing forces and perceptions of harmfulness and potential benefits should be 
considered in examining the initiation, patterns of use and development of addiction."(World 
Health Organization 2009)  Meanwhile, e-cigarette prevalence has increased dramatically with 
rapid increase in prevalence in many countries between 2008 and 2012 (Table 1, bottom of 
document) 
 
 
Both the 2009 TobReg Report 955 and the 2012 World Health Organization Framework 
Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) Conference of the Parties report on e-cigarettes 
(November 2012)(FCTC/COP/5/13 2012) articulated concerns about how the products may 
interfere with implementation of the FCTC, particularly Articles 8, 9, 10, 11, 13, because e-
cigarettes mimic tobacco cigarettes, thus interfering with denormalization and limits on the 
indirect promotion of tobacco use/products. E-cigarettes may hinder protection from exposure to 
tobacco smoke (Article 8) because, while e-cigarettes emit less air pollution into the environment 
than conventional cigarettes, they still subject bystanders to “passive vaping.”  E-cigarettes are 
widely advertised and promoted (often inaccurately) as being exempt from clean indoor air laws. 
In addition, the similar appearance of people using e-cigarettes and those using conventional 
cigarettes can complicate enforcement of restrictions on smoking conventional cigarettes. In 
addition, the e-cigarette vapor has not been proven safe for inhalation by bystanders. A main 
concern with the products was lack of data on the safety of the ingredients in the e-cigarette 
solution, especially the safety of repeated inhalation of a heated mixture of propylene glycol and 
other chemicals. In 2009, TobReg recommended that if e-cigarettes were to be considered 
medicines or tobacco products, they would be subject to the labeling and warnings requirements 
in Articles 10 and 11. The TobReg report placed great emphasis on the products potential 

 

DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
interference with Article 13, which addresses advertising and sponsorship by industry. Both 
Articles 8 and 13 address the denormalization of tobacco products and indirect promotion of 
tobacco products could be undermined in that the appearance of a cigarette-like product that 
produces a smoke-like vapor. 
 
 
While the number of published studies on e-cigarettes has increased dramatically, there 
has been constant innovation in the marketplace of these products and many questions about 
their safety, efficacy for harm reduction and cessation, and total impact on public health remain 
unanswered. Both the individual risks and benefits and the total impact of these products occur in 
the context of the widespread and continuing availability of conventional cigarettes and other 
tobacco products, with high levels of “dual use” of e-cigarettes and conventional cigarettes at the 
same time, which raises questions about the suggested harm reduction benefits. It is important to 
assess e-cigarette toxicant exposure and individual risk as well as health effects of e-cigarettes as 
they are actually used in order to ensure safety and to develop evidence-based policies and a 
regulatory scheme that protects the entire population, children and adults, smokers and non-
smokers, in the context of how the tobacco industry is marketing and promoting these products.  
 
 
This report reviews of the literature on e-cigarettes available as of September 2013, as 
well as an update of tobacco industry involvement in the e-cigarette market, global regulations 
pertaining to e-cigarettes and potential options for regulation. [NOTE:literature table in progress] 
 
PRODUCTS (TYPES, ENGINEERING) 
 
Electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) have many names, including electronic 
cigarettes, e-cigarettes and e-hookah. For the purposes of this report all these products will be 
referred to as e-cigarettes. Product engineering has been evolving since the first e-cigarettes were 
documented as arriving on the global market in 2007(Pauly, Li et al. 2007). As of late 2013, 
there was wide variability in product engineering, including varying concentrations of nicotine in 
the solution that e-cigarettes use to generate the nicotine aerosol (also called e-liquid), varying 
volumes of solution in the product, different carrier compounds (most commonly propylene 
glycol with or without glycerol (glycerine), a wide range of additives and flavors, and battery 
size (which affects how hot the vaporizer gets). Battery size differences results in great 

 

DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
variability in the products' ability to heat and convert the nicotine solution to an aerosol and, 
consequently, a wide range of levels of actual nicotine delivery as well as the nature of the other 
chemicals delivered to users and emitted into the surrounding environment. Products come with 
a variety of nicotine strengths (including some without nicotine), usually expressed in mg/ml of 
solution or percent concentration.  Quality control of the products themselves is highly variable 
and users can modify many of the projects.  In addition, as the types and design of products and 
their contents continue to evolve rapidly, it is increasingly difficult to determine what an e-
cigarette "is," what is may contain, and what it is delivering to the user and  the surrounding 
environment.  
 
The first e-cigarettes were cigarette-shaped, plastic or metal devices comprising three 
parts: a battery, an atomizer (which attaches to the battery and has a heating element to convert 
the liquid into a vapor) and a cartridge (which attaches to the atomizer and contains additional 
heating elements and a wick or fiber where the liquid is placed; Figure 1). In subsequent models 
a cartridge was created called a cartomizer, which combined the atomizer and the wick/fiber 
(Figure 2).  The cartridge is either refillable or pre-filled with e-liquid. The cigarette-shaped and 
sized devices are often called “mini” e-cigarettes or "cig-a-likes" by users (who often call 
themselves “vapers”). There are disposable and rechargeable models (Figure 2). More recent 
designs are pen-shaped and sized with larger-sized cartomizers (Figure 2) in order to hold more 
nicotine solution to reduce the amount of times a user needs to refill throughout the day. Some 
cartridges, called clearomizers, which hold about 1-2ml of e-liquid, are now transparent to allow 
the user to monitor how much fluid is in the device. The devices with larger cartomizers or 
clearomizers are sometimes referred to as "tank" systems and hold about 2-3 ml of solution. 
There are also much larger capacity and technologically sophisticated "tank system" devices 
(Figure 2) that have various mechanical and, even digital display, features. One such feature is a 
larger metal casing to hold larger and higher voltage batteries than found in the mini or pen style 
e-cigarettes. In tank devices the atomizers and batteries can be replaced with more powerful 
batteries (often called variable voltage devices) or lower electrical resistance atomizers that allow 
the user to control the heat level provided to the atomizer which aerosolizes the e-liquid. 
Furthermore, since the first e-cigarette products hit the market, users have been modifying the 
devices and creating their own; instructions to do so are widely available on the Internet on e-
cigarette forum sites and YouTube. A concerning trend that has been occurring at least in the 

 



DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
Department of Health and Human Services 2012). In recognition of the key role that flavors play 
in promoting youth tobacco use, cigarettes with these characterizing flavors (with the exception 
of menthol) have been banned in the U.S. and a flavor ban on nicotine containing products 
(which includes e-cigarettes) was included in the proposed EU Tobacco Products Directive 
(TPD) before the vote by EU Parliament on October 2013 which deleted that proposal.(European 
Parliament 2013) As of September 2013, there were no restrictions on the use of flavors in e-
cigarettes anywhere in the world. 
 
PRODUCT SAFETY 
 
 
There are safety issues with electronic cigarette devices and liquid. Trtchounian and 
Talbot (2011) examined 6 brands of products for design, content, labeling, quality and product 
information including warnings.(Trtchounian and Talbot 2011) Most of the e-cigarette starter 
kits purchased came with some instructions. Most provided information about the battery and 
how to connect the parts of the devices, but did not come with a list of product ingredients, or 
health warning messages. Most of the products leaked when handled and cartridges came with 
fluid leaked on them, creating the potential for dermal nicotine exposure and potential nicotine 
poisoning.(Trtchounian and Talbot 2011)  
 
Major injuries and illness have resulted from e-cigarette use, which may be related to 
lack of basic safeguards in the product design and manufacturing process, as well as the contents 
of the solution. Tobacco product adverse events can be reported to the Food and Drug 
Administration (FDA), Center for Tobacco Products (CTP). Chen (2012) summarized the 47 
adverse event reports filed with the FDA CTP between 2008 and early 2012 regarding e-
cigarettes; finding that 8 of these 47 adverse events were serious health issues with examples 
including hospitalization due to congestive heart failure, hypotension, pneumonia, and chest 
pain.(Chen 2013) Reporting of an adverse event does not indicate causation, but it does raise 
questions of biological plausibility that need to be addressed. There was also a reported infant 
death due to choking on an e-cigarette. Examples of less serious adverse events include nausea, 
vomiting and sore throat. Moreover, one e-cigarette company also instructs users to draw on the 
product differently from a cigarette because they might experience adverse reactions, stating: “If 

 

DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
you find yourself smoking your e-cigarette the way you smoke a traditional cigarette, you are 
doing something wrong. As a matter of fact, if you vape your e-cig as you smoke your 
cigarette you will find yourself with a sore throat, sore lungs, an incessant cough and 
irritation in your mouth and throat.” (bold font in original text  - 
http://www metroecigs.com/content/how-do-you-inhale-an-electronic-cigarette.asp) 
 
An18-month old girl in the U.S. became seriously ill after drinking e-cigarette liquid in a 
refill container that was left in the child's reach and did not come with a child-proof cap.(Shawn 
and Nelson 2013)  A child in Israel died of nicotine poisoning from drinking her grandfather’s e-
cigarette solution.(Winer May 29, 2013)  E-cigarettes have exploded and caught fire, causing 
serious injury. A man in Florida suffered severe burns and lost half his tongue due to an e-
cigarette battery exploding in his face.(CBS NEWS February 16, 2012) A woman in Atlanta 
escaped serious injury from an e-cigarette that exploded in her home, starting a fire .(Strickland 
2013) These problems are common enough that e-cigarette internet forums and some retail 
websites advise that the lithium batteries may explode or overheat when left to charge for long 
periods of time or in direct heat exposure or if charged with the wrong charger or a powerful 
electrical source. The e-cigarette forum e-cigarette-forum.com has a section in which advice is 
given about the risks of specific battery types: http://www.e-cigarette-
forum.com/forum/blogs/baditude/4848-9-battery-basics-mods-imr-protected html. Because e-
cigarettes are not regulated there is no systematic collection of information on these issues. It is 
also unknown to what extent these problems could be eliminated by stronger regulatory 
standards on the product itself.  
 
MARKETING  
 
 
While most attention from the biomedical community has been on the e-cigarette device, 
the aerosol that it delivers to users (and, to a lesser extent, bystanders), and  the potential of e-
cigarettes for cessation of conventional cigarettes, much of the public discourse and popular 
understanding about use of e-cigarettes has been determined by how they have been marketed. 
 

 

DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
 
Patterns of tobacco product adoption are driven and reinforced by marketing, so it is 
important to understand the marketing claims and selling propositions consumers encounter with 
regard to e-cigarettes. Product marketing designed to attract different segments of the population 
(such as youth, current smokers, former smokers) will determine use patterns which is one of the 
main factors contributing to total public health burden from tobacco use.  Consumer perceptions 
of tobacco products (whether cigarettes, smokeless tobacco products, or e-cigarettes) and their 
risks and benefits are important factors in determining uptake and consequently the total public 
health burden due to tobacco use. For example, claims that e-cigarettes are less harmful than 
cigarettes may encourage adoption by non-smokers (potentially children) as well as smokers 
seeking to quit conventional cigarettes.  Promotion of e-cigarettes as a convenient alternative to 
cigarettes when a smoker cannot light up would blunt the effect of smokefree laws on smoking 
cessation. The explicit promotion of dual use (as has been done with snus) for places where 
people cannot smoke cigarettes (Figure 3) has important implications for the ultimate use 
patterns and health impact of introducing e-cigarettes into the marketplace. 
 
 
Grana and Ling (under review at AJPM)(Grana and Ling under review) systematically 
reviewed a sample of single-brand e-cigarette retail websites (n=59) that were online in 2012 to 
determine the main marketing messages, type of products sold and unique marketing features on 
the sites. They found that the most popular claims were that the products are healthier (95%), 
cheaper (93%) and cleaner (95%) than cigarettes, can be smoked anywhere (88%), can 
circumvent smokefree policies (71%), do not produce secondhand smoke, and are modern. 
Health claims were also made through pictorial and video representations of doctors, which was 
present on 22% of sites. Cessation-related claims (ranging from overt statements that one can use 
the product to quit smoking to indirect claims such as you’ll never want to smoke tobacco 
cigarettes again) were found on 64% of sites.  Claims about effects on bystanders frequently 
included statements that e-cigarettes emit "only water vapor" that is harmless to others (76%).  
 
 
While originally promoted almost exclusively on the internet, marketing expenditures for 
e-cigarettes have increased dramatically, with the increasing promotion of e-cigarettes on 
television in some countries (e.g., U.S., U.K.). In the U.S. television advertising is largely by 
Lorillard, Inc., a multinational tobacco company based in the U.S. and the first of the cigarette 

 

DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
companies to enter the e-cigarette business when it purchased Blu brand e-cigarettes in 
2012(Esterl April 25, 2012) and Sky Cig brand e-cigarettes in 2013.(Esterl October 1, 2013) As 
of late 2013, Lorillard had the biggest US national TV campaign which includes use of 
celebrities to glamorize e-cigarettes and shows them inhaling and exhaling what looks like 
smoke.  
 
 
The use of celebrities in product marketing has been occurring since at least 2009.(Grana, 
Glantz et al. 2011) In Poland, a popular ad as of March 2012 featured actor Olaf Lubaszenko 
with the tagline ‘You can smoke wherever you want.’ In the U.S. Katherine Heigl, a famous U.S. 
actress went on the David Letterman Show, a popular late night program in the U.S. and spent 
much of her interview discussing her quit attempt with the e-cigarette and even smoked an e-
cigarette on stage with Mr. Letterman (Figure 4). At the time, she had a relationship with the 
company where a portion of sales of an e-cigarette called the Pitbull were donated to a charity of 
her choice, Compassion Revolution. The video of the interview with David Letterman was on the 
site as well as posted on other websites and widely used in many online press releases and 
advertorials. In the U.K. the commercials range from showing young people out enjoying 
themselves (SkyCig) to older people who are tired of missing out on major life events due to 
their smoking (E-Lites), a sentiment more associated with the harm reduction or NRT approach. 
Jenny McCarthy, a TV host and model, appears in a 2013 Blu advertisement that glamorizes e-
cigarette use and emphasizes the romantic opportunity it creates (Figure 5). Moreover, this 
advertisement is set in a bar which recalls the pairing of cigarettes and alcohol and makes that 
connection for e-cigarettes, and is likely to appeal to older adolescents and young adults, the 
population that spends disproportionately more time out in bars trying to develop romantic 
relationships. Blu also has another actor in its commercials, Stephen Dorff, whose rugged good 
looks recall the Marlboro Man but in a suit, and e-cigarette brand NJOY uses rebel rockstar 
Courtney Love.  
The fact that a large majority of e-cigarette retail websites encouraged the use of the 
products anywhere and everywhere (88%), specifically noting places where cigarette smoking 
would be banned (71%) and places for socializing, has direct implications for regulation of e-
cigarettes and implementation of the FCTC. These messages can be used to undermine the idea 
of smoking restrictions and existing smokefree laws designed to apply to tobacco smoke.  It is 

 



DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
adults and those with lower socioeconomic status. Ever use was higher among smokers than 
among the general population in 2010 (18.2% v 2.7%, respectively). Current smokers who had 
tried e-cigarettes did not differ from non-users in intention to quit or past-year quit attempts.  
 
 
 
King et al (2013), analyzed data from a companion dataset to the ConsumerStyles, called 
HealthStyles, collected in 2010 (mail-based and web-based modalities) and 2011 (web-based 
mode).(King, Alam et al. 2013) They found awareness of e-cigarettes had increased from about 
40% to about 58% and ever use had doubled from 3.4% to 6.2% between 2010 and 2011. Ever 
use was higher in current smokers at both waves (6.8% of the 2010 mail-based sample, 9.8% of 
the 2010 web-based sample and 21% of the 2011 web-based sample). Ever use among former 
smokers increased dramatically from 2010 to 2011, from 0.6% and 2.5% in the 2010 samples to 
7.4% in the 2011 online sample. Authors note data were weighted to be nationally-representative 
and the Styles surveys typically yield estimates of smoking prevalence that are almost identical 
to the nationally-representative National Health Interview Survey.(King, Alam et al. 2013; 
Regan, Promoff et al. 2013) Moreover, both of these studies reported a similar percentage of 
U.S. adults who were aware of e-cigarettes in 2010 as the nationally-representative sample in 
Pearson et al. in 2010(Pearson, Richardson et al. 2012) (32.2% Regan,(Regan, Promoff et al. 
2013) 38.5% and 40.9% in King(King, Alam et al. 2013) vs. 40.3% in Pearson(Pearson, 
Richardson et al. 2012). 
 
 
Pearson et al (2012) estimated e-cigarette use prevalence in two studies, the Legacy 
Longitudinal Study of Smokers (LLSS) and a nationally-representative general population online 
survey, both conducted in 2010.(Pearson, Richardson et al. 2012) Smokers in the LLSS and the 
nationally online sample were similar on all demographics except age (those in the LLSS were 
on average younger) and smoking characteristics and desire to quit with the exception that a 
greater proportion of smokers in the LLSS had made more than one quit attempt (69% v 31%, 
respectively). Overall awareness in the online nationally-representative sample (n=2649) was 
40.2% and ever use was 3.4%, awareness among smokers was 57% and ever use was 11.4%. 
Among LLSS cohort (n=3648), awareness was 57.0% and ever use was 6.4%.  Moreover in the 
online sample, almost all current use (past 30-day) of e-cigarettes was among current smokers: 
4.1%, compared to 0.5% of former smokers and 0.3% of never smokers. (Current use was not 
11 
 

DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
measured in the LLSS.) In addition, although a low percentage of former smokers (2%) had used 
e-cigarettes, that rate was over twice the rate among never smokers (0.77%)(Pearson et al., 
2012).In the online nationally-representative survey the odds of being an e-cigarette user was 
associated with intention to quit in the next 6 months (adjusted OR = 1.74; 95% CI: 1.02, 2.98), 
compared to never expecting to quit; but this was not evident in the LLSS cohort(Pearson et al. 
2012). 
 
 
In a 2010 nationally-representative, mixed-mode survey (telephone-based n=1504, online 
n=1736; total n=3240), McMillen et al. (2013) assessed the ever use of emerging tobacco 
products including e-cigarettes among adults in the U.S. Ever use of e-cigarettes among all 
respondents was 1.8%, with highest rates of use among daily (6.2%), non-daily (8.2%) 
smokers.(McMillen, Maduka et al. 2012) Past 30-day (current) e-cigarette use did not exceed 1% 
for any of the “emerging tobacco products, which included e-cigarettes, but 19.7% of ever e-
cigarette users reported past 30-day use.  
 
 
Popova and Ling (2013) found that among a nationally representative panel of current 
and recent former smokers, 20.1% had ever used e-cigarettes.(Popova and Ling 2013) Ever e-
cigarette use was more common in women than men (OR=0.79, 95% CI: 0.63-0.99), persons of 
Asian ethnicity than white (OR=2.76, 95% CI: 1.03, 7.39), and those aged 18-29 years compared 
to 60 years or older (OR=2.32, 95% CI: 1.57, 3.42). Among smokers, those with some college 
education compared to those with a bachelors degree (OR=2.09; 95% CI: 1.13, 3.86) and those 
with incomes less than $15,000 compared to those with incomes of $60,000 or greater were more 
likely to be current (past 30-day) e-cigarette users (OR=1.95, 95% CI: 1.17, 3.25). Respondents 
who had ever tried e-cigarettes were significantly more likelyto have tried to quit in the past year 
and failed than persons who had not tried to quit (OR=1.78, 95% CI: 1.25, 2.53).  
 
U.S. Regional Samples  
 
Choi and Forster (2013) found that among young adults aged 20-28 in the Midwestern 
US surveyed in 2011, ever use of e-cigarettes was 7.0% and past 30-day use was 1.2%.(Choi and 
Forster 2013) Among those aware of e-cigarettes, most believe e-cigarettes are less harmful than 
12 
 

DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
conventional cigarettes (52.9%) and 44% believe they can help with quitting smoking. Ever use 
was more common among 20-24 year olds (25-28 year olds), men, current smokers, and those 
who believe e-cigarettes are less harmful than conventional cigarettes and can be used for in 
smoking cessation.  
 
Sutfin and colleagues (2013) found that among college students in North Carolina 
surveyed in 2009, ever use of e-cigarettes was 4.5% while past 30-day use was 1.5%, with 
highest use among current smokers.(Sutfin, McCoy et al. 2013) Importantly, they found that 
12% of e-cigarette users were never smokers. E-cigarette use was not associated with intention to 
quit smoking. 
Hawaiian sample of smokers and cessation for e-cigarette use motivation  
A cross-sectional study of Hawaiian daily smokers (n=1567) conducted from 2010-2012, 
examined e-cigarette use prevalence and associations with quitting attitudes and 
behaviors.(Pokhrel, Fagan et al. 2013) Thirteen percent of participants reported having ever used 
e-cigarettes to quit smoking (they did not assess any other reason for using the products). 
Smokers who had used e-cigarettes to quit were younger, more highly motivated to quit, had 
greater self-efficacy for quitting, and reported a longer recent quit duration than smokers who 
had not used e-cigarettes to quit. In the multivariate logistic regression analyses, greater quit 
motivation (OR = 1.14; 95% CI: 1.08, 1.21), quitting self-efficacy (OR = 1.18; 95% CI: 1.06, 
1.36) and having ever used FDA-approved therapies (OR = 3.72; 95% CI: 2.67, 5.19) were 
significantly associated with greater likelihood of having used e-cigarettes to quit smoking, 
whereas age (OR=0.98; 95% CI: 0.97, 0.99) and Native Hawaiian ethnicity (OR = 0.68; 95% CI: 
0.45, 0.99) were inversely associated with greater likelihood of using e-cigarettes for quitting.  
 
 
International Samples 
 
 
 
Adkison and colleagues (2013) estimated rates of e-cigarette use and perceptions of the 
products in 2010 among current and former smokers in the International Tobacco Control Study 
conducted in U.K, U.S., Australia and Canada.(Adkison, O'Connor et al. 2013) Likely reflecting 
the fact that e-cigarettes are freely available in the UK and US and not legal for sale with 
13 
 

DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
nicotine in Australia and Canada, the highest rates of awareness were in the U.K.(54%) and U.S. 
(73%), while rates were much lower in Australia (40%) and Canada (20%). Prevalence of e-
cigarette trial (among those aware) was 20.4% in U.S., 17.7% in the U.K., 10% in Canada and 
11% in Australia.  Across countries use was higher among those of younger age, higher income, 
reporting nondaily smoking and who perceive e-cigarettes as less harmful than cigarettes. 
Despite larges differences in awareness among the countries, current use did not differ among 
the countries (p=0.114).In current smokers, a marker of dependence (cigarettes per day) was not 
associated with ever e-cigarette use or past 30-day use (p value not provided). 
 
Dockrell et al (2013) analyzed data from a nationally representative survey of UK adults 
(2010: n=12597 adults, 2297 smokers; 2010 n=12432, 2093 smokers) finding the prevalence of 
e-cigarette trial and current use doubled from 2010 to 2012.(Dockrell, Morison et al. 2013) Ever 
use in 2010 was not measured among former smokers or never smokers, only current non-daily 
or daily smokers. In 2010, 5.5% of smokers had tried e-cigarettes but no longer used them, which 
increased to 15.0% in 2012. Current use of e-cigarettes among smokers rose from 2.7% in 2010 
to 6.7% in 2012.Ever e-cigarette use among former smokers in 2012 was 2.7% and current use 
1.1%; ever use among never smokers in 2012 (only measured in that year) was 0.4% and current 
use was 0.1%. About 33% of ever e-cigarette users continued to use in 2010 and in 2012.In a 
multivariate model which included only ex- and current smokers, being an occasional (OR=4.32 
95% CI: 2.89, 6.48)or daily smoker (OR=7.33 95% CI: 5.66, 9.48) increased odds of ever e-
cigarette use compared to ex-smokers, while older age (age ≥35) decreased odds of ever e-
cigarette use compared to 18-34 year olds (OR=0.58 95% CI: 0.43, 0.78). In the model for 
current e-cigarette use, only being an occasional (OR=6.04 95% CI: 2.92, 12.49) or daily smoker 
(OR=6.68 95% CI: 4.15, 10.77) increased odds of current e-cigarette use. Authors also analyzed 
data from a 2010 survey of smokers (n=1308) that included a special battery of e-cigarette 
questions. A majority of respondents reported that e-cigarettes: “might satisfy the desire to 
smoke” (60%), “might help cut down on cigarettes” (55%), and “they might help me give up 
smoking entirely (51%).”Perceived disadvantages included “might be too expensive” (53%), 
“might not satisfy the desire to smoke enough” (39%), and might be mistaken for cigarettes 
therefore frowned upon in public”(35%). Among e-cigarette triers (n=494, 37.7% of sample), the 
most common reason for trying e-cigarettes was “as a substitute for smoking where smoking is 
14 
 

DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
not allowed” (reported by 49% of daily pack a day smokers, 43% of those smoking 10-19 
cigarettes per day, and 31% among those smoking 9 or fewer cigarettes per day, p=0.008). 
Secondary reasons were to cut down (35%) and to quit smoking (31%). The finding that using e-
cigarettes to get around smokefree laws is likely reflected in the dominant pattern of dual use in 
both 2010 and 2012 prevalence data reported in this study.  
 
Single Gender Study 
 
 
Douptcheva et al (2013) reported data analyses of the Cohort Study on Substance Use 
Risk Factors (C-SURF), a longitudinal study of Swiss men who are interviewed during 
enrollment in the army, to examine prevalence and predictors of e-cigarette use.(Douptcheva, 
Gmel et al. 2013) Among the entire cohort of young men, aged 19-25, 4.9% of participants 
reported ever trying e-cigarettes. Use differed by smoking status with 9.3% of current smokers 
reporting trying e-cigarettes, 1.6% of former smokers and 0.4% of never smokers. Excluding 144 
occasional e-cigarette users, the conducted an analyses of e-cigarette use among daily smokers 
(n=1233) that compared daily dual users (25) to daily smokers who never use e-cigarettes 
(1064); they found no statistically significant differences in cigarettes per day, nicotine 
dependence or past year quit attempts. 
 
Convenience Samples of Users: Prevalence, User perceptions 
 
 
There have also been five studies with convenience samples that may provide 
information about motivations for using e-cigarettes, attitudes and behavior. These studies likely 
suffer from a bias toward recruitment of persons motivated to quit and enthusiastic about e-
cigarettes, limiting the generalizability of the findings. 
 
 
In an online survey of 81 users of cessation websites and e-cigarette forums conducted in 
2009, authors found that most respondents perceived the products as less harmful than cigarettes 
and used the products to quit smoking or to cut down on conventional cigarette smoking.(Etter 
2010) In a subsequent study conducted in 2010, Etter and Bullen (2011) surveyed 3587 adults 
that were recruited from e-cigarette forums and smoking cessation websites, and employed a 
15 
 

DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
similar questionnaire as Etter 2010.(Etter 2010; Etter and Bullen 2011) They found that top 
reasons for using the e-cigarette was that users perceive them as less toxic, to ameliorate cravings 
for and withdrawal from cigarettes, and to help them quit or avoid relapse.(Etter and Bullen 
2011) 
 
 
Siegel et al. (2011) obtained a list purchasers of Blu brand electronic cigarettes from the 
company and invited them to complete a survey 6 months after making their first purchase (5000 
purchasers, 4.5% response rate, sample n=222) in 2010.(Siegel, Tanwar et al. 2011)  They found 
that 31% reported they were not smoking tobacco cigarettes at the 6 month survey timepoint. 
This study is limited by selection bias (purchasers of one particular product) andvery low 
response rate (4.5%), making these data not generalizeable to e-cigarette users. 
 
 
In 2011, Dawkins et al., (2012) conducted an online survey of 1347 adults recruited from 
an electronic cigarette retail website.(Dawkins, Turner et al. 2013) Participants were 70% men, 
mean aged 43 years, 96% white (72% European), and most (72%) used a "tank" type of e-
cigarette with nicotine-filled solution (1% reported using no-nicotine). Seventy-four percent of 
respondents who had used an e-cigarette reported not smoking for at least a few weeks. Results 
show that users perceive e-cigarettes as healthier than smoking and pleasant to use. In an analysis 
of self-reported ex-smokers, "'time to first vape' was significantly longer than 'time to first 
cigarette' (p<0.001)." 
 
 
Goniewicz and colleagues (2012) surveyed Polish e-cigarette users recruited from online 
forums and retail sites in 2010 (n=179) and found that a majority of e-cigarette users were 
cigarette smokers when they initiated e-cigarette use (86%).(Goniewicz, Lingas et al. 2012) 
Participants reported using the products as a less harmful alternative to smoking (41%) or to quit 
smoking (41%) and 66% reported no conventional tobacco cigarette smoking at the time of the 
survey. Twenty percent of never smokers who tried e-cigarettes stated they initiated tobacco 
smoking after trying e-cigarettes, suggesting e-cigarette use can be a gateway to smoking and 
dual use. 
 
16 
 

DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
 
In the Czech Republic, Kralikova et al (2012), surveyed 1738 (86% response rate) people 
they identified as currently smoking or buying conventional cigarettes in 2012.(Cho, Shin et al. 
2011; Kralikova, Novak et al. 2013) Forty-six point seven percent had heard of e-cigarettes but 
never tried them, 23.9% had tried them once, 16.6% had tried them repeatedly, 9.7% reported 
using them regularly. Of the fifty percent of respondents who had ever tried an e-cigarette,18.3% 
reported regular use and 14% reported using them daily.A positive initial experience with e-
cigarette use was much higher among those who use e-cigarette regularly compared to those who 
only tried them once (68.5% v 15.2%, respectively). Of those who tried only once or repeatedly, 
“not satisfying” was the top reason given by both groups followed by “poor taste.”In depth 
analyses were conducted for the sample of regular users (n=158). Among regular users, reasons 
for trying e-cigarettes were to cut down (39%), use where smoking is not allowed (28%) and to 
quit smoking (27%) (5.3% gave another reason). Regular users who reported that e-cigarettes 
helped them cut down (n=93) smoked on average 9.7 (SD=6.5) cigarettes per day, while those 
who did not report that e-cigarettes helped them cut down (N=61) smoked 13.1 (SD=7.0) 
cigarettes per day (p<.005). Most non-reducers said they used the e-cigarette to circumvent 
smokefree laws.  
 
Youth  
 
 
In a survey of Korean adolescent respondents to the 2008 Health Promotion Fund Project 
survey (n=4,341), 10.2% of students were aware of e-cigarettes.(Cho, Shin et al. 2011) Overall, 
only 0.5% of students reported having tried an e-cigarette, but there were significant differences 
in use by gender (0.91% among males, 0.18% among females, p<0.001) and having ever used 
conventional cigarettes (2.0% among ever cigarette users, 0.15% among never cigarette users, 
p<0.001)  
 
A subsequent study of adolescent (aged 13-18) respondents to the 2011 Korean Youth 
Risk Behaviour Survey (n=75,643) found that prevalence of e-cigarette use had greatly increased 
in just 3 years to 9.4% ever use and4.7% past 30 day use.(Lee, Grana et al. 2013) Use was also 
much higher among respondents who used conventional cigarettes: 8.0% ever e-cigarette use 
among current smokers, 1.4% ever e-cigarette use among non-smokers or former smokers and 
17 
 

DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
3.6% current (past 30-day) use among smokers, 1.1% current use among non-smokers or former 
smokers).  
 
 
In the U.S., Pepper et al, 2013 found high levels of awareness of e-cigarettes (67%) but 
little use among a sample of 228 adolescent males who participated in an online survey in 2011 
(less than 1 percent had tried an e-cigarette).(Pepper, Reiter et al. 2013) However, in the 
multivariate logistic regression only current smoking was strongly associated with increased 
willingness to try an e-cigarette (OR=10.25, CI: 2.88, 36.46). In the bivariate logistic regression, 
holding a negative opinion of “the typical smoker” was associated with less willingness to try an 
e-cigarette (OR=0.58, 95% CI: 0.43, 0.79). These findings demonstrate that adolescent boys who 
use cigarettes are also susceptible to using e-cigarettes and that negative perceptions of being a 
smoker may be protective against e-cigarette smoking. 
 
 
The first national estimates of e-cigarette use among U.S. youth from the National Youth 
Tobacco Survey document rapid growth of e-cigarette use of e-cigarette use among middle 
school and high school students in the U.S. from 2011-2012.(Centers for Disease Control and 
Prevention 2013) Among middle school youth (grades 6-8), prevalence of ever trying an e-
cigarette doubled from 1.4% in 2011 to 2.7% in 2012. Similarly, current use (past 30-day use) 
rose from 0.6% to 1.1%. Among high school youth, ever use doubled from 4.7% in 2011 to 
10.0% in 2012, with current use rising from 1.5% in 2011 to 2.8% in 2012. Notably, dual use 
with cigarette smoking accounts for most of the past 30-day e-cigarette use among middle school 
youth (61.1%) and high school youth (80.5%). Initiation of nicotine exposure with e-cigarettes is 
evidenced by the fact that 20% of middle school youth who had tried an e-cigarette and 7.2% of 
high school youth who had tried an e-cigarette had not tried a conventional tobacco cigarette yet.  
 
Goniewicz studied e-cigarette use among 20,240 students enrolled at 176 high schools 
and universities in Poland.(Goniewicz and Zielinska-Danch 2012) Surveys were administered 
September 2010 to June 2011. 23.5% of Polish teens aged 15-19 had ever used e-cigarettes and 
8.2% reported past 30-day use. Among 20-24 year olds attending universities, 19.0% had ever 
used an e-cigarette and 5.9% reported past 30-day use. In the whole sample, 3.2% of never 
smokers had tried an e-cigarette. 
18 
 





DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
cotinine and beta nicotyrine. It is likely that these alkaloids were extracted along with nicotine 
from tobacco as part of the manufacturing process. The analysis of simulated e-cigarette use 
found that individual puffs contained from 0 µg to 35µg nicotine per puff. Assuming a high 
nicotine delivery of 30 µg/puff, it would take about 30 puffs to deliver the 1 mg of nicotine 
typically delivered by smoking a conventional cigarette.  A Marlboro cigarette was tested and 
found to deliver 152-193µg/puff, so 6 or 7 puffs would deliver 1 mg.  The levels of minor 
alkaloids in vapor were below the limit of detection for both e-cigarettes, although levels could 
be measured from the smoke of a Marlboro. Two products from CIXI labeled as Cialis and 
Rimonabant flavor contained amino-tadalafil and rimonabant, medicines to treat erectile 
dysfunction and a cannabinoid (THC) receptor antagonist, respectively. This study demonstrate 
inconsistency in nicotine amount compared to labeled content of many but not all e-cigarette 
products.  It also shows that the highest nicotine product e-cigarette puff delivers 20% or less 
nicotine than a puff of a conventional cigarette.  
 
 
Goniewicz et al. (2012) analyzed 16 brands of e-cigarette products, and 20 samples 
across brands.(Goniewicz, Kuma et al. 2013) They measured nicotine content in e-liquid and 
used an adapted smoking machine to measure the nicotine content in 300 puffs of aerosol 
generated from each product. The amount of nicotine measured in the e-liquid extracted from the 
cartridges varied from labeled nicotine content by more than 20% in 9 of 20 samples. Similarly, 
a 20% difference in marked content vs. actual content was found in 3 of 15 e-cigarette refill 
liquid samples. Across products, nicotine content ranged from 0.5 mg (SD=0.1) to 15.4 
mg(SD=2.1).  
 
 
Cameron et al. (2013) analyzed 7 e-cigarette solutions (e-liquids) to determine 
concordance between advertised or labeled and actual nicotine content.(Cameron, Howell et al. 
2013) Among the 7 samples of e-liquid, 2 were labeled as containing 24mg/ml of nicotine and 5 
were not marked with a specific nicotine content, but as "low," "medium," "high" and "super 
high." For samples with only strength descriptors, expected concentrations were obtained from 
information on the brands' websites (low=6-14mg/ml, medium=10-18mg/ml, high and super 
high=25-36mg/ml). They found that, while all the samples contained nicotine, only 2 were in the 
expected range and 4 were lower than specified.  
21 
 

DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
 
 
Goniewicz et al (2013) analyzed the vapor from 12 brands of e-cigarettes for toxic and 
carcinogenic compounds, including carbonyls, volatile organic compounds, tobacco-specific 
nitrosamines.(Goniewicz, Knysak et al. 2013 (online first)) They also compared results from the 
e-cigarette vapor to the puffs from a medicinal nicotine inhaler. They found varying levels of 
carbonyls (e.g., formaldehyde, acetealdehyde and acrolein), volatile organic compounds (e.g., 
toluene) and tobacco-specific nitrosamines present in the e-cigarette vapor. E-cigarette products 
varied widely in toxicant content per 150 puffs averaged across sampling timepoints (e.g., 
formaldehyde range: 3.2-56.1 µg; acrolein: 0-41.9 µg, TABLE 2). On one hand, levels of 
toxicants in the vapor were 9-450 times lower than the same volume cigarette smoke (Table 2). 
On the other, depending on brand, some toxicants were found at levels higher than the reference 
product, the nicotine inhaler (e.g.,o-methylbenzaldehyde and formaldehyde). Five of the 11 
toxicants measured were not detected in the nicotine inhaler at all, including acrolein, toluene, 
p,m,-xylene, NNN, and NNK. They also report the presence trace amounts of three metals 
(cadmium, nickel, and lead) in the e-cigarette vapor as well as in the nicotine inhaler. 
 
TABLE 2. Levels of toxicants in e-cigarette vapor compared to nicotine inhaler and cigarette 
smoke (data from Goniewicz et al., 2013) 
Toxicant 
Content in Nicotine  Range in 
Range in content in 
inhaler mist  
content in 
conventional cigarette 
vapor from 
micrograms in 
12 e-cigarette  mainstream smoke from 
samples (per 
1 cigarette 
15 puffs) 
Formaldehyde 
2.0 
0.2-5.61 
1.6-52 
Acetaldehyde 
1.1 
0.11-1.36 
52-140 
Acrolein 
ND 
0.07-4.19 
2.4-62 
o-
0.7 
.13-.71 
-- 
methylbenzaldehyde     
Toluene 
ND 
0-0.63 
8.3-70 
p,m-xylene                 
ND 
0 - 0.2 
-- 
NNN 
ND 
0 - 0.00043 
0.0005-0.19 
NNK 
ND 
0-0.00283 
0.012-0.11 
Cadmium 
0.03 
0 - 0.022 
-- 
Nickel 
0.19 
0.011-0.029 
-- 
Lead 
0.04 
0.003-0.057 
-- 
ND=Not Detected; NOTE: Data were taken from Tables 3 and 4 in Goniewicz et al. 
22 
 

DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
2013. Lowest and highest values reported in each table were used for each toxicant 
 
 
 
Kim et al. (2012) developed a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method 
for analyzing TSNAs in electronic cigarette replacement fluids.(Kim and Shin 2013)  They 
applied their method to 105 refill fluids from 11 different companies in the Korean market. They 
specifically quantified NNN, NNK, NAT, and NAB, and they present data on total TSNAs in 
each product. They found nearly a three order of magnitude variation in TSNA concentrations 
among e-cigarette refill fluids, with total TSNA concentration ranging from 330 µg/ml to 8600 
µg/ml. Their data demonstrate significant variability in TSNA composition and quantity among 
different EC brands and illustrate the importance of screening numerous products to obtain an 
overview of product variability.  
 
 
Schripp et al. (2012) analyzed the vapor exhaled by users to determine the presence of 
toxicants and address the question of secondhand vapor exposure.(Schripp, Markewitz et al. 
2012) Three studies are described. In the first, a smoker in an 8m3 stainless steel chamber with 
an air exchange rate of 0.3/hr who puffed 6 puffs from an e-cigarette separated by 60 seconds 
each time. This puffing regimen in the chamber was repeated with 3 e-liquids (0mg nicotine, 
apple flavor, 18mg nicotine, apple flavor, 18mg nicotine, tobacco flavor) and one tobacco 
cigarette. In the second protocol, vapor from three different types of e-cigarettes puffed for 3 
seconds each was pumped into a 10 L glass chamber with an air exchange rate of 3/hr. In the 
third protocol an e-cigarette consumer exhaled one e-cigarette puff into a glass chamber. Three 
e-cigarette devices were used for these experiments – two that used a “tank” system which is 
directly filled with e-liquid and one that used a cartridge with a cotton fiber on which to drip the 
e-liquid. Authors found that vapor from the 8m3 chamber analysis contained low levels of 
formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, isoprene, acetone, acetic acid,2-butanodione (MEK),acetone and 
proponal (Table 4 reproduced form article below).Analyses of the vapor in the second protocol 
(10-l glass chamber) revealed high levels of 1,2-propanediol (propylene glycol), 1,2,3-
propanetriol, diacetin (from flavoring), traces of apple oil (3- methylbutyl-3-methylbutanoate), 
and nicotine. When e-cigarette vapor was directly pumped into a glass chamber, propylene 
glycol was the predominant element, with lower levels of others. Nicotine release was 0.1 to 0.2 
µg/puff.  
23 
 


DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
 
 
 
McAuley et al (2012) conducted a risk assessment of e-cigarettes funded by the 
Consumer Advocates for Smoke-free Alternatives Association, CASAA, a pro-e-cigarette 
advocacy group.(McAuley, Hopke et al. 2012) Key details about the protocol for conducting 
their "risk assessment" are not described and there are obvious problems with the study that do 
not warrant its review in this report. In fact, a technical report (below) reviewing the existing 
data on e-cigarette constituents that was also funded by CASAA excluded this study due to its 
poor quality, stating: 
“Although the quality of reports is highly variable, if one assumes that each report contains some 
information, this asserts that quite a bit is known about composition of e-cigarette liquids and 
aerosols.  The only report that was excluded from consideration was work of McAuley et al.[23] 
because of clear evidence of cross-contamination – admitted to by the authors – with cigarette 
smoke and, possibly, reagents.  The results pertaining to non-detection of tobacco-specific 
nitrosamines (TSNAs) are potentially trustworthy, but those related to PAH are not since it is 
incredible that cigarette smoke would contain fewer polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH; 
arising in incomplete combustion of organic matter) than aerosol of e-cigarettes that do not burn 
organic matter [23].  In fairness to the authors of that study, similar problems may have occurred 
in other studies but were simply not reported, but it is impossible to include a paper in a review 
once it is known for certain that its quantitative results are not trustworthy.” 
24 
 

DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
Other problems with the analysis and findings include the fact that they did not detect any 
benzo(a)pyrene in the conventional cigarette smoke despite the fact that it has been established 
for over 50 years that benzo(a)pyrene is an important carcinogen in cigarette smoke. The most 
unreliable conclusion in the paper (on page 855, second column, 11 lines from the top) is that 
“neither vapor from e-liquids or cigarette smoke analytes posed a condition of ‘Significant Risk’ 
of harm to human health via the inhalation route of exposure." Given the authors' analysis found 
that conventional cigarettes did not pose significant risk, there is likely a fatal error in the data, 
analysis, or both. This paper's conclusions about e-cigarette toxicity does not appear credible as 
it concludes that cigarettes are not dangerous to inhale. 
 
In a technical report funded by The Consumer Advocates for Smoke-free Alternatives 
Association (CASAA) Research Fund of the constituents in e-cigarette cartridges and liquid, 
Burstyn (2013) employs occupational threshold limit values (TLVs) to evaluate the potential risk 
posed by various toxins at various levels in e-cigarettes.(Burstyn 2013) In reviewing the 
evidence of risk due to propylene glycol or glycerine exposure the report states that assuming a 
high level of consumption around 5-25ml of solution a day could produce levels of exposure to 
propylene glycol and glycerin to justify concern. The author noted that the assessment is limited 
by "the quality of much of the data that was available for [the] assessment was poor." Based on 
calculated levels of inhalation, the author concludes that  
“…there is no evidence that vaping produces inhalable exposures to contaminants of the aerosol 
that would warrant health concerns by the standards that are used to ensure safety of workplaces.  
However, the aerosol generated during vaping as a whole (contaminants plus declared 
ingredients), if it were an emission from industrial process, creates personal exposures that would 
justify surveillance of health among exposed persons in conjunction with investigation of means 
to keep health effects as low as reasonably achievable.Exposures of bystanders are likely to be 
orders of magnitude less, and thus pose no apparent concern.” 
TLVs are an outmoded approach to assessing health effects for occupational chemical exposures 
that lead to much higher permissible levels of exposure than contemporary agencies use for 
setting occupational health standards.  In addition, occupational exposures are generally much 
higher (often orders of magnitude higher) than levels considered acceptable for ambient or 
population-level exposures. (Employing an occupational standard to evaluate risk to the general 
population is the same approach to risk assessment as those conducted for secondhand smoke by 
25 
 

DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
those affiliated with the tobacco industry, which concluded that secondhand tobacco smoke 
could not produce any adverse health effects.)  Occupational exposures also do not consider 
exposure to sensitive subgroups, such as people with medical conditions, children and infants, 
who might be exposed to secondhand e-cigarette emissions.   
 
Particulate Matter 
 
Inhaled particle size is an important determinant of where particles will be deposited in 
the respiratory system and the resulting adverse health effects (U.S. EPA 
http://www.epa.gov/pm/). All particles less than 10 microns in size reach the respiratory system 
and potentially cause health problems in the circulatory  and respiratory systems. 
(http://www.epa.gov/pm/health html). Those whose diameter falls between 2.5 and 10 microns 
are considered “inhalable coarse particles” and impact the upper airway. Fine particles are 
defined as particles less than equal to 2.5 micron. Ultrafine particles or nanoparticles, are 
particles less than or equal to 0.1 micron (0.1 micron = 100 nM). (For reference, conventional 
cigarette smoke particles have a median size of 200-400 nM.) Both terms ultrafine and 
nanoparticle are used interchangeably in the scientific community. Fine particles (2.5 micron and 
smaller) reach the lower lung.  The ultrafine particles are mostly inhaled and exhaled, but some 
do deposit in the lower lung. Ultrafine liquid particles would coalesce with lung fluid to form a 
film, and constituents would be absorbed after impaction as for larger particles.  Solid ultrafine 
or nano-particles (carbonaceous or metal) can be absorbed directed into cells, and could be toxic. 
Frequent or high levels ofexposure to fine and ultrafine particles can trigger inflammatory 
processes and heart attacks(Pope, Burnett et al. 2009) and respiratory problems.(Mehta, Shin et 
al. 2013) Because of these health concerns, the U.S. EPA has standards for particulate exposure 
by particle size: http://www.epa.gov/air/criteria.html. However, the EPA standards are related to 
outdoor air pollution particles, which are carbonaceous.  It is not clear is the ultrafine particles in 
e-cigarette vapor will have the same health effects and toxicity as carbonaceous particles to the 
extent that they are pure liquid particles. 
 
 
 
Schripp et al. (2012) observed two peaks in the particle diameter distribution in e-
cigarette exhaled aerosol, one at 100 nm and one at 30 nm(Figure  reproduced below).(Schripp, 
26 
 

DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
Markewitz et al. 2012) Particle size was observed to decrease as a function of time with specified 
time intervals, 1, 5, 10 minutes in both the 8m3 chamber and the glass 10 liter chamber, 
presumably due to evaporation. Exhaled e-cigarette aerosol contained mostly propylene glycol 
and smaller amounts of related VOCs, apple oil (flavorant) and nicotine. The authors conclude 
that "’passive vaping’ must be expected from the consumption of e-cigarettes." Like secondhand 
cigarette smoke, levels of these chemicals in real environments where e-cigarettes are being used 
will depend on the density of users and properties of the ventilation system. 
 
Metals in e-cigarette liquid and aerosol were  studied by Williams et al (2013) who 
performed various laboratory analyses on 22 dissected cartomizers (the atomizer and cartridge 
combined into a single component).(Williams, Villarreal et al. 2013)  They examined metal 
content and quantity in both cartomizer e-liquid and the corresponding vapor using electron 
microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Both the e-liquid and the Poly-fil fibers 
used to absorb the e-liquid so it can be heated and converted to an aerosol, which comes into 
contact with heating elements in the cartomizers, contained heavy metals (tin, nickel, copper, 
lead, chromium). Tin, which appeared to originate from solder joints, was found in the form of 
both particles and tin whiskers in cartomizer fluid and Poly-fil. E-cigarette fluid containing tin 
was cytotoxic to human pulmonary fibroblasts. E-cigarette aerosol also contained metals. Levels 
of nickel were measured that were 2-100 times higher than found in Marlboro cigarette smoke. 
The nickel and chromium possibly originated from the heating element, which conventional 
cigarettes would not have. Some nickel, tin and chromium in the aerosol was in the form of 
nanoparticles (<100 nM). These metal nanoparticles can deposit into alveolar sacs in the lung, 
potentially causing respiratory problems. This study analyzed e-cigarette models that employ 
Poly-fil fiber to contain the e-liquid, which is not used in some “tank” systems, where liquid 
surrounds a heating element or wick. Therefore, it is unknown how the type of e-cigarette device 
might influence which particles are produced, how many and at what size. There is evidence that 
some metal nanoparticles may harm human health (from studies of titanum) but the overall 
health significance is unclear. 
 
 
Zhang et al. (2103) examined the size of particles and likely deposition in the human 
body. They examined e-cigarette aerosol produced by a single brand of e-cigarette 
27 
 

DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
(BloogMaxXFusion) using both propylene glycol and vegetable glycerin-based liquids.(Zhang, 
Sumner et al. 2013) They generated the aerosol by using a smoking machine that was altered to 
take 25ml aerosol samples for analysis. In order to assess the likely deposition of particles in the 
human respiratory system, they used two factors: particle size and lung ventilation rates (one for 
a"reference worker" one for a "heavy worker," 1.2 m3/hr and 1.688 m3/hr, respectively). They 
found that e-cigarette and tobacco cigarettes produce aerosols with similar particle size, with 
some particles are in the nanoparticle range (Figure reproduced below). Excerpt: “The e-cig with 
PG solution generated an immediate peak at 117 nm of 170,000 d N/d log Da (Figure 3), with a 
VMAD of 250 nm and GSD of 1.6. The VG solution produced an immediate peak at 180 nm of 
21,600 d N/d log Da (Figure 4), with a VMAD of 440 nm and GSD of 1.3. The total volume of 
PG particles was about 30% greater than that of the VG aerosol. The conventional filtered 
cigarette produced a comparable pattern, with a peak at 215 nm, VMAD of 250 nm, and GSD 
of 1.4.” The calculated human deposition model predicted that 73-80% of particles are 
distributed into the exhaled vapor, while 7%–18% of particles would be deposited in alveoli 
resulting in arterial delivery and 9%–19% would be deposited in the head and airways, resulting 
in venous delivery. In total, about 20-27% of particles are predicted to be deposited in the 
circulatory system and into organs from e-cigarette vapor, which is comparable to the 25-35% 
for conventional cigarette smoke. As expected, the heavy worker model showed more alveolar 
delivery across puffs compared to the reference worker who would have more head and airway 
delivery. It is important to note that 25ml would be less aerosol than a user would be expected to 
inhale (personal communication with Dr. Prue Talbot, UC Riverside).  
 
 
Ingebrethsen et al. (2012) (all from RJ Reynolds tobacco company) conducted a study of 
particle size in e-cigarette vapor using three methods (spectral transmission, electric mobility, 
and gravimetric).(Ingebrethsen, Cole et al. 2012) The spectral method enabled particles in e-
cigarette aerosol to be measured without dilution. They found the aerosol particles to average 
250–450 nm in size, which is comparable to what has been found with conventional cigarettes. 
Testing two brand of e-cigarette (one disposable, one rechargeable) and one tobacco cigarette, 
authors found that the geometric mean particle size ranged from 238 to 387 nm, and was similar 
for e-cigarette and tobacco cigarettes. (The authors did not describe the composition of the e-
liquids, which can potentially affect particle size and concentration.) 
28 
 


DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
 
 
Based on the data from all these studies one would expect that e-cigarette vapor could be 
inhaled into the deep lung, similarly to a tobacco cigarette. The particle concentrations (109/cm3) 
were also similar for e-cigarette and conventional tobacco cigarettes. However, the particles in 
the Schripp study may be smaller than those that are inhaled because of evaporation prior to 
measurement, as discussed by Ingebrethsen.  (Figure reproduced below) 
 
FIGURE: Example of particle sizes: clockwise from left to right: Schripp et al. 2012; Zhang et 
al. ;Ingbrethesen et al. 2012;  
 
Figure 4a) Aerosol size distribution during consumption of an e-cigarette in an 8-m3 chamber 
 
29 
 



DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
 
Figure 3. Single puff with propylene glycol-based e-liquid 
 
 
 
 
Cytotoxicity 
30 
 

DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
 
 
Bahl et al (2012) screened 41 e-cigarette refill fluids obtained from 4 companies (year of 
purchase not reported) for cytoxicity (measured as the ability to kill half of the cells in a culture 
using the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay procedure) 
to three cell types: human pulmonary fibroblasts, human embryonic stem cells, and mouse neural 
stem cells.(Bahl, Lin et al. 2012) The latter two cells types were chosen as early prenatal and 
early postnatal models. A hierarchy of cytotoxicity was determined based on e-cigarette liquid 
that killed 50% of the cells (IC50) for the human embryonic stem cells, which were the most 
sensitive of the three cell types tested. Results showed that: (1) cytoxicity varied among products 
with some being highly toxic and some having low or no cytoxicity, (2) nicotine did not cause 
cytotoxicity, (3) all companies has some products that were non-cytotoxic and some that were 
highly cytotoxic, (4) one company had products that were non-cytotoxic to pulmonary 
fibroblasts but cytotoxic to both types of stem cells, (5) cytotoxicity was related to the 
concentration and number of flavorings used. The finding that the stem cells were more sensitive 
than the differentiated adult pulmonary fibroblasts cells suggests that adult lungs are probably 
not the most sensitive system to the effects of exposure to e-cigarette aerosol.  These findings 
also raise concerns about pregnant women who use e-cigarettes or are exposed secondhand e-
cigarette vapor.   
 
 
 In a study funded by FlavorArt e-cigarette liquid manufacturers, Romagna and 
colleagues (2013) compared the cytotoxicity of aerosol produced from 21 flavored (12 tobacco 
flavored and 9 fruit or candied flavored; all contained nicotine) brands of e-cigarette liquid to 
smoke from a reference conventional tobacco cigarette.(Romagna, Allifranchini et al. 2013) 
Samples were analyzed for cytotoxicity using an embryonic mouse fibroblast cell line (3T3) via 
the MTT assay according to UNI ISO 10993-5 standards, which defines cytoxicity as a 30% 
decrease in viability of treated cells vs. untreated controls. Only aerosol from coffee-flavored e-
liquid produced a cytotoxic effect average of 51% viabilityat 100% concentration of solution). 
They concluded that e-cigarette aerosol is much less toxic than cigarette smoke and could be 
useful products in tobacco harm reduction.  
 
 
31 
 

DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
Conclusion 
 
 
The studies of what is in e-cigarettes are limited by the selection of a handful of products 
tested (from the hundreds on the market) and by puffing protocol which may or may not reflect 
actual users puffing behavior. Considering these limitations, the published research demonstrates 
a lack of standards and quality control for e-cigarettes.(Hadwiger, Trehy et al. 2010; Trehy, Ye et 
al. 2011; Cameron, Howell et al. 2013; Goniewicz, Kuma et al. 2013) The e-liquid that is 
aerosolized in e-cigarette devices is not uniform in ingredient content and proportion; some do 
not even include nicotine. Studies have detected varying levels of nicotine content from labeled 
amounts, and the presence of volatile organic compounds, tobacco-related carcinogens, metals 
and chemicals. For the carbonyl compounds (formaldehyde) and the VOCs, the data show lower 
levels than a cigarette but higher levels than the nicotine inhaler.(Goniewicz, Knysak et al. 2013 
(online first)) In addition, the data in Table 2 demonstrate that, depending on brand and sample, 
an e-cigarette possibly delivers 14 times as much formaldehyde, 7 times as much actaldehyde, 6 
times as much o-methylbenzaldehyde as a nicotine inhaler, as well as additional toxicants and 
carcinogens (acrolein, toulene, p,m-xylene, NNN and NNK), which were not detected at all in 
the nicotine inhaler (the reference for this study). Some of the chemicals in e-cigarette aerosol 
are cytotoxic to human cells, particularly embryonic cells. Several chemical that have been found 
in e-cigarette vapor and e-liquid are on human carcinogens or reproductive toxicants maintained 
by the California Proposition 65 list, including nicotine, acetaldehyde, formaldehyde, nickel, 
lead, toluene (http://oehha.ca.gov/prop65/prop65 list/Newlist.html).  
 
 
Studies that have measured the diameter of the particles comprising e-cigarette vapor 
have detected small (<10microns in diameter), fine (<2.5microns in diameter) and 
ultrafine/nanoparticles (<1 micron in diameter).(Schripp, Markewitz et al. 2012; Williams, 
Villarreal et al. 2013; Zhang, Sumner et al. 2013) The size of particles is important for how they 
can deposit in the body’s bloodstream, cells and organs. The smaller the particle size, the easier 
it is for chemicals to enter the bloodstream and cells, potentially effecting damage or changes. 
Very small particles mostly get inhaled and exhaled.  However some fraction of these particles, 
at least of certain types, may be absorbed directly. Medium sized particles (cig smoke size) are 
optimal to impact and release their constituents into the airways, and then be absorbed.   
32 
 

DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
 
 
At minimum, these studies show that e-cigarette vapor is not merely "water vapor" as is 
often claimed in the marketing for these products.  The thresholds for human toxicity of potential 
toxicants in e-cigarette vapor are not known, and the possibility of health risks to primary users 
of the products and those exposed passively to the product emissions must be considered. Based 
on these studies, the e-cigarettes tested have lower levels of toxicants than conventional 
cigarettes. However, these studies suggest that switching smokers to a pharmaceutical nicotine 
inhaler as a harm reduction strategy (long term use among those unable/unwilling to quit) would 
be a safer approach than using these brands of e-cigarettes, as it delivers fewer toxicants and 
does not emit fine and ultrafine particulate matter into the environment. 
 
BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS 
Nicotine Absorption  
 
 
Vansickel et al. (2010) conducted a study with 32 healthy smokers to examine nicotine 
absorption from e-cigarettes, cardiovascular effects on craving and withdrawal after using an e-
cigarette.(Vansickel, Cobb et al. 2010) Participants with no experience of prior e-cigarette use 
were asked to participate in each of 4product use protocols(own brand of cigarette, 18mg NJOY 
“NPRO” e-cigarette, 16mg Crown Seven “Hydro” e-cigarette, and sham-unlit cigarette) 
separated by 48 hours and after 12 hours of abstinence from tobacco smoking. Flavor of e-
cigarette cartridge was matched to the type usually used by the participant. Biological measures 
were blood plasma nicotine, carbon monoxide (CO), heart rate and subjective effects on craving 
and withdrawal. They found that 5 minutes after puffing in each condition both e-cigarettes and 
sham resulted in little or no change from baseline in blood plasma nicotine levels but the 
expected increased occurred with own brand of tobacco cigarettes (18.8 ng/ml) (Figure 
reproduced from article below). After 5 minutes of puffing, heart rate increased only for own 
cigarette brand from 65.7(SD=10.4) to 80.3(SD=10.9) beats per minute. Neither e-cigarette 
product raised CO, but own cigarette brand smoking raised CO as expected. E-cigarettes 
decreased some nicotine/tobacco abstinence withdrawal symptomsat lower levels than own 
conventional cigarette brand at some timepoints in the protocol. This study shows smokers could 
33 
 


DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
experience some modest relief of some withdrawal symptoms and positive subjective effects 
with e-cigarette use with minimal systemic delivery of nicotine. 
 
 
 
 
 
In a cross-over trial, (Bullen et al 2011) 40 adult smokers were randomized to the 
following groups at different times: e-cigarette (Ruyan V8) 16 mg nicotine, 0mg e-cigarette, 
Nicorette inhalator, or their usual cigarette for four days (with three days in between test 
rounds).(Bullen, McRobbie et al. 2010) The 16mg e-cigarette resulted in similar serum level of 
nicotine as the Nicorette inhalator in a similar amount of time (1.3ng/ml at 19.6 min and 
2.1ng/ml at 32.0 min, respectively), with the inhaler taking longer. However, both the e-cigarette 
and the nicotine inhaler achieved much lower peak blood plasma nicotine levels with a longer 
34 
 


DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
time to peak concentration than a tobacco cigarette, which increased blood plasma nicotine to 
13.4ng/ml at 14.3 min. The 16 mg e-cigarette and nicotine inhalator reduced desire to smoke 
over the 60 minute puffing period more than the 0 mg e-cigarette (See Reproduced Figure 2 
below). Both 16mg e-cigarette and the nicotine inhalator reduced the desire to smoke and 
withdrawal symptoms, with no statistically significant differences. Respondents reported a 
similarly low level of "satisfaction" with both the 16mg e-cigarette and the nicotine inhalator 
(approximately 3 on a 10 point scale, exact number not reported), but rated the 16mg e-cigarette 
as more "pleasant to use" than the inhalator by 1.49 units on a 10 point visual analog scale 
(VAS) scale (p=0.016). The cross-over design is a strength of the study as it tests the methods 
within the same person at different times. However, authors noted that the 16mg e-cigarettes 
failed to deliver nicotine to one-third of participants and participants reported failure of the 
device to function and produce vapor. This study may also be limited by lack of a “practice 
period” for participants to become familiar with how to use the e-cigarette or nicotine inhalator, 
as participants had never used them and only 2 participants had ever used the nicotine inhalator. 
This study was funded by the e-cigarette manufacturer, Ruyan Group Holdings Limited through 
Health New Zealand Ltd., a company owned by one of the authors, M. Laugesen. 
 
 
35 
 

DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
 
Vansickel and Eissenberg (2013) conducted a second study of nicotine delivery and 
craving suppression, this time in former smokers who were experienced e-cigarette users (at least 
3 months of regular use) and brought their own e-cigarette device to use in the protocol (n=8) for 
use during a 5-hr. session.(Vansickel and Eissenberg 2013) For the first part of the protocol, 
plasma nicotine, heart rate and subjective effects were assessed at baseline and 5 and 15 minutes 
after users took 10 puffs (at 30 second intervals) followed by a one-hour ad lib puffing session, 
where blood was sampled every 15 minutes and during a 2-hour rest (no puffing) session where 
blood was sampled every 30 minutes. Seven of the eight participants used “tank system” devices 
with larger batteries than the cigarette-sized products which differed from their previous work 
with the cigarette-shaped devices.(Vansickel, Cobb et al. 2010) Most of the participants used 18 
mg/ml nicotine solution (n=6), 1 used 24mg/ml and one used 9mg/ml. Mean blood plasma 
nicotine level reached 10.3 ng/ml (SEM = 2ng/ml)during the 10-puff protocol, which was much 
higher than previous studies and comparable to that delivered by conventional cigarette smoking. 
Blood plasma levels reached an even higher mean after one-hour of ad lib puffing (Figure 
reproduced form the original article below). During ad lib puffing, heart rate increased from an 
average of 73.2(SD=2.0beats per minute to 78(SD=1.9) within the first 5 minutes and remained 
elevated throughout the hour, consistent with the expected effects of nicotine. Nicotine 
withdrawal symptoms (e.g., restlessness) were relieved over the 75-minute puffing period 
(Figure reproduced below). Overall, these results show effective nicotine delivery by the users’ 
own e-cigarettes compared to conventional cigarettes, and subjective effects on withdrawal 
symptoms suggest the e-cigarette relieves symptoms of nicotine dependence. 
36 
 


DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
 
 
Abuse Liability 
 
 
Vansickelet al 2012 conducted a study of the abuse liability of an 18mg e-cigarette 
(Vapor King brand) with 20 current, daily smokers.(Vansickel, Weaver et al. 2012) They tested 
several aspects of abuse liability during a series of four within-subject sessions, 1 of which 
allowed for product sampling to familiarize users with the device and 3 of which involved the 
“multiple choice procedure,” (MCP) where participants sample the drug and then make two or 
more discrete choices between it and another drug/preparation or a series of monetary values. 
37 
 

DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
The first session involved 6, 10-puff bouts of 30 seconds inter-puff interval, each bout separated 
by 30 minutes. During the MCP sessions, participants chose between 10 e-cigarette puffs and 
varying amounts of money, 10 e-cigarette puffs and a varying number of own brand 
conventional cigarette puffs, or 10 conventional cigarette puffs and varying amounts of money. 
The monetary value at which users chose money over the 10 product puffs was considered the 
"crossover value," or for e-cigarette and conventional cigarette choice condition crossover value 
was when participants chose conventional cigarette puffs over the e-cigarette puffs. The 
crossover values were higher for conventional cigarettes compared to e-cigarettes (average of 
$1.06(SD=$0.16) for 10 e-cigarette puffs and average of $1.50(SD=$0.26) for 10 conventional 
cigarette puffs (p<0.003). E-cigarettes delivered a similar level of nicotine as a cigarette, but 
more slowly and require a greater number of puffs than cigarettes to achieve the same nicotine 
level, and reduced withdrawal symptoms. The authors concluded that e-cigarettes deliver 
nicotine, can reduce withdrawal symptoms and appear have lower abuse potential compared to 
conventional cigarettes. 
 
Conclusion 
 
 
The early studies of nicotine absorption found that e-cigarettes delivered a lower level of 
plasma nicotine than conventional cigarettes (Eissenberg 2010, Vansickel 2011, Bullen 2011), 
with newerstudies demonstrates that when users are experienced and using their own product 
(mostly tank systems) and engaged in more puff intervals nicotine absorption is similar to that of 
conventional cigarettes (Vansickel 2013; Vansickel 2012).This difference in nicotine delivery is 
likely due to the larger voltage batteries in the newer devices which produce more heat and/or 
atomizers with lower resistance to the heat transfer, resulting in more efficient aerosolizing of the 
liquid contained in the device. However, despite the greater efficiency at nicotine delivery in the 
more recent study (Vansicket at al 2013), all of these studies show that e-cigarettes regardless of 
nicotine delivery  can modestly alleviate some symptoms of withdrawal and produce positive 
subjective appraisal of the e-cigarette as pleasant to use. Moreover, the one study examining 
abuse liability found that at least one model of cigarette-shaped 18mg e-cigarettes appear to have 
a lower abuse liability than cigarettes. In the trial comparing nicotine inhalator to e-cigarettes, the 
nicotine inhalator delivered a similar amount of nicotine as the 16mg e-cigarette, however 
38 
 

DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
authors noted that the e-cigarette malfunctioned and did not deliver any nicotine in a third of 
participants, which did not occur with the nicotine inhalator. This result highlights the need for 
product regulation in terms of the device quality and labeling. Only a few brands and models of 
e-cigarettes were tested in these studies, limiting the generalizeablity of the findings to other 
products.    
 
HEALTH EFFECTS 
 
 
Vardavas et al. (2012) conducted a study examining pulmonary function after acute ad 
libpuffing of an e-cigarette (Nobacco, medium, 11mg)in a group of healthy cigarette 
smokers(n=30).(Vardavas, Anagnostopoulos et al. 2012) All subjects were asked to use the same 
e-cigarette device (>60% propylene glycol, 11 mg/ml nicotine) as desired for 5 minutes.Subjects 
refrained from smoking tobacco cigarettes for 4 hr prior to study. On another day, 10 participants 
selected randomly from the 30 participants were asked to sham-smoke an e-cigarette device with 
the cartridge removed. Three lung function measures were assessed: spirometry, dynamic lung 
volumes and resistance and expired nitric oxide (NO). E-cigarette use had no effect on 
spirometric flows (such as FEV1/FVC) but did significantly increase airway resistance (18%) 
and decrease expired NO (16%). Sham e-cigarette use had no significant effect, as expected. 
Acute short term effects suggest that more prolonged e-cigarette use could have greater effects. 
This study is limited by small sample size, the short period of abstinence before the protocol was 
executed and the lack of comparison to smoking conventional tobacco cigarettes. Also, because 
of the short length of exposure, this study cannot lead to any conclusions about the clinical 
significance of the findings. In addition, smokers in general have high airway resistance with 
dynamic testing and lower expired NO, likely due to oxidant stress. Despite these limitations, 
this study suggests that e-cigarette constricts lung peripheral airways, possibly due to the irritant 
effects of propylene glycol, which could be of concern particularly in people with chronic lung 
disease such as asthma, emphysema or chronic bronchitis.  
 
 
Flouris et al assessed the short term effects of active and secondhand e-cigarette and 
conventional tobacco cigarette use on serum cotinine and pulmonary function in 15 cigarette 
smokers and 15 never smokers.(Flouris, Chorti et al. 2013) A single brand of e-cigarette made in 
39 
 

DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
Greece and a single e-liquid (> 60% propylene glycol; 11 mg/ml nicotine) was used. The authors 
attempted to compute how many e-cigarette puffs would deliver the same amount of nicotine as 
a conventional cigarette using a number of assumptions, some of which are not valid. For 
example, authors assume that the smoking machine yield of each person’s cigarette indicates 
amount of nicotine delivered to the smoker, yet there is little to no correlation between yield and 
actual systemic delivery.  The passive exposure study was conducted in a 60m3 chamber. The 
ventilation (air exchange rate) was not specified. The secondhand cigarette smoke was generated 
with a target air CO of 23 ppm which is extremely high but which simulates exposure in a very 
smoky bar. E-cigarette vapor was generated using a pump that operated for the same duration as 
the cigarette smoking and aerosol was released into the room. The study limitations include 
using only type of e-cigarette product, studying people who were not regular e-cigarette users, 
studying a specified puffing (vs ad lib) regimen, using extremely high passive exposure 
conditions, and studying short term pulmonary effects in healthy people (as opposed to 
asthmatics, who would be expected to be more sensitive to a lung irritant).The authors found a 
similar rise in serum cotinine with active tobacco cigarette or e-cigarette use immediately after 
active use (mean increase about 20 ng/ml). The passive exposure the serum cotinine increase was 
similar for e-cigarette and tobacco cigarette exposure (averaging 0.8 ng/ml for tobacco cigarette 
and 0.5 ng/ml for e-cigarette). These results suggest that in cigarette smokers, some e-cigarette 
devices deliver similar amounts of nicotine as tobacco cigarette smoking. With very heavy 
passive exposure there is also similar systemic exposure to nicotine from tobacco and e-
cigarettes among bystanders. Active cigarette smoking resulted in a significant decrease in 
expired lung volume (FEV1 / FVC) but not with active e-cigarette or with passive tobacco 
cigarette or e-cigarette exposure.  
 
 
Flouris et al. (2013) studied the effects of passive e-cigarette vapor on white blood cell 
count. The study is exactly the same as that described by Flouris et al 2013,with a different 
biomarker outcome.(Flouris, Poulianiti et al. 2012)  This study presents the effects of tobacco 
cigarettes and e-cigarettes, both with active use and passive exposure, on white blood cell count.  
White cell count is known to be increased acutely and chronically by cigarette smoking, 
reflecting a chronic inflammatory state, and is associated with future risk of acute cardiovascular 
events. As expected, active conventional cigarette smoking and exposure to secondhand 
40 
 



DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
 
EFFECTS ON CONVENTIONAL CIGARETTE CESSATION 
 
 
As noted above e-cigarettes are promoted as devices to assist in smoking cessation and 
most adults who use e-cigarettes are doing so because they believe that they will help them quit 
smoking conventional cigarettes.  The assumption that e-cigarettes will be as effective, or more 
effective, than pharmaceutical nicotine replacement therapy has also motivated support for e-
cigarette use among some public health researchers and policy makers and (as discussed later) 
formed the basis for public policies on the regulation of e-cigarettes. 
 
Population-based studies 
In Adkison et al. (2013) (ITC 4-Country Study noted above) authors presented a 
longitudinal analysis of data from current and former smokers over 2 timepoints separated by a 
year.(Adkison, O'Connor et al. 2013) E-cigarette users had a statistically significant greater 
reduction in cigarettes per day from the first timepoint to the second, one year later (e-cigarette 
users: 20.1cig.day to 16.3 cig/day; non-users: 16.9 cig/day to 15.0 cig/day). Although 85% of e-
cigarette users reported they were using the product to quit smoking at the initial wave, e-
cigarette users were no more likely to have quit one year later than non-users ( OR=0.81, 95% 
CI: 0.43-1.53; p=0.52). 
 
Vickerman et al. (2013) collected data about e-cigarette use among quitline callers from 6 
U.S. states assessed at 7-months post enrollment.(Vickerman, Carpenter et al. 2013) 30.9% 
reported they had ever tried e-cigarettes in their lifetime and the majority of those who have ever 
tried them used them for less than one month (67.1%) and 9.2% were using them at 7-month 
survey. Respondents' main reason for using e-cigarettes was tobacco cessation (51.3%), but it is 
not known whether the ever use occurred as part of a quit attempt in the past 7 months.  
Nevertheless, those who reported using e-cigarettes were statistically significantly less likely to 
quit than those who had not used e-cigarettes (21.7% among callers who used for one month or 
longer, 16.6% among those who used less than one month and 31.4% among never-users; 
p<0.001).(Vickerman et al., 2013) The unadjusted odds of quitting were statistically significantly 
lower for e-cigarette users compared to non-users (OR=0.50, 95% CI: 0.40-0.63). 
42 
 

DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
 
Grana, Popova and Ling (submitted to NEJM) explored predictors of quitting or relapse 
among a population of smokers and recent former smokers (n=951) recruited from a nationally 
representative online panel, who participated in a study in (2011) and one-year later 
(2012).(Grana, Popova et al. 2013) In a logistic regression model, current e-cigarette use (past 30 
days) at baseline did not predict greater likelihood of being quit at one-year follow-up (OR=0.82, 
95% CI=0.39, 1.70), controlling only for demographics (age, gender, ethnicity and education). In 
a second logistic regression model that included baseline cigarettes per day, time to first cigarette 
and intention to quit in addition to baseline current e-cigarette use, only intention to quit 
(OR=5.95, 95% CI=2.52, 14.06) and cigarettes per day (OR=0.97, 95% CI=0.94, 0.99) predicted 
greater likelihood of being quit at one year follow-up and e-cigarettes remained non-significant 
(OR=0.84, 95% CI=0.39, 1.81). Among recent former smokers at baseline (n=288), neither past 
30-day e-cigarette use, nor measure of past history of cigarette dependence, predicted likelihood 
of relapse at one year follow-up.  
 
Conclusion 
 
 
There are three population-based longitudinal studies of the effects of e-cigarette use on 
cessation of conventional cigarettes. Several strengths and limitations should be noted. A 
strength of the Adkison and Vickerman studies is the assessment of why participants were using 
e-cigarettes, which is a limitation of the Grana study. In Adkison, 85% of e-cigarette users and in 
Vickerman 66.5% of e-cigarette users indicated they were using the product to quit or switch “to 
replace other tobacco,” which limits the possibility that lack of effect on quitting is observed due 
to a lack of intention to quit by using the device. Although quitline callers represent a small 
population of smokers motivated to quit, these data present a real-world estimate of the potential 
effectiveness of using e-cigarettes to quit in a population of motivated to quit. However, this 
study may be subject to recall bias as e-cigarette use and perceptions was only assessed at 7-
month follow-up.  
As participants are not randomly assigned to use e-cigarettes in the real world, a strength 
of the Vickerman and Grana studies are that they provide information on smoking 
characteristics, including measures of tobacco dependence, which could potentially be a source 
43 
 

DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
of self-selection bias. In the Vickerman study those who tried e-cigarettes did not statistically 
significantly differ from non-users in cigarettes per day or time to first cigarette, although they 
were more likely to have tried to quit 2 or more times (Vickerman). In the Grana et al study, e-
cigarette users differed in cigarettes per day and time to first cigarette; however, in the 
multivariate regression predicting quit status that included these dependence factors, e-cigarette 
use remained non-significant. Therefore, it is unclear to what extent self-selection is occurring 
and contributes to quit success or failure. More observational, population-based research that 
assesses e-cigarette use, motivations for use and patterns of use as well as cessation motivation 
and behavior is needed. In sum, taken together these studies suggest that e-cigarettes are not 
associated with higher quit rates in the general population of smokers. 
 
Clinical trials 
 
Four clinical trials have attempted to examine the efficacy of e-cigarettes for smoking 
cessation (2 with very small samples).(Polosa, Caponnetto et al. 2011; Bullen, Howe et al. 2013; 
Caponnetto, Auditore et al. 2013; Caponnetto, Campagna et al. 2013) Three of the four studies 
did not have a control group who were not using e-cigarettes.(Polosa, Caponnetto et al. 2011; 
Caponnetto, Auditore et al. 2013) The other study compared e-cigarette efficacy to a standard of 
care regimen with 21mg nicotine patch (Bullen 2013).  None of the trials were conducted with 
the level of behavioral support that accompanies most pharmaceutical trials for smoking 
cessation.  
 
Polosa et al. conducted a proof-of-concept study conducted in Italy in 2010 with 
smokers18-60 year old not intending to quit in the next 30 days were offered ‘Categoria’ e-
cigarettes and instructed to use up to 4 cartridges (7.4mg nicotine content) per day as desired to 
reduce smoking and to keep a log of cigarettes smoked per day, cartridges used per day and 
adverse events.(Polosa, Caponnetto et al. 2011) Six-month follow-up was completed with 68% 
(27/40) of participants. At 6-month follow-up, 13 were using both e-cigarettes and tobacco 
cigarettes, 5 maintained exclusive tobacco cigarette smoking and 9 stopped using tobacco 
cigarettes entirely and continued using e-cigarettes (Polosa et al., 2011). Cigarette consumption 
was reduced by at least 50% in the 13 dual users (25 cigarettes per day (cpd) at baseline to 6 cpd 
44 
 

DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
at 6-months, p<0.001). Most common adverse events reported during the trial were throat 
irritation, dry cough and mouth irritation, followed closely by headache, nausea and dizziness. 
Participants reported they would recommend the e-cigarette to a friend yet noted the need for 
better manufacturing practices as they were frustrated by problems they had operating their 
devices. This study is limited by use of a non-standard cut-off for considering a smoker abstinent 
by expired breath carbon monoxide (CO). Also, limitations include use of a product that was 
noted for poor quality during the trial and lack of a comparison or control group, which could 
make it difficult to determine if quit rates achieved were not due to chance. 
 
A similar study was conducted by Caponnetto et al (2013) with 14 smokers with 
schizophrenia not intending to quit in the next 30 days.(Caponnetto, Auditore et al. 2013) 
Participants were provided the same “Categoria” e-Cigarette and CO, product use, number of 
cigarettes smoked, and positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia were assessed at 
baseline, week-4, week-8, week-12 week-24 and week 52. Sustained 50% reduction in the 
number of cigarettes per day smoked at week-52 in 7/14 (50%) participants and median of 30 
cig/day decreased to 15 cig/day (p = 0.018). Sustained abstinence from smoking occurred with 2 
participants (14.3%) by week 52. Most common side effect was dry cough followed by nausea, 
throat irritation, and headache. Positive and negative aspects of schizophrenia were not increased 
after smoking cessation in those who quit. The most common outcome was dual use of e-
cigarettes with conventional cigarettes. Study findings are not generalizeable to smokers with 
mental illness due to very small sample size and lack of a control group.  
 
Caponnetto et al. (2013) also conducted a randomized, quasi-controlled trial to examine 
efficacy of different strength e-cigarettes for smoking cessation and reduction in three study 
arms: 12 weeks of treatment with the 7.2mg nicotine e-cigarette, a 12-week nicotine tapering 
regimen (6 weeks of treatment with a 7.2mg e-cigarette and 6 weeks with 5.4mg e-cigarette), and 
12 weeks of treatment with a non-nicotine e-cigarette.(Caponnetto, Campagna et al. 2013) 
Reduction occurred in the median value of cigarettes per day at all study visits among all three 
treatment arms. At one-year follow-up the reduction in median level of cigarettes per day among 
participants in the 7.2 mg nicotine e-cigarette group was 19 to 12 cpd; the tapered e-cigarette 
group was 21 to 14 cpd and the non-nicotine e-cigarette group was 22 to 12 cpd. Differences in 
45 
 

DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
reductions between groups were not significant after week 8 assessment. There was no 
statistically significant difference in 6-month or one year quit rate among the three conditions 
(one year rates: 4% for placebo e-cigarette users, 9% for low nicotine e-cigarette users and 13% 
for high nicotine e-cigarette users) (Capponetto 2013). The authors noted that those who initiated 
quitting in the first few weeks of the study stayed quit, while those who did not remained dual 
users throughout the study. In addition, 26% of quitters continued to use e-cigarettes at 1 year. 
Problems with the study include lack of a control group not using e-cigarettes and noted lack of 
product quality (the authors noted the devices malfunctioned often and new ones had to be sent 
out frequently over the course of the treatment period). An author on all of these studies, R. 
Polosa notes that beginning in February 2011, he served as a consultant for the Arbi Group Srl., 
the manufacturer of the ‘Categoria’ e-cigarette used in the study. 
 
Bullen et al (2013) conducted the first randomized controlled clinical trial of e-cigarettes 
compared to medicinal nicotine replacement therapy in Auckland, New Zealand.  Adult smokers, 
18+ who wanted to quit (n=657) were randomised using a 4:4:1 ratio to the 3 study arms (16mg 
e-cigarettes n=289, 21mg NRT patch n=295, no-nicotine e-cigarette n=73).(Bullen, Howe et al. 
2013) Voluntary telephone counseling was offered to all subjects. Subjects were observed at 
baseline, week 1 (quit day), 12 weeks to 6 months. Fifty-seven percent of participants in the 
nicotine e-cigarettes group reduced their cigarettes per day by ≥50% by 6 months compared to 
41% in the patch group (p=0.002) and 45% in the non-nicotine e-cigarette group (p=0.08). Those 
randomized to the nicotine patch group were less adherent to the treatment (46%) than the 16mg 
e-cigarette group (78%) and the no-nicotine e-cigarette group (82%). This may be due to aspects 
of the study methodology which may have biased the study against success in the nicotine patch 
group. E-cigarettes were provided by mail for free to participants randomized to either the 
nicotine or no-nicotine e-cigarette group. Participants in the patch group were provided with 
usual care for quitline callers in New Zealand, where they are mailed cards redeemable for 
nicotine patches at a pharmacy at a very reduced rate of about $4 USD for 12 weeks of nicotine 
patches. In this study they were provided with monetary vouchers to compensate for the $4 that 
had to be paid for the patches at time of card redemption. There were no statistically significant 
differences in biochemically-confirmed (breath CO) self-reported continuous abstinence from 
46 
 





DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
TOBACCO INDUSTRY INVOLVEMENT 
 
In 2012 and 2013 major tobacco companies – Lorillard, Reynolds American Inc, (which 
is 42% owned by British American Tobacco), Altria (Philip Morris), and British American 
Tobacco -- purchased or developed e-cigarette products. Lorillard, Reynolds and Altria's 
products are put forth by subsidiary companies: Lorillard Vapor Corporation, R.J.Reynolds 
Vapor Company, and Nu Mark, LLC. (owned by Altria). Lorillard acquired e-cigarette 
companies that produced Blu and SkyCig brands marketed under Lorillard Vapor Corporation. 
As of 2013, Altria’s Mark Ten e-cigarette is in test market in Indiana, Reynolds’ product, the 
Vuse, is in test market in Colorado and has planned to roll out national distribution and has 
created a TV commercial for the launch. BAT markets the Vype in the U.K. In addition, a 
smaller tobacco company, Swisher, that makes little cigars and cigarillos, also markets an e-
cigarette called the e-Swisher. 
 
There is no evidence that the cigarette companies are acquiring or producing e-cigarettes 
as part of a strategy to phase out regular cigarettes, but some claim to want to participate in 
"harm reduction." Lorillard CEO Murray Kessler stated in a Sept. 23, 2013 interview with the 
Wall Street Journal in which he claimed that e-cigarettes will provide smokers an unprecedented 
chance to reduce their risk from cigarettes. Also, in USA Today he published an op-ed on 
September 23, 2013 where he stated: “E-cigarettes might be the most significant harm-reduction 
option ever made available to smokers.”Shortly before this op-ed was published, however, 
Lorillard gained approval from the US Food and Drug Administration to market a new non-
mentholated Newport conventional cigarette, demonstrating the inherent inconsistency in 
messaging and deeds by expanding their cigarette line while touting their ability to offer a 
product they claim reduces harm from cigarettes. In this way the cigarette companies get to have 
it both ways, they offer an alternative to their products while continuing to market their products. 
In fact as noted in the 2010 Surgeon General’s Report, "How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease," 
the tobacco industry has used every iteration of cigarette design to undermine cessation and 
prevention. 
 
49 
 

DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
The tobacco companies have e-cigarette issues on their radar as part of their policy 
agenda. They are still engaging in “smokers rights” activities - where they use seemingly 
independent groups to interact with consumers directly on political involvement in support of 
their agenda. Altria has a website called “Citizens for Tobacco Rights” and Reynolds has 
“Transforming Tobacco.” E-cigarette news and action alerts are featured on the homepages of 
these websites and include instructions for taking action against bills designed to include e-
cigarette use in smokefree laws.  
 
 
 
An e-cigarette market analysis report by Goldman-Sachs in 2013 noted that despite 
currently comprising <1% total industry sales, there is the potential for e-cigarettes to account for 
15% of US tobacco market profit by 2020. However, the report noted that “full conversion” from 
cigarettes to e-cigarettes has not been achieved and most users are dual users with conventional 
cigarettes. The report noted that products would have a longer lifespan because its users would 
have a longer lifespan, reflecting the obvious goal of lifelong use of the products and uptake by 
new users. Importantly, the market analysts remained positive on the long term growth of the 
tobacco industry with e-cigarettes playing a role, not as a replacement for the tobacco products.  
 
 
Likewise, after evaluating the cigarette companies’ internal documents and public 
positions on snus as “harm reduction” in Europe, Gilmore et al. (2013)(Peeters S and Gilmore 
AB 2013) found that they were entering the market to protect their cigarette business as long as 
possible.  They saw clear lessons for assessing the companies’ involvements in e-cigarettes: 
 
While such evidence must be considered alongside the broader body of evidence around 
snus and the fact it is significantly less harmful than smoked tobacco, collectively these 
issues suggest that legalising snus sales in Europe may have considerably less benefit 
than envisaged and could have a number of harmful consequences. Perhaps of greater 
concern, however, given that harm reduction using nicotine products is already an 
established element of tobacco control and recent research suggests scope for benefit via 
newer nicotine products, are the recent industry investments in pure nicotine products. 
These raise two concerns. First, one of competition: should such investments continue, 
competition between cigarettes and clean nicotine products would decrease, limiting the 
50 
 





DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
Thus, the draft directive accepts as a premise that NCPs, including e-cigarettes, are "medicinal 
products" within the meaning of Directive 2001/83/EC because they have properties that are 
useful "for treating or preventing disease" by aiding smoking cessation.  TPD Article 18  seems 
inconsistent with these provisions, however, since it differentiates between NCPs that are 
"presented as having properties for treating or preventing disease," which are required to get 
premarket authorization under Directive 2001/83/EC under paragraph 2 of Article 18, and all 
other NCPs, which need only follow the notification procedure set out in Article 17.   
 
The TPD prohibits nicotine-containing products with the following types of additives: 
additives such as vitamins that create the impression of health benefit or reduced risk; caffeine, 
taurine and other stimulants associated with energy and vitality; and additives having coloring 
properties for emissions.  However, the additives which may impart a characterizing flavor that 
increase product appeal to children (e.g., chocolate, cherry, strawberry, licorice, menthol) that 
are explicitly prohibited from tobacco products (conventional cigarettes) are explicitly allowed in 
e-cigarettes.  
 
E-cigarette manufacturers and importers are nominally required to submit lists of all 
ingredients contained in and emissions resulting from the use of their products by brand name 
and type, and including quantities, but the TPD explicitly ensures protection for companies’ 
trade secrets, creating a loophole while will permit companies to avoid this disclosure 
requirement by claiming that their ingredient lists are trade secrets, as they have done in response 
to required submissions to the FDA in the United States.   
 
The TPD requires that “each unit packet and any outside packaging of nicotine- 
containing products carry the following health warning: ‘This product is intended for use by 
existing smokers. It contains nicotine which is a highly addictive substance.’”  The size and 
placement of the warning is the same as for tobacco products for smoking other than cigarettes 
and roll-your-own tobacco: 30%-35% of the external area of the unit pack and any outside 
packaging, depending of the number of a Member State’s official languages. 
 
53 
 



DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
 
Perhaps most significantly, the amendments to the TPD adopted on October 8, 2013 
eliminated the authority of the European Commission to update the regulations related to e-
cigarettes as new information about marketing and use patterns and their direct health effects and 
effects on cigarette consumption develops in the currently rapidly changing market.  Specifically, 
the requirement that:  
 
The Commission shall be empowered to adopt delegated acts in accordance with Article 
22 to adapt the requirements in paragraphs 3 and 4 taking into account scientific and 
market developments and to adopt and adapt the position, format, layout, design and 
rotation of the health warnings. 
 
was deleted and replaced with a weak requirement for monitoring and preparation of a report 
after 5 years that could recommend changes to the TPD (but not make any actual changes). 
 
 
This change effectively insulates the e-cigarette companies from any science-based 
regulations for at least 5 years and likely much longer, since it moves the issue back into the 
political sphere where the tobacco companies are strongest.  
(http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(02)08275-2/abstract and 
http://www.plosmedicine.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pmed.1000202) 
 
NATIONAL POLICIES 
 
FCTC Conference of the Parties Survey Results (2012) 
 
FCTC Conference of the Parties’ report on e-cigarettes, (11/2012, n=33 
Parties).(FCTC/COP/5/13 2012) Brazil, Singapore, the Seychelles and Uruguay ban e-cigarettes 
from being sold or distributed in their countries. Several countries have proposed or enacted 
regulations. Australia, New Zealand and Switzerland allow e-cigarettes without nicotine to be 
sold, but residents may purchase e-cigarettes and e-liquid with nicotine over the Internet for 
personal use (may not sell them in the country). Many with regulations focus on drug delivery 
55 
 

DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
device classification for e-cigarettes with nicotine and that make health claims. For example, 
Germany's regulation separates e-cigarette products into consumer and medicinal by it nicotine 
and health claims. If a product contains no nicotine and no health claim it is currently 
unregulated. However if a product has nicotine in it and is marketed with a health claim, it must 
go through their drug delivery regulatory scheme to be approved for retail, distribution and 
advertisement as a medication. Similar regulations exist in Germany, Belgium, Turkey and the 
U.K. where e-cigarette products require pre-market authorization if they contain nicotine and are 
marketed with a health claim or if they are intended to be used for smoking cessation. By 
contrast, in Korea, products without nicotine are regulated as quit aid by the Korean Food and 
Drug Administration (KFDA) and products with nicotine are treated as tobacco products and 
regulated by Ministry of Finance. 
 
United Kingdom 
 
Policymaking on e-cigarettes in the U.K. is based on two assumptions: (1) harm 
reduction implemented by shifting cigarette smokers to “cleaner” forms of nicotine delivery is an 
effective public health policy (cite NICE standards); (2) e-cigarettes are a safe effective form of 
nicotine replacement; and (3) the widespread introduction of e-cigarettes will increase cigarette 
cessation and not increase initiation.  Specifically, the U.K. Medicines and Healthcare Products 
Regulatory Agency (MHRA) has announced they plan to regulate e-cigarettes as medicines 
because MHRA believes that e-cigarettes function as nicotine replacement for smokers cutting 
down or quitting: 
 
The consistent evidence from a variety of sources is that most electronic cigarettes use is 
to support stop smoking attempts or for partial replacement to reduce harm associated 
with smoking. This is comparable to other nicotine replacement products (e.g., gums, 
patches, inhalator), which are licensed as medicines. The current evidence is that 
electronic cigarettes have shown promise in helping smokers quit tobacco but the quality 
of existing NCPs [nicotine containing products, how MHRA labels e-cigarettes] is such 
that they cannot be recommended for use.  
 
56 
 

DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
The MHRA’s regulatory plans focus on ensuring consistency of nicotine delivery and 
quality control of the e-cigarette devices.  Since March 2011 MHRA reviewed evidence to 
regarding safety of the devices and e-liquid and their own analysis of four e-cigarette products, 
finding that existing products on the market are low quality and not assured for safety 
(http://www.mhra.gov.uk/home/groups/comms-ic/documents/websiteresources/con286839.pdf). 
Their evidence review, like this report, found that products have incongruous nicotine content 
from labeled values and levels varied for identical products within the same brand and that is just 
among a selection of brands among the hundreds on the market. The MHRA found diethylene 
glycol in one product in accordance with the FDA analysis (2009) likely to be from improper 
processing of propylene glycol. In addition, they found the presence of a toxic contaminant (1,3-
bis(3-phenoxyphenooxy) benzene), which they stated has no plausible reason for being in the 
products. They concluded that the devices cannot be considered safe or effective nicotine 
delivery devices as the content and delivery of nicotine differs from brand to brand and even 
within brand. Moreover, their evidence review acknowledges that low levels of known tobacco-
specific carcinogens were found in products, likely from low-quality nicotine extraction 
processes.   
 
Research published after the EU draft directive and MHRA evidence review 
(http://www.mhra.gov.uk/home/groups/commsic/documents/websiteresources/con286839.pdf) 
were published provides additional information that should be considered in designing these 
regulatory approaches. In contrast to the assumption that e-cigarettes would function as a better 
form of NRT, population-based longitudinal studies which reflect real-world e-cigarette use  
found that e-cigarette use is not associated with or predict successful quitting (Vickerman, 
Adkison, Grana Popova and Ling, submitted) and the 1 clinical trial examining the effectiveness 
of e-cigarettes (both with and without nicotine) compared to the medicinal nicotine patch found 
that e-cigarettes are no better than nicotine patch and all treatments produced very modest quit 
rates without counseling. Although more participants liked using the e-cigarette compared to 
patch and would recommend it to a friend trying to quit. 
 
MHRA noted that their regulation of e-cigarettes as medicines is in accordance with the 
proposed EU Tobacco Products Directive before it was amended on October 8, 2013, 
57 
 

DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
(http://ec.europa.eu/health/tobacco/docs/com_2012_788_en.pdf) which MHRA assumed will be 
adopted in 2014 and come into effect by 2016. The MHRA specifies that their program seeks to 
determine four dimensions to establish medicines licensing for e-cigarettes: “the nature, quality 
and safety of unlicensed NCPs; the actual use of unlicensed NCPs in the marketplace; the 
effectiveness of unlicensed NCPs in smoking cessation; and modelling of the potential impact of 
bringing these products into medicines regulation on public health outcomes.”  It is unclear the 
specific steps to achieve these aims.  
 
As part of what appears to be a broad consensus in the UK that the introduction of e-
cigarettes will reduce the harm of smoking, the anti-smoking advocacy group ASH UK has 
announce that it "does not consider it appropriate to include e-cigarettes under smokefree 
regulations," (http://www.ash.org.uk/files/documents/ASH_715.pdf), supporting one the e-
cigarette companies’ key marketing messages, namely that e-cigarettes can be used everywhere 
without the restrictions and social stigma of smoking (Grana and Ling, under review; McKee, 
2013). It is unclear how the UK plans to address the potential interference with enforcement of 
existing smokefree laws and potential promotion of smoking as these are mimicking products. 
 
The MHRA does not include any restrictions on e-cigarette marketing.  An undated 
document, “The Regulation of Nicotine Containing Products: Questions and Answers,” attempts 
to address this issue: 
 
24. What will be done by the Government to stop manufacturers making their 
products attractive to young people/children – such as making fruit tasting 
electronic cigarettes or doing special offers such as two for the price of one? 
 
Medicines regulation prohibits advertising to children (under 16 years of age).Any 
licensed medicines would have an age limit – likely to be 18 years of age. One of the 
reasons for favouring medicines regulation is that it has controls on advertising and 
promotion and sale and supply. We will look at applications from manufacturers on a 
case-by-case basis. 
 
58 
 

DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
If need be, we are able to set particular conditions on the way that products are presented 
and promoted, especially if they become popular with young people. 
 
At present, we are not aware of any widespread use of e-cigarettes by young people. 
 
These assurances provide little or no protection against aggressive marketing of e-cigarettes to 
youth; the tobacco companies are long-practiced at developing and implementing effective 
marketing campaigns directed at youth with similar restrictions for decades all over the world. 
Evidence published after this agency issued their intended policies has shown rapid e-cigarette 
uptake among adolescents in the US, (with use doubling from 3.4% to 6.8% among all middle 
school and high school youth from 2011 to 2012, with rates even  higher among older youth in 
high school 4.7% to 10.0%), mostly among current smokers.   
 
France 
 
 
In contrast to the position ASH UK took in England, the French Health Minister, Marisol 
Touraine, announced on May 31, 2013 (World No Tobacco Day) that the French government 
plans to extend existing smoking restrictions to e-cigarettes. These restrictions were undertaken 
to prevent confusion in enforcement of the national smokefree law and prevent modeling of 
smoking by a product that mimics cigarette smoking. (http://www.france24.com/en/20130531-
french-health-minister-electronic-cigarette-ban-public-places)  It will also protect bystanders 
from being exposed to secondhand e-cigarette vapor. 
 
Spain 
 
Although no national action has been taken, regional action has been pursued to treat e-
cigarettes the same as tobacco products under their existing state-wide smokefree law. The 
Catalan Network of Smoke-free Hospitals and the Network of Primary Care issued a statement 
that there is a lack of evidence of safety and efficacy for e-cigarettes and they act as mimicking 
products which can create confusion and may interfere with “denormalization.” They stated: 
“…the Catalan Network of Smoke-free Hospitals and Primary Care recommend that hospitals, 
59 
 

DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
health centers and other healthcare facilities: - Prohibit by internal regulation the use of 
electronic cigarettes on their premises, both in enclosed places (buildings) and outdoors, similar 
to that established in the current legislation (Law 42/2010) of sanitary measures to control 
tobacco snuff products. - Prohibit by regulation for internal system sale, promotion or advertising 
of these devices in their units, similar to that established in the current Spanish smoke-free 
legislation (Law 42/2010).” 
 
India 
 
In India e-cigarettes were declared as illegal under Drugs and Cosmetics Act by State 
Drug Controller in Punjab and the government of India is preparing to ban them. (Per personal 
communication from Dr.Rakesh Gupta, State Programme Officer, Tobacco Control Cell Punjab) 
 
U.S. 
 
As of October 2013, e-cigarette products remained unregulated by any federal authority, 
particularly the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The Sottera Inc. case ruling that was 
upheld on appeal in U.S. court, found that e-cigarettes could be regulated as tobacco products 
unless they are marketed with health and therapeutic claims.(D.C. Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals 
2010)  The FDA accepted that ruling and issued a letter to stakeholders on April 25, 2011 stating 
their intent to issue guidance about exercising their deeming authority over e-cigarettes in the 
future, but, no such deeming authority or guidance had been issued.(FDA 2011) 
 
In the absence of Federal regulations, 23 states have passed bills restricting sales to 
minors and 3 bills have been passed prohibiting the use of e-cigarettes where smoking is also 
restricted. There are several bills at the local level restricting many aspects of e-cigarette 
distribution, sales and use, including minor access restrictions, use indoors and point of sale. The 
Federal Aviation Administration issued a regulation prohibiting the use of e-cigarettes on 
domestic flights.  
 
Phillipines 
60 
 



DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
E-cigarette devices and their components should be evaluated for safety by consumer 
product safety regulatory authorities and consumers appropriately warned about risks and proper 
handling. Although the data are limited, the studies to date indicate that e-cigarette vapor would 
be a source of air pollution and is not "harmless water vapor" as is frequently claimed. Article 13 
of the FCTC focuses on smoke-free policies to afford protections for the public and all workers 
to breathe clean air. When evaluating the risks of exposure to e-cigarette vapor, the standard of 
comparison should not be whether the vapor is better than the toxic chemical mixture in tobacco 
cigarette smoke (which is already prohibited), it should be whether the product's emissions 
introduce toxins into clean air, and their effect on existing public health protections. In contrast 
to the paucity of research on e-cigarettes, there is an extensive scientific literature showing that 
smoke-free policies protect nonsmokers from exposure to toxins and encourage smoking 
cessation (USDHHS, 2006).  100% smoke-free policies have about twice the effect on 
consumption and smoking prevalence than policies with exceptions (Fichtenberg and Glantz, 
2002). Exceptions for e-cigarettes may similarly decrease the effects of smoke-free policies on 
smoking cessation, and as noted in the CoP report, use of the products in smoke-free 
environments may also decrease enforcement of Article 13. Introducing e-cigarettes into clean 
air environments may result in population harm if use of the product reinforces acts of smoking 
as socially acceptable, and/or if use undermines the effects of smoke-free policies on smoking 
cessation.  Strong smoke-free policies are an integral part of the recognized and proven 
comprehensive global tobacco control policies (FCTC). 
 
 
This assessment is based on the assumption that the current policy environment around 
cigarettes will continue and that there will be little or no effective regulations of e-cigarette 
marketing and promotion or of how and where e-cigarettes are consumed.  This situation could 
change if the following policies were all implemented: 
 
  Ban conventional cigarettes or regulate nicotine to non-addictive levels. 
  Subject and e-cigarette marketing to the same level of restrictions that apply to conventional 
cigarettes (on the grounds that, while less dangerous than conventional cigarettes, e-
cigarettes still deliver the addictive drug nicotine together with other toxic chemicals) 
62 
 



DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
  No country or subnational jurisdiction should be compelled to permit the sale of e-
cigarettes. 
  Legislation and regulations regarding e-cigarettes need to take into account the fact that, 
unlike conventional cigarettes and other tobacco products and medicinal nicotine 
replacement therapies, e-cigarettes can be altered by users to change the nicotine 
delivery and be used to deliver other drugs. 
  There should be transparency in the role of the e-cigarette and tobacco companies in 
advocating for and against legislation and regulation, both directly and through third 
parties. 
  FCTC Article 5.3 should be respected when developing and implementing legislation and 
regulations related to e-cigarettes. 
 
 
 
 
 
64 
 

DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
 
65 
 

DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
Table 1. Prevalence of e-cigarette use in various countries as measured by population-based surveys 
Authors 
Country, sample description, n 
Ever use among general population 
 
Ever use among smokers (%) 
(%) 
2009 
2010 
2011 
2012 
 
2009 
2010 
2011 
2012 
Regan et  U.S., Adults 18+, n=10587 (2009); n= 10328 
0.6 
2.7 
-- 
-- 
 
Not 
18.2 
-- 
-- 
al 2013 
(2010), ConsumerStyles nationally-
report
representative survey 
ed 
King et 
U.S., Adults, 18+, HealthStyles survey 
-- 
2.1 
6.2  
-- 
 
-- 
6.8 
21.2 
-- 
al 2012 
nationally-representative, mail-back 
mail,  
online 
mail,  
online 
(n=4,184) andonline (n=2505) modes 
      3.3 
    9.8 
n=6689 in 2010, online only n=4050 in 2011 
online 
online 
Pearson 
U.S., Adults 18+ , 2 samples 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
et al 
2012 
 
Nationally-representative online sample 
-- 
3.4 
-- 
-- 
 
-- 
11.4 
-- 
-- 
(Knowledge Networks), 2010, n=2649 
 
Legacy Longitudinal Study of Smokers 
-- 
-- 
-- 
-- 
 
-- 
6.4 
-- 
-- 
(smokers and former smokers), 2010, 
n=3648 
McMille
U.S., Adults 18+, nationally-representative 
-- 
1.8 
-- 
-- 
 
-- 
14.4 
-- 
-- 
n at al 
samples recruited via 2 survey modes: 
2013 
telephone-based (n=1504) and online 
(n=1736), Social Climate on Tobacco 
Control survey, 2010 
Dockrell 
U.K., Adults 18+, nationally-representative 
-- 
-- 
-- 
-- 
 
-- 
2.7 
-- 
6.7 
et al 
online panel (YouGov), 2010: n=12597 
2013 
adults; 2010 n=12432 
Adkison 
ITC 4-country survey, Adults 18+,* July 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
et al 
2010-June 2011*  
2013 
 
U.S. (n=1520) 
-- 
-- 
-- 
-- 
 
 
20.4 
 
 
 
Canada (n=1581) 
-- 
-- 
-- 
-- 
 
 
10.0 
 
 
 
U.K. (n=1325) 
-- 
-- 
-- 
-- 
 
 
17.7 
 
 
66 
 

DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
 
Australia (n=1513) 
 
-- 
-- 
-- 
-- 
 
 
11.0 
 
 
Popova 
U.S., Adults 18+, nationally-representative 
-- 
-- 
-- 
-- 
 
-- 
-- 
20.1 
-- 
and Ling  online sample  (Knowledge Networks), 
2013 
current and former smokers, n=1836 
Cho 
Korea, Adolescents, middle school and high  0.5*  
-- 
-- 
-- 
 
-- 
-- 
-- 
-- 
2011 
school, n=4,341, national survey of   in 
2008* 
Lee et al  Korea, Adolescents, 12-19, 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
2013 
(under 
review) 
CDC 
U.S., Adolescents, middle and high school, 
-- 
-- 
MS: 1.4 
MS: 2.7   
-- 
-- 
-- 
-- 
NYTS 
2011, 2012 (n’s not reported) 
HS: 4.7 
HS: 
2013 
10.0 
 
67 
 

DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
 
68 
 

DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
 
References: 
 
Adkison, S. E., R. J. O'Connor, et al. (2013). "Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems: International Tobacco 
Control Four-Country Survey." American Journal of Preventive Medicine 44(3): 207-215. 
Bahl, V., S. Lin, et al. (2012). "Comparison of Electronic Cigarette Refill Fluid Cytotoxicity Using 
Embryonic and Adult Models." Reproductive Toxicology. 
Bjartveit, K. and A. Tverdal (2005). "Health consequences of smoking 1–4 cigarettes per day." Tobacco 
Control 14(5): 315-320. 
Bullen, C., C. Howe, et al. (2013). "Electronic cigarettes for smoking cessation: a randomised controlled 
trial." The Lancet. 
Bullen, C., H. McRobbie, et al. (2010). "Effect of an electronic nicotine delivery device (e cigarette) on 
desire to smoke and withdrawal, user preferences and nicotine delivery: randomised cross-over 
trial." Tobacco Control 19(2): 98. 
Burstyn, I. (2013). Peering through the mist: What does the chemistry of contaminants in electronic 
cigarettes tell us about health risks? 
Cameron, J. M., D. N. Howell, et al. (2013). "Variable and potentially fatal amounts of nicotine in e-
cigarette nicotine solutions." Tobacco Control. 
Caponnetto, P., R. Auditore, et al. (2013). "Impact of an Electronic Cigarette on Smoking Reduction and 
Cessation in Schizophrenic Smokers: A Prospective 12-Month Pilot Study." International journal 
of environmental research and public health 10(2): 446-461. 
Caponnetto, P., D. Campagna, et al. (2013). "EffiCiency and Safety of an eLectronic cigAreTte (ECLAT) as 
tobacco cigarettes substitute: a prospective 12-month randomized control design study." PloS 
one 8(6): e66317. 
CBS NEWS (February 16, 2012) "Electronic cigarette explodes in man's mouth, causes serious injuries." 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2013). "Notes from the Field: Electronic Cigarette Use 
Among Middle and High School Students — United States, 2011–2012." Morbidity and Mortality 
Weekly Report 62(35): 729-730. 
Chen, I.-L. (2013). "FDA Summary of Adverse Events on Electronic Cigarettes." Nicotine & Tobacco 
Research 15(2): 615-616. 
Cho, J. H., E. Shin, et al. (2011). "Electronic-cigarette smoking experience among adolescents." Journal of 
Adolescent Health 49(5): 542-546. 
Choi, K. and J. Forster (2013). "Characteristics associated with awareness, perceptions, and use of 
electronic nicotine delivery systems among young US Midwestern adults." American journal of 
public health 103(3): 556-561. 
Cobb, N. K., M. J. Byron, et al. (2010). "Novel Nicotine Delivery Systems and Public Health: The Rise of 
the" E-Cigarette"." American journal of public health 100(12): 2340. 
D.C. Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals (2010). Sottera, Inc. v. Food & Drug Administration. 627 F.3d 891. 
Dawkins, L., J. Turner, et al. (2013). "‘Vaping’profiles and preferences: an online survey of electronic 
cigarette users." Addiction. 
Dockrell, M., R. Morison, et al. (2013). "E-cigarettes: Prevalence and attitudes in Great Britain." Nicotine 
& Tobacco Research. 
Douptcheva, N., G. Gmel, et al. (2013). "Use of electronic cigarettes among young Swiss men." Journal of 
Epidemiology and Community Health: jech-2013-203152. 
Esterl, M. (April 25, 2012) "Got a Light--er Charger? Big Tobacco's Latest Buzz." The Wall Street Journal. 
Esterl, M. (October 1, 2013) "Lorillard to Buy U.K. Cigarette Maker." 
69 
 

DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
Etter, J. F. (2010). "Electronic cigarettes: a survey of users." BMC Public Health 10(1): 231. 
Etter, J. F. and C. Bullen (2011). "Electronic cigarette: users profile, utilization, satisfaction and perceived 
efficacy." Addiction 11: 2017-2028. 
European Parliament (2013). Amendments to the proposal for a Directive of the European Parliament 
and of the Council on the approximation of laws, regulations, and administrative provisions of 
the Member States concerning the manufacture presentation and sale of tobacco and related 
products (COM(2012)0788). 
FCTC/COP/5/13 (2012). Report: Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems, including electronic cigarettes. 
WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. Seoul, Republic of Korea. 
FDA. (2011). "Letter to Stakeholders: Regulation of E-cigarettes and Other Tobacco Products."   
Retrieved March 20, 2013, from 
http://www.fda.gov/newsevents/publichealthfocus/ucm252360.htm. 
Felberbaum, M. (2013). "Old Tobacco Playbook Gets New Use by E-cigarettes."   Retrieved August 16, 
2013, from http://bigstory.ap.org/article/old-tobacco-playbook-gets-new-use-e-cigarettes. 
Flouris, A. D., M. S. Chorti, et al. (2013). "Acute impact of active and passive electronic cigarette smoking 
on serum cotinine and lung function." Inhalation toxicology 25(2): 91-101. 
Flouris, A. D., K. P. Poulianiti, et al. (2012). "Acute effects of electronic and tobacco cigarette smoking on 
complete blood count." Food and Chemical Toxicology 50(10): 3600–3603. 
Food and Drug Administration (2009) "FDA and public health experts warn about electronic cigarettes.". 
Galanti, M. R., I. Rosendahl, et al. (2008). "The development of tobacco use in adolescence among “snus 
starters” and “cigarette starters”: An analysis of the Swedish “BROMS” cohort." Nicotine & 
Tobacco Research 10(2): 315-323. 
Goniewicz, M. L., J. Knysak, et al. (2013 (online first)). "Levels of selected carcinogens and toxicants in 
vapour from electronic cigarettes." Tobacco Control. 
Goniewicz, M. L., T. Kuma, et al. (2013). "Nicotine levels in electronic cigarettes." Nicotine & Tobacco 
Research 15(1): 158-166. 
Goniewicz, M. L., E. O. Lingas, et al. (2012). "Patterns of electronic cigarette use and user beliefs about 
their safety and benefits: An Internet survey." Drug and alcohol review. 
Goniewicz, M. L. and W. Zielinska-Danch (2012). "Electronic cigarette use among teenagers and young 
adults in Poland." Pediatrics 130(4): e879-e885. 
Grana, R., L. Popova, et al. (2013). "E-cigarette use, smoking cessation and relapse: a national 
longitudinal study." NEJM under review
Grana, R. A., S. A. Glantz, et al. (2011). "Electronic nicotine delivery systems in the hands of Hollywood." 
Tobacco Control 20(6): 425-426. 
Grana, R. A. and P. M. Ling (under review). "Smoking Revolution? A content analysis of electronic 
cigarette retail websites." American Journal of Preventive Medicine. 
Haddock, C. K., M. V. Weg, et al. (2001). "Evidence that smokeless tobacco use is a gateway for smoking 
initiation in young adult males." Preventive medicine 32(3): 262-267. 
Hadwiger, M. E., M. L. Trehy, et al. (2010). "Identification of amino-tadalafil and rimonabant in 
electronic cigarette products using high pressure liquid chromatography with diode array and 
tandem mass spectrometric detection." Journal of Chromatography A. 
Hua, M., M. Alfi, et al. (2013). "Health-Related Effects Reported by Electronic Cigarette Users in Online 
Forums." Journal of medical Internet research 15(4). 
Ingebrethsen, B. J., S. K. Cole, et al. (2012). "Electronic cigarette aerosol particle size distribution 
measurements." Inhalation toxicology 24(14): 976-984. 
70 
 

DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
Kim, H.-J. and H.-S. Shin (2013). "Determination of tobacco-specific nitrosamines in replacement liquids 
of electronic cigarettes by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry." Journal of 
Chromatography A. 
King, B. A., S. Alam, et al. (2013). "Awareness and Ever Use of Electronic Cigarettes Among US Adults, 
2010–2011." Nicotine & Tobacco Research: (online first). 
Kralikova, E., J. Novak, et al. (2013). "Do e-cigarettes have the potential to compete with conventional 
cigarettes? A survey of conventional cigarette smokers’ experiences with e-cigarettes." CHEST 
Journal. 
Lee, S., R. Grana, et al. (2013). "Electronic-cigarette use among Korean adolescents: A cross-sectional 
study of market penetration, dual use, and relationship to quit attempts and former smoking." 
Journal of Adolescent Health under review
McAuley, T., P. Hopke, et al. (2012). "Comparison of the effects of e-cigarette vapor and cigarette smoke 
on indoor air quality." Inhalation toxicology 24(12): 850-857. 
McMillen, R., J. Maduka, et al. (2012). "Use of emerging tobacco products in the United States." Journal 
of Environmental and Public Health 2012
Mehta, S., H. Shin, et al. (2013). "Ambient particulate air pollution and acute lower respiratory 
infections: a systematic review and implications for estimating the global burden of disease." Air 
Quality, Atmosphere & Health: 1-15. 
Pauly, J., Q. Li, et al. (2007). "Letter: Tobacco-free electronic cigarettes and cigars deliver nicotine and 
generate concern." Tobacco Control 16: 357-360. 
Pearson, J. L., A. Richardson, et al. (2012). "E-cigarette awareness, use, and harm perceptions in US 
adults." American journal of public health 102(9): 1758-1766. 
Peeters S and Gilmore AB (2013). "Transnational Tobacco Company Interests in Smokeless Tobacco in 
Europe: Analysis of Internal Industry Documents and Contemporary Industry Materials." PLoS 
Med 10(9): e1001506. 
Pepper, J. K., P. L. Reiter, et al. (2013). "Adolescent males' awareness of and willingness to try electronic 
cigarettes." Journal of Adolescent Health 52(2): 144-150. 
Pokhrel, P., P. Fagan, et al. (2013). "Smokers Who Try E-Cigarettes to Quit Smoking: Findings From a 
Multiethnic Study in Hawaii." American journal of public health 103(9): e57-e62. 
Polosa, R., P. Caponnetto, et al. (2011). "Effect of an electronic nicotine delivery device (e-Cigarette) on 
smoking reduction and cessation: a prospective 6-month pilot study." BMC public health 11(1): 
786. 
Pope, C. A., R. T. Burnett, et al. (2009). "Cardiovascular mortality and exposure to airborne fine 
particulate matter and cigarette smoke shape of the exposure-response relationship." 
Circulation 120(11): 941-948. 
Popova, L. and P. M. Ling (2013). "Alternative Tobacco Product Use and Smoking Cessation: A National 
Study." American Journal of Public Health 103(5): 923-930. 
Post, A., H. Gilljam, et al. (2010). "Symptoms of nicotine dependence in a cohort of Swedish youths: a 
comparison between smokers, smokeless tobacco users and dual tobacco users." Addiction 
105(4): 740-746. 
Regan, A. K., G. Promoff, et al. (2013). "Electronic nicotine delivery systems: adult use and awareness of 
the ‘e-cigarette’in the USA." Tobacco Control 22(1): 19-23. 
Romagna, G., E. Allifranchini, et al. (2013). "Cytotoxicity evaluation of electronic cigarette vapor extract 
on cultured mammalian fibroblasts (ClearStream-LIFE): comparison with tobacco cigarette 
smoke extract." Inhalation toxicology 25(6): 354-361. 
Schripp, T., D. Markewitz, et al. (2012). "Does e‐cigarette consumption cause passive vaping?" Indoor Air 
23(1): 25-31. 
71 
 

DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
Shawn, L. and L. S. Nelson (2013). Smoking Cessation Can Be Toxic to Your Health. Emergency Medicine. 
January: 7-19. 
Siegel, M. B., K. L. Tanwar, et al. (2011). "Electronic cigarettes as a smoking-cessation tool: results from 
an online survey." American Journal of Preventive Medicine 40(4): 472-475. 
Strickland, J. (2013) "Woman says e-cigarette exploded, shot flames 4 feet across living room." WSB-TV  
Sutfin, E. L., T. P. McCoy, et al. (2013). "Electronic cigarette use by college students." Drug and alcohol 
dependence. 
Trehy, M. L., W. Ye, et al. (2011). "Analysis of electronic cigarette cartridges, refill solutions, 
and smoke for nicotine and nicotine related impurities." Journal of Liquid 
Chromatography & Related Technologies 34(14): 1442-1458. 
Trtchounian, A. and P. Talbot (2011). "Electronic nicotine delivery systems: is there a need for 
regulation?" Tobacco Control 20(1): 47-52. 
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (2012). Preventing Tobacco Use Among Youth and 
Young Adults: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA, U.S. Department of Health and 
Human Services, Centers for Disease Prevention and Control, National Center for Chronic 
Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. 
Vansickel, A. R., C. O. Cobb, et al. (2010). "A clinical laboratory model for evaluating the acute effects of 
electronic “cigarettes”: nicotine delivery profile and cardiovascular and subjective effects." 
Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention 19(8): 1945. 
Vansickel, A. R. and T. Eissenberg (2013). "Electronic cigarettes: Effective nicotine delivery after acute 
administration." Nicotine & Tobacco Research 15(1): 267-270. 
Vansickel, A. R., M. F. Weaver, et al. (2012). "Clinical laboratory assessment of the abuse liability of an 
electronic cigarette." Addiction 107(8): 1493-1500. 
Vardavas, C. I., N. Anagnostopoulos, et al. (2012). "Short-term Pulmonary Effects of Using an Electronic 
Cigarette Impact on Respiratory Flow Resistance, Impedance, and Exhaled Nitric Oxide." Chest 
141(6): 1400-1406. 
Vickerman, K. A., K. M. Carpenter, et al. (2013). "Use of Electronic Cigarettes Among State Tobacco 
Cessation Quitline Callers." Nicotine & Tobacco Research. 
Williams, M., A. Villarreal, et al. (2013). "Metal and silicate particles including nanoparticles are present 
in electronic cigarette cartomizer fluid and aerosol." PloS one 8(3): e57987. 
Winer, S. (May 29, 2013) "Police investigating a toddler's death from nicotine overdose." The Times of 
Israel. 
World Health Organization (2009). "WHO Study Group on Tobacco Product Regulation: Report on the 
Scientific Basis of Tobacco Product Regulation." WHO Technical Report Series (955): i-21. 
Zhang, Y., W. Sumner, et al. (2013). "In Vitro Particle Size Distributions in Electronic and Conventional 
Cigarette Aerosols Suggest Comparable Deposition Patterns." Nicotine & Tobacco Research 
15(2): 501-508. 
 
 
Developmental nicotine effects citations: 
  
Dwyer JB, Broide RS, Leslie FM. Nicotine and brain development. Birth Defects Res C Embryo Today. Mar 
2008;84(1):30-44. 
Liao C-Y, Chen Y-J, Lee J-F, Lu C-L, Chen C-H. Cigarettes and the developing brain: Picturing nicotine as a 
neuroteratogen using clinical and preclinical studies. Tzu Chi Medical Journal. 2012;24(4):157-161. 
72 
 

DRAFT e-cigarette background paper 10-14-13 
 
 
Lichtensteiger W, Ribary U, Schlumpf M, Odermatt B, Widmer HR. Prenatal adverse effects of nicotine on the 
developing brain. In: Boer GJ, Feenstra MG, Mirmiran PM, Swaab DF, Van Haaren F, eds. Progress in 
Brain Research.
Vol Volume 73: Elsevier; 1988:137-157. 
Navarro HA, Seidler FJ, Eylers JP, et al. Effects of prenatal nicotine exposure on development of central and 
peripheral cholinergic neurotransmitter systems. Evidence for cholinergic trophic influences in 
developing brain Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics. December 1, 1989 
1989;251(3):894-900. 
Dwyer JB, McQuown SC, Leslie FM. The dynamic effects of nicotine on the developing brain. Pharmacology & 
Therapeutics. 2009;122(2):125-139. 
 
73 
 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
 
A Summary Report of Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: 
A Global Perspective 
 
 
 
Prepared for the World Health Organization by the National Cancer 
Institute 

Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 


link to page 81 link to page 81 link to page 81 link to page 82 link to page 82 link to page 83 link to page 83 link to page 84 link to page 84 link to page 88 link to page 90 link to page 90 link to page 90 link to page 92 link to page 93 link to page 93 link to page 94 link to page 94 link to page 96 link to page 96 link to page 97 link to page 98 link to page 98 link to page 100 link to page 101 link to page 102 link to page 103 link to page 103 link to page 104 link to page 104 link to page 106 link to page 113 link to page 113 link to page 113 link to page 113 link to page 115 link to page 115 link to page 116 link to page 116 link to page 118 link to page 119 Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
Contents 
 
Introduction ...............................................................................................................................5 
The Global Challenge ............................................................................................................5 
1. Wide Range of Products in Use ....................................................................................5 
2. Complex and Limited Data ..........................................................................................6 
3. Novel Products and Marketing .....................................................................................6 
4. Impact on Youth and Development of Ongoing Tobacco Use Behaviors ......................7 
5. Limited Treatment Options ..........................................................................................7 
6. Tobacco “Harm Reduction” .........................................................................................8 
Summary and Major Conclusions ..........................................................................................8 
References ........................................................................................................................... 12 
 
Global Smokeless Tobacco Products ...................................................................................... 14 
Introduction to Global Smokeless Tobacco Products ............................................................ 14 
Product Preparation ............................................................................................................. 14 
Tobacco Types ..................................................................................................................... 16 
Changes in Chemical Composition of Tobacco .................................................................... 17 
Alkaloid Formation and Cultivation ............................................................................... 17 
Curing…   ..................................................................................................................... 18 
Fermentation/Aging ....................................................................................................... 18 

Additives ............................................................................................................................. 20 
Flavoring Agents, Spices, Fruit Juices, Sweeteners, Salt, Humectants, Alkaline Agents . 20 
Non-Tobacco Plant Material .......................................................................................... 21 
Toxic and Carcinogenic Agents in Smokeless Tobacco Products .......................................... 22 
Nicotine and Free Nicotine ............................................................................................ 22 
Tobacco-Specific Nitrosamines ...................................................................................... 24 
Metals and Metalloids.................................................................................................... 25 
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons ................................................................................ 26 
Areca Nut  27 
Other Harmful Agents.................................................................................................... 27 

Gaps and Limitations of the Current Evidence Base ............................................................ 28 
Summary/Best Practices ...................................................................................................... 28 
References ........................................................................................................................... 30 
 
Smokeless Tobacco in the Region of the Americas ................................................................. 37 
Introduction to the Region of the Americas .......................................................................... 37 
Smokeless Tobacco Products in the Region of the Americas ................................................ 37 

Snuff and Chewing Tobacco (North America) ................................................................ 37 
Iqmik (Alaska)............................................................................................................... 39 
Chimo and Rapé (South America) .................................................................................. 39 

Region-Specific Observations and Regulation Challenges ................................................... 40 
Best Practices and Future Needs .......................................................................................... 40 
References ........................................................................................................................... 42 
 
Smokeless Tobacco in the European Region .......................................................................... 43 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 


link to page 119 link to page 119 link to page 119 link to page 121 link to page 123 link to page 123 link to page 124 link to page 127 link to page 129 link to page 129 link to page 129 link to page 130 link to page 130 link to page 131 link to page 132 link to page 132 link to page 133 link to page 134 link to page 136 link to page 136 link to page 136 link to page 138 link to page 139 link to page 141 link to page 143 link to page 143 link to page 143 link to page 146 link to page 148 link to page 150 link to page 154 link to page 154 link to page 154 link to page 154 link to page 155 link to page 156 link to page 157 link to page 159 link to page 161 link to page 161 link to page 161 Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
Introduction to the European Region ................................................................................... 43 
Smokeless Tobacco Products in the European Region .......................................................... 43 

Snus (Sweden, Norway, Finland, and Iceland) ............................................................... 43 
Zarda, Gutka, and Khaini (United Kingdom) ................................................................. 45 
Nasway (Uzbekistan and Kyrgyzstan)............................................................................ 47 
Region-Specific Observations and Regulation Challenges ................................................... 47 
Best Practices and Future Needs .......................................................................................... 48 
References ........................................................................................................................... 51 
 
Smokeless Tobacco in the Eastern Mediterranean Region .................................................... 53 
Introduction to the Eastern Mediterranean Region ............................................................... 53 
Smokeless Tobacco Products in the Eastern Mediterranean Region ..................................... 53 

Nass (Iran and Pakistan) ................................................................................................ 54 
Paan and Tombol (Pakistan and Yemen)......................................................................... 54 
Shammah (Saudi Arabia and Yemen) ............................................................................. 55 
Toombak (Sudan) .......................................................................................................... 56 
Region-Specific Observations and Regulation Challenges ................................................... 56 
Best Practices and Future Needs .......................................................................................... 57 
References ........................................................................................................................... 58 
 
Smokeless Tobacco in the African Region .............................................................................. 60 
Introduction to the African Region ...................................................................................... 60 
Smokeless Tobacco Products in the African Region ............................................................. 60 
Region-Specific Observations and Regulation Challenges ................................................... 62 
Best Practices and Future Needs .......................................................................................... 63 
References ........................................................................................................................... 65 
 
Smokeless Tobacco in the South-East Asia Region ................................................................ 67 
Introduction to the South-East Asia Region ......................................................................... 67 
Smokeless Tobacco Products in South-East Asia Region ..................................................... 67 
Region-Specific Observations and Regulation Challenges ................................................... 70 
Best Practices and Future Needs .......................................................................................... 72 
References ........................................................................................................................... 74 
 
Smokeless Tobacco in the Western Pacific Region ................................................................. 78 
Introduction to Smokeless Tobacco in the Western Pacific Region ....................................... 78 
Smokeless Tobacco Products in the Western Pacific Region ................................................ 78 

Chewing Tobacco With Areca Nut ................................................................................. 78 
Other Types of Smokeless Tobacco ................................................................................ 79 
Region-Specific Observations and Challenges ..................................................................... 80 
Best Practices and Future Needs .......................................................................................... 81 
References ........................................................................................................................... 83 
 
Key Findings and Recommendations ..................................................................................... 85 
Key Findings ....................................................................................................................... 85 
1) Smokeless Tobacco Use Is a Complex Global Problem .............................................. 85 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 


link to page 162 link to page 162 link to page 163 link to page 165 link to page 165 link to page 165 link to page 166 link to page 166 link to page 166 link to page 167 link to page 167 link to page 168 link to page 168 link to page 168 link to page 168 link to page 169 link to page 169 link to page 170 link to page 170 link to page 170 link to page 171 link to page 171 link to page 171 link to page 171 link to page 171 link to page 172 link to page 172 link to page 172 link to page 173 link to page 173 link to page 174 link to page 176 link to page 176 Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
2) Smokeless Tobacco is Not Safe ................................................................................. 86 
3) Health Impact May Vary Across Countries ................................................................ 86 
4) Smokeless Tobacco Products Are Diverse.................................................................. 87 
5) Marketing Strategies Are Made to Appeal to Youth .................................................... 89 
5) Smokeless Tobacco Products are Evolving to Capture More Users ............................ 89 
6) Interventions and Knowledge about Health Effects Are Limited ................................ 89 
7) Smokeless Tobacco Policies Are Varied and Often Weaker than for Smoking ............ 90 
Overall Challenges .............................................................................................................. 90 
1) Not Focusing on the Smokeless Tobacco Problem ..................................................... 90 
2) Limited Data to Inform Decisions .............................................................................. 91 
3) Emerging New Products in High Income Countries ................................................... 91 
4) Harm Reduction Debate ............................................................................................ 92 
Research Needs ................................................................................................................... 92 
1) Surveillance and Monitoring...................................................................................... 92 
2) Products .................................................................................................................... 92 
3) Health Effects ............................................................................................................ 93 
4) Economics and Marketing ......................................................................................... 93 

Building Capacity ................................................................................................................ 94 
1) Regional Clearinghouses ........................................................................................... 94 
2) Infrastructure for Networking, Communication, and Collaboration. ........................... 94 
3) Build Collaborations among Scientists, Tobacco Control Advocates, and Policymakers.
 
..................................................................................................................... 95 

4) Build Research Capacity ........................................................................................... 95 
Intervention and Policy Needs ............................................................................................. 95 
1) Apply FCTC requirements to Smokeless Tobacco Products ....................................... 95 
2) Educate the Public about Harms of Smokeless Tobacco ............................................. 96 
3) Develop Product Standards for Smokeless Tobacco Producs ...................................... 96 
4) Consider Ban on Flavorants ....................................................................................... 96 
5) Stronger Public Health Warnings ............................................................................... 97 
6) Increase Taxes ........................................................................................................... 97 

References ........................................................................................................................... 98 
 
Description of Representative Products From the Four Broad Categories of the Smokeless 
Tobacco Products Used Globall
y .......................................................................................... 100 
 

Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 


Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   

Introduction  

Smokeless tobacco (ST) products present a complex and widespread challenge to public health 

that has so far received limited attention from researchers and policymakers. In many regions of 

the world, such as in India, ST use is the predominant form of tobacco use. Indeed, data from the 

Global Youth Tobacco Survey show that students aged 13–15 surveyed in 132 countries were 

more likely to report using non-cigarette tobacco products including ST products (11.2%) than to 

report smoking cigarettes (8.9%) (CDC 2006). Yet international tobacco control efforts have 

focused largely on cigarettes, devoting only limited attention to other types of products, 
10 
including ST.  
11 
The Global Challenge  
12 
The serious health effects of ST have been documented. A 2004 IARC review found that there is 
13 
sufficient evidence, based on epidemiologic and laboratory studies, to conclude that ST causes 
14 
oral cancer, esophageal cancer, and pancreatic cancer in humans (Cogliano et al. 2004; IARC 
15 
2004). At least 28 carcinogens have been identified in ST products, including tobacco-specific 
16 
nitrosamines (TSNAs), which cause tumors affecting the nasal cavity, lung, trachea, pancreas, 
17 
liver, and esophagus in animal models (NCI 1992). ST use is also a cause of adverse oral health 
18 
outcomes including oral mucosal lesions, leukoplakia, and periodontal disease (Shulman et al. 
19 
2004, Fisher et al. 2005). Additionally, ST products contain nicotine, and users of ST products 
20 
demonstrate signs of dependence similar to those of cigarette smokers, including tolerance with 
21 
repeated use and symptoms of withdrawal upon cessation of use (Henningfield et al. 1997). 
22 
Although ST use, like tobacco smoking, causes serious health damage, ST use poses substantial 
23 
challenges for science and public health that are distinct from those presented by tobacco 
24 
smoking:  
25 
1. Wide Range of Products in Use 
26 
Understanding the use and impact of ST products is complicated by the diversity of products and 
27 
related behaviors that exist. A wide range of ST products with different characteristics are in use 
28 
around the world, including chewing tobacco, snuff, gutka, betel quid with tobacco, snus, 
29 
toombak, iqmik, tobacco lozenges, and others. Yet limited data are available on the properties of 
30 
these products, how they are used, and their prevalence within different population groups. This 
31 
diversity makes it difficult to generalize about these products as a class. Additionally, the ways in 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 


Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
32 
which these products are produced, sold, used, and controlled (such as through taxes or 
33 
marketing restrictions) differ widely across countries and regions.  
34 
2. Complex and Limited Data 
35 
In addition to the known biologic effects of ST, the overall public health impact of ST use 
36 
depends on a range of health and environmental factors, including the prevalence and patterns of 
37 
use of different products in the population, the impact of marketing messages, and the 
38 
effectiveness of prevention and cessation efforts. While certain groups have been identified as 
39 
being at increased risk for ST use, limited data are available on why particular populations begin 
40 
to use ST and what factors are most important in preventing or promoting initiation of ST use.  
41 
3. Novel Products and Marketing 
42 
Tobacco manufacturers have introduced a new generation of ST products that may have broad 
43 
consumer appeal due to use of attractive flavorings, such as mint or fruit flavors, and new 
44 
delivery methods, such as lozenges or small pouches that eliminate the need to spit. Major 
45 
multinational cigarette companies Philip Morris and R.J. Reynolds have introduced snus 
46 
products carrying the well-known Marlboro and Camel brand names, thereby putting the 
47 
marketing expertise of these companies to work in the service of ST products. Tobacco control 
48 
experts warn that increased marketing of these products may have an adverse impact on 
49 
population health by appealing to young, new users or by helping current smokers maintain their 
50 
nicotine dependence (Henningfield et al. 2002). Novel nicotine delivery devices, such as 
51 
electronic cigarettes, which use heat, rather than combustion, to release a vapor containing 
52 
nicotine are also being marketed in many countries as an alternative to conventional cigarettes. 
53 
These products are not addressed in this report, but they may also have an important impact on  
54 
patterns of tobacco use behavior (WHO 2009). 
55 
Some tobacco companies have also responded to the tremendous growth in smoke-free indoor air 
56 
laws by advertising ST products to smokers as a temporary alternative to cigarettes for situations 
57 
where they cannot smoke, using slogans such as “Enjoy tobacco inside the office? You bet” and 
58 
“Enjoy tobacco on a 4-hour flight? You bet” (O’Hegarty et al. 2007). In addition to increasing ST 
59 
use, this marketing strategy may impede smoking cessation efforts by making it easier for 
60 
smokers to maintain their nicotine addiction between cigarettes. This is an example of how 
61 
progress made in one area of tobacco control, such as through smoke-free indoor air laws, has 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 


Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
62 
been followed by tobacco manufacturers’ efforts to adapt, this time by introducing new products 
63 
and marketing strategies.  
64 
4. Impact on Youth and Development of Ongoing Tobacco Use Behaviors 
65 
The potential for increased initiation of ST use among youth also poses a major, ongoing public 
66 
health challenge. This increased initiation may be caused by increased marketing and the 
67 
introduction of new flavored products. Indeed, ST use among teens and young adults rose 
68 
substantially in the United States during the 1970s after the introduction of products that were 
69 
more accessible to new users (Connolly 1995). These products had lower nicotine content and 
70 
attractive flavorings, and evidence suggests that users who begin with low-nicotine “starter” 
71 
products are more likely to subsequently “graduate” to products with higher nicotine content 
72 
(Tomar et al. 1995). Moreover, a number of studies suggest that ST use is associated with and 
73 
reinforces use of other tobacco products, including cigarettes. Thus, adolescents who use ST 
74 
products may also be more likely to move on to cigarette smoking (Hatsukami et al. 2004, Tomar 
75 
2003).  
76 
5. Limited Treatment Options 
77 
Intervention strategies for ST use cessation have had mixed success. Clinical trials have shown 
78 
that behavioral interventions in particular settings, such as in dental offices, may increase 
79 
abstinence rates among ST users, although the available evidence is insufficient to support 
80 
recommendations about the specific intervention components that should be applied (Carr and 
81 
Ebbert 2006, Severson 2003). In contrast, trials of pharmacotherapies in ST users, including 
82 
nicotine patch, nicotine gum, and bupropion, have shown no impact on long-term (>6 months) 
83 
abstinence rates (Ebbert et al. 2004). Some individual study results suggest that 
84 
pharmacotherapies may help reduce symptoms associated with cessation, such as craving and 
85 
weight gain, but such symptom reduction has not been shown to have any impact on cessation 
86 
outcomes (Dale et al. 2007). Moreover, evidence suggests that people who use both cigarettes 
87 
and ST demonstrate higher nicotine exposure levels and find cessation more difficult to achieve 
88 
than those who only use ST or those who only smoke (Hatsukami and Severson 1999, Wetter et 
al. 2002, Spangler et al. 2001).  
89 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 


Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
90 
6. Tobacco “Harm Reduction” 
91 
The response to the hazards of ST use is complicated by discussions about the possibility of 
92 
using ST as a means of harm reduction for cigarette smokers. Some scientists have suggested 
93 
that ST use may actually reduce harm to smokers by providing an alternative to cigarettes—that 
94 
is, smokers who switch completely to ST, which does not carry the same risk of lung cancer and 
95 
respiratory diseases as cigarette smoking, might reduce their overall risk. While smokeless 
96 
tobacco also causes cancer and other diseases, the overall health risks for a lifetime smokeless 
97 
tobacco user may be lower than those for a lifetime cigarette smoker.  
98 
This inference requires a number of assumptions, however. Given the tremendous diversity of ST 
99 
products and patterns of use around the world, it is difficult to support broad generalizations 
100 
about the level of harm associated with ST products as a category. Little is known about the 
101 
constituents of some ST products or the exposures users receive from them. Will smokers who 
102 
begin using ST products completely replace their cigarettes, or will they instead become dual 
103 
product users, which may not yield any health benefit and could potentially increase their risk? 
104 
Additionally, it is essential to consider the overall population-level impact of increased ST use. 
105 
For example, will increased promotion of ST products lead to an increase in tobacco use 
106 
initiation or have an adverse impact on smoking cessation efforts? While the body of evidence on 
107 
this topic is expanding, definitive studies to answer key questions are lacking. In short, there 
108 
remain more questions than answers.  
109 
Discussions regarding harm reduction have been limited primarily to high-income countries with 
110 
a long history of tobacco control measures and where cigarette smoking is the predominant form 
111 
of tobacco use, such as in North America and Western Europe. Because tobacco products, 
112 
patterns of use, disease profiles, and policy regimes vary so widely across regions, the relevance 
113 
of these discussions for other regions are limited and are not explored in this report.  
114 
Summary and Major Conclusions  
115 
The report that follows summarizes current knowledge regarding the properties and 
116 
characteristics of smokeless tobacco products, followed by a series of regionally-focused 
117 
chapters that specifically address the context of tobacco use and the existing tobacco control 
118 
policy and intervention landscape by region. The final section of the report provides some cross-
119 
regional observations regarding product characteristics, health effects, industry strategies, and 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 


Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
120 
tobacco control measures. This final section also make recommendations regarding information 
121 
needs and best practices for ST control.  
122 
Key conclusions from the report are highlighted here: 
123 
  ST is a global problem that is present in at least 70 low-, middle-, and high-income countries 
124 
and affects more than 300 million people. The greatest burden from ST use is in the South-
125 
East Asia Region, which experiences the highest prevalence of ST use (including the 
126 
majority [89%] of users), carries the highest attributable disease burden, and has the greatest 
127 
diversity in product types and forms of use. ST use is highly prevalent in India, where it 
128 
exceeds cigarette smoking among both men and women.  
129 
  The magnitude of disease risks directly associated with ST use appears to differ across 
130 
countries and regions, likely due in part to differences between ST products and patterns of 
131 
use. Laboratory analyses have shown widely varying levels of known carcinogens and 
132 
nicotine in ST products from different regions. And epidemiologic studies of ST users in 
133 
different regions have reached varying risk estimates for cancer and cardiovascular disease 
134 
from country to country. Yet data to precisely quantify these differences in disease risk and to 
135 
identify the factors that drive them are lacking.  
136 
  ST use and marketing present distinct public health challenges in different countries and 
137 
regions. In particular, there is a divide between some high-income countries (such as in 
138 
Scandinavia) with high prevalence of low-nitrosamine ST use, reductions in smoking 
139 
prevalence, and strong tobacco control and regulatory frameworks, and low- or middle-
140 
income countries (such as India) where ST products are associated with very high levels of 
141 
harmful constituents, where marketing of cigarettes is increasing, and a large unorganized 
142 
business sector makes product control and regulation extremely challenging. Changes in 
143 
product marketing, patterns of use, and tobacco control programs and interventions may have 
144 
very different results in these different environments.  
145 
  Changing tobacco industry marketing strategies may influence the future public health 
146 
impact of ST use. In some high-income countries where restrictions on public smoking have 
147 
increased and smoking prevalence has decreased, tobacco companies have marketed oral 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 


Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
148 
tobacco products to smokers. However, the impact of this trend on smoking behavior, and 
149 
possible dual or poly-tobacco use, remains uncertain. At the same time, multinational tobacco 
150 
companies have an increasing presence among low- and middle-income countries with both 
151 
smoked and smokeless products.  
152 
  In many regions, even those where ST use is highly prevalent, policies and programs aimed 
153 
at ST use prevention and cessation are generally weaker than those existing for smoked 
154 
tobacco products: prices are lower, warning labels are weaker, surveillance is less developed, 
155 
fewer proven interventions are available, and fewer resources are devoted to prevention and 
156 
control programs.  
157 
  Significant challenges exist in monitoring the use and health effects of ST. These challenges 
158 
include the diversity of ST products and their use, the lack of information to characterize 
159 
products and manner of use, the informal, unorganized nature of the ST market in some 
160 
regions, and the limited attention given to tailored educational and intervention programs.   
161 
  A wide range of research gaps remain for ST products, including lack of surveillance data, 
162 
characterization of diverse ST products, health consequences from use of different products, 
163 
including fetal exposure and reproductive outcomes, better understanding of the economic 
164 
policies surrounding ST products and their use, and effective region-specific ST education, 
165 
prevention, and treatment interventions.  
166 
  A range of different policies have been proposed or implemented for ST products in some 
167 
countries, but data are often lacking on their impact or effectiveness. Greater attention is 
168 
needed to strengthen the use of evidence-based policies for control of ST use, which could 
169 
include: having tobacco industries disclose the contents of ST products; establishing 
170 
performance standards for toxicants and maximum pH levels; banning flavorants; 
171 
establishing effective and relevant health warning labels; increasing taxes on ST products; 
172 
banning or restricting ST promotions, sponsorship, or marketing; and raising public 
173 
awareness of the toxicity and health effects of ST products. In sum, prevention and cessation 
174 
of ST use should form an integral part of any comprehensive tobacco control effort.  
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
10 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
175 
  Capacity for research and public health action around ST is limited in many countries, 
176 
especially those where the public health burden is greatest. Development of international 
177 
infrastructure for research and information sharing could enhance the ability of many 
178 
countries to reduce the consequences of ST use. International collaboration and shared 
179 
capacity building could include the following: (a) creating regional but globally accessible 
180 
information clearinghouses for ST; ( b) strengthening infrastructure for networking, 
181 
communication, and collaboration; (c) building collaborations across disciplines and 
182 
professions (e.g., scientists with policymakers and tobacco control advocates); and (d) 
183 
developing ways to build research capacity by leveraging existing resources.  
184 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
11 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
185 
References 
186 
Carr AB, Ebbert JO. Interventions for tobacco cessation in the dental setting. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2006 Jan 
187 
25;(1):CD005084.  
188 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Use of cigarettes and other tobacco products among students aged 13–
189 
15 years—worldwide, 1999–2005. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2006;55(20):553–6.  
190 
Cogliano V, Straif K, Baan R, Grosse Y, Secretan B, El Ghissassi F. Smokeless tobacco and tobacco-related 
191 
nitrosamines. Lancet Oncol. 2004;5(12):708.  
192 
Connolly GN. The marketing of nicotine addiction by one oral snuff manufacturer. Tob Control. 1995;4(1):73–9.  
193 
Dale LC, Ebbert JO, Glover ED, Croghan IT, Schroeder DR, Severson HH, et al. Bupropion SR for the treatment of 
194 
smokeless tobacco use. Drug Alcohol Depend. 2007;90(1):56–63.  
195 
Ebbert JO, Rowland LC, Montori V, Vickers KS, Erwin PC, Dale LC, et al. Interventions for smokeless tobacco use 
196 
cessation. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2004;(3):CD004306.  
197 
Fisher MA, Bouquot JE, Shelton BJ. Assessment of risk factors for oral leukoplakia in West Virginia. Community 
198 
Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2005;33(1):45–52. 
199 
Hatsukami DK, Severson HH. Oral spit tobacco: addiction, prevention and treatment. Nicotine Tob Res. 
200 
1999;1(1):21–44.  
201 
Hatsukami DK, Lemmonds C, Tomar SL. Smokeless tobacco use: harm reduction or induction approach? Prev Med. 
202 
2004;38(3):309–17.  
203 
Henningfield JE, Fant RV, Tomar SL. Smokeless tobacco: an addicting drug. Adv Dent Res. 1997;11(3):330–5.  
204 
Henningfield JE, Rose CA, Giovino GA. Brave new world of tobacco disease prevention: promoting dual product 
205 
use? Am J Prev Med. 2002;23(3):226–8.  
206 
International Agency for Research on Cancer. Betel-quid and areca-nut chewing and some areca-nut-derived 
207 
nitrosamines. IARC monographs on the evaluation of carcinogenic risks to humans. Vol. 85. Lyon, France: World 
208 
Health Organization, International Agency for Research on Cancer; 2004. 
209 
National Cancer Institute. Smokeless tobacco or health: an international perspective. Smoking and tobacco control 
210 
monograph no. 2. Bethesda, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Cancer Institute; 1992. 
211 
Publication no. 92-3461. Available from: http://www.cancercontrol.cancer.gov/tcrb/monographs/2/index.html   
212 
National Institutes of Health. NIH State-of-the-Science Conference statement on tobacco use: prevention, cessation, 
213 
and control. NIH Consens State Sci Statements. 2006;23(3):1–26. 
214 
O’Hegarty M, Richter P, Pederson LL. What do adult smokers think about ads and promotional materials for 
215 
PREPs? Am J Health Behav. 2007;31(6):526–34.  
216 
Severson HH. What have we learned from 20 years of research on smokeless tobacco cessation? Am J Med Sci. 
217 
2003;326(4):206–11.  
218 
Shulman JD, Beach MM, Rivera-Hidalgo F. The prevalence of oral mucosal lesions in U.S. adults: data from the 
219 
Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1988–1994. J Am Dent Assoc. 2004;135(9):1279–86.  
220 
Spangler JG, Michielutte R, Bell RA, Knick S, Dignan MB, Summerson JH. Dual tobacco use among Native 
221 
American adults in southeastern North Carolina. Prev Med. 2001;32(6):521–8.  
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
12 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
222 
Tomar S. Is use of smokeless tobacco a risk factor for cigarette smoking? The U.S. experience. Nicotine Tob Res. 
223 
2003;5(4):561–9.  
224 
Tomar SL, Giovino GA, Eriksen MP. Smokeless tobacco brand preference and brand switching among US 
225 
adolescents and young adults. Tob Control. 1995;4(1):67–72.  
226 
Wetter DW, McClure JB, de Moor C, Cofta-Gunn L, Cummings S, Cinciripini PM, et al. Concomitant use of 
227 
cigarettes and smokeless tobacco: prevalence, correlates, and predictors of tobacco cessation. Prev Med. 
228 
2002;34(6):638–48.  
229 
World Health Organization Study Group on Tobacco Product Regulation. Report on the scientific basis of tobacco 
230 
product regulation. Second report of a WHO study group. WHO Technical Report Series no. 951. Geneva: World 
231 
Health Organization; 2008. Available from: 
232 
http://www.who.int/tobacco/global interaction/tobreg/publications/9789241209519.pdf  
233 
World Health Organization Study Group on Tobacco Product Regulation. Report on the scientific basis of tobacco 
234 
product regulation. Third report of a WHO study group. WHO Technical Report Series no. 955. Geneva: World 
235 
Health Organization; 2009. Available from: 
236 
http://www.who.int/tobacco/global interaction/tobreg/publications/tsr 955/en/index.html 
237 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
13 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
238 
Global Smokeless Tobacco Products 
239 
Introduction to Global Smokeless Tobacco Products 
240 
Unlike smoked tobacco, which is burned or heated and then inhaled in products such as 
241 
cigarettes and cigars, or via hookahs, smokeless tobacco (ST) is predominantly used orally 
242 
(chewed, sucked, dipped, held in the mouth, etc.) or nasally, which results in absorption of 
243 
nicotine and other chemicals across mucus membranes (Boffetta et al. 2008). Smokeless tobacco 
244 
products are used in a wide variety of forms with differing ingredients, composition, and toxic 
245 
emissions (SCENIHR 2008; IARC 2004; IARC 2007).  
246 
Worldwide, ST products range in complexity from simple cured tobacco to elaborate products 
247 
with added flavorings and, in some cases, non-tobacco plant material that may affect the 
248 
attractiveness, addictiveness, and toxicity of the products (SCENIHR 2008; IARC 2007; IARC 
249 
2004). Preparation, ingredient selection (including non-tobacco plant materials), and mode of use 
250 
(oral, nasal, etc.) can vary based on geographic locality, ingredient availability, cultural/societal 
251 
norms, and personal preferences (Boffetta et al. 2008; SCENIHR 2008; IARC 2004; IARC 
252 
2007). 
253 
Product Preparation 
254 
ST can be broadly divided into premade and custom-made products (please refer to table on the 
255 
next page). Premade ST products, which are manufactured for sale and generally consumed as 
256 
purchased (i.e., “ready-to-use”), can be subdivided into: (1) commercial products (i.e., moist 
257 
snuff, snus, khaini) that are made in traditional manufacturing settings such as factories or 
258 
production facilities; and (2) cottage industry products (i.e., toombak, nasway, mainpuri, mawa) 
259 
that are made on a smaller scale in nontraditional production environments (market stalls, shops, 
260 
houses, etc.) and often sold in noncommercial packaging (paper or plastic bags; wrapped in 
261 
paper) (IARC 2004; IARC 2007; SCENIHR 2008).  
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
14 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
262 
Characteristics and product examples of premade and custom-made smokeless tobacco products 
Premade 
Custom-made 
Manufactured 
Cottage industry 
Vendor/individual 
 Made in advance for sale 
 Made in advance for sale 
 Made by a vendor or individual 
 Made in a manufacturing 
 Usually handmade in 
according to user preferences, 
environment 
nontraditional environments 
generally for immediate 
 Sealed in labeled commercial 
 Often sold in noncommercial 
consumption 
packaging 
packaging 
 Involves mixing two or more 
components (including premade 
products) together by hand to 
form a final product 
Product examples: 
Product examples: 
Product examples: 
 Chewing tobacco 
 Dohra 
 Gudahku/Gudahka 
(plug/twist/loose leaf) 
 Gutka 
 Iqm k 
 Creamy snuff 
 Mainpuri 
 Nass/Naswar 
 Dissolvables 
 Nass/Naswar 
 Nasway 
 Dry snuff 
 Nasway 
 Betel quid (paan) 
 Gudahku/Gudahka 
 Betel quid (paan) 
 Rapé 
 Khaini 
 Rapé 
 Shammah 
 Moist snuff 
 Shammah 
 Tapkeer 
 Kiwam 
 Toombak 
 Tobacco leaf 
 Rapé 
 Tu bur 
 Tombol 
 Red toothpowder 
 Toombak 
Some premade ingredients are 
used to make custom-made 
products: twist, zarda, toombak, 
gudahku/gudahka, and kiwam. 
 
263 
Premade manufactured ST products are available in a wide variety of physical forms, including 
264 
but not limited to, twisted tobacco leaves, loose tobacco, ground tobacco, dry tobacco (dry 
265 
snuff), tars (chimó), pastes (kiwam), dentifrices (creamy snuff, toothpowder), tobacco-containing 
266 
chewing gums, and mixtures of tobacco and other materials (zarda, gutka) (SCENIHR 2008; 
267 
IARC 2004; IARC 2007; Swedish Match 2006). Manufactured ST products, such as moist snuff 
268 
and snus, are available as loose tobacco or tobacco sealed in porous teabag-like sachets, which 
269 
are easily inserted and removed from the mouth. Release of nicotine and presumably other 
270 
compounds is greater from loose tobacco than from sachets (Nasr, Reepmeyer and Tang 1998).  
271 
Increasingly, new varieties of manufactured smokeless products made with the smoker in mind 
272 
appear in a discrete, spit-less form that can be used where smoking is prohibited or socially 
273 
inappropriate (Carpenter et al. 2009). Since 2001, several tobacco companies, including those 
274 
that have traditionally marketed cigarettes, have been introducing dissolvable ST products, which 
275 
are made from finely milled tobacco pressed into tablets, sticks, or flat strips that fully dissolve 
276 
in the mouth (Connolly et al. 2010; Rainey et al. 2011; Stepanov et al. 2012). Novel products 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
15 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
277 
introduced after about 2010 include tobacco-coated toothpicks, which are sucked on to release 
278 
nicotine (Seidenberg et al. 2012), and an “energy-enhanced” ST product called Revved Up, made 
279 
by Southern Smokeless, which is essentially moist snuff augmented with energy drink 
280 
constituents (Southern Smokeless Tobacco Company 2012). Altria introduced a nicotine disk 
281 
product called Verve in Virginia in 2012. The chewable disc, which is made of cellulose fibers 
282 
and a polymer, is impregnated with flavor and nicotine. The disc does not dissolve, but is chewed 
283 
for about 15 minutes and then discarded (Lawson 2012). Although many novel ST products are 
284 
not yet widely distributed, they are part of an increasing trend in the development of diverse, new 
285 
forms of ST products intended to appeal to both smokers and ST users alike. 
286 
Premade cottage products can be in the form of pressed cakes (mawa), pellets (nasway), or 
287 
pulverized tobacco (toombak, shammah), among others. Some premade products are used as the 
288 
tobacco ingredient in custom-made products; for example, manufactured products (e.g., zarda 
289 
and kiwam) or cottage products (e.g., mainpuri and toombak) can be used as the tobacco 
290 
ingredient in betel quid and tombol. The “tobacco ingredient” in products such as mainpuri and 
291 
toombak may already be mixtures of tobacco with other ingredients such as areca nut, alkaline 
292 
agents, spices, and silver flakes (IARC 2007; SCENIHR 2008). 
293 
Custom-made products, handmade by the user, a relative, or a vendor according to user 
294 
preferences, are characteristic of smokeless tobacco use in South Asia and Africa, as well as 
295 
other defined regions with a tradition of smokeless tobacco use, such as Alaska and Brazil.  
296 
Custom-made products such as tombol and betel quid (also known as paan) are made by 
297 
combining cured tobacco or a premade tobacco product (e.g., zarda) with one or more 
298 
ingredients, such as ashes, alkaline agents, areca nut, spices, catechu, or other plant materials 
299 
(Bhonsle et al. 1990). Spices, for example, can be selected and added to meet the customer’s 
300 
preferences.   
301 
Tobacco Types 
302 
Approximately 70 species of tobacco (Nicotiana) occur naturally, although few are regularly 
303 
used for smoked or ST products (Lewis and Nicholson 2007; IARC 2007). The identity of 
304 
different tobacco species in products can be determined by a chemical analysis of the levels of 
305 
nicotine and other tobacco alkaloids (Sisson and Severson 1990) and confirmed using infrared 
306 
analysis (Stanfill et al. 2011). Most commercial tobacco products worldwide contain the species 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
16 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
307 
Nicotiana tabacum (cultivated tobacco), but N. rustica is also frequently grown and used in 
308 
regions of South America, Africa, and Asia (Lewis and Nicholson 2007; IARC 2007). In India, 
309 
smoking tobacco tends to be made with N. tabacum, but most ST contains N. rustica, which has 
310 
higher concentrations of nicotine and other alkaloids than N. tabacum (Bhide et al. 1987, 1989; 
311 
WHO 2004). Some products, such as khaini and kiwam from South Asia, may contain both N. 
312 
rustica and N. tabacum (IARC 2007). N. rustica is also contained in some forms of naswar, 
313 
Bangladeshi tobacco leaf, Indian chewing tobacco, maras, zarda, and toombak (Idris et. al 1991; 
314 
Stanfill et al. 2011; IARC 2007; WHO 2004). Smokeless tobacco products such as toombak may 
315 
contain N. glauca (tree tobacco) (IARC 2007; Steenkamp et al. 2002), which has high levels of 
316 
the alkaloid anabasine; ingestion of this form of tobacco has been linked to accidental poisoning 
317 
and fatality in a few cases (Steenkamp et al. 2002; Furer et al. 2011).  
318 
Changes in Chemical Composition of Tobacco  
319 
Alkaloid Formation and Cultivation 
320 
As tobacco grows, it absorbs metals, metalloids (Pappas 2011), and nitrate from the soil (Burton 
321 
et al. 1989a; Burton et al. 1989b) and synthesizes alkaloids, including nicotine and minor 
322 
alkaloids (e.g., nornicotine, anabasine, and anatabine) in various concentrations, depending on 
323 
species and variety (Sisson and Severson 1990). Alkaloids are key chemical precursors in the 
324 
formation of tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNAs) (Hecht et al. 1974; Hecht et al. 1978; 
325 
Spiegelhalder and Fischer 1991), some of which are potent carcinogens (IARC 2007; Hecht 
326 
1998).  
327 
Tobacco nitrate content and the presence of certain microorganisms on tobacco leaves contribute 
328 
to the formation of TSNAs from alkaloids (Fisher et al. 2012). During cultivation, 
329 
microorganisms (yeast, mold, fungi, and bacteria) and agricultural chemicals can be deposited on 
330 
tobacco plants. At harvest, tobacco is not generally washed, thus leaves with deposited 
331 
microorganisms and agricultural chemicals will be processed and the contaminants will be 
332 
present in the final product. During the subsequent curing step, the tobacco leaves dry, and 
333 
bacteria, which proliferate to levels 10 to 20 times higher than on the growing leaf (Wiernik et al. 
334 
1995), begin converting the nitrate (NO -
-
3 ) present in the plant tissue to nitrite (NO2 ), a process 
335 
called nitrate reduction. Once nitrite is produced, a chemical process of nitrosation occurs in 
336 
which nitrite reacts with tobacco alkaloids to generate TSNAs (Djordjevic et al. 1989). Amine 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
17 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
337 
compounds other than tobacco alkaloids can also react with nitrite to form nonvolatile N–
338 
nitrosamines, volatile nitrosamines, and N–nitrosamino acids (SCENIHR 2008; Hoffmann et al. 
339 
1995). The International Agency for Research in Cancer (IARC) has classified various nitroso 
340 
compounds as IARC Group 1 (carcinogenic to humans), 2A (probably carcinogenic to humans), 
341 
or 2B (possibly carcinogenic) agents (IARC 2012b). The IARC has also classified nitrate and 
342 
nitrite as Group 2A agents (IARC 2010) because of their potential to form nitroso compounds in 
343 
the human body after ingestion. There are indications that additional amounts of nitrosamines 
344 
can be formed in the mouth during ST use (Nair et al. 1987).  
345 
Curing 
346 
Prior to use in products, tobacco is dried using sun, air, flue, or fire curing. Any given ST product 
347 
can be produced using various tobacco-curing methods, depending on the manufacturer. The 
348 
simplest method of tobacco processing is sun curing, the process of drying tobacco leaves in the 
349 
sun, which is often used in making toombak, gutka, maras, khaini, and nass/naswar; some 
350 
tobaccos used in betel quid are also sun cured (IARC 2007). Air curing, which involves placing 
351 
tobacco stalks on wooden staves that are hung in a well-ventilated barn, is usually used in loose 
352 
leaf and twist chewing tobaccos and moist snuff (Peedin 1999; IARC 2007). Flue curing 
353 
involves hanging tobacco in an enclosed structure connected to an external heat source without 
354 
exposing the tobacco directly to smoke (Peedin 1999; Fisher et al. 2012); this method is often 
355 
used in making chewing tobacco. During fire curing, tobacco is hung in a large enclosed barn 
356 
and exposed to smoke from hardwood fires that are continuously burning or smoldering, a 
357 
process directly analogous to producing smoked meat (Miller and Fowlkes 1999). Fire-cured 
358 
tobacco is used in the production of plug chewing tobacco, moist and dry snuff, and iqmik 
359 
(Peedin 1999; IARC 2007; Hearn et al. 2013). Fire curing not only causes chemical changes in 
360 
the tobacco leaf, it also contaminates the tobacco with smoke-related chemicals. As a result, the 
361 
levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), phenols, and volatile aldehydes tend to be 
362 
higher in fire-cured tobacco than air-cured tobacco (Bhide et al. 1987, 1989; Hearn et al. 2013; 
363 
Leffingwell 1999). 
364 
Fermentation/Aging  
365 
Fermentation and aging of tobacco are common in the production of tobacco used in cigars (Di 
366 
Giacomo et al. 2007) and ST (e.g., moist and dry snuff, toombak, taaba) (IARC 2007; Fisher et 
367 
al. 2012; Tso 1999). During fermentation or aging, the tobacco takes on a more agreeable flavor 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
18 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
368 
(Tso 1999). For manufactured products, fermentation can occur in a partially insulated tank 
369 
(Fisher et al. 2012), which, because of increased microbial activity, can reach high temperatures 
370 
(up to 65°C) (Di Giacomo et al. 2007). Fermentation of toombak, a cottage industry product, 
371 
occurs in a closed container at 30 to 45°C for a few weeks, then the tobacco is aged for a year 
372 
(IARC 2007). 
373 
Tobacco fermentation involves chemical and biochemical changes (bacteria-mediated reactions) 
374 
(IARC 2007; Di Giacomo et al. 2007; Fisher et al. 2012). During fermentation, a portion of 
375 
nitrate in fire-cured tobacco is converted to nitrite, which then reacts with alkaloids to produce 
376 
TSNAs (Di Giacomo et al. 2007; Fisher et al. 2012). 
377 
During one fermentation study, nitrite levels generated by bacteria resulted in an almost threefold 
378 
increase in TSNA levels (Di Giacomo et al. 2007). In tobacco or tobacco products, a number of 
379 
bacteria species have been identified that are capable of converting nitrate to nitrite (nitrate 
380 
reduction) (Di Giacomo et al. 2007; Sapkota et al. 2010; Ayo-Yusuf et al. 2008; Bao et al. 2013; 
381 
Winn and Koneman 2006; Cockrell et al. 1989; Fisher et al. 2012). Additionally, several genera 
382 
of fungi are capable of nitrate reduction (Wahlberg et al. 1999; Pauly and Paszkiewicz 2011; Di 
383 
Giacomo et al. 2007; Cockrell et al. 1989). Throughout production, the combined capacity of 
384 
product microorganisms to generate nitrite is a key determinant of the levels of TSNAs and other 
385 
nitrosamines in the final product (IARC 2012a; Brunnemann et al. 1996).  
386 
Pasteurization, or heat treating, of tobacco is a very effective means of eliminating 
387 
microorganisms during ST production, and thus preventing the reduction of nitrate to nitrite 
388 
(Rutqvist et al. 2011). Indeed, Swedish snus, a pasteurized product, generally has lower nitrite 
389 
and TSNA levels than nonpasteurized products, such as moist snuff and khaini (Stepanov et al. 
390 
2008; Stepanov et al. 2005). It has also been shown that the additional formation of nitrite and 
391 
TSNA levels can be prevented by cleaning fermentation equipment before use and “seeding” the 
392 
fermentation process with non-nitrate-reducing bacteria (Fisher et al. 2012). Together, these 
393 
observations provide additional support for the idea that the levels of some carcinogenic and 
394 
toxic agents in tobacco products can be substantially reduced by changing tobacco processing 
395 
methods.  
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
19 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
396 
Following fermentation, tobacco may still contain substantial amounts of nitrate, nitrite, and 
397 
bacteria (such as Bacillus spp.) that are active across a wide temperature and pH range 
398 
(Rubinstein and Pederson 2002; Di Giacomo et al. 2007; Fisher et al. 2012). Moreover, moist 
399 
snuff products, including South African smokeless tobacco, contain nitrate, nitrite, and viable 
400 
nitrite-producing bacteria (e.g., Bacillus spp.) (Rubinstein and Pederson 2002; Ayo-Yusuf et al. 
401 
2008; Stepanov et al. 2008).  Various strains of bacteria have also been found to directly produce 
402 
infections, inflammation and periodontal abscesses. (Sapkota et al. 2010; Ayo-Yusuf et al. 2008). 
403 
Although conditions in ST products are favorable for the presence of bacteria, it is not known 
404 
which strains of bacteria are most common in ST products.  
405 
Products from India, such as zarda, mishri, gutka, creamy snuff, and toothpowder, have elevated 
406 
nitrate levels but lower levels of nitrite. In contrast, Indian khaini contains higher levels of nitrite 
407 
and TSNAs (Stepanov et al. 2005).  The high levels of nicotine and other alkaloids in N. rustica 
408 
(Sisson and Severson 1990; Bhide et al. 1987) may contribute to extreme levels of TSNAs such 
409 
as are found in the Sudanese product toombak (Idris et al. 1991; Stanfill et al. 2011). 
410 
Additives 
411 
Flavoring Agents, Spices, Fruit Juices, Sweeteners, Salt, Humectants, Alkaline 
412 
Agents 
413 
After curing, aging, and fermentation, further steps for manufacturing smokeless products 
414 
include cutting the tobacco to the proper width, adding other substances, and adjusting moisture 
415 
and pH levels (Dube et al. 2008). Manufactured ST products, particularly Western-style forms 
416 
(e.g., moist snuff, snus) are known to contain flavoring agents, spices, fruit juices, sweeteners, 
417 
salt, humectants, and alkaline agents (SCENIHR 2008; U.S. House of Representatives 1994; 
418 
Swedish Match 2012; R.J. Reynolds 2012; U.S. Smokeless Tobacco Company 2012; Phillip 
419 
Morris 2012). Flavorings used include cocoa, licorice, rum, spice powders, extracts, oleoresins, 
420 
individual flavor compounds (e.g., menthol, vanillin, etc.), and more than 60 different essential 
421 
oils (e.g., wintergreen, cinnamon, ginger) (SCENIHR 2008; U.S. House of Representatives 
422 
1994). The most common flavor chemicals detected in 85 brands of ST, primarily moist snuff, 
423 
were methyl salicylate, ethyl salicylate, benzaldehyde, citronellol, menthol, nerol, menthone, and 
424 
caryopyllene (Stanfill 2009). Among many mint and wintergreen moist snuff brands, Chen and 
425 
colleagues (2010) found high levels of methyl salicylate (18.5–29.7 milligram per gram [mg/g]), 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
20 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
426 
ethyl salicylate (0.17–5.78 mg/g), and menthol (undetectable–5.25 mg/g). Sweeteners added to 
427 
ST include honey, molasses, saccharin, brown sugar, sugar, and xylitol. Humectants, which are 
428 
added to maintain product moisture, include agents such as glycerol, glycerin, and propylene 
429 
glycol (U.S. House of Representatives 1994; SCENIHR 2008; Swedish Match 2012). 
430 
Dissolvable tobacco products include ingredients such as flavorings, sweeteners, humectants, 
431 
and alkaline agents, as well as fillers, coatings, binders, colorings, and preservatives (R.J. 
432 
Reynolds 2012; U.S. Smokeless Tobacco Company 2012; Phillip Morris 2012).  
433 
Cottage ST products made in the Eastern Mediterranean region, Africa, and South-East Asia may 
434 
contain ingredients such as edible oils, metallic silver, potassium nitrate, and soil. 
435 
 Alkaline modifiers used in manufactured ST products are predominantly chemicals including 
436 
sodium bicarbonate, ammonium bicarbonate, various metallic carbonates (calcium, sodium, and 
437 
ammonium), and slaked lime (calcium hydroxide) (SCENIHR 2008; U.S. House of 
438 
Representatives 1994). Chemical alkaline agents (mostly slaked lime or sodium bicarbonate) are 
439 
also used in the preparation of cottage products (e.g., toombak, nass, shammah) or custom-made 
440 
ST (iqmik). In some rural or tribal areas, custom-made or cottage industry ST products are 
441 
prepared with ashes from the burning of certain woods, plants, or fungi (for example, wood: 
442 
willow, mamón, paricá; plants: Aloe vera, Amaranthus, grapevine; fungi: punk fungi [Phellinus 
443 
igniarius]), which significantly increases product pH (IARC 2007; Renner et al. 2005; 
444 
Blanchette et al. 2002). Unlike rapé products that are mildly acidic, the type of rapé used by the 
445 
Kaxinawás Indians, who live in eastern Peru and in the States of Amazonas and Acre in Brazil, 
446 
includes ashes from the paricá tree (Schizolobium amazonicum) (Lagrou 1996). Products that 
447 
contain alkaline ashes, such as iqmik (Hearn et al. 2013) and nass (Brunnemann et al. 1985), 
448 
have extremely high pH levels (pH 11).   
449 
Non-Tobacco Plant Material 
450 
In several regions of the world, especially South Asia and the Eastern Mediterranean region, 
451 
tobacco is commonly combined with substantial amounts of non-tobacco plant material. In those 
452 
regions, several premade ST products (gutka, mawa, mainpuri, and some zarda products) and 
453 
custom-made products (betel quid, dohra, tombol) contain areca nut, the seeds of the Areca palm 
454 
(Areca catechu) (IARC 2004; IARC 2007; Stanfill et al. 2011; WHO 2004). Products in South 
455 
Asia often contain appreciable amounts of spices  or other plant materials such as betel leaf 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
21 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
456 
(Piper betle) and catechu (Acacia catechu) (IARC 2004; IARC 2007; WHO 2004). Alternatively, 
457 
packets containing non-tobacco condiments, such as supari or pan masala (a mixture of spices, 
458 
flavorings, and other ingredients), can be purchased separately and combined with tobacco prior 
459 
to use. In South Asian and Mediterranean countries, custom-made ST products, such as betel 
460 
quid, dohra, or tombol, are often handmade from tobacco or premade ST (kiwam, zarda, 
461 
toombak) combined with other ingredients, such as alkaline agents, areca nut, spices, 
462 
condiments, or other plant material (such as coconut), and rolled in a betel leaf (IARC 2004; 
463 
IARC 2007; SCENIHR 2008; WHO 2004). Some forms of tombol, such as those used in Yemen, 
464 
contain khat (Catha edulis) (Dr. Ghazi Zaatari, personal communication), a plant that has 
465 
psychoactive properties (Lee 1995). In South America, rapé and other indigenous forms of nasal 
466 
ST used in Brazil and Peru contain tobacco mixed with ingredients such as tonka bean (Dipteryx 
467 
odorata), cinnamon powder, clove buds, camphor, sunflower, Peruvian cocoa, and possibly 
468 
cassava (Wilbert 1987; McKenna 1993; André Oliveira da Silva, personal communication). 
469 
Toxic and Carcinogenic Agents in Smokeless Tobacco Products 
470 
In general, tobacco contains roughly 4,000 chemical constituents (Rodgman and Perfetti 2009), 
471 
including nicotine and other toxicants and carcinogens, which are believed to play a crucial role 
472 
in causing the negative health effects associated with ST use (Khariwala et al. 2012; Yuan et al. 
473 
2012; Yuan et al. 2011).  
474 
Nicotine and Free Nicotine 
475 
Nicotine in tobacco products leads to addiction and persistent use of tobacco products, and thus 
476 
continuous exposure to numerous toxic and carcinogenic agents, which results in devastating 
477 
health consequences and premature deaths worldwide (DHHS 2004). Additionally, nicotine is a 
478 
major precursor of carcinogenic NNK and NNN (IARC 2007). Nicotine has also been associated 
479 
with fetal toxicity and an increase in cardiovascular risk factors (DHHS 2004).  
480 
In an ST product, the entire amount of nicotine present is referred to as total nicotine, which 
481 
includes both free and bound nicotine. The fraction of nicotine present as free nicotine depends 
482 
on the pH of the ST product: A higher pH means that a greater proportion of nicotine will be free 
483 
nicotine, which is the most biologically available form (Tomar and Henningfield 1997; 
484 
Henningfield et al. 1995; Fant et al. 1999; Djordjevic et al. 1995). Products with similar total 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
22 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
485 
nicotine concentrations can contain a wide range of free nicotine concentrations, depending on 
486 
pH (IARC 2007; Richter et al. 2008).  
487 
Products with higher free nicotine concentrations generate faster spikes in blood nicotine 
488 
concentrations and could cause such products to be more addictive (Alpert, Koh and Connolly 
489 
2008; Henningfield, Fant and Tomar 1997). The addition of alkaline agents and the resulting pH 
490 
increase in some products may play a decisive role in the targeted delivery of free nicotine. The 
491 
availability of products spanning a wide pH range may make it easier for ST users to move on to 
492 
products with increasingly higher nicotine levels (i.e., the graduation strategy) (Alpert, Koh and 
493 
Connolly 2008; Connolly 1995).  
494 
The wide ranges of pH, total nicotine, and free nicotine levels among various products have been 
495 
clearly demonstrated in numerous studies (Brunnemann et al. 1985; Djordjevic et al. 1995; 
496 
Henningfield et al. 1995; McNeill et al. 2006; Gupta 2004; Richter et al. 2008; IARC 2007; 
497 
Stanfill et al. 2011; Stepanov et al. 2012; Hearn et al. 2013; Lawler et al. 2013; Zakiullah et al. 
498 
2012). Combined, these studies include more than 20 product types (e.g., zarda, chimó, gutka) 
499 
from 12 countries. Products with the lowest pH include chewing tobacco (Brunnemann 1985; 
500 
IARC 2007; Lawler et al. 2013) and some forms of dry snuff, zarda, and snus (Lawler et al. 
501 
2013; Stanfill et al. 2011). Toombak, khaini, chimó, naswar, tuiber (tobacco water), and some 
502 
varieties of African snuff and gutka have values generally between pH 8 to pH 10 (IARC 2007; 
503 
Gupta 2004; Brunnemann et al. 1985; McNeill 2006; Stanfill et al. 2011; Hearn et al. 2013; 
504 
Zakiullah et al. 2012); products such as iqmik and nass have the highest known values (pH 11.0 
505 
to pH 11.8) (Brunnemann et al 1985; Hearn et al. 2013).  Products that have both high pH values 
506 
(due to alkaline agents) and contain the nicotine-enriched N. rustica can deliver extremely high 
507 
levels of free nicotine (Idris 1991; Brunnemann et al. 1985; Stanfill et al. 2011; Hearn et al. 
508 
2013), such as observed in toombak samples. 
509 
The wide variation of nicotine levels in various ST products used worldwide depends on the 
510 
method of tobacco curing (e.g., air cured, fire cured, or flue cured), variety within the type, 
511 
manufacturing techniques, and tobacco blending approaches used (Borgerding et al.1999; Burton 
512 
et al. 1992). The content of nicotine and other alkaloids in growing tobacco plants is affected by 
513 
numerous factors, including genetics, geographic location, climate, fertilization rates, stalk and 
514 
leaf position, and maturity of the leaf.  
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
23 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
515 
Tobacco-Specific Nitrosamines  
516 
TSNAs are commonly considered among the most potent carcinogens in all tobacco products 
517 
(Hecht 1998; IARC 2007). A total of five TSNAs have been identified in ST products: N’-
518 
nitrosonornicotine (NNN), 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), 4-
519 
(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL), N’-nitrosoanatabine (NAT), and N’-
520 
nitrosoanabasine (NAB). NNN, NNK, and NNAL are among the more common TSNAs and are 
521 
the most carcinogenic (Hecht 1988; Hecht 1998). The carcinogenicity of NNN and NNK has 
522 
been reviewed and established by IARC (IARC 2007) as a Group 1 carcinogen and believed to 
523 
be involved in the induction of oral cancer (Hecht 1998). The pulmonary and pancreatic 
524 
carcinogenicity of NNAL has been demonstrated in a few animal studies (reviewed in Hecht 
525 
1998). NNN, NNK, and NAT generally occur in greater quantities than the other TSNAs 
526 
(Chamberlain et al. 1988; Hoffmann and Djordjevic 1997; Brunnemann et al. 2002; Österdahl et 
527 
al. 2004; Stepanov et al. 2005; Stepanov et al. 2008; Richter et al. 2008; Stanfill et al. 2011; 
528 
Hecht 1998).  
529 
Because of NNAL’s potential for carcinogenicity, the levels of NNAL present are also important, 
530 
but these have been reported in smokeless products only occasionally (Prokopczyk 1995; 
531 
Djordjevic et al. 1993; Richter 2008; Stanfill et al. 2011). However, regardless of the sparse 
532 
reporting, NNAL carcinogenicity should always be taken into consideration because it is 
533 
metabolically formed from NNK in ST users. Moreover, NNAL is commonly utilized as a 
534 
biomarker of exposure to carcinogenic NNK (Hecht 2007).  
535 
Worldwide, the use of different tobacco types, processing techniques, and tobacco blending 
536 
approaches leads to wide variation of TSNA levels in various ST products. Several comparative 
537 
international reports (Brunnemann et al. 1985; McNeill et al. 2006; Stanfill et al. 2011; IARC 
538 
2007) and individual studies on ST products used in different countries (Idris et al. 1991; 
539 
Österdahl et al. 2004; Stepanov et al. 2005; Richter et al. 2008; Stepanov et al. 2012) provide an 
540 
informative view of the variations in TSNA levels among countries and product types. 
541 
The most current and comprehensive analysis of international samples showed wide variation in 
542 
TSNA levels in more than 53 products from 9 countries reported in 2011 (Stanfill et al. 2011). 
543 
The concentration of total TSNAs (that is, the sum of NNK, NNN, NAT, NAB, and NNAL) in 
544 
the products ranged from 0.084 to 992 µg/g. The highest NNK concentrations were found in 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
24 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
545 
Sudanese toombak and dry zarda (Bangladesh) (3.84 µg/g). The highest NNN concentrations 
546 
were observed also in toombak (Sudan), dry zarda (Bangladesh), khaini (India), and handmade 
547 
gutka (India). Handmade gutka and mawa from Pakistan had the lowest NNK concentrations. 
548 
The study found that NNAL levels ranged from 0.004 to 6.77 µg/g, with the highest NNAL 
549 
concentrations in toombak, dry zarda, and khaini (Stanfill et al. 2011). Extremely high 
550 
concentrations of TSNAs were found in saliva from toombak users (Idris et al. 1991, 1992, 
551 
1994). Given the high carcinogenic potency of NNN and NNK, it is not surprising that over 50% 
552 
of oral cancers in Sudanese men are attributed to the use of toombak or other oral products (Idris 
553 
et al. 1994, 1995; Ahmed et al. 2007; SCENIHR 2008).  
554 
Metals and Metalloids  
555 
Metals and metalloids are naturally present in tobacco, and amounts of these substances in 
556 
tobacco are influenced by soil pH, soil composition, and industrial contamination (Adamu et al. 
557 
1989; Mulchi et al. 1992). Smokeless tobacco products have been reported to contain detectable 
558 
levels of several metals that are classified as IARC Group 1 carcinogens (i.e., arsenic, beryllium, 
559 
chromium (VI), cadmium, nickel compounds, polonium-210) or Group 2B carcinogens (i.e., 
560 
cobalt, lead) (IARC 2012a). A review of studies of ST products from Ghana, Canada, India, and 
561 
the United States found detectable concentrations of arsenic (0.1–3.5 g/g), beryllium (0.01–
562 
0.038 g/g), chromium (0.71–21.9 g/g), cadmium (0.3–1.88 g/g), nickel (0.84–13.1 g/g), 
563 
lead (0.23–13 g/g), and cobalt (0.056–1.22 g/g) (Pappas 2011). A report of metals values in 
564 
Pakistani naswar showed detectable levels of arsenic (0.15–14.04 g/g), chromium (0.8–54.05 
565 
g/g), cadmium (0.25–9.2 g/g), nickel (2.2–64.85 g/g), lead (12.4–111.15 g/g), and even 
566 
higher levels of several other metals (Zakiullah et al. 2012).  
567 
Some ST products also contain mercury, a systemic toxicant, and barium, a dermal irritant (Addo 
568 
et al. 2008; Shaikh et al. 1992; Dhaware et al. 2009; Pappas 2011) and metals such as aluminum 
569 
and chromium, which may cause biologic sensitization (Addo et al. 2008; Pappas et al. 2008; 
570 
Pappas 2011). The potential for exposure to several of the toxic metals listed above (barium, 
571 
beryllium, cadmium, cobalt, nickel, and lead) was demonstrated by determining how much of 
572 
these metals transferred from tobacco to artificial saliva (Pappas et al. 2008).  
573 
The amount of copper in ST products is also of interest. The copper content of areca nuts is 
574 
higher than that found in other nuts (Trivedy et al. 1997). A study of seven ST product types from 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
25 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
575 
India (zarda, creamy snuff, khaini, etc.) revealed very high levels of copper in four gutka 
576 
products (237–656 g/g) compared with other gutka products or other types of ST products 
577 
(0.012–36.1 g/g) (Dhaware et al. 2009). Areca nut use has been linked to oral submucous 
578 
fibrosis (OSF), a condition that affects the mouth, pharynx, and esophagus. It has been suggested 
579 
that copper upregulates lysyl oxidase, resulting in the excessive cross linking and accumulation 
580 
of collagen that occurs in OSF (Trivedy et al. 1997).  
581 
Among the previously mentioned GothiaTek standards set for the Swedish tobacco industry are 
582 
guidelines for the allowable levels of metals in Swedish snus: cadmium (1.0 g/g), lead (2.0 
583 
g/g), arsenic (0.5 g/g), nickel (4.5 g/g), and chromium (3.0 g/g). The average levels of 
584 
metals in Swedish snus in 2009 were: cadmium (0.6 g/g), lead (0.3 g/g), arsenic (0.1 g/g), 
585 
nickel (1.3 g/g), and chromium (0.8 g/g) (Rutqvist et al. 2011). These low levels of metals in 
586 
Swedish snus demonstrate that the levels of metals in ST can be monitored and held below 
587 
certain limits.  
588 
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons 
589 
Compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), phenols, and volatile aldehydes 
590 
are formed from burning wood and sawdust (Stepanov et al. 2010; Miller and Fowlkes 1999). 
591 
During fire curing, tobacco is exposed to wood smoke, and these substances can be deposited on 
592 
the curing leaf. Indeed, levels of PAHs and phenols tend to be higher in tobacco that is fire cured 
593 
rather than air cured (Bhide et al. 1987, 1989; Hearn et al. 2013; Leffingwell 1999). Products 
594 
made with fire-cured tobacco (e.g., moist snuff) have higher levels of PAHs, including PAHs that 
595 
are IARC Group 1 or 2 carcinogens, than products such as snus, which do not contain fire-cured 
596 
tobacco (Stepanov et al. 2008, 2010).  
597 
Ten PAH compounds have been designated as IARC carcinogens or potential carcinogens: in 
598 
Group 1, benzo[a]pyrene (BaP); in Group 2A, dibenz[a,h]anthracene; and in Group 2B, 
599 
benzo[b]fluoranthene, benzo[j]fluoranthene, benzo[k]fluoranthene, dibenzo[a,i]pyrene, 
600 
indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene, 5-methylchrysene, naphthalene, and benz[a]anthracene (IARC 2012b). 
601 
All of these compounds have been found in smokeless tobacco (Stepanov et al. 2010).  
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
26 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
602 
Areca Nut  
603 
Areca nut, an ingredient in some ST products, is an IARC Group 1 carcinogen (IARC 2012a). 
604 
Areca nuts are seeds from the Areca palm (Areca catechu), which is native to South-East Asia 
605 
and Eastern Africa. The seed can be used in the ripe or unripe form; can be dried, baked, or 
606 
roasted; and then cut into slices, crushed, or consumed whole. Betel quid often contains areca 
607 
nut, among other ingredients such as tobacco, catechu, alkaline agents, and spices, wrapped in a 
608 
piper betel leaf (IARC 2004). 
609 
Areca nut contains compounds such as arecoline and guvacoline that can react with nitrite to 
610 
form areca-specific nitrosamine compounds (ASNAs) (IARC 2004). These ASNAs are also 
611 
formed in the mouth during use of products containing areca nut (Nair et al. 1987). The areca-
612 
derived nitrosoguvacoline (NG) has been shown to induce pancreatic tumors in lab animals, and 
613 
a mixture of NG and NNK has been shown to induce lung tumors (Rivenson 1988). Another 
614 
ASNA compound, 3-(N-nitrosomethylamino) propionaldehyde, is both highly cytotoxic and 
615 
genotoxic to human buccal epithelial cells, a finding that is important to understanding tumor 
616 
induction among users of areca nut–containing products (Sundqvist 1989). Areca nut is a 
617 
carcinogen and a very harmful substance that should not be included in tobacco products (IARC 
618 
2004).  
619 
Other Harmful Agents  
620 
Flavoring agents are added to ST products worldwide (U.S. House of Representatives 1994; 
621 
Swedish Match 2012; Dabur India Ltd. 2012):  
622 
  Diphenyl ether, a flavor compound with a harsh metallic aroma (Burdock 1995), and 
623 
camphor have been identified as highly concentrated constituents of some tobacco products 
624 
and certain spice condiment packs used to make betel quid (Joseph Lisko, personal 
625 
communication). Diphenyl ether irritates mucus membranes and can cause damage to the 
626 
liver, kidney, spleen, or thyroid after prolonged exposure (Material Safety Data Sheet 1994; 
627 
International Programme CS 1997). Camphor can adversely affect the neurological, 
628 
respiratory, cardiovascular, and gastrointestinal systems. Even small amounts of camphor 
629 
have caused convulsions followed by depression (International Programme CS 1988). 
630 
Ingestion of these substances is of note since betel quid can be swallowed during use.  
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
27 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
631 
  Brazilian rapé, a nasal product, contains tobacco mixed with tonka bean, cinnamon powder, 
632 
or clove buds, but usually lacks alkaline agents. Varieties of rapé produced in the Minas 
633 
Gerais State of Brazil are known to contain extremely high levels of coumarin, a liver 
634 
toxicant, which is derived from tonka bean and cinnamon (André Oliveira da Silva, personal 
635 
communication). 
636 
  Energy-enhanced smokeless products such as Revved Up contain stimulants (caffeine, 
637 
ginseng), taurine, and vitamins B and C.  
638 
  Some forms of tombol contain khat (Catha edulis), a plant that contains cathinone, an 
639 
alkaloid with amphetamine-like stimulant properties, which purportedly causes euphoria, 
640 
excitement, and loss of appetite (Lee 1995).  
641 
Gaps and Limitations of the Current Evidence Base 
642 
Further research is required to better characterize the chemical contents of a wider range of 
643 
products, including ST products that are used in combination with other non-tobacco plant 
644 
material. Research is also needed into the role of microorganisms (i.e., bacteria and mold) in 
645 
altering product chemistry (i.e., generating nitrite and nitrosamines, producing mycotoxins). The 
646 
effects of bacteria and mold on TSNA levels in products and the conditions that increase TSNA 
647 
levels are also subjects in need of further study.  
648 
Because of the complexity of ST products—which can include a variety of tobacco types, 
649 
chemical additives, non-tobacco plant ingredients, and microorganisms—ST products should not 
650 
be viewed as a single homogenous product category for assessing composition or health effects. 
651 
Because of these widely varying characteristics, along with different patterns of use, ST products 
652 
are likely to differ across regions in their abuse liability, toxicity, carcinogenicity, and impact on 
653 
health. 
654 
Summary/Best Practices 
655 
  Curing: Air curing is preferred over other methods as TSNAs are lower products with air 
656 
cured-tobacco  
657 
  Pasteurization rather than fermentation is preferred. 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
28 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
658 
  Storage: Not storing tobacco in warm weather for prolonged periods of time. 
659 
  Additives: Eliminating carcinogenic products such as areca nut and tonka beans. 
660 
  Quick drying tobacco: Many studies have investigated techniques for reducing TSNA 
661 
levels in tobacco (Anderson et al. 1989; Lewis et al. 2008; Ricket et al. 2008). One study 
662 
by Wiernik and colleagues proposed a method of quick drying tobacco at 70C for 24 
663 
hours to remove excess water and reduce growth of microorganisms, which resulted in 
664 
decreased nitrite and TSNA levels (Wiernik 1995). Drying tobacco quickly at this stage 
665 
of curing reduces the microbial activity but lowers tobacco leaf quality 
666 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
29 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
667 
References 
668 
Adamu CA, Bell RE, Mulchi CL, Chaney RL. Residual metal levels in soils and leaf accumulations in tobacco a 
669 
decade following farmland application of municipal sludge. Environ Pollut. 1989;56:113–26. 
670 
Addo MA, Gbadago JK, Affum HA, Adom T, Ahmed K, Okley GM. Mineral profile of Ghanaian dried tobacco 
671 
leaves and local snuff: a comparative study. J Radioanal Nucl Chem. 2008;277:517–24.  
672 
Ahmed HG, Mahgoob RM. Impact of toombak dipping in the etiology of oral cancer: gender-exclusive hazard in the 
673 
Sudan. J Cancer Res Ther. 2007;3:127–30. 
674 
Alpert HR, Koh H, Connolly GN. Free nicotine content and strategic marketing of moist snuff tobacco products in 
675 
the United States: 2000–2006. Tob Control. 2008;17:332–8. 
676 
Andersen RA, Burton HR, Fleming PD, Hamilton-Kemp TR. Effect of storage conditions on nitrosated, acylated, 
677 
and oxidized pyridine alkaloid derivatives in smokeless tobacco products. Cancer Res. 1989;49:5895–900. 
678 
Ayo-Yusuf OA, Reddy PS, van den Borne BW. Association of snuff use with chronic bronchitis among South 
679 
African women: implications for tobacco harm reduction. Tob Control. 2008;17:99–104. 
680 
doi:10.1136/tc.2007.022608  
681 
Bao P, Huang H, Hu ZY, Haggblom MM, Zhu YG. Impact of temperature, CO2 fixation and nitrate reduction on 
682 
selenium reduction, by a paddy soil clostridium strain. J Appl Microbiol. 2013;114(3):703–12. 
683 
Bhide SV, Nair J, Maru GB, Nair UJ, Kameshwar Rao BV, Chakraborty MK, et al. Tobacco-specific N-
684 
nitrosamines [TSNA] in green mature and processed tobacco leaves from India. Beit Tabakforsch. 1987;14:29–32. 
685 
Bhide SV, Kulkarni JR, Padma PR, Amonkar AJ, Maru GB, Nair UJ, et al. Studies on tobacco specific nitrosamines 
686 
and other carcinogenic agents in smokeless tobacco products. In: Sanghvi LD and Notani PP, editors. Tobacco and 
687 
health: the Indian scene. Proceedings of the UICC workshop “Tobacco or Health.” Bombay: UICC and Tata 
688 
Memorial Centre, Bombay; 1989:121–31. 
689 
Bhonsle RBMurti PRGupta PC. Tobacco habits in India. In  Gupta PCHamner JE 3rdMurti PR, editors. 
690 
Control of tobacco-related cancers and other diseases. Proceedings of an international symposium, Tata Institute of 
691 
Fundamental Research. Bombay, January 15–19, 1990. Bombay: Oxford University Press; 1992. p. 2546. 
692 
Blanchette RA, Renner CC, Held BW, Enoch C, Angstman S. The current use of Phellinus igniarius by the Eskimos 
693 
of western Alaska. Mycologist. 2002;16(4):142–5. 
694 
Boffetta P, Hecht S, Gray N, Gupta P, Straif K. Smokeless tobacco and cancer. Lancet Oncol. 2008 Jul;9(7):667–75. 
695 
Borgerding MF, Perfetti TA, Ralapati S. Determination of nicotine in tobacco, tobacco processing environments and 
696 
tobacco products. In: Gorrod JW, Jacob P 3rd, editors. Analytical determination of nicotine and related compounds 
697 
and their metabolites. Amsterdam: Elsevier; 1999. p. 285–391. 
698 
Brunnemann KD, Genoble L, Hoffmann D. N-nitrosamines in chewing tobacco: an international comparison. J 
699 
Agric Food Chem. 1985;33:1178–81. 
700 
Brunnemann KD, Prokopczyk B, Djordjevic MV, Hoffmann D. Formation and analysis of tobacco-specific N-
701 
nitrosamines. Crit Rev Toxicol. 1996;26(2):121–37. 
702 
Burdock GA, editor. Fenaroli’s handbook of flavor ingredients. Vol. II. 3rd ed. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press; 1995.  
703 
Burton HR, Dye NK, Bush LP. Distribution of tobacco constituents in tobacco leaf tissue. 1. Tobacco-specific 
704 
nitrosamines, nitrate, nitrite, and alkaloids. J Agric Food Chem.1992;40(6):1050–5. 
705 
Burton HR, Bush LP, Djordjevic MV. Influence of temperature and humidity on the accumulation of tobacco-
706 
specific nitrosamines in stored burley tobacco. J Agric Food Chem. 1989a;37:1372–7. 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
30 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
707 
Burton HR, Childs GH, Anderson RA, Fleming PD. Changes in chemical composition of burley tobacco during 
708 
senescence and curing. 3. Tobacco-specific nitrosamines. J Agric Food Chem. 1989b;37:426–30. 
709 
Brunnemann KD, Qi J, Hoffmann D. Chemical profile of two types of oral snuff tobacco. Food Chem Toxicol. 
710 
2002;40(11):1699–703. 
711 
Carpenter CM, Connolly GN, Ayo-Yusuf OA, Wayne GF. Developing smokeless tobacco products for smokers: an 
712 
examination of tobacco industry documents. Tob Control. 2009;18:54–9. doi: 10.1136/t.c.2008.026583  
713 
Chamberlain WJ, Schlotzhauer WS, Chortyk OT. Chemical composition of nonsmoking tobacco products. J Agric 
714 
Food Chem. 1988;36:48–50. 
715 
Chen C, Isabelle LM, Pickworth WB, Pankow JF. Levels of mint and wintergreen flavorants: smokeless tobacco 
716 
products vs. confectionery products. Food Chem Toxicol. 2010 Feb;48(2):755–63. 
717 
Cockrell WT, Roberts JS, Kane BE, Fulghum RS. Microbiology of oral smokeless tobacco products. Tobacco Int. 
718 
1989;55–7. Available from: http://legacy.library.ucsf.edu/documentStore/m/t/d/mtd27d00/Smtd27d00.pdf 
719 
Connolly GN. The marketing of nicotine addiction by one oral snuff manufacturer. Tob Control 1995;4:73–9. 
720 
Connolly GN, Richter P, Aleguas A, Pechacek TF, Stanfill SB, Alpert HR. Unintentional child poisonings by 
721 
ingestion of conventional and novel tobacco products. Pediatrics. 2010;125(5):896–9.  
722 
Dabur India, Ltd. Dabur Red Toothpowder. [cited 2012 May 1]. Available from: http://www.dabur.com/Export-
723 
Dabur%20Red%20Toothpowder 
724 
Dhaware D, Deshpande A, Khandekar RN, Chowgule R. Determination of toxic metals in Indian smokeless tobacco 
725 
products. Scientific World Journal. 2009;9:1140–7. 
726 
Di Giacomo M, Paolino M, Silvestro D, Vigliotta G, Imperi F, Visca P, et al. Microbial community structure and 
727 
dynamics of dark fire-cured tobacco fermentation. Appl Environ Microbiol. 2007;73:825–37. doi: 
728 
10.1128/AEM.02378-06 
729 
Djordjevic MV, Fan J, Bush LP, Brunnemann KD, Hoffmann D. Effects of storage conditions on levels of tobacco-
730 
specific N-nitrosamines and N-nitrosamino acids in U.S. moist snuff. J Agric Food Chem. 1993;41:1790–4. 
731 
Djordjevic MV, Hoffman D, Glynn T, Connolly GN. U.S. commercial brands of moist snuff, 1994. I. Assessment of 
732 
nicotine, moisture, and pH. Tob Control1995;4:62–6. 
733 
Djordjevic M, Gay SL, Bush LP, Chaplin JF. Tobacco-specific nitrosamine accumulation and distribution in flue-
734 
cured tobacco alkaloid isolines. J Agric Food Chem.1989; 37(3):752–6. 
735 
Dube MF, Cantrell DV, Mua JP, Holton DE, Stokes CS, Figlar JN, inventors. R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, 
736 
assignee. United States patent application 20080029110. 2008 Feb 7. Available from: 
737 
http://appft1.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-
738 
Parser?Sect1=PTO1&Sect2=HITOFF&d=PG01&p=1&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsrchnum.html&r=1&f=G&l=5
739 
0&s1=%2220080029110%22.PGNR.&OS=DN/20080029110&RS=DN/20080029110 
740 
Eriksen M, Mackay J, Ross H. The tobacco atlas. 4th ed. Atlanta: American Cancer Society; New York: World 
741 
Lung Foundation; 2012. Available from: www.tobaccoatlas.org  
742 
Fant RV, Henningfield JE, Nelson RA, Pickworth WB. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of moist snuff in 
743 
humans. Tob Control. 1999;8:387–92. 
744 
Fisher MT, Bennett CB, Hayes A, Kargalioglu Y, Knox BL, Xu D, et al. Sources of and technical approaches for the 
745 
abatement of tobacco specific nitrosamine formation in moist smokeless tobacco products. Food Chem Toxicol
746 
2012;50:942–8. 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
31 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
747 
Furer V, Hersch M, Silvetzki N, Breuer GS, Zevin S. Nicotiana glauca (tree tobacco) intoxication—two cases in 
748 
one family. J Med Toxicol. 2011;7(1):47–51. 
749 
Gupta P. Laboratory testing of smokeless tobacco products. Final report to the India Office of the WHO (Allotment 
750 
No.: SE IND TOB 001.RB.02). New Delhi; 2004. 
751 
Hearn BA, Ding YS, England L, Kim S, Vaughan C, Stanfill SB, et al. Chemical analysis of Alaskan iq’mik 
752 
smokeless tobacco. Nicotine Tob Res. 2013;15(7):1283-8. Epub 2013 Jan 3. doi: 10.1093.ntr/nts270 
753 
Hecht SS, Carmella SG, Murphy SE, Riley WT, Le, C, Luo X, et al. Similar exposure to a tobacco-specific 
754 
carcinogen in smokeless tobacco users and cigarette smokers. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2007;16:1567–
755 
72. doi: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-07-0227  
756 
Hecht SS, Chen CB, Hirota N, Ornaf RM, Tso TC, Hoffman D. Tobacco-specific nitrosamines: formation from 
757 
nicotine in vitro and during tobacco curing and carcinogenicity in strain A mice. J Natl Cancer Inst. 1978;60(4):819–
758 
24. 
759 
Hecht SS, Ornaf RM, Hoffman D. Chemical studies on tobacco smoke. XXXIII. N’-nitrosonornicotine in tobacco: 
760 
analysis of possible contributing factors and biologic implications. J Natl Cancer Inst. 1974;54(5):1237–44. 
761 
Hecht SS. Biochemistry, biology, and carcinogenicity of tobacco-specific N-nitrosamines. Chem Res Toxicol. 
762 
1998;11(6):559–603. 
763 
Hecht SS, Hoffmann D. Tobacco-specific nitrosamines, an important group of carcinogens in tobacco and tobacco 
764 
smoke. Carcinogenesis. 1988;9(6):875–84. 
765 
Henningfield JE, Fant RV, Tomar SL. Smokeless tobacco: an addicting drug. Adv Dental Res. 1997;11:330–5. doi: 
766 
10.1177/08959374970110030401 
767 
Henningfield JE, Radzius A, Cone EJ. Estimation of available nicotine content of six smokeless tobacco products. 
768 
Tob Control. 1995;4:57–61. 
769 
Hoffmann D, Djordjevic MV, Fan J, Zang E, Glynn T, Connolly GN. Five leading U.S. commercial brands of moist 
770 
snuff in 1994: assessment of carcinogenic N-nitrosamines. J Natl Cancer Inst. 1995;87(24):1862–9. 
771 
Idris AM, Ahmed HM, Malik MO. Toombak dipping and cancer of the oral cavity in the Sudan: a case-control 
772 
study. Int J Cancer 1995;63:477–80.  
773 
Idris AM, Nair J, Friesen M, Ohshima H, Brouet I, Faustman EM, et al. Carcinogenic tobacco-specific nitrosamines 
774 
are present at unusually high levels in the saliva of oral snuff users in Sudan. Carcinogenesis. 1992;13(6):1001–5. 
775 
Idris AM, Nair J, Ohshima H, Friesen M, Brouet I, Faustman EM, et al. Unusually high levels of carcinogenic 
776 
tobacco-specific nitrosamines in Sudan snuff (toombak). Carcinogenesis. 1991;12(6):1115–8. 
777 
Idris AM, Prokopczyk B, Hoffmann D. Toombak: a major risk factor for cancer of the oral cavity in Sudan. Prev 
778 
Med. 1994;23:832–9.  
779 
International Agency for Research on Cancer. Smokeless tobacco and some tobacco-specific N-nitrosamines. IARC 
780 
monographs on the evaluation of carcinogenic risks to humans. Vol. 89. Lyon, France: World Health Organization, 
781 
International Agency for Research on Cancer; 2007 [cited 2012 April 24]. Available from: 
782 
http://monographs.iarc.fr/ENG/Monographs/vol89/index.php 
783 
International Agency for Research on Cancer. Betel-quid and areca-nut chewing and some areca-nut-derived 
784 
nitrosamines. IARC monographs on the evaluation of carcinogenic risks to humans. Vol. 85. Lyon, France: World 
785 
Health Organization, International Agency for Research on Cancer; 2004 [cited 2012 April 24]. Available from: 
786 
http://monographs.iarc.fr/ENG/Monographs/vol85/index.php 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
32 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
787 
International Agency for Research on Cancer. A review of human carcinogens: personal habits and indoor 
788 
combustions. IARC monographs on the evaluation of carcinogenic risks to humans. Vol. 100E. Lyon, France: World 
789 
Health Organization, International Agency for Research on Cancer; 2012a [cited 2012 July 16]. Available from: 
790 
http://monographs.iarc.fr/ENG/Monographs/vol100E/mono100E.pdf 
791 
International Agency for Research on Cancer. Agents classified by the IARC monographs, Volumes 1–106. Updated 
792 
June 28, 2012b. [cited 2012 July 16]. Available from: 
793 
http://monographs.iarc.fr/ENG/Classification/ClassificationsAlphaOrder.pdf  
794 
International Agency for Research on Cancer. Ingested nitrate and nitrite and cyanobacterial peptide toxins. IARC 
795 
monographs on the evaluation of carcinogenic risks to humans. Vol. 94. Lyon, France: World Health Organization, 
796 
International Agency for Research on Cancer; 2010. 
797 
International Programme on Chemical Safety. Diphenyl ether. INCHEM Database. ICSC Number: 0791; 1997 
798 
[cited 2012 April 24]. Available from: http://www.inchem.org/documents/icsc/icsc/eics0791.htm 
799 
International Programme on Chemical Safety. Camphor. INCHEM Database. PIM095; 1988 [cited 2013 April 24]. 
800 
Available from: http://www.inchem.org/documents/pims/pharm/camphor.htm 
801 
Khariwala SS, Carmella SF, Stepanov I, Fernandes P, Lassig AA, Yueh B, et al. Elevated levels of 1-hydroxypyrene 
802 
and N’-nitrosonornicotine in smokers with head and neck cancer: a matched control study. Head Neck. Epub 2012 
803 
Jul 17. doi: 10.1002/hed.23085 
804 
Lagrou E. Xamanismo e representagao entre os kaxinawá [Shamanism and representation among the Kaxinawa]. In: 
805 
Langdon EJ, editor. Xaminismo no Brasil: novas perspectives [Shamanism in Brazil: new perspectives]. 
806 
Florianόpolis, Brazil: Federal University of Santa Catarina Publishing House; 1996. p. 197–231. 
807 
Lawson K. Altria will launch verve – a non-dissolving nicotine disc [Internet]. Tobacco Pub. 2012 Jun 18 [cited 
808 
2013 Apr 23]. Available from: http://www.tobaccopub.net/tobacco-info/altria-will-launch-verve-a-non-dissolving-
809 
nicotine-disc 
810 
Lee MM. The identification of cathinone in khat (Catha edulis): a time study. J Forensic Sci. 1995;40(1):116–21. 
811 
Leffingwell JC. Leaf chemistry: basic chemical constituents of tobacco leaf and differences among tobacco types. 
812 
In: Davis DL, Nielson MT, editors. Tobacco: production, chemistry, and technology. London: Blackwell Publishing; 
813 
1999. p. 265–84. 
814 
Lewis RS, Jack AM, Morris JW, Robert VJM, Gavilano LB, Siminszky B, et al. RNA interference (RNAi)–induced 
815 
suppression of nicotine demethylase activity reduces levels of a key carcinogen in cured tobacco leaves. Plant 
816 
Biotechnol J. 2008 May;6(4):346–54. Epub 2008 Feb 14. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-7652.2008.00324.x 
817 
Lewis R, Nicholson J. Aspects of the evolution of Nicotiana tabacum L. and the status of the United States 
818 
Nicotiana germplasm collection. Genet Resour Crop Ev. 2007;54(4):727–40. 
819 
Material Safety Data Sheet. Diphenyl ether, MSDS# BWXKJ [Internet]. St. Louis: Sigma Chemical Co; 1994 [cited 
820 
2012 Apr 24]. Available from: http://hazard.com/msds/f2/bwx/bwxkj.html 
821 
McKenna T. Food of the gods: the search for the original tree of knowledge: a radical history of plants, drugs, and 
822 
human evolution. New York: Bantam; 1993. 
823 
McNeill A, Bedi R, Islam S, Alkhatib MN, West R. Levels of toxins in oral tobacco products in the UK. Tob 
824 
Control. 2006;15(1):64–7. doi: 10.1136/tc2005.013011  
825 
Miller RD, Fowlkes DJ. Dark fire-cured tobacco. In: Davis DL, Nielson MT, editors. Tobacco: production, 
826 
chemistry, and technology. London: Blackwell Publishing; 1999. p. 164–82. 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
33 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
827 
Mulchi CL, Adamu CA, Bell PF, Chaney RL. Residual heavy metal concentrations in sludge amended coastal plain 
828 
soils – II. Predicting metal concentrations in tobacco from soil test information. Commun Soil Sci Plant Anal. 
829 
1992;23(9&10):1053–69. 
830 
Nair J, Nair UJ, Ohshima H, Bhide SV, Bartsch H. Endogenous nitrosation in the oral cavity of chewers while 
831 
chewing betel quid with or without tobacco. In: Bartsch H, O’Neill IK, Schulte‐Hermann R, editors. Relevance of 
832 
N‐nitroso compounds to human cancer: exposures and mechanisms. IARC Scientific Publications no. 84. Lyon, 
833 
France: IARC; 1987. p. 465–9.  
834 
Nasr MM, Reepmeyer JC, Tang Y. In vitro study of nicotine release from smokeless tobacco. J AOAC Int. 
835 
1998;81(3):540–3. 
836 
Österdahl BG, Jansson C, Paccou A. Decreased levels of tobacco-specific N-nitrosamines in moist snuff on the 
837 
Swedish market. J Agric Food Chem. 2004 Aug;11;52(16):5085–8. 
838 
Pappas RS. Toxic elements in tobacco and in cigarette smoke: inflammation and sensitization. Metallomics. 2011 
839 
Nov;3(11):1181–98. Epub 2011 Jul 28. doi10.1039/c1mt00066g  
840 
Pappas, RS. Stanfill SB, Watson C., Ashley DL. Analysis of toxic metals in commercial moist snuff and Alaskan 
841 
iqmik. J Anal Toxicol. 2008 May;32(4):281–91. 
842 
Pauly JL, Paszkiewicz G. Cigarette smoke, bacteria, mold, microbial toxins, and chronic lung inflammation. J 
843 
Oncol. 2011;2011:819129. 
844 
Peedin GF. Production practices: flue-cured tobacco. In: Davis DL, Nielsen MT, editors. Tobacco: production, 
845 
chemistry, and technology. London: Blackwell Publishing; 1999. p. 104–42. 
846 
Phillip Morris USA. Smokeless tobacco: Ingredients [Internet]. Richmond, VA: Phillip Morris USA; c1999–2012 
847 
[cited 2012 May 30]. Available from: 
848 
http://www.philipmorrisusa.com/en/cms/Products/Smokeless_Tobacco/Ingredients/default.aspx 
849 
Prokopczyk B, Wu M, Cox JE, Amin S, Desai D, Idris AM, et al. Improved methodology for the quantitative 
850 
assessment of tobacco-specific N-nitrosamines in tobacco by supercritical fluid extraction. J Agric Food Chem. 
851 
1995;43:916–22. 
852 
R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company. Brand compounds [Internet database].Winston-Salem, NC: R.J. Reynolds; 2012 
853 
[cited 2012 July 16]. Available from: http://www.rjrt.com/smokelessingredientsbybrand.aspx  
854 
Rainey CL, Conder PA, Goodpaster JV. Chemical characterization of dissolvable tobacco products promoted to 
855 
reduce harm. J Agric Food Chem. 2011;59:2745–51. 
856 
Renner CC, Enoch C, Patten CA, Ebbert JO, Hurt RD, Moyer TP, et al. Iqmik: a form of smokeless tobacco used 
857 
among Alaska Natives. Am J of Health Behav. 2005;29(6):588–94. 
858 
Ricket WS, Joza PJ, Sharifi M, Wu J, Lauterbach JH. Reductions in the tobacco specific nitrosamine (TSNA) 
859 
content of tobaccos taken from commercial Canadian cigarettes and corresponding reductions in TSNA deliveries in 
860 
mainstream smoke from such cigarettes. Regul Toxicol Pharmacol. 2008 Aug;51(3):306–10. Epub 2008 Apr 24 
861 
Rivenson A, Hoffmann D, Prokopczyk B, Amin S, Hecht SS. Induction of lung and exocrine pancreas tumors in 
862 
F344 rats by tobacco-specific and areca-derived N-nitrosamines. Cancer Res 1988 Dec 1;48(23):6912–7. 
863 
Rodgman A, Perfetti TThe chemical components of tobacco and tobacco smoke. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press; 
864 
2009. doi:10.1201/9781420078848 
865 
Rubinstein I, Pederson GW. Bacillus species are present in chewing tobacco sold in the United States and evoke 
866 
plasma exudation from the oral mucosa. Clin Diagn Lab Immunol. 2002 Sept;9(5):1057–60. 
867 
doi: 10.1128/CDLI.9.5.1057-1060.2002 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
34 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
868 
Rutqvist LE, Curvall M, Hassler T, Ringberger T, Wahlberg I. Swedish snus and the GothiaTek standard. Harm 
869 
Reduct J. 2011;8:11. Epub 2011 May 16. doi: 10.1186/1477-7517-8-11 
870 
Sapkota AR, Berger S, Vogel TM. Human pathogens abundant in the bacterial metagenome of cigarettes. Environ 
871 
Health Perspect. 2010 March;118(3):351–6. Epub 2009 Oct 22. doi: 10.1289/ehp.0901201 
872 
Scientific Committee on Emerging and Newly Identified Health Risks (SCENIHR). Health effects of smokeless 
873 
tobacco products. Brussels: European Commission; 2008 [cited 2010 July 8]. Available from: 
874 
http://ec.europa.eu/health/archive/ph risk/committees/04 scenihr/docs/scenihr o 013.pdf  
875 
Seidenberg AB, Rees VW, Connolly GN. RJ Reynolds goes international with new dissolvable tobacco products. 
876 
Tob Control. 2012 May;21(3):368–9. Epub 2011 Oct 7. doi: 10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2011-050116  
877 
Shaikh AN, Khandekar RN, Anand SJS, Mishra UC. Determination of some toxic trace elements in Indian tobacco 
878 
and its smoke. J Radioanal Nucl Chem. 1992;163:349–53. 
879 
Sisson VA, Severson RF. Alkaloid composition of Nicotiana species. Beitr Tabakforsch. 1990;14:327–39. 
880 
Southern Smokeless Tobacco Company. Revved up [Internet]. [cited 2012 Apr 18]. Available from: 
881 
http://www.southernsmokeless.com/Revved-up.html 
882 
Spiegelhalder B, Fischer S. Formation of tobacco-specific nitrosamines. Crit Rev Toxicol. 1991;21:241. 
883 
Stanfill SB, Connolly GN, Zhang L, Jia LT, Henningfield JE, Richter P, et al. Global surveillance of oral tobacco 
884 
products: total nicotine, unionised nicotine and tobacco-specific N-nitrosamines. Tob Control. 2011 May;20(3):e2. 
885 
Epub 2010 Nov 25. doi:10.1136/tc.2010.037465  
886 
Stanfill SB. Utilizing GC/MS to eliminate flavor-related interferences in nicotine analysis [poster presentation]. 5th 
887 
National Summit on Smokeless and Spit Tobacco. Madison, WI. September 2009. 
888 
Steenkamp PA, van Heerden FR, van Wyk BE. Accidental fatal poisoning by Nicotiana glauca: identification of 
889 
anabasine by high performance liquid chromatography/photodiode array/mass spectrometry. Forensic Sci Int. 2002 
890 
Jul 17;127(3):208–17. 
891 
Stepanov I, Biener L, Knezevich A, Nyman AL, Bliss R, Jensen J, et al. Monitoring tobacco-specific N-nitrosamines 
892 
and nicotine in novel Marlboro and Camel smokeless tobacco products: findings from round 1 of the New Product 
893 
Watch. Nicotine Tob Res. 2012 Mar;14(3):274–81. Epub 2011 Oct 29. doi: 10.1093/ntr/ntr209 
894 
Stepanov I, Hecht SS, Ramakrishnan S, Gupta PC. Tobacco-specific nitrosamines in smokeless tobacco products 
895 
marketed in India. Int J Cancer. 2005 Aug 10;116(1):16–9. 
896 
Stepanov I, Jensen J, Hatsukami D, Hecht SS. New and traditional smokeless tobacco: comparison of toxicant and 
897 
carcinogen levels. Nic Tob Research. 2008 Dec;10(12):1773–82. doi: 10.1080/14622200802443544 
898 
Sundqvist K, Liu Y, Nair J, Bartsch H, Arvidson K, Grafström RC. Cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of areca nut–
899 
related compounds in cultured human buccal epithelial cells. Cancer Res. 1989 Oct 1;49(19):5294–8. 
900 
Swedish Match. Firebreak – the smoke-free tobacco product of the future [Internet]. 2006 Mar 23 [cited on 2012 
901 
May 2]. Available from: http://www.swedishmatch.com/en/Media/Pressreleases/Press-releases/Other/Firebreak--
902 
the-smoke-free-tobacco-product-of-the-future/ 
903 
Swedish Match. Ingredients in snus [Internet]. 2012 [cited on 2012 Jul 16]. Available from: 
904 
http://www.swedishmatch.com/en/Our-business/Snus-and-snuff/Ingredients-in-snus/ 
905 
Tomar SL, Henningfield JE. Review of the evidence that pH is a determinant of nicotine dosage from oral use of 
906 
smokeless tobacco. Tob Control. 1997;6(3):219–25. 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
35 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
907 
Trivedy C, Baldwin D, Warnakulasuriya S, Johnson N, Peters T. Copper content in Areca catechu (betel nut) 
908 
products and oral submucous fibrosis. Lancet. 1997 May 17;349(9063):1447. 
909 
Tso TC. Seed to smoke. In: Davis DL, Nielson MT, editors. Tobacco: production, chemistry, and technology. 
910 
London: Blackwell Publishing; 1999. p. 1–31. 
911 
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service. The health consequences of smoking: a 
912 
report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease 
913 
Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking 
914 
and Health; 2004. Available from: http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/sgr/2004/complete_report/index.htm 
915 
U.S. House of Representatives. Smokeless tobacco ingredient list as of April 4, 1994. U.S. House of 
916 
Representatives, Report to the Subcommittee on Health and the Environment, Committee on Energy and Commerce, 
917 
Washington, DC: Patton, Boggs, and Blow; May 3, 1994. Brown and Williamson. Bates No. 566415479/5524. 
918 
http://legacy.library.ucsf.edu/tid/pac33f00/pdf 
919 
U.S. Smokeless Tobacco Company. Ingredients [Internet]. C2009–2013 [cited 2012 July 16]. Available from: 
920 
http://www.ussmokeless.com/en/cms/Products/Ingredients Nav/Ingredients/default.aspx 
921 
Wahlberg I, Wiernik A, Christakopoulos A, and Johansson L. Tobacco-specific nitrosamines. A multidisciplinary 
922 
research area. Agro Food Industry Hi Tech. 1999 Jul/Aug;23–8. 
923 
Wiernik A, Christakopoulos A, Johansson L, Wahlberg I. Effect of air-curing on the chemical composition of 
924 
tobacco. Recent Adv Tob Sci. 1995;21:39–80. 
925 
Wilbert J. Tobacco and shamanism in South America. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press; 1987. 
926 
Winn W, Allen S, Janda W, Koneman E, Procop G, Schreckenberger P, et al. Koneman’s color atlas and textbook of 
927 
diagnostic microbiology. Sixth edition. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2006. Available from: 
928 
http://books.google.com/books/about/Koneman s color atlas and textbook of di.html?id=xzIsZo44GkoC 
929 
World Health Organization Study. WHO report on the global tobacco epidemic, 2011. Appendix VIII, Table 8.2: 
930 
Crude smokeless tobacco prevalence in WHO member states. Geneva: World Health Organization; 2011. Available 
931 
from: http://www.who.int/tobacco/global report/2011/en tfi global report 2011 appendix VIII table 2.pdf 
932 
World Health Organization. Report on oral tobacco use and its implications in South-East Asia [Internet]. World 
933 
Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia; 2004. Available from: 
934 
http://www.searo.who.int/LinkFiles/NMH OralTobaccoUse.pdf 
935 
Yuan JM, Gao YT, Murphy SE, Carmella SG, Wang R, Zhong Y, et al. Urinary levels of cigarette smoke constituent 
936 
metabolites are prospectively associated with lung cancer development in smokers. Cancer Res2011;71(21):6749–
937 
57. Epub 2011 Oct 25. doi:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-11-0209 
938 
Yuan JM, Gao YT, Wang R, Chen M, Carmella SG, Hecht SS. Urinary levels of volatile organic carcinogen and 
939 
toxicant biomarkers in relation to lung cancer development in smokers. Carcinogenesis2012 Apr;33(4):804–9. 
940 
Epub 2012 Jan 31. doi: 10.1093/carcin/bgs026 
941 
Zakiullah, Saeed M, Muhammad N, Khan SA, Gul F, Khuda F, et al. Assessment of potential toxicity of a smokeless 
942 
tobacco product (naswar) available on the Pakistani market. Tob Control. 2012 Jul;21(4):396–401. Epub 2011 Jun 3. 
943 
doi:10.1136/tc.2010.042630 
944 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
36 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
945 
Smokeless Tobacco in the Region of the Americas 
946 
Introduction to the Region of the Americas 
947 
The Region of the Americas holds a notable place in the history of tobacco use because the 
948 
tobacco plant is thought to have originated on the mainland in North, Central, or South America. 
949 
Cultivation of tobacco in the region dates back at least 5,000 years, and Native Americans were 
950 
probably the first people to smoke, chew, and inhale tobacco. 
951 
Overall national youth prevalence of current ST use ranges from 1.8% in Canada to 9.8% in 
952 
Barbados, though adequate data was only available for 14 of 35 countries. Smokeless tobacco 
953 
use was more prevalent among boys than among girls in nearly all countries and localities. The 
954 
prevalence of ST use among boys ranged from 2.6% in Canada to 11.5% in Barbados, and ST 
955 
use among girls ranged from 0.8% in Canada to 8.5% in Jamaica. For adults, basic ST 
956 
prevalence data were available for only nine countries in the region. Among men, the highest 
957 
prevalence of use among these countries was in the United States (6.9%), while use among 
958 
women was highest in Haiti (2.5%).  
959 
Smokeless Tobacco Products in the Region of the Americas 
960 
A diverse range of smokeless tobacco products are in use in the region, including manufactured 
961 
products such as snuff and chewing tobacco used in the United States and Canada and  
962 
traditional, locally made products such as chimó used in Venezuela.  
963 
Snuff and Chewing Tobacco (North America) 
964 
Most of the ST products used in North America are broadly categorized as snuff or chewing 
965 
tobacco. Three companies account for nearly 90% of the U.S. retail market: U.S. Smokeless 
966 
Tobacco Company (UST; a subsidiary of Altria), American Snuff Company (a subsidiary of 
967 
Reynolds American, formerly Conwood Sales Company), and Swedish Match North America 
968 
(Euromonitor 2011a). Small retailers such as convenience stores and small groceries represented 
969 
72% of the ST sales volume in 2010 (Euromonitor 2011a). Nearly all the snuff sold in Canada is 
970 
U.S.-style moist snuff, and the chewing tobacco products available in Canada are predominantly 
971 
the same as those sold in the United States.  
972 
Two types of snuff are manufactured and used in the United States: moist snuff and dry snuff. 
973 
Dry snuff is a finely powdered, fire-cured tobacco product (Hoffmann and Djordjevic 1997). It 
974 
can be used either nasally or orally, although oral use predominates in North America. Moist 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
37 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
975 
snuff is by far the most widely consumed type in the United States (Federal Trade Commission 
976 
2011) and Canada (Euromonitor 2011b). It is typically made from a mixture of fire-cured and 
977 
air-cured tobacco laminae and stems, which then are shredded (Hoffmann and Djordjevic 1997). 
978 
Traditional moist snuff is often flavored with wintergreen or various fruit flavors. Loose-leaf 
979 
chewing tobacco is also used in North America, consisting mainly of air-cured tobacco and 
980 
generally heavily treated with licorice and sugar (Hoffmann and Djordjevic 1997) 
981 
TSNA levels in the 39 top-selling brands of United States moist snuff ranged from 4.87 
982 
micrograms per gram (μg/g) (wet weight) for Red Seal Long Cut Wintergreen to 90.0 μg/g (wet 
983 
weight) for Skoal Key (Richter et al. 2008). All U.S. products had higher TSNA levels than the 
984 
Swedish product Ettan snus (Swedish Match), which had a TSNA level of 2.8 μg/g. Although the 
985 
technology to reduce TSNA levels exists, U.S. smokeless tobacco manufacturers have not 
986 
applied it to their most popular products (Hecht et al. 2011). In the top 39 selling brands of U.S. 
987 
moist snuff, free nicotine in these same moist snuff products ranged from 0.01 to 7.81 mg/g (wet 
988 
weight), which represents a free nicotine percentage between 0.3% and 79.9%, and pH values 
989 
between 5.54 and 8.62 (Richter et al. 2008). Loose-leaf chewing tobacco is also used in North 
990 
America, consisting mainly of air-cured tobacco and generally heavily treated with licorice and 
991 
sugar (Hoffmann and Djordjevic 1997).  
992 
Some novel ST products have also been introduced on the U.S. market. Products called 
993 
“dissolvables” or “dissolvable tobacco products” were introduced starting in about 2001. 
994 
Dissolvables are made of ground tobacco shaped into compressed pellets, lozenges, strips, or 
995 
sticks and sometimes packaged to resemble breath-freshening mints or strips. Dissolvables have 
996 
had a very limited presence in the United States, and some have only appeared in test markets. A 
997 
recent study on was conducted nicotine and TSNAs in novel products on the U.S. market 
998 
(Stepanov et al.2012). The study looked at 117 regional samples of novel products such as 
999 
Camel Snus, Marlboro Suns, and Camel Strips, and found that levels of free nicotine in Marlboro 
1000 
Snus and Camel Snus varied significantly by region. Some regional variations in TSNA levels 
1001 
were also observed. Overall, Camel Snus had significantly higher TSNA levels than Marlboro 
1002 
Snus, and Camel Strips had the lowest TSNA levels among all novel products analyzed.  
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
38 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
1003 
Iqmik (Alaska) 
1004 
Alaska Native people make an ST mixture known as iqmik by combining tobacco with the ashes 
1005 
from fungus or wood (Renner et al. 2004). Iqmik is prepared either by premastication or by hand 
1006 
mixing, using air- or fire-cured full leaf or twisted leaf tobacco in varying proportions, and 
1007 
different types of ashes based on the user’s personal practice (Renner et al. 2005).  
1008 
Because the alkaline ash used in iqmik has extremely high pH levels (pH of 11-11.8), nearly all 
1009 
nicotine in iqmik is in the free form, which is more rapidly absorbed than bound nicotine 
1010 
(Henningfield et al. 1995). The total nicotine and free nicotine levels in iqmik are much higher 
1011 
than in popular U.S. commercial smokeless products.  
1012 
Chemical analysis of iqmik samples found pH values between 11 and 11.8. In addition to high 
1013 
levels of free nicotine, iqmik contains other hazardous substances such as TSNAs, polycyclic 
1014 
aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and heavy metals (Hearn et al. 2013). 
1015 
Chimo and Rapé (South America) 
1016 
In South America, noncommercial ST products are more commonly available than commercial 
1017 
products. The main ST product used in Venezuela is chimó, a mixture of cooked tobacco leaves 
1018 
and flavorings. Use of chimó declined in the second half of the 20th century with the increase in 
1019 
urbanization and the introduction of mass-produced cigarettes. However, in the past 20 years, 
1020 
chimó has re-emerged as a trendy urban youth phenomenon and is perceived among some 
1021 
sectors of Venezuelan society as part of the national identity.  
1022 
Most chimó production occurs in small family-operated factories scattered across the Andes and 
1023 
the flat lands of Venezuela and Colombia. However, commercially manufactured production of 
1024 
chimó is growing in Venezuela, with increasing sophistication of equipment and methods 
1025 
(Granero and Jarpa 2011). The tobacco leaf is cooked in large metal containers for several days 
1026 
to discharge fiber and starch, and the resulting paste is stored for maturation for up to two years 
1027 
after which sweeteners and flavorings are added according to the manufacturer’s proprietary 
1028 
recipe.  
1029 
In Venezuela, chimó is widely available at local convenience stores across the country. It is 
1030 
produced by either commercial or cottage industries. Sold tax-free, chimó is relatively 
1031 
inexpensive compared with cigarettes,  
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
39 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
1032 
Chemical analysis of selected samples of commercially manufactured and cottage industry 
1033 
chimó products found the following upper values: pH = 9.82 and percentage of free nicotine = 
1034 
95.9%. Therefore, chimó has among the world’s highest levels of nicotine content, pH, and 
1035 
alkalinity in an ST product (Jarpa 2003; Stanfill et al. 2011).  
1036 
Region-Specific Observations and Regulation Challenges 
1037 
In general, detailed information on ST use is sparse or nonexistent for most countries in the 
1038 
region. Additionally, little is known about the content of or specific health effects associated with 
1039 
many of the locally used products such as rapé and iqmik. 
1040 
Established tobacco control measures, such as increased taxation, graphic warning labels, and 
1041 
limits on advertising and promotion, are not currently applied consistently across all tobacco 
1042 
products. Many tobacco control measures applied to cigarettes are not applied to ST products or 
1043 
are less stringent, such as lower taxes, and lack of pictorial warning labels. In Brazil, no ST 
1044 
products are licensed for sale, but they are still available in some areas. Controlling and taxing 
1045 
cottage industry products such as rapé poses a particular challenge. Investments are also needed 
1046 
to enhance surveillance efforts on ST products, particularly in areas where such products are 
1047 
available. And there is a general need for epidemiologic studies on the adverse health effects of a 
1048 
variety of ST products, including traditional products, and of dual use of ST and cigarettes.  
1049 
Implementation of the World Health Organization (WHO) Framework Convention on Tobacco 
1050 
Control and proliferation of smoke-free regulations throughout the region can be expected to 
1051 
accelerate the decline in consumption of cigarettes. The social acceptability of smoking 
1052 
continues to wane. At the same time, major cigarette manufacturers have taken control of most of 
1053 
the ST industry in North America and are marketing novel products to nontraditional users, 
1054 
including cigarette smokers. Dual use of cigarettes and ST is an emerging pattern, especially 
1055 
among young people, and may be influenced by marketing that encourages dual use. In this 
1056 
dynamic and shifting landscape, it is increasingly urgent to address ST throughout the region, 
1057 
while preserving the gains made in reducing smoking consumption. 
1058 
Best Practices and Future Needs 
1059 
In 2010, Brazil was the world’s second largest tobacco producer and the world’s largest tobacco 
1060 
exporter (FAOSTAT 2010). Brazil is among the few countries in the world to establish a public 
1061 
health-based regulatory structure for tobacco products through its National Health Surveillance 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
40 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
1062 
Agency, which was established in 1999 (ANVISA). In Brazil, manufacturers must submit 
1063 
information about the contents, emissions, packaging, and design of every tobacco product to 
1064 
ANVISA, the National Health Surveillance Agency. However, because the list of commercially 
1065 
permitted brands in Brazil does not include ST brands (effectively making ST product sales 
1066 
illegal), smokeless products marketed and sold illegally in Brazil usually do not contain any 
1067 
health warnings. 
1068 
In the United States, the 2009 Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act (Tobacco 
1069 
Control Act) gave the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulatory authority over ST 
1070 
products. Effective June 22, 2009, the law prohibits sales of cigarettes and ST to individuals less 
1071 
than 18 years of age, limits modes of sale, prohibits tobacco sponsorship of events, and requires 
1072 
advertising restrictions including health warning that must take up at least 30 percent of each 
1073 
principal display panel on the package and at least 20 percent of advertisements, with four 
1074 
specific rotating messages.  
1075 
The Tobacco Control Act also gives the FDA authority over standards for manufacturing tobacco 
1076 
products, requires premarket review of new tobacco products, and requires manufacturers who 
1077 
wish to market a tobacco product with a claim of reduced harm to obtain a marketing order from 
1078 
the FDA. While the Act does not currently require pictorial warnings or ban flavorings, the Act 
1079 
does give the FDA the authority to do so by issuing a regulation. In the United States, taxes are 
1080 
levied at the federal and state levels. State excise taxes on ST products vary widely in rate and 
1081 
formula. Some states apply an excise tax rate based on weight and other states set their ST excise 
1082 
tax rate as a percentage of wholesale price. 
1083 
In Canada, advertising of ST is subject to the same restrictions as cigarette advertising: These 
1084 
products can only be advertised to retailers or to adults through direct mail or in adult-only 
1085 
venues such as bars. Tobacco products cannot be sold to children (that is, anyone under 18). ST 
1086 
manufacturers must report their products’ ingredients and additives to Health Canada. However, 
1087 
ST products in Canada can still be sweetened with sugar or contain fruit flavorings, even though 
1088 
such flavorings have been banned in cigarettes and little cigars. Rotating health messages is 
1089 
required on ST product packaging. ST products are subject to federal and provincial tobacco 
1090 
laws in Canada, including taxation. Excise taxes on ST products vary by province, but they are 
1091 
taxed by weight at rates comparable to excise taxes on cigarettes.  
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
41 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
1092 
References 
1093 
Euromonitor International. Country report: smokeless tobacco in the US. July 2011a. 
1094 
Hoffmann D, Djordjevic MV. Chemical composition and carcinogenicity of smokeless tobacco. Adv Dent Res. 
1095 
1997;11(3):322–9. 
1096 
Euromonitor International. Country report: smokeless tobacco in Canada. July 2011b. 
1097 
Hecht SS, Stepanov I, Hatsukami DK. Major tobacco companies have technology to reduce carcinogen levels but do 
1098 
not apply it to popular smokeless tobacco products. Tob Control. 2011;20(6):443. doi: 10.1136/tc.2010.037648 
1099 
FAOSTAT. Exports—countries by commodity: top exports—tobacco, unmanufactured, 2010 [Internet database] 
1100 
[cited 2012 July 23]. Available from: http://faostat.fao.org/desktopdefault.aspx?pageid=342&lang=en&country=21 
1101 
Federal Trade Commission. Federal Trade Commission smokeless tobacco report for 2007 and 2008. Washington, 
1102 
DC: Federal Trade Commission; 2011. 
1103 
Granero R, Jarpa P. Uso de chimo entre adolescentes en Venezuela. Encuesta Mundial sobre Tabaquismo en Jóvenes 
1104 
1999–2008. Acta Odontológica Venezolana. 2011;49(3):9 pp. Spanish. 
1105 
Hearn BA, Renner CC, Ding YS, Vaughan-Watson C, Stanfill SB, Zhang L, et al. Chemical analysis of Alaskan 
1106 
iq’mik smokeless tobacco. 2013;15(7):1283-8. Epub 2013 Jan 3. doi: 10.1093/ntr/nts270 
1107 
Henningfield JE, Radzius A, Cone EJ. Estimation of available nicotine content of six smokeless tobacco products. 
1108 
Tob Control. 1995;4(1):57–61. 
1109 
Jarpa P. Medición del pH de 12 preparaciones distintas de pasta de tabaco de mascar, relacionándolas con la adición 
1110 
a la nicotina. Revista de la Facultad de Farmacia 2003;45(2):7–11. Spanish. 
1111 
Renner CC, Patten CA, Enoch C, Petraitis J, Offord KP, Angstman S, et al. Focus groups of Y-K Delta Alaska 
1112 
Natives: attitudes toward tobacco use and tobacco dependence interventions. Prev Med. 2004;38(4):421–31. 
1113 
Richter P, Hodge K, Stanfill S, Zhang L, Watson C. Surveillance of moist snuff: total nicotine, moisture, pH, un-
1114 
ionized nicotine, and tobacco-specific nitrosamines. Nicotine Tob Res. 2008;10(11):1645–52. 
1115 
Stanfill SB, Connolly GN, Zhang L, Jia LT, Henningfield JE, Richter P, et al. Global surveillance of oral tobacco 
1116 
products: total nicotine, unionised nicotine and tobacco-specific N-nitrosamines. Tob Control. 2011;20(3):e2. Epub 
1117 
2010 Nov 25. doi: 10.1136/tc.2010.037465 
1118 
Stepanov I, Biener L, Knezevich A, Nyman AL, Bliss R, Jensen J, Hecht SS, Hatsukami DK.  
1119 
Monitoring tobacco-specific N-nitrosamines and nicotine in novel Marlboro and Camel smokeless tobacco products: 
1120 
findings from round 1 of the New Product Watch. Nicotine Tob Res. 2012;14(3):274–81. 
1121 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
42 



Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
1151 
increasingly recognized as such in the international literature. Snus has been manufactured and 
1152 
marketed in Sweden since the 1820s.  
1153 
Swedish snus is sold either packed loose or portion-packed in small teabag-like sachets. Both 
1154 
varieties are sold in round boxes (paper or plastic) or tins. Loose snus is a moist powder which 
1155 
can be formed into a cylindrical or spherical shape with the fingertips. Longtime users may pinch 
1156 
the tobacco in place under the upper lip and keep it in the recess between gingiva and lip. 
1157 
Prepacked portion snus, more widely used, contains smaller uniform portions that can be used 
1158 
more discreetly. Swedish snus, in both loose and sachet forms, is held under the upper lip for a 
1159 
period of 30 minutes to a few hours. The nicotine in snus is absorbed through the mucous 
1160 
membrane of the oral cavity, as are other substances. The juice produced in this process is 
1161 
usually swallowed and spitting is uncommon.  
1162 
Snus products differ in packaging, alkalinity, other additives, and flavoring. The largest 
1163 
manufacturer, Swedish Match, lists over 240 ingredients that are used as flavors in snus, 
1164 
including herbal extracts (e.g., menthol), spices (e.g., ginger, basil), lime, and alcohol (e.g., 
1165 
whiskey) (Swedish Match Company 2011).  
1166 
Snus manufactured in Sweden is sold in Nordic countries as well as in other countries around the 
1167 
world. The Nordic market has been fairly stable since the year 2000. There are about a dozen 
1168 
manufacturers of snus, and Swedish Match is the dominant producer, with about 85% of the 
1169 
market in Sweden and 70% of the market in Norway (Kesmodel 2011). Smaller domestic 
1170 
companies market products mostly within the Nordic countries. In the other European Region 
1171 
countries (non-EU), international tobacco companies such as British American Tobacco, Japan 
1172 
Tobacco International, Philip Morris, and Imperial Tobacco market snus-type products, but they 
1173 
differ in their characteristics from Swedish snus. Swedish snus is sold in general stores, 
1174 
convenience stores, gas stations, tobacco shops, and from vending machines in shops and 
1175 
restaurants. It is often stored in refrigerators to minimize fermentation and bacterial growth.  
1176 
Manufacturers of Swedish snus pasteurize their products and most adhere to the GothiaTek 
1177 
standard, a voluntary standard developed by the industry (Rutqvist et al. 2011). As a 
1178 
consequence, snus products manufactured in Sweden using this standard show lower measured 
1179 
levels of some key toxicants, such as nitrosamines, than most products found in other countries. 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
44 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
1180 
However, Swedish snus products vary in their levels of nicotine and free nicotine. For example, 
1181 
so-called “starter” brands such as Catch Mint often have a lower pH and less free nicotine, and 
1182 
stronger varieties such as General, the market’s leading brand, have a higher alkalinity so that 
1183 
they deliver more free nicotine. 
1184 
The GothiaTek standard limits and average content for important toxic constituents in tobacco 
Content† (2011)  
Content† (2011)  
Component* 
Limit† 
(± 2 SD‡) 
Component 
Limit† 
(± 2 SD‡) 
Nitrite (mg/kg) 
3.5 
1.0 (<0.5–1 9) 
Cadmium (mg/kg) 
0.5 
0.2 (0.1–1.4) 
TSNA (mg/kg) 

0.7 (0.5–1.1) 
Lead (mg/kg) 
1.0 
0.1 (0 05–0.2) 
NDMA (µg/kg) 

0.4 (<0.3–1.1)) 
Arsenic (mg/kg) 
0.25 
<0.05 (<0 05–0.09) 
BaP (µg/kg) 
10 
0.5 (<0.5–0 8) 
Nickel (mg/kg) 
2.25 
0.7 (0 3–1.0) 
Agrochemicals 
According to Swedish 
Below Swedish Match 
Chromium (mg/kg) 
1.5 
0 3 (0.1– 0.6) 
Match Agrochemical 
internal limits 
Management Program 
1185 
Notes: * TSNA = tobacco-specific nitrosamines; NDMA = N-nitrosodimethylamine; BaP = benzo(a)pyrene. † Limits and average 
1186 
contents are based on Swedish snus wi h 50% water content. ‡ SD = standard deviation. 
1187 
Source: Swedish Match 2012. Available at: http://www.swedishmatch.com/en/Snus-and-health/GOTHIATEK/GOTHIATEK-standard/ 
1188 
Zarda, Gutka, and Khaini (United Kingdom) 
1189 
Zarda, gutka, and khaini are the three major types of ST used by South Asian immigrants in the 
1190 
United Kingdom. Common ingredients in these products are tobacco flakes or powder, with 
1191 
slaked lime (calcium hydroxide) as an alkalinity enhancer. Gutka and zarda contain additional 
1192 
spices and flavorings such as saffron and menthol. Zarda is also mixed with areca nut and other 
1193 
ingredients to produce the homemade product paan/khilli paan. Gutka and khaini are typically 
1194 
sold in small individual sachets, and zarda is sold in larger containers so it can be used in the 
1195 
production of paan by the user at home or by a vendor at a kiosk. (See SEARO section for more 
1196 
on these products) 
1197 
Within individual boroughs, or neighborhoods, these brands represent between one-quarter and 
1198 
two-thirds of the tobacco products available in the United Kingdom. Outlets serving 
1199 
communities of Indian origin are likely to sell a more homogeneous group of products (gutka 
1200 
and khaini), but those serving the Bangladeshi community are more likely to sell a variety of 
1201 
zarda brands from Bangladesh. These variations reflect differing cultural contexts, with 
1202 
domestically made khilli paan being the predominant form of consumption in Bangladeshi 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
45 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
1203 
communities. Zarda is produced commercially, gutka and khaini are often produced by both 
1204 
commercial and cottage industries. 
1205 
Marketing of ST in the UK is informal, relying on point-of-sale displays, packaging styles, and 
1206 
affordability. Most ST products sold in the UK are imported from India and are marketed to 
1207 
specific ethnic subgroups in the region. Although ST products are required to display warning 
1208 
labels in the UK, the dominant brands of imported products most often do not comply with this 
1209 
requirement.  
1210 
Some of the South Asian ST products used in the UK contain Nicotiana rustica, a tobacco with 
1211 
high alkalinity and a higher concentration of nicotine than the more commonly used tobacco, N. 
1212 
tabacum. 
1213 
One study investigating the toxicity of some of the ST products available in the UK assessed data 
1214 
on nicotine content and tobacco-specific nitrosamine levels. Nicotine in these products ranged 
1215 
from 3 milligrams per gram (mg/g) (Manikchard, a gutka products) to 83.5 mg/g (for dried 
1216 
tobacco leaves). Free nicotine was high in several of the gutka products, ranging from 3.0 mg/g 
1217 
to 8.0 mg/g, but was much lower in the zarda products (0.1–0.4 mg/g). Tooth-cleaning powder 
1218 
contained the highest levels of free nicotine, measuring in at 63.2 mg/g. Gutka and tooth-
1219 
cleaning powder also had the highest pH levels of the products tested (9.52 and 9.94 for gutka 
1220 
and the tooth-cleaning powder respectively) (McNeill et al. 2006). 
1221 
The Niche Tobacco Products Directory (NTPD) (Niche Tobacco Products Directory 2011) 
1222 
website is managed by the Department of Health and informs the activities of local authorities 
1223 
and excise enforcement officers with respect to ST regulation and seizure in the UK. This 
1224 
directory focuses primarily on the tobacco content of a product; it does not report additional 
1225 
toxicity information. The NTPD data suggest that tobacco content varies considerably, 
1226 
particularly in Bangladeshi products; the tobacco content of one popular zarda brand was 
1227 
observed as varying between 5% and 20%. Although zarda alone has a relatively low pH, the 
1228 
mixture of slaked lime and zarda used in paan/khilli paan varied between pH 12.2 and pH 12.5, 
1229 
indicating that 99% of the nicotine was available as free nicotine (Croucher 2013).  
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
46 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
1230 
Nasway (Uzbekistan and Kyrgyzstan) 
1231 
In Uzbekistan and Kyrgyzstan the most commonly used form of ST is known as nasway or 
1232 
nasvay. As central Asian countries, they are geographically close to Pakistan and Afghanistan (in 
1233 
the WHO Eastern Mediterranean Region) where this product is referred to as nass, naswar, or 
1234 
niswar (SCENIHR 2008; IARC 2007). Nasway contains the same main ingredients as nass, but 
1235 
the published information is insufficient to determine if nass and nasway are exactly the same 
1236 
product. 
1237 
In Uzbekistan and Kyrgyzstan, nasway is mostly produced as a custom-made or cottage industry 
1238 
product. It is partially manufactured before being sold to consumers. Nasway originating from 
1239 
Pakistan is available for wholesale purchase on the Internet. The core ingredients are locally 
1240 
grown, sun-dried tobacco and an alkalinity modifier such as ash or slaked lime (calcium 
1241 
hydroxide) (SCENIHR 2008; IARC 2007). Other flavorings and spices such as cardamom or 
1242 
menthol may be added according to preference. The product also contains an emulsifying agent 
1243 
such as butter or oil. Water is added during the mixing of ingredients, and the mixture is then 
1244 
rolled into balls. A ball is placed under the tongue on the floor of the mouth and sucked. No 
1245 
marketing data are available for Kyrgyzstan. 
1246 
Nasway, is made from N. rustica, which has a higher concentration of nicotine than common 
1247 
tobacco. Nasway samples have high pH levels and contain more than 70% free nicotine, 
1248 
indicating their high potential for causing dependency (Stanfill et al. 2011).  
1249 
Region-Specific Observations and Regulation Challenges 
1250 
The EU is a key player in leading tobacco control efforts within the European Region. Although 
1251 
the sale of moist snuff or snus is restricted in EU countries such as Denmark and Finland, it is 
1252 
allowed in Sweden. The prohibition of snus sales within the EU has been challenged by Swedish 
1253 
Match and by the Swedish Ministry of Trade and Ministry of Health and Social Affairs on 
1254 
numerous occasions. Internet purchases are still possible, but most Internet-based vendors are 
1255 
located in Sweden and they market to other EU citizens (Peeters and Gilmore 2012). Some 
1256 
medical and public health experts have also called for debate on the EU snus ban, responding to 
1257 
suggestions that low-nitrosamine snus products may provide an alternative to cigarette smoking 
1258 
or aid smokers in quitting. (Royal College of Physicians 2007; Medicines and Healthcare 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
47 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
1259 
Products Regulatory Authority 2010). However, this view remains controversial and evidence is 
1260 
lacking to demonstrate that snus is effective in helping smokers to quit.  
1261 
Although Kyrgyzstan is a signatory to the World Health Organization’s Framework Convention 
1262 
for Tobacco Control (FCTC), Uzbekistan is not. The two countries vary in their commitments to 
1263 
population protection, cessation promotion, provision of health warnings, and enforcement of 
1264 
bans on tobacco advertising. Kyrgyzstan has adopted specific national objectives for tobacco 
1265 
control and a tobacco control budget that funds a national unit for tobacco control, but 
1266 
Uzbekistan has undertaken neither of these initiatives. 
1267 
In Uzbekistan, health warnings are required on cigarette packaging only. Tobacco advertising in 
1268 
the national media and outdoors is banned. Kyrgyzstan is reported to require health warnings on 
1269 
ST products in addition to cigarettes. Legal mandates also control the percentage of the package 
1270 
these warnings will cover and specify the number and wording of health warnings as well as the 
1271 
fines for violations. Kyrgyzstan has a wider range of bans on tobacco advertising, promotion, and 
1272 
sponsorship than Uzbekistan. 
1273 
Best Practices and Future Needs 
1274 
Initial tobacco control measures were introduced in the European Region in 1987 (WHO 2002). 
1275 
The EU is the only regional political and economic entity that has become a full signatory to the 
1276 
FCTC. When the FCTC negotiations began, the EU had already implemented a public 
1277 
information campaign and banned TV advertising of tobacco products and sponsorship by 
1278 
tobacco companies (Faid and Gleicher 2011). The EU tobacco product labeling requirements 
1279 
predate FCTC Article 11. Since the introduction of the FCTC, the EU has chaired the 
1280 
Intergovernmental Negotiating Body on Illicit Trade (FCTC Article 15). EU tobacco control 
1281 
activity is cross-cutting, also affecting taxation, illicit trade, and agricultural policies. As of 2013, 
1282 
two Nordic countries, Norway and Iceland, follow most of the EU tobacco regulatory framework 
1283 
although they are not EU members. Point-of-sale advertising is largely unrestricted in Sweden 
1284 
but banned in Norway, where all tobacco products are stored behind closed shutters marked 
1285 
“Tobakk” (grey cabinet) or “Snus” (white cabinet). Media advertising of all tobacco products (on 
1286 
TV, radio, print media, and outdoor billboards) is banned or restricted in Sweden, Norway, and 
1287 
Iceland. Norway’s comprehensive ban on tobacco advertising also bans indirect advertising, such 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
48 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
1288 
as advertisements for non-tobacco products that depict tobacco or advertising using colors and 
1289 
designs that resemble tobacco brands.  
1290 
The EU Tobacco Products Directive (EU Directive 2001/37/EC) was issued in 2001 and intended 
1291 
to be a model after which individual states could pattern their own tobacco regulations (The 
1292 
European Parliament 2001). The Directive establishes warnings on packs, product traceability, 
1293 
annual reporting of ingredients, and maximum yields of tar, nicotine, and carbon monoxide in 
1294 
cigarettes, and prohibits use of the terms “mild” and “light.” According to the Directive, text 
1295 
warnings are mandatory but pictorial warnings are optional. Ten European region countries, 
1296 
including EU and non–EU member states, have adopted pictorial warnings for cigarettes: 
1297 
Belgium, Romania, UK, Latvia, Malta, France, Spain, Denmark, Hungary, and Ireland.  
1298 
In December 2012, the EuropeanU Commission adopted a proposal to revise the Tobacco 
1299 
Products Directive that would place greater restrictions on the manufacture, sale, and 
1300 
presentation of tobacco products. The proposal maintains a ban on oral tobacco products, except 
1301 
for Sweden, and proposes major revisions such as a ban on characterizing flavors, prior 
1302 
notification for retailers intending to sell products across borders (such as Internet retailers) and 
1303 
for manufacturers intending to sell novel tobacco products, and mandatory pictorial health 
1304 
warnings for cigarettes but not ST products. The proposal is expected to be adopted by the EU in 
1305 
2014 and go into effect in 2015–2016. 
1306 
Tobacco products “for oral use,” namely snus and moist snuff, are prohibited within the EU at 
1307 
this writing (2013). The UK had previously banned these products following an attempt in the 
1308 
mid-1980s to introduce a new ST product (Skoal Bandits) that targeted adolescents in the UK 
1309 
(UK Parliament 1997). Sweden was allowed to retain its use of snus, an oral moist snuff, at its 
1310 
accession to the EU.  
1311 
The Directive’s regulations differ for smoked tobacco and ST, most obviously with respect to 
1312 
requiring that packaging display health warnings. There have been no EU–wide proposals for 
1313 
pictorial warnings on ST products specifically, although some member states have proposed 
1314 
adopting pictorial warnings and increasing the size of warnings for cigarettes. 
1315 
The UK’s 2011 tobacco control plan specifically called upon the National Institute for Health 
1316 
and Clinical Excellence (NICE) to provide public health guidance to help people of South Asian 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
49 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
1317 
origin stop using smokeless tobacco (Department of Health 2011). That resulting 2012 guidance 
1318 
document proposes a systematic engagement with South Asian communities in the planning and 
1319 
implementation of smokeless tobacco cessation services. The UK’s tobacco control plan also 
1320 
commits to further developing the Web-based Niche Tobacco Products Directory. The 2009 
1321 
Health Act for the first time prohibited displays of smokeless tobacco products at the point of 
1322 
sale in the UK. However, the timetable for implementing the Act has been relaxed, and small 
1323 
retail outlets, such as those selling ST products, will not be required to comply until 2015.  
1324 
A variety of innovative tobacco control initiatives have also been proposed or tested and warrant 
1325 
further development. The London Borough of Brent has classified spitting paan/khilli paan juice 
1326 
as criminal damage, which is liable to a fixed-penalty enforcement (London Borough of Brent 
1327 
2010). Novel policies in the country of origin may also impact use of imported tobacco products 
1328 
in the UK; The number of gutka brands available for purchase in the UK declined following a 
1329 
2011 Indian Supreme Court order banning the use of plastic as a gutka packaging material 
1330 
(Venkatesan 2011), thus restricting its export. In Sweden, legislation carries no penalties for 
1331 
throwing away cigarette butts and snus sachets, and these discarded items outnumber all other 
1332 
litter on the streets; the environmental impact of this litter awaits appropriate investigation. In the 
1333 
UK, the 2009 Health Act demonstrates how ST products can be included in legislation along 
1334 
with smoked tobacco products by simply using the term “tobacco” in place of “cigarettes” or 
1335 
“smoking”. And the Niche Tobacco Products Directory illustrates the potential of a publicly 
1336 
available Web-based resource. 
1337 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
50 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
1338 
References 
1339 
Bittner B, Borsos J. Trends in the European tobacco sector. Second AGRIMBA-AVA Congress. Wageningen, The 
1340 
Netherlands: Wageningen University; 2011 [cited 2012 Aug 8]. Available from: 
1341 
http://www.aep.wur.nl/NR/rdonlyres/D3255A0B-D9AB-4EF3-93EE-EE059BA76DAF/141037/F117 Bittner.doc 
1342 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Global Adult Tobacco Survey, 2008–2010. Percentage of adults who 
1343 
currently use smokeless tobacco. Global Tobacco Surveillance System data [Internet database]. Atlanta: Centers for 
1344 
Disease Control and Prevention; [no date]. Available from: 
1345 
http://apps.nccd.cdc.gov/GTSSData/default/IndicatorResults.aspx?TYPE=&SRCH=C&SUID=GATS&SYID=RY&
1346 
CAID=Topic&SCID=C443&QUID=Q469&WHID=WW&COID=&LOID=LL&DCOL=S&FDSC=FD&FCHL=&F
1347 
REL=&FAGL=&FSEL=&FPRL=&DSRT=DEFAULT&DODR=ASC&DSHO=False&DCIV=N&DCSZ=N&DOC
1348 
T=0&XMAP=TAB&MPVW=&TREE=0 
1349 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [Unpublished data from the Global Youth Tobacco Survey (GYTS).] 
1350 
Atlanta: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; 2008–2011. 
1351 
Croucher R, Dahiya M, Gowda KK. Contents and price of vendor assembled paan quid with tobacco in five London 
1352 
localities: a cross-sectional study. Tob Control. 2013 Mar;22(2):141–3. doi: 10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2012-050564 
1353 
Department of Health (United Kingdom). Healthy lives, healthy people: a tobacco control plan for England. 
1354 
London: HM Government, Department of Health; 2011. Available from: 
1355 
http://www.dh.gov.uk/en/Publicationsandstatistics/Publications/PublicationsPolicyAndGuidance/DH 124917 
1356 
The European Parliament and the Council of the European Union. Directive 2001/37/EC of the European Parliament 
1357 
and of the Council of 5 June 2001 on the approximation of the laws, regulations and administrative provisions of the 
1358 
member states concerning the manufacture, presentation and sale of tobacco products. Official Journal of the 
1359 
European Communities. 2001;18(7):L194/26–34 [cited 2011 Jul 14]. Available from: http://eur-
1360 
lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:L:2001:194:0026:0034:EN:PDF 
1361 
International Agency for Research on Cancer. Smokeless tobacco and some tobacco-specific N-nitrosamines. IARC 
1362 
monographs on the evaluation of carcinogenic risks to humans. Vol. 89. Lyon, France: World Health Organization, 
1363 
International Agency for Research on Cancer; 2007. Available from: 
1364 
http://monographs.iarc.fr/ENG/Monographs/vol89/mono89.pdf  
1365 
Faid M, Gleicher D. Dancing the tango: the experience and roles of the European Union in relation to the 
1366 
Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. Brussels: Global Health Europe; 2011 [cited 2012 Aug 15]. Available 
1367 
from: http://ec.europa.eu/health/tobacco/docs/tobacco tango en.pdf 
1368 
Kesmodel D. Snus maker sets its sights on U.S. The Wall Street Journal; 2011 Jun 17 [cited 2012 May 21]. Available 
1369 
from: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702304319804576389742932108046.html 
1370 
London Borough of Brent. Brent tackles illegal paan spitting on streets. Wembley, UK: The Brent Magazine. April 
1371 
2010 [cited 2010 Jul 14]. Available from: http://www.brent.gov.uk/media.nsf/Files/LBBA-
1372 
263/$FILE/The%20Brent%20Magazine%20issue%20101%20April%202010.pdf 
1373 
Niche Tobacco Products Directory [cited 2011 Jul 14]. Available from: http://www.ntpd.org.uk 
1374 
McNeill A, Bedi R, Islam S, Alkhatib MN, West R. Levels of toxins in oral tobacco products in the UK. Tob 
1375 
Control. 2006;15(1):64–7. 
1376 
Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency. Public consultation: the regulation of nicotine containing 
1377 
products. Series No: MLX 364. London: Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency; 2010. Available 
1378 
from: http://www.mhra.gov.uk/Publications/Consultations/Medicinesconsultations/MLXs/CON065617 
1379 
Peeters S, Gilmore AB. How online sales and promotion of snus contravenes current European Union legislation. 
1380 
Tob Control. 2012. Epub 2012 Jan 21. doi: 10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2011-050209. Available from: 
1381 
http://tobaccocontrol.bmj.com/content/early/2012/01/21/tobaccocontrol-2011-050209  
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
51 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
1382 
Royal College of Physicians. Harm reduction in nicotine addiction: helping people who can’t quit. A report by the 
1383 
Tobacco Advisory Group of the Royal College of Physicians. London: Royal College of Physicians; 2007. 
1384 
Rutqvist LE, Curvall M, Hassler T, Ringberger T, Wahlberg I. Swedish snus and the GothiaTek standard. Harm 
1385 
Reduct J. 2011;8:11. doi: 10.1186/1477-7517-8-11  
1386 
Scientific Committee on Emerging and Newly Identified Health Risks (SCENIHR). Health effects of smokeless 
1387 
tobacco products: preliminary report. Brussels: European Commission, SCENIHR; 2008. Available from: 
1388 
http://ec.europa.eu/health/archive/ph risk/committees/04 scenihr/docs/scenihr o 013.pdf.  
1389 
Stanfill SB, Connolly GN, Zhang L, Jia LT, Henningfield JE, Richter P, et al. Global surveillance of oral tobacco 
1390 
products: total nicotine, unionised nicotine and tobacco-specific N-nitrosamines. Tob Control. 2011;20(3):e2. Epub 
1391 
2010 Nov 25. doi: 10.1136/tc.2010.037465 
1392 
Swedish Match. GothiaTek standards [Internet]. Stockholm: Swedish Match; [no date] [cited 2012 May 21]. 
1393 
Available from: http://www.swedishmatch.com/en/Snus-and-health/GOTHIATEK/GOTHIATEK-standard/ 
1394 
Swedish Match. Ingredients in snus [Internet]. Stockholm: Swedish Match; [no date] [cited 2011 Jul 14]. Available 
1395 
from: http://www.swedishmatch.com/en/Our-business/Snus-and-snuff/Ingredients-in-snus/ 
1396 
UK Parliament, House of Commons, Select Committee on Standards and Privileges. First report. Allegations 
1397 
relating to non-declaration of interests: the campaign relating to Skoal Bandits. London: UK Parliament; 1997 [cited 
1398 
2011 Aug 30]. 
1399 
Venkatesan J. Tobacco in plastic pouches: Supreme Court rejects plea. New Delhi: The Hindu; 2011. Available from: 
1400 
http://www.hindu.com/2011/02/18/stories/2011021864111100.htm  
1401 
World Health Organization. The European report on tobacco control policy. Review of implementation of the Third 
1402 
Action Plan for a Tobacco-Free Europe 1997–2001. Copenhagen: World Health Organization, Regional Office for 
1403 
Europe; 2002 [cited 2012 Aug 15]. Available from: 
1404 
http://www.euro.who.int/
data/assets/pdf file/0007/68065/E74573.pdf 
1405 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
52 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
1406 
Smokeless Tobacco in the Eastern Mediterranean Region 
1407 
Introduction to the Eastern Mediterranean Region 
1408 
Tobacco use is prevalent in the Eastern Mediterranean Region, the predominant form being 
1409 
manufactured cigarettes, followed by tobacco used in waterpipes (shisha, nargila). In a few 
1410 
countries, such as Sudan, Yemen, and Pakistan, smokeless tobacco (ST) is traditional and widely 
1411 
consumed. In other countries, such as Egypt, the most populous Arab country, ST use has 
1412 
markedly increased among adults (WHO 2010; CDC no date). As in other regions of the world, 
1413 
the production of ST reflects a combination of cultural practices, local preferences, and the 
1414 
availability of particular tobacco leaves and other ingredients. Products and usage patterns are 
1415 
also influence by the practices brought by immigrants from their home countries, such as the 
1416 
large population of Asian workers, many from the Indian subcontinent, who have immigrated to 
1417 
some Gulf countries. 
1418 
Few studies have been published on ST use in the Eastern Mediterranean Region. Data on 
1419 
prevalence rates have been obtained from the Global Youth Tobacco Survey (GYTS), Global 
1420 
Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS), WHO STEPwise Approach to Surveillance (WHO STEPS), and 
1421 
various individual country surveys. Youth (aged 13–15 years) prevalence rates in the region 
1422 
range from 1.6% in Oman to 12.6% in Djibouti (with boys’ rates reported at 15.2%), with 14 of 
1423 
23 countries reporting. Only 5 of 23 countries reported data on prevalence among adults, which 
1424 
range from 1.2% in Libya to 10.7% in Yemen. Some local estimates of ST prevalence rates are 
1425 
quite high, especially in Sudan, where 2011 unpublished estimates presented by the Sudan 
1426 
Toombak and Smoking Research Center report toombak use is as high as 40.7% in the Northern 
1427 
states. 
1428 
Smokeless Tobacco Products in the Eastern Mediterranean Region 
1429 
Nass (or naswar) and paan (or betel quid with tobacco) are the most commonly used ST products 
1430 
in Pakistan (Ali 2009; Imam 2007; Khawaja 2006; Merchant 2000; Maher 1994; Shah 1992; 
1431 
Euromonitor 2010) and the UAE (National 2009; Bowman 2008). Shammah is mostly used in 
1432 
Yemen (Ministry of Public Health, Yemen 2003) and Saudi Arabia (Allard 1999; Ibrahim 1986; 
1433 
Salem 1984), and toombak is used in Sudan (Idris et al. 1998).  
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
53 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
1434 
Nass (Iran and Pakistan) 
1435 
Nass, also known as naswar or niswar depending on the region in which it is made, is used in 
1436 
many countries, notably Iran (where it is known as nass) and Pakistan (where it is commonly 
1437 
known as naswar). It is made mainly of tobacco, ash, cotton or sesame oil, water, and sometimes 
1438 
gum. Nass is processed by mixing dried tobacco leaves, slaked lime (calcium hydroxide), ash 
1439 
from tree bark, flavoring and coloring agents, and water. Nass users roll this mixture into balls to 
1440 
be placed in the mouth for 10 to 15 minutes and chewed slowly (SCENIHR 2008). Nass is 
1441 
primarily locally-produced on a small scale or custom-made by a vendor (Basharat 2012; 
1442 
Usmanova 2012). 
1443 
Chemical analysis of nass revealed the following concentrations of the carcinogenic tobacco-
1444 
specific nitrosamines (TSNAs): 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK)—up to 
1445 
309 nanograms per gram (ng/g) wet tobacco; N’-nitrosonornicotine (NNN)—up to 545 ng/g wet 
1446 
tobacco; N’-nitrosoanabasine (NAB)—up to 30 ng/g dry tobacco; and N’-nitrosoanatabine 
1447 
(NAT)—up to 300 ng/g dry tobacco (IARC 2007). 
1448 
Naswar contains various toxic/carcinogenic substances, such as heavy metals, in addition to 
1449 
TSNAs. An assessment of the potential toxicity of 30 brands of naswar available in the Pakistani 
1450 
market (Zakiullah 2012) showed that the average values of all toxicants studied were above 
1451 
limits set by model regulatory agencies, including the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease 
1452 
Registry at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).  
1453 
Paan and Tombol (Pakistan and Yemen) 
1454 
In this region, paan, or betel quid, is used mainly in Pakistan. It is produced commercially or by 
1455 
vendors or prepared at home. Slaked lime (calcium hydroxide) and catechu (extract from the 
1456 
acacia tree) are smeared on a betel leaf, which is folded into a funnel shape to which tobacco, 
1457 
areca nut, and other ingredients are added. The tobacco used may be raw, sun dried, or roasted, 
1458 
and it is finely chopped, powdered, and scented. Alternatively, the tobacco may be boiled, made 
1459 
into a paste, and scented with rosewater or perfume. After the betel leaf funnel is filled with the 
1460 
ingredients, the top of the funnel is folded over, resulting in a quid which is placed in the mouth, 
1461 
usually between the gum and cheek, and gently sucked and chewed. Paan is sometimes served in 
1462 
restaurants after meals (WHO 2004).  
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
54 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
1463 
A national product used in Yemen, tombol, has much the same ingredients, with some variation 
1464 
in flavorings (National Cancer Institute 2002), but it is not always made with tobacco. Tombol is 
1465 
made from the tombol leaf (also known as betel leaf), fofal (areca nut), noura, slaked lime 
1466 
(calcium hydroxide), and catechu. As an ST product, there are three types of tombol: (1) sweet (a 
1467 
sweetening agent, often coconut, is added to the basic components described above, with or 
1468 
without tobacco); (2) bitter (additives like clove oil, cardamom, and herbal medicine are used, 
1469 
with or without tobacco); and (3) tombol with toombak tobacco (a local type of tobacco), which 
1470 
is available in two varieties: socha, or dry, thin pieces of Yemeni tobacco (similar to Indian 
1471 
pattiwalla), and zarda, scented tobacco from India (National Cancer Institute 2002). Tombol is 
1472 
mostly a custom-made product. 
1473 
Some forms of tombol, such as those used in Yemen, contain khat (Catha edulis), a plant that has 
1474 
psychoactive properties (Baselt 2008). Khat is used in East Africa, Yemen, and Ethiopia. In 
1475 
Yemen, approximately 80% of males and 30% of females chew khat on a regular basis (Sporkert 
1476 
2003). Khat contains cathinone, an alkaloid with amphetamine-like stimulant properties, which is 
1477 
purported to cause euphoria, excitement, increased energy, and loss of appetite (Lee 1995; 
1478 
Sporkert 2003; Baselt 2008). Cathinone, like amphetamine, is a potent agent that causes 
1479 
norepinephrine and dopamine to be released in the body (Kalix 1981). Khat is added to tombol 
1480 
by spreading it in powder form onto a betel leaf to which an alkaline agent (noura) is then added 
1481 
(Ghazi Zaatari, personal communication, 2013). Tombol containing only khat and tobacco 
1482 
without noura would contain less free nicotine. Specific chemical and toxicity data are not 
1483 
available for this product. 
1484 
Shammah (Saudi Arabia and Yemen) 
1485 
Shammah is made from powdered tobacco, slaked lime (calcium hydroxide), ash, oils, black 
1486 
pepper, and flavoring agents (Scheifele 2007). The tobacco leaves are sun dried and pulverized 
1487 
with bombosa (sodium carbonate), and the preparation is usually sold as a dry product. Shammah 
1488 
is placed in the buccal lower and sometimes upper labial vestibule. Various commercial types of 
1489 
shammah are available in the market: bajeli, haradi, sharaci, and black shammah), but shammah 
1490 
is most frequently sold as a cottage or custom product. Black shammah is prepared by mixing 
1491 
tobacco leaves with a solution of bombosa in water; it is sold as wet shammah. Chemical and 
1492 
toxicity data is not available for this product. 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
55 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
1493 
Toombak (Sudan) 
1494 
Toombak (IARC 2007), used in Sudan as a traditional national product, is made of sun-dried 
1495 
tobacco (wild Nicotiana rustica) mixed with an aqueous solution of sodium bicarbonate called 
1496 
atrun. The mixture is kept in an airtight container for about two hours, after which it is ready for 
1497 
sale. Toombak is rolled into a ball, called saffa, weighing about 10 grams (g). The saffa is dipped 
1498 
into the mouth; men preferentially hold it between the gum and the lip, but women, for aesthetic 
1499 
reasons, hold it between the gum and the cheek or under the tongue on the floor of the mouth. It 
1500 
is sucked slowly for 10 to 15 minutes; a few users may extend this to several hours. Men usually 
1501 
spit periodically, whereas women users typically swallow the saliva generated. Users usually 
1502 
rinse their mouths with water after the saffa is removed (WHO GTCR 2011). Occasionally 
1503 
toombak is also used nasally or postauricular with transdermal effect.  
1504 
Toombak has the highest levels of free nicotine and nicotine-derived TSNAs ever measured in 
1505 
tobacco products (free nicotine: 5.16–10.6 milligrams per gram [mg/g] wet weight) (TSNAs: 
1506 
NNN, as high as 368,000 ng/g wet weight; and NNK, up to 516,000 ng/g wet weight) (IARC 
1507 
Stanfill 2011). 
1508 
A 2011 global surveillance report on oral tobacco products (Stanfill 2011) confirmed that, 
1509 
compared to a variety of other global ST products, toombak is among the highest in nicotine 
1510 
concentration, which ranges from 9.56 to 28.2 mg/g in four different samples, and in 
1511 
concentrations of NNK (147,000–516,000 ng/g) and NNN (115,000–368,000 ng/g).  
1512 
Region-Specific Observations and Regulation Challenges 
1513 
In the Eastern Mediterranean Region, the production and marketing of ST products, such as nass, 
1514 
paan, shammah, and toombak, are primarily cottage industries that are mainly centered in areas 
1515 
of tobacco farming. The ST industry relies on locally available resources both for producing ST 
1516 
products and for marketing and distributing them to retailers under brand names intended to 
1517 
attract customers in their areas. For example, vendors use names such as Sultan Elkayef (i.e., the 
1518 
one that masters the mind), Wad Amari (a reference to the person who introduced the plant to the 
1519 
area), and Alsanf (which means “the best brand”). Toombak in Sudan is sold in small metal 
1520 
containers called hookahs or in plastic bags called keece.  
1521 
Some ST products brought in from the Indian subcontinent are marketed to the large immigrant 
1522 
Asian labor force in the Gulf region. In a few countries, such as the United Arab Emirates (UAE) 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
56 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
1523 
where there is a ban on ST products, there are reports of health inspectors and police inspecting 
1524 
and shutting down illegal manufacturing of nass and paan (National 2009; Bowman 2008). 
1525 
Well-structured regulatory policies are not present in the Eastern Mediterranean Region. 
1526 
Countries in this region have not made use of taxation as part of a policy of tobacco control. 
1527 
Taxes on ST products and prices of all types of tobacco products are among the lowest in the 
1528 
world. Tobacco taxes as a total proportion of government taxes collected are 1%–2% in Syria, 
1529 
Lebanon, Egypt, and Kuwait; 4% in Tunisia; and up to 5.6% in Algeria (World Bank 2001). 
1530 
Best Practices and Future Needs 
1531 
Only Bahrain and the UAE have introduced policies banning smokeless tobacco. In 2009 the 
1532 
government of Bahrain introduced strict anti-smoking regulations and banned the importation of 
1533 
chewable tobacco products (Time Out Bahrain 2009). Ajman Municipality in the UAE banned 
1534 
the sale, import, storage, and possession of chewing tobacco and prescribed heavy fines for 
1535 
violations of the new law (Bowman 2008).  
1536 
Smokeless tobacco is still an under-investigated topic in the Eastern Mediterranean Region 
1537 
because most production and marketing are cottage industry activities. A lack of comprehensive 
1538 
surveillance and the lack of updated data on ST use and its adverse health effects limit the ability 
1539 
of governments to introduce regulatory policies and design programs to combat ST use in their 
1540 
countries. 
1541 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
57 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
1542 
References 
1543 
Ali NS, Khuwaja AK, Ali T, Hameed R. Smokeless tobacco use among adult patients who visited family practice 
1544 
clinics in Karachi, Pakistan. J Oral Pathol Med. 2009;38(5):416–21. 
1545 
Allard WF, DeVol EB, Te OB. Smokeless tobacco (shamma) and oral cancer in Saudi Arabia. Community Dent Oral 
1546 
Epidemiol. 1999;27(6):398–405. 
1547 
Baselt RC. Disposition of toxic drugs and chemicals in man. 8th ed. Foster City, CA: Biomedical Publications; 
1548 
2008.  
1549 
Basharat S, Kassim S, Croucher RE. Availability and use of naswar: an exploratory study. J Public Health (Oxf.). 
1550 
2012;34(1):60–4. 
1551 
Bowman J. Chewing tobacco outlawed [Internet]. Arabian Business Publishing; 2008 May 19. Available from: 
1552 
http://www.arabianbusiness.com/chewing-tobacco-outlawed-49783.html 
1553 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Global Adult Tobacco Survey, 2008–2010. Percentage of adults who 
1554 
currently use smokeless tobacco. Global Tobacco Surveillance System data [Internet database]. Atlanta: Centers for 
1555 
Disease Control and Prevention; [no date]. Available from: 
1556 
http://apps.nccd.cdc.gov/GTSSData/default/IndicatorResults.aspx?TYPE=&SRCH=C&SUID=GATS&SYID=RY&
1557 
CAID=Topic&SCID=C443&QUID=Q469&WHID=WW&COID=&LOID=LL&DCOL=S&FDSC=FD&FCHL=&F
1558 
REL=&FAGL=&FSEL=&FPRL=&DSRT=DEFAULT&DODR=ASC&DSHO=False&DCIV=N&DCSZ=N&DOC
1559 
T=0&XMAP=TAB&MPVW=&TREE=0 
1560 
Euromonitor International. Country report: smokeless tobacco in Pakistan. December 2010. Available from: 
1561 
http://www.euromonitor.com/smokeless-tobacco-in-pakistan/report 
1562 
Ibrahim EM, Satti MB, Al Idrissi HY, Higazi MM, Magbool GM, Al Quorain A. Oral cancer in Saudi Arabia: the 
1563 
role of alqat and alshammah. Cancer Detect Prev. 1986;9(3–4):215–8. 
1564 
Idris AM, Ibrahim YE, Warnakulasuriya KA, Cooper DJ, Johnson NW, Nilsen R. Toombak use and cigarette 
1565 
smoking in the Sudan: estimates of prevalence in the Nile state. Prev Med. 1998;27(4):597–603. 
1566 
Imam SZ, Nawaz H, Sepah YJ, Pabaney AH, Ilyas M, Ghaffar S. Use of smokeless tobacco among groups of 
1567 
Pakistani medical students—a cross sectional study. BMC Public Health. 2007;7:231. 
1568 
International Agency for Research on Cancer. Smokeless tobacco and some tobacco-specific N-nitrosamines. IARC 
1569 
monographs on the evaluation of carcinogenic risks to humans. Vol. 89. Lyon, France: World Health Organization, 
1570 
International Agency for Research on Cancer; 2007. Available from: 
1571 
http://monographs.iarc.fr/ENG/Monographs/vol89/mono89.pdf  
1572 
Kalix P. Cathinone, an alkaloid from khat leaves with an amphetamine-like releasing effect. Psychopharmacology 
1573 
(Berl). 1981;74(3):269–70. doi: 10.1007/BF00427108 
1574 
Khawaja MR, Mazahir S, Majeed A, Malik F, Merchant KA, Maqsood M, et al. Chewing of betel, areca and 
1575 
tobacco: perceptions and knowledge regarding their role in head and neck cancers in an urban squatter settlement in 
1576 
Pakistan. Asian Pac J Cancer Prev. 2006;7(1):95–100. 
1577 
Lee MM. The identification of cathinone in khat (Catha edulis): a time study. J Forensic Sci. 1995;40(1):116–121. 
1578 
Maher R, Lee AJ, Warnakulasuriya KA, Lewis JA, Johnson NW. Role of areca nut in the causation of oral 
1579 
submucous fibrosis: a case-control study in Pakistan. J Oral Pathol Med. 1994;23(2):65–9. 
1580 
Merchant A, Husain SS, Hosain M, Fikree FF, Pitiphat W, Siddiqui AR, et al. Paan without tobacco: an independent 
1581 
risk factor for oral cancer. Int J Cancer. 2000;86(1):128–31. 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
58 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
1582 
Ministry of Public Health and Population (Yemen). The 2003 Family Health Survey sample in Yemen. Sana’a, 
1583 
Yemen: Republic of Yemen Ministry of Public Health and Population; 2003. Available from: http://www.mophp-
1584 
ye.org/arabic/docs/Familyhealth english.pdf  
1585 
The National. UAE: police close chewing tobacco factories to clean up towns and cities [Internet]. Dubai, UAE: 
1586 
Daijiworld Media; 2009 Mar 31. Available from: 
1587 
http://www.daijiworld.com/news/news disp.asp?n id=58384&n tit=UAE%3A+Police+Close+Chewing+Tobacco+
1588 
Factories+to+Clean+Up+Towns+%26+Cities 
1589 
National Cancer Institute. Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Smokeless/Spit Tobacco: summary 
1590 
report. Chicago, Illinois, 2000 Aug 5. Bethesda, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National 
1591 
Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute, Tobacco Control Research Branch; 2002. Available from: 
1592 
http://cancercontrol.cancer.gov/tcrb/2ndICSTREPORTweb3.pdf 
1593 
Salem G, Juhl R, Schiødt T. Oral malignant and premalignant changes in “shammah”- users from the Gizan region, 
1594 
Saudi Arabia. Acta Odontol Scand. 1984;42(1):41–5. 
1595 
Scheifele C, Nassar A, Reichart PA. Prevalence of oral cancer and potentially malignant lesions among shammah 
1596 
users in Yemen. Oral Oncol. 2007;43(1):42–50. 
1597 
Scientific Committee on Emerging and Newly Identified Health Risks (SCENIHR). Health effects of smokeless 
1598 
tobacco products: preliminary report. Brussels, Belgium: European Commission, SCENIHR; 2008. Available from: 
1599 
http://www.euro.who.int/
data/assets/pdf file/0007/68065/E74573.pdf 
1600 
Shah SH, Khan SM. Association of oral carcinoma with nasswar (snuff dipping). J Environ Pathol Toxicol Oncol. 
1601 
1992;11(5–6):323–5. 
1602 
Sporkert F, Pragst F, Bachus R, Masuhr F, Harms L. Determination of cathinone, cathine and norephedrine in hair of 
1603 
Yemenite khat chewersForensic Sci Int. 2003;133(1–2):39–46.  
1604 
Stanfill SB, Connolly GN, Zhang L, Jia LT, Henningfield JE, Richter P, et al. Global surveillance of oral tobacco 
1605 
products: total nicotine, unionised nicotine and tobacco-specific N-nitrosamines. Tob Control. 2011;20(3):e2. Epub 
1606 
2010 Nov 25. doi: 10.1136/tc.2010.037465 
1607 
Time Out Bahrain Staff. Smoking ban in Bahrain. Time Out Bahrain, 2009 Apr 28. Available from: 
1608 
http://www.timeoutbahrain.com/knowledge/features/8573-smoking-ban-in-bahrain 
1609 
Usmanova G, Neumark Y, Baras M, McKee M. Patterns of adult tobacco use in Uzbekistan. Eur J Public Health. 
1610 
2012;22(5):704–7.  
1611 
The World Bank. Economics of tobacco for the Middle East and North Africa (MNA) region. Regional report: 
1612 
Middle East and North Africa. Washington, DC: The World Bank; 2001. Available from: 
1613 
http://siteresources.worldbank.org/INTETC/Resources/375990-1089913200558/MiddleEastandNorternAfrica.pdf 
1614 
World Health Organization. Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS): Egypt country report, 2009. Cairo: World Health 
1615 
Organization, Regional Office of the Eastern Mediterranean; 2010. Available from: 
1616 
http://www.who.int/tobacco/surveillance/gats rep egypt.pdf 
1617 
World Health Organization. Report on oral tobacco use and its implications in South-East Asia. New Delhi: World 
1618 
Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia; 2004. Available from: 
1619 
http://www.searo.who.int/entity/tobacco/topics/oral_tobacco_use.pdf 
1620 
World Health Organization. WHO report on the global tobacco epidemic, 2011. Appendix VIII—Table 8.2: crude 
1621 
smokeless tobacco prevalence in WHO member states. Geneva: World Health Organization; 2011. Available from: 
1622 
http://www.who.int/tobacco/global report/2011/en tfi global report 2011 appendix VIII table 2.pdf 
1623 
Zakiullah, Saeed M, Muhammad N, Khan SA, Gul F, Khuda F, et al. Assessment of potential toxicity of a smokeless 
1624 
tobacco product (naswar) available on the Pakistani market. Tob Control. 2012;21(4):396–401.  
1625 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
59 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
1626 
Smokeless Tobacco in the African Region  
1627 
Introduction to the African Region 
1628 
In the African Region, use of smokeless tobacco (ST) products by adults is common in some 
1629 
countries, but prevalence of ST use varies widely across countries and across geographic areas 
1630 
within countries. For instance, although national prevalence data from Nigeria suggest relatively 
1631 
low use rates (3.2% for men and 0.5% for women) (Kishor et al., forthcoming), data from a state 
1632 
in the northeastern geopolitical zone of Nigeria indicated higher rates among people aged 15 
1633 
years and older (10.8% for men and 4.1% for women) (Desalu 2010). Unfortunately, little 
1634 
information is available on prevalence of use in the region, and the data that are available tend to 
1635 
be dated and/or limited to small areas or subregions. National data that are available on ST 
1636 
prevalence show that current ST use among adults appears highest in Madagascar (22.6% for 
1637 
men, 19.6% for women) and Mauritania (28.3% for men, 9.0% for women) and lowest in Ghana 
1638 
(0.9% for men, 0.2% for women) and Zambia (0.2% for men, 1.2% for women) (Kishor et al., 
1639 
forthcoming; WHO GTCR 2011b). Among youth (13- to 15-year-olds), current ST use ranges 
1640 
from 5.4% in Swaziland to 21.9% in Gambia (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2008–
1641 
2011).  
1642 
Smokeless Tobacco Products in the African Region 
1643 
Smokeless tobacco products available in the region include a variety of ST products produced by 
1644 
small cottage industries and custom-made products for personal use or for sale by street vendors. 
1645 
Custom-made or traditional snuff products are sold from plastic buckets in open markets in 
1646 
South Africa and Nigeria and are dispensed in spoon-sized portions that are transferred to plastic 
1647 
bags, as requested by the customer. In Nigeria, it is also possible to request a mixture of local 
1648 
products and imported products. Commercial ST products are also available across the region, 
1649 
although they generally are not as common as cottage and custom-made products. Smokeless 
1650 
tobacco products such as snuff and betel nut with or without tobacco, previously popular only in 
1651 
a limited number of countries, are now being marketed heavily to specific target groups. These 
1652 
groups include women, for use as an alternative to smoking in cultures where smoking by 
1653 
women is not socially acceptable; young people, for whom flavored and milder-tasting “starter” 
1654 
products have been developed; and smokers, for use where smoking is prohibited (Kaduri 2008). 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
60 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
1655 
In Algeria, chemma or shammah, the local term for moist snuff, is the most prevalent type of 
1656 
smokeless tobacco. Dry snuff, called neffa, is taken in through the nose (Euromonitor 2010). In 
1657 
Uganda and a number of West African countries including northern Nigeria, Cameroon, Senegal, 
1658 
and Chad, a dry snuff product locally known as taaba is widely consumed orally or by nasal 
1659 
inhalation. It is prepared from pulverized fermented tobacco and mixed with natron (a mixture of 
1660 
sodium bicarbonate and sodium chloride). Toombak is an oral snuff that is traditionally made by 
1661 
small local vendors in Sudan and is fairly common in Chad. Toombak is a custom-made blend of 
1662 
leaves of the Nicotiana rustica variety of tobacco mixed with sodium bicarbonate (baking soda), 
1663 
and stored for two hours or longer before sale (Idris 1994).  
1664 
In Tanzania, three types of ST products are used. Kuberi and ugoro (moist oral snuffs) are used 
1665 
by indigenous people, and tobacco with betel nut (locally called thinso but more widely known 
1666 
as gutka) is used by migrants of Indian descent. Kuberi is the most popular product, followed by 
1667 
ugoro, which is wrapped in banana bark when sold. In Ghana, local snuff is prepared by mixing 
1668 
the dried tobacco leaf indigenous to the forested areas (N. tabacum) with chemicals such as 
1669 
saltpeter (potassium nitrate) and then grinding it into a fine powder. Dried tobacco leaves are also 
1670 
a form of ST, which is sometimes dipped into the fly ash of wood before use (Addo 2008). The 
1671 
ash is an alkaline agent added to intensify the delivery of free nicotine; adding alkaline agents for 
1672 
this purpose is a common practice among ST producers worldwide (Tomar and Henningfield 
1673 
1997). In South Africa and neighboring countries, including Lesotho, traditional homemade snuff 
1674 
and a limited range of manufactured products are used. The traditional snuff is prepared by hand-
1675 
mixing finely ground sun-dried tobacco leaf and ash (mokgako) from local plants. Mokgako is 
1676 
used as a condiment or flavor intensifier (Ayo-Yusuf and Swart 2000; Ayo-Yusuf and Peltzer 
1677 
2006; Ayo-Yusuf and Van Wyk 2005).  
1678 
With regard to commercially manufactured products, multinational tobacco companies have 
1679 
introduced various local brand equivalents of Swedish snus in test markets across South Africa 
1680 
since 2003, albeit with limited sales success to date (Simpson 2005). In South Africa, these snus 
1681 
products have been promoted with health claims and as convenient to use in situations where 
1682 
smoking is not permitted. Commercially manufactured ST is also imported into Uganda and 
1683 
Algeria. 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
61 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
1684 
Only limited data are available on the toxicity of ST products used in the region, but product 
1685 
testing suggests considerable variability in the toxicity and nicotine profiles of these products 
1686 
(see the table below). Generally, the commercialized products tend to have lower levels of 
1687 
carcinogenic tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNAs) than traditional custom-made products, one 
1688 
exception being traditional products used in Nigeria, which contain notably lower levels of 
1689 
TSNAs than traditional products in Chad, Ghana, and South Africa, and even lower than the 
1690 
levels in the manufactured snus products on the South African market (Stanfill et al. 2011). 
1691 
Toombak has among the highest levels of TSNAs (295,000–992,000ng/g) of any product in the 
1692 
world (Stanfill et al. 2011). Local vendors and small-scale producers and of toombak could 
1693 
reduce the nitrosamine levels by switching from N. rustica tobacco species to N. tabacum
1694 
Traditional snuff products in South Africa and Ghana have been found to contain heavy metals 
1695 
such as chromium, lead, cadmium, or nickel (Addo 2008, Keen 1974). 
1696 
Toxicity and nicotine profiles of selected smokeless tobacco products used in the African Region* 
Heavy metals (ppm) 
Free nicotine 
BaP 
TSNAs 
(mg/g) (% of total 
Country 
Products (n) 
Cr 
Pb 
Cd 
Ni 
(ng/g) 
(ng/g) 
pH 
nicotine) 
Chada 
Toombak† (4) 
 
 
 
 
 
295,000–
7.38–10.1 
5.16 (18.3%)–
992,000 
10.6 (98.6%) 
Ghanab 
Traditional snuff (5) 
0.95–1.41 
 
1.06–1.11 
 
 
 
 
 
South 
Traditional snuff† (3) 
9–84 
6–8 
1.1–1.5 
25–87 
4,550 
20,500 (n=1) 
9.29 
5 01 (94.8%) 
Africaa,b 
 
Commercial snuff (3) 
 
 
 
 
 
1,710–4,670  9.15–10.1 
1.16 (99.1%–
13.8 (92.9%) 
 
Commercial snus (2) 
 
 
 
 
 
1,720–5,850  6.48–7.02 
0.47 (2.7%)–
1.19 (8.9%) 
Nigeriaa 
Traditional† (1) 
 
 
 
 
 
1,520 
9.42 
2 39 (96.1%) 
 
Commercial (1) 
 
 
 
 
 
2,420 
9.02 
6.72 (90.7%) 
 
1697 
Notes: *Abbrevia ions: ppm = parts per million. CR = chromium, Pb = lead, Cd = cadmium, NI = nickel, BaP = benzo(a)pyrene, ng/g 
1698 
= nanograms per gram of tobacco, TSNAs = tobacco-specific nitrosamines, mg/g = milligrams per gram of tobacco. 
1699 
Notes: †Sudanese toombak data is used for Chad toombak here for comparison.  
1700 
Sources: (a) For Sou h Africa, Nigeria and Chad, data on pH, nico ine, and TSNA: Stanfill et al. 2011. (b) For Ghana, heavy metals 
1701 
data: Addo 2008. (c) For South Africa, heavy metals and BaP data: Keen 1974. 
1702 
Region-Specific Observations and Regulation Challenges 
1703 
The variety of ST products used on the African continent and their modes of production and 
1704 
distribution make establishing polices to control ST use—for example, levying taxes on diverse 
1705 
products from numerous small producers—extremely challenging. There is also a widespread 
1706 
perception that snuff possesses “medicinal” properties (Desalu 2010; Ajani 2001; Ayo-Yusuf, 
1707 
Swart 2000; Peltzer 2001). Medicinal uses that have been reported include relief from physical 
1708 
conditions such as headache, epistaxis, sinus problems, and toothache. In South Africa, some 
1709 
manufactured ST brands are mentholated and tend to attract “health conscious” consumers 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
62 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
1710 
(personal communication, Ayo-Yusuf). Previously confidential industry documents also suggest 
1711 
that manufacturers have used additives or flavorings as part of marketing strategy (1) to mask the 
1712 
poor quality of some products in Nigeria (Creighton 1985) or (2) to target certain population 
1713 
groups in South Africa (Wingate-Pearse 1987). 
1714 
Smokeless tobacco products in the African Region are generally much cheaper than cigarettes 
1715 
(Desalu 2010; Rantao 2012). In South Africa, excise tax is payable on cigarettes but not on 
1716 
commercial ST products, therefore ST is much less expensive than cigarettes in South Africa, 
1717 
and traditional homemade snuff products are even cheaper. Because ST products in the African 
1718 
Region are usually custom-made or cottage industry product, they are not widely advertised in 
1719 
the media, and tobacco promotion and advertising beyond the point of sale is banned in some 
1720 
countries, such as South Africa (Republic of South Africa 1993).  
1721 
Of the 46 countries in the African Region, 41 had ratified the WHO Framework Convention on 
1722 
Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC) as of January 2013 (WHO 2013). The five countries that have 
1723 
not ratified the Convention are Malawi, Zimbabwe, Mozambique, Eritrea, and Ethiopia 
1724 
(Mozambique and Ethiopia have signed but not ratified). Malawi is one of the leading tobacco 
1725 
producers in the world; tobacco is grown on about 3% of Malawi’s total agricultural land 
1726 
(Eriksen et al. 2012). 
1727 
Best Practices and Future Needs 
1728 
Although the majority of countries in the region have ratified the WHO FCTC, many countries 
1729 
have not implemented regulations targeted at smokeless tobacco. Among countries that have 
1730 
adopted ST-related regulations (such as an ST sales ban in Tanzania and ST warning labels in 
1731 
Algeria and South Africa), there is insufficient information available to determine if these 
1732 
regulations are effective or adequately enforced. In Tanzania, the sale of ST was officially 
1733 
banned in 2006, although it has been suggested that more stringent monitoring and enforcement 
1734 
are needed (Kaduri et al. 2008). 
1735 
While custom-made and cottage industry ST products generally do not carry health warning 
1736 
labels, some countries have require warning labels on commercial products. In Algeria, ST 
1737 
containers are subject to the same legislation as the packaging of other tobacco products, which 
1738 
includes specified health warnings. However, ST product packaging is not subject to the same 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
63 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
1739 
warning requirements as cigarette packages, which must have multiple “rotating” health 
1740 
warnings that are required to cover 15% of the entire package (WHO 2011a). In South Africa, 
1741 
manufacturers of ST products are required by regulation to place the phrase “Causes cancer” on 
1742 
every can of snuff (Republic of South Africa 1993). 
1743 
Considering the region’s limited institutional and financial capacity for tobacco control research 
1744 
and for tobacco control in general, future efforts to document and monitor use, toxicity, health 
1745 
effects, and regulation of ST products in the region would benefit from international 
1746 
collaboration. More research is needed to determine which policy measures would be most 
1747 
effective at regulating both cottage and commercial ST manufacturers, reducing ST use, and 
1748 
limiting the populations’ exposure to toxicants in smokeless tobacco. 
1749 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
64 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
1750 
References 
1751 
Addo MA, Gbadago JK, Affum HA, Adom T, Ahmed K, Okley GM. Mineral profile of Ghanaian dried tobacco 
1752 
leaves and local snuff: a comparative study. J Radioanal Nucl Chem. 2008;277(3):517–524. 
1753 
Ajani FA. Prevalence and determinants of snuff use among adult women in Mabopane, North-West Province 
1754 
[M.P.H. thesis]. Johannesburg, South Africa: University of Witwatersrand; 2001. 
1755 
Ayo-Yusuf O, Peltzer K, Mufamadi J. Traditional healers’ perception of smokeless tobacco use and health in the 
1756 
Limpopo Province of South Africa. Subst Use Misuse. 2006;41(2):211–22. 
1757 
Ayo-Yusuf OA, Swart TJ, Ayo-Yusuf IJ. Prevalence and pattern of snuff dipping in a rural South African population. 
1758 
SADJ. 2000;55(11):610–4. 
1759 
Ayo-Yusuf OA, van Wyk C, van Wyk CW, de Wet I. Smokeless tobacco products on the South African market do 
1760 
not inhibit oral bacterial flora: a pilot study. SA J Epidemiol Infect. 2005;20(4):136–9. 
1761 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [Unpublished data from the Global Youth Tobacco Survey (GYTS).] 
1762 
Atlanta: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; 2008–2011. 
1763 
Creighton DE. Dry snuff. Bates No. 400419507–9. British-American Tobacco Company Limited. 1985 Jul 3. 
1764 
Available from: http://legacy.library.ucsf.edu/tid/fkc72a99/pdf 
1765 
Desalu OO, Iseh KR, Olokoba AB, Salawu FK, Danburam A. Smokeless tobacco use in adult Nigerian population. 
1766 
Niger J Clin Pract. 2010;13(4):382–7. 
1767 
Eriksen M, Mackay J, Ross H. The tobacco atlas. 4th ed. Atlanta: American Cancer Society; New York: World Lung 
1768 
Foundation; 2012. Available from: www.tobaccoatlas.org 
1769 
Euromonitor International. Country report: smokeless tobacco in Algeria. August 2010. 
1770 
Idris AM, Prokopczyk B, Hoffmann D. Toombak: a major risk factor for cancer of the oral cavity in Sudan. Prev 
1771 
Med. 1994;23(6):832–9. 
1772 
Kaduri P, Kitua H, Mbatia J, Kitua AY, Mbwambo J. Smokeless tobacco use among adolescents in Ilala 
1773 
Municipality, Tanzania. Tanzan J Health Res. 2008;10(1):28–33. 
1774 
Keen P. Trace elements in plants and soil in relation to cancer. S Afr Med J. 1974;48(57):2363–4. 
1775 
Kishor S., et al. Prevalence of current cigarette smoking and tobacco use among women and men in developing 
1776 
countries. Forthcoming, 2013. 
1777 
Peltzer K, Phaswana N, Malaka D. Smokeless tobacco use among adults in the Northern Province of South Africa: 
1778 
qualitative data from focus groups. Subst Use Misuse. 2001;36(4):447–62. 
1779 
Rantao M, Ayo-Yusuf OA. Dual use of cigarettes and smokeless tobacco among South African adolescents. Am J 
1780 
Health Behav. 2012;36(1):124–33. 
1781 
Republic of South Africa. Tobacco Products Control Act 83 of 1993. June 23, 1993. 
1782 
http://www.tobaccocontrollaws.org/files/live/South%20Africa/South%20Africa%20-
1783 
%20Tobacco%20Products%20Control%20Act%20-%20national.pdf 
1784 
Simpson D. Swedish Match: sucked into controversy, worldwide. Tob Control. 2005;14(4):223–4. 
1785 
Stanfill SB, Connolly GN, Zhang L, Jia LT, Henningfield JE, Richter P, et al. Global surveillance of oral tobacco 
1786 
products: total nicotine, unionised nicotine and tobacco-specific N-nitrosamines. Tob Control. 2011;20(3):e2. Epub 
1787 
2010 Nov 25. doi: 10.1136/tc.2010.037465 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
65 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
1788 
Tomar SL, Henningfield JE. Review of the evidence that pH is a determinant of nicotine dosage from oral use of 
1789 
smokeless tobacco. Tob Control. 1997;6(3):219–25. 
1790 
van Wyk CW, Stander I, Padayachee A, Grobler-Rabie AF. The areca nut chewing habit and oral squamous cell 
1791 
carcinoma in South African Indians. A retrospective study. S Afr Med J. 1993;83(6):425–9. 
1792 
Wingate-Pearse GAS. Wet and dry snuff production. Bates No. 304569062. United Tobacco Companies Limited. 
1793 
1987 Oct 23 [cited 2011 Jul 7]. Available from: http://legacy.library.ucsf.edu/tid/gao11a99/pdf 
1794 
World Health Organization. WHO report on the global tobacco epidemic, 2011. Country profile: Algeria. Geneva: 
1795 
World Health Organization; 2011a. Available from: 
1796 
http://www.who.int/tobacco/surveillance/policy/country profile/dza.pdf 
1797 
World Health Organization. WHO report on the global tobacco epidemic, 2011. Appendix VIII—Table 8.2: Crude 
1798 
smokeless tobacco prevalence in WHO member states. Geneva: World Health Organization; 2011b. Available from: 
1799 
http://www.who.int/tobacco/global report/2011/en tfi global report 2011 appendix VIII table 2.pdf 
1800 
World Health Organization. Parties to the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. Geneva: World Health 
1801 
Organization, Framework Convention on Tobacco Control; c2012 [updated 2013 June 25] [cited 2013 Sep 25]. 
1802 
Available from: www.who.int/fctc/signatories parties/en/index.html 
1803 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
66 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
1804 
Smokeless Tobacco in the South-East Asia Region 
1805 
Introduction to the South-East Asia Region 
1806 
The South-East Asia Region experiences the highest prevalence of smokeless tobacco (ST) use 
1807 
(among both men and women), the greatest diversity of product types and forms of use, and the 
1808 
greatest attributable disease burden of all the WHO regions. Of the 70 countries reporting data on 
1809 
ST prevalence, South-East Asian countries account for 89% of the world’s adult ST users (268.6 
1810 
million of 300+ users) (CDC no date; Kishor et al. forthcoming; WHO 2011d). India alone has 
1811 
more than 220 million ST users and Bangladesh is home to 28 million. Because of their large 
1812 
populations, high prevalence of ST use, and toxicity of the ST products used, the attributable 
1813 
disease burden is very high in countries such as India. 
1814 
Prevalence of current ST use among men in the South-East Asia Region is high, ranging between 
1815 
24.9% and 51.4% in five countries, although in Thailand it is less than 2% (WHO 2011d; Kishor 
1816 
et al, forthcoming). Smoking remains more common than ST use in Indonesia, Thailand, 
1817 
Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, and Nepal, but ST use is predominant in India and Myanmar among 
1818 
men. Among women, prevalence of current ST use is particularly high (>15%) in four 
1819 
countries—Bangladesh (27.9%), Bhutan (17.3%), India (18.4%), and Myanmar (16.1%) (WHO 
1820 
2011d; CDC no date). Prevalence of ST is higher among men than women in most South-East 
1821 
Asian countries, except in Thailand (1.3% for men, 6.3% for women) and Bangladesh (26.4% for 
1822 
men, 27.9% for women) (CDC, no date). Among adolescents aged 13–15 years, ST use is as 
1823 
prevalent as smoking or more prevalent (WHO 2011c), and current ST use ranges from 2.8% in 
1824 
Indonesia to 9.4% in Bhutan (CDC 2007–2009).  
1825 
Smokeless Tobacco Products in South-East Asia Region  
1826 
A wide variety of products are used throughout the region, which can be as simple and cheap as 
1827 
unmanufactured tobacco leaves (e.g., sada pata) or as complex as a processed paste made from 
1828 
boiled tobacco and spice flavorings (e.g., kiwam) (WHO 2004, Kyaing 2004, IARC 2004, IARC 
1829 
2007). Unprocessed ST is sometimes packaged in small pouches like the processed products. 
1830 
Some products, such as mawa or betel quid with tobacco, can be made or assembled by a vendor 
1831 
on demand from users, or users can buy the ingredients from shops and assemble them (as in 
1832 
betel quid and tobacco) or process them (such as by roasting and powdering tobacco flakes to 
1833 
make mishri). Smokeless tobacco products in the region are usually custom-made or produced by 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
67 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
1834 
cottage industries, though some products are manufactured by larger local factories or 
1835 
multinational corporations. 
1836 
Chewing betel quid with tobacco is a common ST practice in the region, particularly in Nepal, 
1837 
Indonesia (Lee, Ko et al. 2011), Myanmar (Ministry of Health Myanmar 2009), and Bangladesh 
1838 
(MHFW Bangladesh 2009). Betel quid is composed of areca nuts, slaked lime paste, and other 
1839 
minor ingredients such as catechu, all wrapped in a betel leaf. Tobacco is not a necessary 
1840 
component of betel quid, and many users do not add it. Vendors or users combine the ingredients 
1841 
to make fresh betel quids for immediate consumption. Although some users believe that betel 
1842 
quid has beneficial medicinal properties (IARC 1985, Gode 1961), areca nut alone is 
1843 
carcinogenic (IARC 2004). Users who incorporate tobacco into the betel quid may not consider 
1844 
tobacco a harmful addition (International Institute for Population Sciences 2010). 
1845 
Other products that may be used with or without betel quid—such as plain tobacco leaf 
1846 
(sometimes called sada pata), zarda, and khaini—are seen in Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, and 
1847 
Nepal. Zarda is processed by boiling broken up tobacco leaves with lime and spices until the 
1848 
water evaporates. It is then dried, colored with vegetable dyes, and sold in small packets or tins. 
1849 
Khaini (also known as khoinee, sada, or surti) is usually custom-made by the user by mixing sun-
1850 
dried tobacco flakes with slaked lime (calcium hydroxide) in the palm of the hand, but it can also 
1851 
be commercially manufactured (WHO 2004, IARC 2007). Compared to most other types of ST 
1852 
in the South-East Asia Region, both zarda and khaini have high levels of tobacco-specific 
1853 
nitrosamines (TSNAs). A 2011 study by Stanfill and colleagues found that total TSNAs1 ranged 
1854 
from 5,490–53,700 nanograms per gram (ng/g) in zarda and from 21,600–23,500 ng/g in khaini. 
1855 
Mawa, dohra, and Mainpuri tobacco are areca nut-containing custom- and cottage-made products 
1856 
that are popular in certain districts in India. Mawa is composed of 95% areca nut shavings mixed 
1857 
with tobacco flakes and slaked lime. It is sold in plastic wrappers. Dohra is a wet mixture of 
1858 
tobacco, areca nut, catechu, and flavorings. It is sold either as a ready-made mixed tobacco 
1859 
product or in two packets, one containing tobacco (often zarda or surti), which is mixed with the 
1860 
contents of the second packet (areca nut, catechu, and other flavorings). Dohra is normally sold 
                                                 
1 Total TSNAs include: 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), N’-nitrosonornicotine (NNN), 4-
(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (NNAL), N’-nitrosoanatabine (NAT) and N’-nitrosoanabasine (NAB). 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
68 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
1861 
in a plastic bag with a rubber band around it. Mainpuri tobacco is ready-made mixture of 
1862 
tobacco, slaked lime, areca nut, and flavoring such as camphor and cloves (WHO 2004).  
1863 
Gutka and pan masala are essentially dried, nearly imperishable versions of betel quid without 
1864 
the fresh betel leaf; they have become increasingly popular alternatives to traditional betel quid. 
1865 
Gutka always contains tobacco, but most brands of pan masala do not. These two products are 
1866 
usually commercially manufactured and are used in India, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Myanmar, 
1867 
Nepal, and Sri Lanka. Gutka is sold in single-dose, colorful packages that are cheap enough for 
1868 
children to buy. Gutka and pan masala products frequently carry the same brand names and 
1869 
similar packaging, allowing manufacturers to circumvent laws banning tobacco advertisements 
1870 
since they are able to advertise a product that appears identical to tobacco-containing gutka 
1871 
(WHO 2004).  
1872 
Some smokeless tobacco products are applied orally as a tooth cleanser. These may be 
1873 
commercially manufactured, such as red toothpowder (powdered tobacco with herbs and 
1874 
flavorings), gul (pyrolysed tobacco) and creamy snuff (tobacco paste flavored with mint and 
1875 
other ingredients); or they may be prepared by the user or a vendor, or in cottage industry (for 
1876 
example, mishri, which is roasted, powdered tobacco) (IARC, 2004, WHO 2004). These applied 
1877 
products are mainly used in India, although gul is commonly used in Bangladesh (IARC 2007; 
1878 
WHO 2004). While people typically use these products to clean teeth, they may become addicted 
1879 
and increase their rate of use (WHO 2004). Gul has particularly high levels of free nicotine; one 
1880 
study found that gul had 29.1–31.0 milligrams per gram (mg/g) of free nicotine—higher than any 
1881 
of the other global ST products tested (Stanfill et al. 2011). Gul also had a high level of total 
1882 
TSNAs, which ranged from13,400–17,100 mg/g (Stanfill et al. 2011). 
1883 
In 1992, an amendment to India’s Drugs and Cosmetics Act of 1940 prohibited the manufacture, 
1884 
sale, and distribution of toothpastes and toothpowders containing tobacco (such as creamy snuff 
1885 
and red toothpowder), although several studies continue to find nicotine in some brands of dental 
1886 
care products (Agrawal & Ray 2012; Agrawal & Rajagopal 2009). This is particularly 
1887 
concerning because the tobacco-containing red toothpowders do not list tobacco as an ingredient. 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
69 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
1888 
Region-Specific Observations and Regulation Challenges 
1889 
Evidence from existing toxicity profiles indicates high levels of TSNAs in products such as 
1890 
khaini and zarda (Stepanov et al. 2005; Stanfill et al. 2011), and areca nut, which is used in many 
1891 
products, contains several harmful constituents. While some studies have assessed toxicant levels 
1892 
in various ST products used in the region, many Asian economies—including the countries 
1893 
where the ST burden is extremely high (India, Bangladesh, and Myanmar)—lack laboratory 
1894 
capacity to test ST products (Health Sciences Authority 2010). The ability to understand and 
1895 
regulate ST in this region are complicated by the wide diversity of traditional products, their 
1896 
production in cottage industries, and the addition of spices, areca nut, sweeteners, and scents..  
1897 
All member states in the region except Indonesia have ratified the World Health Organization’s 
1898 
Framework Convention for Tobacco Control (FCTC). As of 2011, nine of the countries that have 
1899 
ratified the FCTC have adopted comprehensive tobacco control laws. (Timor-Leste has ratified 
1900 
the FCTC and as of December 2012 is in the process of passing national-scale legislation.) Table 
1901 
1 below summarizes the policies of these countries. However, implementation and enforcement 
1902 
of tobacco control laws is impeded by factors such as high rates of use in large populations, the 
1903 
informal nature of much of the industry, resource limitations, and interference from the organized 
1904 
tobacco industry (WHO 2011a). 
1905 
Policy measures for controlling smokeless tobacco use in the South-East Asia Region 
Health warning  Ban on sale within 
Ban on 
Ban on 
Ban on 
Ban on sale to  for smokeless  100 yards/meters of 
Countries 
exports 
imports 
advertisement 
minors 
tobacco 
a school 
Bangladesh 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Bhutan  
 
* 
 
 
Yes† 
NA‡ 
DPR Korea 
 
 
 
 
 
 
India  
 
 
 
 
Yes 
 
Indonesia  
 
 
 
 
 
 
Maldives 
 
 
 
 
Yes§ 
 
Myanmar  
 
 
 
 
Yes§ 
 
Nepal  
 
 
 
 
Yes§ 
 
Sri Lanka  
 
 
 
 
Yes§ 
 
Thailand  
 
 
 
 
Yes 
 
Timor Leste 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1906 
Notes:  = Ban applied. NA = Not Applicable. * Bhutan allows limited import of tobacco products for personal consumption only, 
1907 
†Heal h warnings are required on all imported tobacco products (added by the country of origin). ‡Bhutan banned sale of smokeless 
1908 
tobacco products in any location,  herefore a specific ban on sale near schools does not apply. §Health warnings are required on 
1909 
tobacco products by the national laws, but there is no specific rule for smokeless tobacco.  
1910 
Source: Adapted from: World Heal h Organization. Expert group meeting on smokeless tobacco control and cessation, New Delhi: 
1911 
World Health Organization, Regional Office for Sou h-East Asia; 2011b.  
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
70 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
1912 
Some of the world’s major tobacco producers are South-East Asia countries: India, Indonesia, 
1913 
Thailand, DPR Korea, and Bangladesh (FAOSTAT 2009). India is one of the world’s largest 
1914 
exporters of tobacco, exporting approximately 50% of its total tobacco production to other 
1915 
countries (Directorate of Tobacco Development 2006). From 2000–2001 to 2009–2010, legal 
1916 
exports of chewing tobacco from India increased nearly 450% (Tobacco Board 2011; Tobacco 
1917 
Board 2004). Indonesia, where tobacco production increased 24.1% between 2000 and 2009, 
1918 
ranks among the top 10 countries in the world for tobacco leaf production (Erikson et al. 2012). 
1919 
Reports also suggest that ST products are imported and exported illegally among countries 
1920 
within the region and those outside (Kabir 2010). Bhutan is reported to have a thriving black 
1921 
market for tobacco, despite laws prohibiting all tobacco sales, importation, and exportation 
1922 
(except for importation of limited quantities for personal use) (Magistad 2011; Parameswaran 
1923 
2012).  
1924 
Unlike taxes on cigarettes, taxes on ST are low or nonexistent. In the South-East Asia Region, 
1925 
unmanufactured tobacco sold in loose form is often not taxed. Betel quid with tobacco, which is 
1926 
sold fresh by street vendors, is not taxed and has no warning labels. In India, the ST industry, 
1927 
particularly the gutka industry, has grown tremendously in the last three decades. All 
1928 
manufacturers of tobacco products in India are expected to register with the government and pay 
1929 
excise taxes, but this is poorly enforced, and it is estimated that only one-fourth of the excise tax 
1930 
due on the gutka and pan masala industry is actually paid (Rediff News 2007). 
1931 
While custom- and cottage-made products frequently are not taxed, commercially manufactured 
1932 
products are taxed in some countries, such as India and Bangladesh. Since the early 1990s, India 
1933 
has seen a rise in industrial production of chewing tobacco (Panchamukhi 2008). In 2008–2009, 
1934 
India collected INR 35 billion (US$632 million) in taxes (Smokeless Tobacco Federation of 
1935 
India 2011). In 2008–2009, the government of Bangladesh recognized ST (mainly for chewing) 
1936 
as a manufacturing industry rather than a cottage industry, and has begun to levy taxes on it 
1937 
(Bangladesh Budget Speech 2008/9). In Bangladesh, ST products were taxed for the first time 
1938 
under the 2011–2012 budget.    
1939 
Custom- and cottage- made products, also generally do not display health warnings, even in 
1940 
countries where commercial cigarettes do contain such warnings. India requires textual and 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
71 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
1941 
pictorial health warnings for ST products sold domestically but not for exports; however,  the 
1942 
tobacco industry has challenged this health warning legislation, causing a long delay in 
1943 
introducing these pictorial warnings (Arora 2010, Oswal 2010). In Thailand, packages of 
1944 
shredded tobacco meant for roll-your-own cigarettes carry a warning about smoking but no 
1945 
warning about using tobacco in smokeless form. Nepal passed legislation in 2011 requiring 
1946 
graphic warnings on all kinds of tobacco products (Framework Convention Alliance News 2011).  
1947 
Bhutan, India, Maldives, Myanmar, Sri Lanka, and Thailand have prohibited advertisements for 
1948 
ST, but implementation is sometimes inadequate and more work is needed to improve these 
1949 
efforts in the region. In India, a ban on direct advertisements is enforced, but indirect 
1950 
advertisements and surrogate advertisements persist. Direct advertisement continues at points of 
1951 
sale, and 10.8% of adults have noticed point-of-sale advertisements or promotions of ST 
1952 
(International Institute for Population Sciences 2010). Bangladesh and DPR Korea have no 
1953 
restrictions on advertising of smokeless tobacco.  
1954 
Best Practices and Future Needs 
1955 
Bhutan has introduced the strongest tobacco restrictions of any country in the world. In addition 
1956 
to banning imports, Bhutan has banned exports, agricultural production, manufacture, and sale of 
1957 
tobacco and all tobacco products. Bhutan first introduced a ban on tobacco sales in 2004, but 
1958 
implementation was weak, and a thriving black market for tobacco developed (Givel 2011; 
1959 
Parameswaran 2012; Bhutan Department of Trade 2004). In 2010, Bhutan passed the Tobacco 
1960 
Control Act, which imposed harsher penalties and strengthened enforcement (Parameswaran 
1961 
2012; Parliament of Bhutan 2010). Now individuals may bring in small amounts of ST for 
1962 
personal use if they declare it and pay a duty. Health warnings are required on tobacco brought in 
1963 
from another country for personal use.  
1964 
The Indian Supreme Court has also attempted to ban gutka, one of the most popular ST products 
1965 
in India, by defining it as a food product. At present, gutka satisfies the legal definition of a food 
1966 
item and is thus covered, along with “other tobacco-containing food items,” under the Food 
1967 
Safety and Standards Act of 2006, Regulation 2.3.4 of 2011, which prohibits any harmful 
1968 
ingredient, including nicotine and tobacco, from being added to food (Singh n.d.; Zolty et al. 
1969 
2012). This decision essentially bans all gutka products throughout the country, although it was 
1970 
not widely enforced at first. In April 2012, Madhya Pradesh became the first state to implement 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
72 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
1971 
the ban on gutka (Sandhu 2012). As of April 2013, 23 of India’s 28 states and 5 of 7 union 
1972 
territories have banned gutka by invoking Regulation 2.3.4 (Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids 
1973 
2013).  
1974 
India has also enacted and enforced a number of other tobacco regulations in recent years. In 
1975 
2011, India strengthened their pictorial health warnings on smokeless tobacco packaging by 
1976 
changing from a picture of a scorpion (first implemented in 2009) to more graphic images of oral 
1977 
cancer (Tobacco Labeling Resource Centre 2013). India also has among the most comprehensive 
1978 
restrictions of tobacco advertising, sponsorship, and promotion in the South-East Asia Region. 
1979 
As of 2012, India is the only country in the region to enact laws restricting tobacco imagery in 
1980 
movies—for example, they require health warnings to be displayed when tobacco products or 
1981 
use is displayed on screen (Zolty et al. 2012). While all South-East Asian countries (except 
1982 
Bangladesh) have comprehensive laws prohibiting the sale of ST to minors, India is among the 
1983 
few that prohibit selling tobacco within 100 yards of educational institutions. In 2011, India 
1984 
increased enforcement efforts for this ban with the assistance of some NGOs, local governments, 
1985 
and courts (Singh 2011).  
1986 
While both Bhutan and India have made significant steps toward decreasing ST use, additional 
1987 
surveillance and research are needed to monitor the situation to assess whether these regulations 
1988 
are adequately enforced, as well as evaluated the impact of these regulations on ST use and 
1989 
tobacco-related disease. Advocacy campaigns to strengthen and enforce policies restricting ST 
1990 
and smoking are also needed in most of the region’s countries, but these efforts require more 
1991 
resources, both for the present and the long term. Government action is also needed to curb the 
1992 
illegal trade in smokeless tobacco both within the South-East Asian Region and between South-
1993 
East Asian countries and other regions.   
1994 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
73 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
1995 
References 
1996 
Agrawal SS, Rajagopal K. Nicotine contents in various toothpowders (dant manjans): measurement and safety 
1997 
evaluation. Food Chem Toxicol. 2009;47(3):511–24. 
1998 
Agrawal SS, Ray RS. Nicotine contents in some commonly used toothpastes and toothpowders: a present scenario. J 
1999 
Toxicol. 2012;11 pp. Epub 2012 Jan 12. doi: 10.1155/2012/237506 
2000 
Arora M, Yadav A. Pictorial health warnings on tobacco products in India: Sociopolitical and legal developments. 
2001 
Natl Med J India. 2010;23(6):357–9. Available from: http://www.nmji.in/archives/Volume-23/Issue-6/Medicine-and-
2002 
Societies-II.pdf 
2003 
Bangladesh Budget Speech, 2008–2009 [cited 2011 Nov 21]. Available from: 
2004 
http://www.mof.gov.bd/en/budget/08 09/budget speech/08 09 en.pdf?phpMyAdmin=GqNisTr562C5oxdV%2CEr
2005 
uqlWwoM5 
2006 
Bhutan Department of Trade, Ministry of Trade and Industry: Royal Government of Bhutan. Notification of the Ban 
2007 
on Sale of Tobacco. DT/GEN-2/2004/87g. 2004 Nov 8. Available from: 
2008 
http://www.tobaccocontrollaws.org/files/live/Bhutan/Bhutan%20-
2009 
%20Notification%20Ban%20on%20Sale%20of%20Tobacco.pdf 
2010 
Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids. India’s most populous state bans deadly gutka chewing tobacco; 2013 Apr 5. 
2011 
[cited 2013 Sept 27]. Available at: http://www.tobaccofreekids.org/tobacco unfiltered/post/2013 04 05 gutka 
2012 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Global Adult Tobacco Survey, 2008–2010. Percentage of adults who 
2013 
currently use smokeless tobacco. Global Tobacco Surveillance System data [Internet database]. Atlanta: U.S. 
2014 
Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; [no date]. Available from: 
2015 
http://apps.nccd.cdc.gov/GTSSData/default/IndicatorResults.aspx?TYPE=&SRCH=C&SUID=GATS&SYID=RY&
2016 
CAID=Topic&SCID=C443&QUID=Q469&WHID=WW&COID=&LOID=LL&DCOL=S&FDSC=FD&FCHL=&F
2017 
REL=&FAGL=&FSEL=&FPRL=&DSRT=DEFAULT&DODR=ASC&DSHO=False&DCIV=N&DCSZ=N&DOC
2018 
T=0&XMAP=TAB&MPVW=&TREE=0 
2019 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [Unpublished data from the Global Youth Tobacco Survey (GYTS).] 
2020 
Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; 2007–2009. 
2021 
Directorate of Tobacco Development (India). Status paper on tobacco. Chennai, India: India Ministry of Agriculture, 
2022 
Directorate of Tobacco Development; 2006 [cited 2011 Nov 21]. Available from: 
2023 
http://dtd.dacnet.nic.in/TS PAPER FINE.pdf 
2024 
Eriksen M, Mackay J, Ross H. The Tobacco Atlas, Fourth Edition. Atlanta: American Cancer Society and World 
2025 
Lung Foundation; 2012. http://tobaccoatlas.org/ (Indonesia Country Fact Sheet: 
2026 
http://www.tobaccoatlas.org/uploads/Files/country pdfs/TA4 FactSheet Indonesia.pdf). 
2027 
FAOSTAT. Food and agricultural commodities production. Countries by commodity. Unmanufactured tobacco. Final 
2028 
2009 data [Internet database]. Rome: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations; c2011 [cited 2011 
2029 
Nov 21]. Available from: http://faostat.fao.org/site/339/default.aspx 
2030 
Framework Convention Alliance News. Nepal tobacco package warnings lead Asia. Geneva: Framework 
2031 
Convention Alliance; 2011 Nov 10. Available from: 
2032 
http://www.fctc.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=619:nepal-package-warnings-lead-
2033 
asia&catid=239:packaging-and-labelling&Itemid=243 
2034 
Givel MS. History of Bhutan’s prohibition of cigarettes: implications for neo-prohibitionists and their critics. The 
2035 
International journal on drug policy. 2011;22(4): 306-310. 
2036 
Gode PK. Studies in the history of tambula: some beliefs about the number of ingredients in a tambula. In: Gode, 
2037 
PK. Studies in Indian cultural history. Vol. I. Hoshiarpur, India: Vishveshvaranand Vedic Research Institute; 1961, p. 
2038 
139–44. 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
74 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
2039 
Health Sciences Authority (Singapore). Smoking (Control of Advertisements and Sale of Tobacco) Act, Chapter 309. 
2040 
1993 May 31 [cited 2010 Sept 15]. Available from: 
2041 
http://www.hsa.gov.sg/publish/etc/medialib/hsa library/health products regulation/legislation/smoking
control of
2042 
.Par.0416.File.dat/SMOKING%20(CONTROL%20OF%20ADVERTISEMENTS%20AND%20SALE%20OF%20T
2043 
OBACCO)%20ACT%202010.pdf 
2044 
International Institute for Population Sciences, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India. Global 
2045 
Adult Tobacco Survey India, 2009–10. New Delhi: India Ministry of Health and Family Welfare; Mumbai: 
2046 
International Institute for Population Sciences; 2010. Available from: 
2047 
http://whoindia.org/EN/Section20/Section25 1861.htm  
2048 
International Agency for Research on Cancer. Betel-quid and areca-nut chewing and some areca-nut-derived 
2049 
nitrosamines. IARC monographs on the evaluation of carcinogenic risks to humans. Vol. 85. Lyon, France: World 
2050 
Health Organization, International Agency for Research on Cancer; 2004.  
2051 
International Agency for Research on Cancer. Smokeless tobacco and some tobacco-specific N-nitrosamines. IARC 
2052 
monographs on the evaluation of carcinogenic riskss to humans. Vol. 89. Lyon, France: World Health Organization, 
2053 
International Agency for Research on Cancer; 2007. Available from: 
2054 
http://monographs.iarc.fr/ENG/Monographs/vol89/mono89.pdf 
2055 
International Agency for Research on Cancer. Tobacco habits other than smoking; betel-quid and areca-nut chewing; 
2056 
and some related nitrosamines. IARC monographs on the evaluation of carcinogenic risks to humans. Vol. 37. Lyon, 
2057 
France: World Health Organization, International Agency for Research on Cancer; 1985. 
2058 
Kabir FHMH, Shukla DS, Iqbal N, Peiris M. Tracing illicit tobacco trade in South Asia. Geneva: Framework 
2059 
Convention Alliance and Health Bridge; 2010. Available from: 
2060 
http://www.healthbridge.ca/Illicit%20Tobacco%20Trade%20in%20South%20Asia.pdf 
2061 
Kishor S, et al. Prevalence of current cigarette smoking and tobacco use among women and men in developing 
2062 
countries. Forthcoming, 2013. 
2063 
Kyaing NN. Regional situation analysis of women and tobacco in South-East Asia. New Delhi: World Health 
2064 
Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia; 2004. Available from: 
2065 
http://209.61.208.233/LinkFiles/NMH regSituationAnalysis.pdf 
2066 
Lee CH, Ko AM, Warnakulasuriya S, Yin BL, Sunarjo, Zain RB, et al. Intercountry prevalences and practices of 
2067 
betel-quid use in south, southeast and eastern Asia regions and associated oral preneoplastic disorders: an 
2068 
international collaborative study by Asian Betel-Quid Consortium of South and East Asia. Int J Cancer. 
2069 
2011;129(7):1741–51. 
2070 
Magistad MK. Bhutan’s tough tobacco laws. The World [Internet]; 2011 Apr 19 [cited 2011 Apr 25]. Available from: 
2071 
http://www.theworld.org/2011/04/bhutan-tough-tobacco-laws/ 
2072 
Ministry of Health (Myanmar). Brief profile on tobacco control in Myanmar. Yangon: Myanmar Ministry of Health; 
2073 
2009. Available from: http://209.61.208.233/LinkFiles/Tobacco_Free_Initiative_SEA-Tobacco-25.pdf 
2074 
Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (Bangladesh). Global Adult Tobacco Survey: Bangladesh report 2009. 
2075 
Dhaka, Bangladesh: World Health Organization, Country Office for Bangladesh; 2009. Available from: 
2076 
http://www.who.int/tobacco/surveillance/global adult tobacco survey bangladesh report 2009.pdf 
2077 
Oswal KC, Pednekar MS, Gupta PC. Tobacco industry interference for pictorial warnings. Indian J Cancer. 
2078 
2010;47(Suppl 1):101–4. 
2079 
Panchamukhi PR, Woollery T, Nayanatara SN. Economics of bidis in India. In: Gupta PC, Asma S, editors. Bidi 
2080 
smoking and public health. New Delhi: India Ministry of Health and Family Welfare; 2008, pp. 167–95. Available 
2081 
from: http://www.who.int/tobacco/publications/prod regulation/bidi smoking public health.pdf 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
75 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
2082 
Parameswaran G. Bhutan smokers huff and puff over tobacco ban. Aljazeera [Internet]; 2012 Sept 28. [cited 2013 
2083 
Nov 27]. Available from: http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/features/2012/09/201292095920757761.html 
2084 
Parliament of Bhutan. Tobacco Control Act of Bhutan, 2010; 2010 June 6. Available from: 
2085 
http://www.tobaccocontrollaws.org/files/live/Bhutan/Bhutan%20-%20Tobacco%20Control%20Act.pdf 
2086 
Rediff News. Pan masala, chewing tobacco units under tax scanner. PTI; 2007 Mar 16 [cited 2011 Nov 23]. 
2087 
Available from: http://imsports.rediff.com/money/2007/mar/16tax.htm 
2088 
Sandhu V. Gutkha warriors. Business Standard; 2012 Aug 18. Available from: http://www.business-
2089 
standard.com/india/news/gutkha-warriors/483533/ 
2090 
Singh A. The role of legislation litigation and judicial measures to ban smokeless tobacco (PowerPoint) 
2091 
(unpublished). 
2092 
Singh AP (editor). Delhi High Court directs police to enforce tobacco ban. The Med Guru [Internet]; 2011 Mar 31. 
2093 
Available from: http://www.themedguru.com/node/44219 
2094 
Smokeless Tobacco Federation (India). About us. Delhi: Smokeless Tobacco Federation (India); c2011 [cited 2012 
2095 
Jun 26]. Available from: http://www.sltfi.com/about-us 
2096 
Stanfill SB, Connolly GN, Zhang L, Jia LT, Henningfield JE, Richter P, et al. Global surveillance of oral tobacco 
2097 
products: total nicotine, unionised nicotine and tobacco-specific N-nitrosamines. Tob Control. 2011;20(3):e2. Epub 
2098 
2010 Nov 25. doi: 10.1136/tc.2010.037465 
2099 
Stepanov I, Hecht SS, Ramakrishnan S, Gupta PC. Tobacco-specific nitrosamines in smokeless tobacco products 
2100 
marketed in India. Int J Cancer 2005;116(1):16–19. 
2101 
Tobacco Board. Export performance of tobacco and tobacco products: 2003–2004. Guntur, India: India Ministry of 
2102 
Commerce and Industry, Tobacco Board; 2004 [cited 2012 Jun 26]. Available from: 
2103 
http://www.indiantobacco.com/admin/statisticsfiles/exp perf 2003 04.pdf 
2104 
Tobacco Board. Exports of unmanufactured tobacco and tobacco products from India in 2009–10: a review. Guntur, 
2105 
India: India Ministry of Commerce and Industry, Tobacco Board; 2011 [cited 2011 Nov 26]. Available from: 
2106 
http://www.indiantobacco.com/admin/statisticsfiles/exp perf 2009 10.pdf 
2107 
Tobacco Labeling Resource Centre. India pictorial health warning images; 2013. [cited 2013 Sept 27]. Available 
2108 
from: http://www.tobaccolabels.ca/healthwarningimages/country/india 
2109 
World Health Organization. Report on oral tobacco use and its implications in South-East Asia. New Delhi: World 
2110 
Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia; 2004 [cited 2013 Sept 19]. Available from: 
2111 
http://www.searo.who.int/entity/tobacco/topics/oral tobacco use.pdf 
2112 
World Health Organization. Expert group meeting on smokeless tobacco control and cessation, New Delhi: World 
2113 
Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia; 2011b. Available from: 
2114 
http://www.searo.who.int/entity/tobacco/documents/seatobacco43/en/index.html 
2115 
World Health Organization. Noncommunicable diseases in the South-East Asia Region: situation and response, 
2116 
2011. New Delhi: World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia; 2011c. Available from: 
2117 
http://www.searo.who.int/entity/noncommunicable diseases/documents/9789290224136/en/index.html 
2118 
World Health Organization. Profile on implementation of WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control in the 
2119 
South-East Asian Region. New Delhi: World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia; 2011a [cited 
2120 
2011 Jul 17]. Available from: http://www.searo.who.int/entity/tobacco/documents/9789290223986/en/index.html 
2121 
World Health Organization. WHO report on the global tobacco epidemic, 2011. Appendix VIII—Table 8.2: crude 
2122 
smokeless tobacco prevalence in WHO member states. Geneva: World Health Organization; 2011d. Available from: 
2123 
http://www.who.int/tobacco/global report/2011/en tfi global report 2011 appendix VIII table 2.pdf  
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
76 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
2124 
Zolty B, Sinha D, Sinha P. Best practices in tobacco control in the South-East Asia Region. Indian J Cancer. 2012; 
2125 
49(4):321-326 
2126 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
77 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
2127 
Smokeless Tobacco in the Western Pacific Region 
2128 
Introduction to Smokeless Tobacco in the Western Pacific Region 
2129 
Smoking is the predominant form of tobacco consumption in the Western Pacific Region, which 
2130 
is home to one-third of the world’s smokers (Cheng 2009). At present no regional mechanism 
2131 
systematically tracks the prevalence of smokeless tobacco (ST) use, and data on ST use are 
2132 
scarce. The available data indicate that ST use is many orders of magnitude less prevalent than 
2133 
smoking. 
2134 
 Of the few countries that have ST use data, rates vary from 22.4% among men aged 25–64 years 
2135 
in Micronesia, to 0.7% among males older than 15 years in China and Cambodia. Among 
2136 
women, prevalence of ST use ranges from 12.7% in Cambodia to essentially 0% in China. In 
2137 
some countries (e.g., Cambodia, Malaysia, and Vietnam), the rates of ST use are higher in 
2138 
females than males (WHO GTCR 2011; CDC no date). Among adolescents in the four countries 
2139 
where data area available (Cook Islands, Macau, Malaysia, and South Korea), prevalence of 
2140 
current ST use ranges from 2.1% in Macau to 8.7% in Cook Island (CDC 2008–2011). Rates 
2141 
among boys and girls are similar. 
2142 
Smokeless Tobacco Products in the Western Pacific Region 
2143 
Chewing Tobacco With Areca Nut 
2144 
The literature on ST use in the Western Pacific focuses primarily on chewing tobacco mixed with 
2145 
areca nut/betel quid. The areca nut is the seed of Areca catechu fruit, which is an important 
2146 
agricultural product in the Western Pacific Region and other parts of the world (IARC 2004). The 
2147 
areca nut is chewed by itself, or in combination with the leaf or fruit of a pepper plant (Piper 
2148 
betle) and lime powder, the mixture being popularly known as “betel quid.” Fresh nuts are 
2149 
consumed in both the fully ripe and unripe stages (WHO 2012; IARC 2004). The fine white lime 
2150 
powder (calcium oxide, or quicklime) used in the betel quid is usually the end-product of burning 
2151 
coral rock, sea coral, or shells (IARC 2004), and it must be kept in sealed containers to stay dry. 
2152 
As an alternative, water may be added to produce slaked lime (calcium hydroxide). Tobacco 
2153 
(either loose tobacco or as a portion from a cigarette) and other flavorings (spices such as 
2154 
cardamom and even garlic) may be added to the betel quid to enhance the flavor and heighten the 
2155 
physiologic effects (WHO 2012).  
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
78 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
2156 
Use of areca nut/betel quid does not involve tobacco use in all cultures. For instance, areca nut 
2157 
chewers in island countries within Melanesia (Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, 
2158 
Vanuatu) as well as in Taiwan and Hunan province, China, are unlikely to add tobacco to their 
2159 
quid (WHO 2012; IARC 2004). Tobacco is added to the areca nut/betel quid in certain areas, 
2160 
especially in the Pacific Islands, Cambodia, Vietnam, and the Philippines. Where areca nut/betel 
2161 
quid is consumed with tobacco, national and subnational published studies indicate that 
2162 
prevalence and patterns of consumption vary both across and within countries. Key informant 
2163 
interviews conducted in 2005 by the Secretariat for the Pacific Community (SPC) in several 
2164 
Pacific island countries highlighted the rising prevalence of areca nut/betel quid consumption 
2165 
among younger people and the increasing practice of adding tobacco to the quid (WHO 2012). 
2166 
The growing popularity of chewing areca nut/betel quid with tobacco has spurred the emergence 
2167 
of local sales of areca nut and prepackaged betel quid as a cottage industry in several Asia–
2168 
Pacific countries. For example, in Palau it is possible to purchase premade quids from local 
2169 
vendors, and the ingredients for a quid are increasingly becoming available at convenience stores 
2170 
and neighborhood shops throughout Micronesia (personal communication, C. Otto 2011). In 
2171 
Guam, a community-based participatory research project on tobacco points of sale revealed that 
2172 
over 50% of manufactured tobacco retail outlets also sold fresh betel nut, P. betle leaf, and lime, 
2173 
which were usually displayed beside or close to cigarettes, cigarette lighters, or candy (David 
2174 
2011).  
2175 
Areca nut is considered an IARC Group 1 carcinogen (IARC 2004). Arecoline, a major areca nut 
2176 
alkaloid, is considered the most important carcinogen in the areca nut. Areca nut extract (ANE) 
2177 
is highly cytotoxic and genotoxic to cultured human oral mucosal epithelial cells and fibroblasts 
2178 
(connective tissue cells). Researchers from Taiwan have published studies on the toxicologic 
2179 
profile and toxic effects of betel quid without tobacco (Chen 2008), but toxicity information on 
2180 
the combination of areca nut/betel quid with tobacco, as used in the Western Pacific, represents a 
2181 
data gap for the region.  
2182 
Other Types of Smokeless Tobacco 
2183 
It is likely that other types of ST are used in the region, but data are not readily available. In 
2184 
addition to chewing tobacco, snuff may be used in Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands 
2185 
(CNMI). In Japan in 2003, the Swedish company Swedish Match initiated consumer testing for a 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
79 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
2186 
brand of tobacco gum called “Firebreak,” which was launched in Sweden in 2006 (Swedish 
2187 
Match 2006); however, specific data on the prevalence of use of this product could not be found. 
2188 
In Kiribati, young people are using a novel form of ST, a mixture of tobacco from cigarettes with 
2189 
immature green coconuts (personal communication with Kireata Ruteru, 2011).  
2190 
Region-Specific Observations and Challenges 
2191 
Existing measures to control ST use in the Western Pacific involve both supply- and demand-
2192 
reduction strategies. Compared to policies and interventions to reduce smoking, actions to 
2193 
control ST use in the Western Pacific are rudimentary and often fail to consider the sociocultural 
2194 
context of the region as it relates to other forms of tobacco use. In part, policy inconsistencies 
2195 
stem from ambivalence regarding areca nut/betel quid use in contrast to tobacco use. This 
2196 
ambivalence arises partly from the long-held popular notion that chewing areca nut/betel quid is 
2197 
symbolic of cultural identity, and partly from a general lack of awareness of the negative effects 
2198 
of areca nut/betel quid chewing. Efforts to educate policymakers and the public should focus not 
2199 
only on smokeless tobacco but also on areca nut/betel quid, because use of areca nut/betel quid is 
2200 
closely linked with ST use. 
2201 
Current policies and interventions vary across countries in this region. Some countries have 
2202 
instituted bans on ST (Australia, New Zealand), bans on ST manufacturing (Taiwan), or bans on 
2203 
ST importation (Japan, Hong Kong, Singapore, Taiwan). However, the ST importation bans in 
2204 
Hong Kong, Japan, Singapore, and Taiwan have had no impact on the consumption of areca 
2205 
nut/betel quid with tobacco because the tobacco used is often taken from cigarettes and other 
2206 
sources.  
2207 
Western Pacific countries are highly impacted by forces of economic globalization, and the high 
2208 
priority placed on international trade in the region presents both benefits and obstacles to 
2209 
effective tobacco control. For example, economic rather than public health goals may make 
2210 
governments reluctant to impose trade restrictions on tobacco products, and this position could 
2211 
undermine tax policies and other measures to raise tobacco prices. Under the ASEAN Free Trade 
2212 
Agreement (AFTA), tobacco products made in ASEAN countries with at least 40% of the raw 
2213 
materials from the ASEAN subregion are subject to a tariff-reduction scheme mandated in the 
2214 
agreement, thus encouraging use of these products (ASEAN Secretariat 1992). Furthermore, the 
2215 
sale and distribution of areca nut also contribute to government revenue sources, and therefore 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
80 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
2216 
exports of these products have increased to meet the demands of migrants. Internet sales are 
2217 
likewise increasing (Van McCrary 1998).  
2218 
Because cultivation, sales, and distribution of areca nut/betel quid with tobacco most often occur 
2219 
as part of the informal economy, regulation through taxation (other than taxing cigarettes) is 
2220 
challenging. In Taiwan, areca growing and the sale of betel quid are rapidly growing businesses 
2221 
that appear to parallel the expansion of the cigarette market. Although international tobacco 
2222 
companies have not begun marketing the product, Taiwanese betel quid producers have set up 
2223 
neon-lit roadside kiosks around the country, where scantily clad young women, known as “Betel 
2224 
Quid Barbies,” sell betel quid and cigarettes to motorists (Wen 2005). Since areca nut and betel 
2225 
quid use are culturally ingrained in many Asia–Pacific societies, there is little need for extensive 
2226 
marketing outside of local channels. On the other hand, anecdotal reports indicate that 
2227 
commercial ST products produced by national and multinational tobacco companies are 
2228 
becoming more visible and that advertising for these products is increasing. Hong Kong, 
2229 
Singapore, and Taiwan prohibit advertising and promotion of ST products. 
2230 
Best Practices and Future Needs 
2231 
Existing data on ST use, toxicity, and health effects are scarce and fail to provide an accurate and 
2232 
comprehensive picture of the magnitude of the problem and its attendant health, economic, and 
2233 
social consequences. Without an effective surveillance system, there is no reasonable way to 
2234 
gauge changes in prevalence over time within countries and across the region, or to measure the 
2235 
effectiveness of policy and program interventions. Although we know that areca nut contains 
2236 
carcinogenic compounds, detailed toxicologic data are incomplete, with most of the studies 
2237 
conducted on areca nut and betel quid without tobacco. Addressing the multiple data gaps should 
2238 
be the first step toward developing an effective and coordinated response to controlling ST use in 
2239 
this region. 
2240 
The Western Pacific Region is the first and, to date, the only WHO Region to achieve a 100% 
2241 
ratification rate for the WHO FCTC. Globalization is facilitating the diffusion of ideas and 
2242 
examples of successful national tobacco control strategies across the Western Pacific countries 
2243 
and areas and is mobilizing support for implementation of the FCTC (da Costa 2009).  
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
81 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
2244 
Despite the challenges for implementing ST use restriction policies in this region, there are many 
2245 
success stories. For example, in 1986, the government of the Australian state of South Australia 
2246 
became the first government in the world to ban ST; the ban became national in 1991 (Chapman 
2247 
2001). New Zealand has also banned ST (WHO 1997). In March 2010, the Marshall Islands 
2248 
became the first Pacific island country to ban importation, distribution, and sales of areca 
2249 
nut/betel quid, with violations punishable by a fine of up to US$100 and 30 days in jail 
2250 
(Secretariat of the Pacific Community 2010). While some of these bans contain loopholes such 
2251 
as allowing importation of ST products or areca nut for personal consumption (Australian 
2252 
Competition and Consumer Commission 2012; Marshall Island Journal 2011), they still 
2253 
represent significant strides toward reducing the burden of tobacco-related health, economic, and 
2254 
social consequences. 
2255 
In addition to banning ST, Singapore has also taken steps to keep pace with industry 
2256 
developments and preempt the entry and spread of new products in local markets. In July 2010, 
2257 
the government of Singapore passed an amendment that expanded the scope of the 1993 Tobacco 
2258 
(Control of Advertisements and Sale) Act. Novel and emerging forms of tobacco products, such 
2259 
as tobacco derivatives (dissolvable tobacco) and nicotine-based products, are now subject to the 
2260 
same regulatory control as existing ST products, and the Minister for Health is empowered to 
2261 
ban a wider array of products, including more types of smokeless tobacco.  
2262 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
82 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
2263 
References 
2264 
Secretariat of the Pacific Community. Betel nut banned in Marshall Islands. Pacific Islands Report. New Caledonia: 
2265 
Secretariat of the Pacific Community; 2010 Mar 11. Available from: 
2266 
http://www.spc.int/hpl/index.php?option=com content&task=view&id=61&Itemid=1 
2267 
Association of South-East Asian Nations Secretariat. Agreement on the common effective preferential tariff (CEPT) 
2268 
scheme for the ASEAN free trade area (AFTA). Singapore: ASEAN Secretariat; 1992 [cited 2011 Jul 25]. Available 
2269 
from: http://www.asean.org/communities/asean-economic-community/item/agreement-on-the-common-effective-
2270 
preferential-tariff-cept-scheme-for-the-asean-free-trade-area-afta 
2271 
Australian Competition and Consumer Commission. Product Safety Australia: smokeless tobacco products. 
2272 
Canberra, Australia: Australian Competition and Consumer Commission; 2012 [cited 2012 Jan 27]. Available from: 
2273 
http://www.productsafety.gov.au/content/index.phtml/itemId/974275 
2274 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Global Adult Tobacco Survey, 2008–2010: percentage of adults who 
2275 
currently use smokeless tobacco. Global Tobacco Surveillance System data [Internet database]. Atlanta: Centers for 
2276 
Disease Control and Prevention; [no date]. Available from: 
2277 
http://apps.nccd.cdc.gov/GTSSData/default/IndicatorResults.aspx?TYPE=&SRCH=C&SUID=GATS&SYID=RY&
2278 
CAID=Topic&SCID=C443&QUID=Q469&WHID=WW&COID=&LOID=LL&DCOL=S&FDSC=FD&FCHL=&F
2279 
REL=&FAGL=&FSEL=&FPRL=&DSRT=DEFAULT&DODR=ASC&DSHO=False&DCIV=N&DCSZ=N&DOC
2280 
T=0&XMAP=TAB&MPVW=&TREE=0 
2281 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [Unpublished data from the Global Youth Tobacco Survey (GYTS).] 
2282 
Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2008–2011. 
2283 
Chapman S, Wakefield M. Tobacco control advocacy in Australia: reflections on 30 years of progress. Health Educ 
2284 
Behav. 2001;28(3):274–89. 
2285 
Chen YJ, Chang JT, Liao CT, Wang HM, Yen TC, Chiu CC, et al. Head and neck cancer in the betel quid chewing 
2286 
area: recent advances in molecular carcinogenesis. Cancer Sci. 2008;99(8):1507–14. Available from: 
2287 
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1349-
2288 
7006.2008.00863.x/abstract;jsessionid=61A22EADB9E2E789406FB858C033EFE5.d03t02 
2289 
Cheng MH. WHO’s Western Pacific region agrees on tobacco-control plan. Lancet. 2009;374(9697):1227–8. 
2290 
Available from: http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(09)61769-4/fulltext 
2291 
da Costa e Silva VL, David A, editors. History of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control. Geneva: 
2292 
World Health Organization, Framework Convention on Tobacco Control; 2009. 
2293 
David AM, Elf J, Mummert A, Tamplin SA, Stillman F. Using a community‐based participatory approach to 
2294 
mapping tobacco point of sale advertising [unpublished data]. Mangilao, Guam: University of Guam Cancer 
2295 
Research Center; 2011. 
2296 
International Agency for Research on Cancer. Betel-quid and areca-nut chewing and some areca-nut-derived 
2297 
nitrosamines. IARC monographs on the evaluation of carcinogenic risks to humans. Vol. 85. Lyon, France: World 
2298 
Health Organization, International Agency for Research on Cancer; 2004 [cited 2012 Jun 25]. Available from: 
2299 
http://monographs.iarc.fr/ENG/Monographs/vol85/index.php 
2300 
Marshall Islands Journal. Bill beefs up 2010 Betelnut Act. Majuro, Marshall Islands: Micronitor News and Printing 
2301 
Company; 2011 Mar 4 (updated 2012 Jan 27] [cited 2012 Jan 27). 
2302 
Swedish Match. Firebreak—the smoke-free tobacco product of the future [press release] [Internet]. Stockholm: 
2303 
Swedish Match; 2006 Mar 23 [cited 2011 Jul 25]. Available from: 
2304 
http://www.swedishmatch.com/en/Media/Pressreleases/Press-releases/Other/Firebreak--the-smoke-free-tobacco-
2305 
product-of-the-future 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
83 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
2306 
Van McCrary S. The betel nut: an emerging public health threat? Health Law Policy Inst. 1998 Sep 8 [cited 2012 Jan 
2307 
27]. Available from: http://www.law.uh.edu/healthlaw/perspectives/healthpolicy/980908Betel.html 
2308 
Wen CP, Tsai SP, Cheng TY, Chen CJ, Levy DT, Yang HJ, et al. Uncovering the relation between betel quid chewing 
2309 
and cigarette smoking in Taiwan. Tob Control. 2005:14(Suppl 1):i16–i22. 
2310 
World Health Organization. WHO report on the global tobacco epidemic, 2011. Appendix VIII—Table 8.2: Crude 
2311 
smokeless tobacco prevalence in WHO member states. Geneva: World Health Organization; 2011. Available from: 
2312 
http://www.who.int/tobacco/global report/2011/en tfi global report 2011 appendix VIII table 2.pdf 
2313 
World Health Organization, Regional Office for the Western Pacific. Review of areca (betel) nut and tobacco use in 
2314 
the Pacific: a technical report. Manila: World Health Organization, Regional Office for the Western Pacific; 2012 
2315 
[cited 2012 Aug 16]. Available from: http://www.wpro.who.int/tobacco/documents/201203 Betelnut/en/index.html 
2316 
World Health Organization. Tobacco or health: a global status report. Geneva: World Health Organization, 1997. 
2317 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
84 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
2318 
Key Findings and Recommendations 
2319 
Key Findings 
2320 
1) Smokeless Tobacco Use Is a Complex Global Problem 
2321 
Smokeless tobacco (ST) use is a global problem affecting an estimated 300 million people across 
2322 
about 70 low-, middle-, and high-income countries. All six WHO regions contain a significant 
2323 
population of ST users, and almost all countries for which data are available report some level of 
2324 
ST use. In countries with the highest prevalence, most current users report daily use of ST. ST 
2325 
use poses an extremely complex public health challenge, as product characteristics, patterns of 
2326 
use, health effects, marketing and production practices, and public health and policy responses 
2327 
vary widely between countries and regions.  
2328 
ST has a disproportionate impact in some countries and subpopulations. The majority of adult ST 
2329 
users (89%, or approximately 268 million) live in low- and middle-income countries in South-
2330 
East Asia. There are an estimated 220 million adult ST users in India alone, where overall adult 
2331 
prevalence is 26% (exceeding the prevalence of cigarette smoking), followed by Bangladesh 
2332 
with 28 million ST users (27%), and Myanmar with 11 million ST users (30%). The figures 
2333 
presented here represent only those countries for which data are available; data are lacking for 
2334 
some key regions, including some countries in South-East Asia where substantial ST use might 
2335 
be expected.  
2336 
In most countries ST use is more prevalent among men than women. However, several countries 
2337 
reported high use of ST among both men and women. In several countries in the African, South-
2338 
East Asian and Western Pacific Regions, prevalence of ST use among women significantly 
2339 
exceeded that of men. Some studies have found that women report initiating ST use during 
2340 
pregnancy because they believe it will alleviate symptoms of morning sickness (Senn et al. 2009, 
2341 
Singh et al. 2009), and ST use during pregnancy has been associated with adverse reproductive 
2342 
outcomes. More research is needed to understand the factors that lead to high prevalence of ST 
2343 
use among women in these countries.  
2344 
ST use is also prevalent among youth in many countries. Of the 57 countries for which sufficient 
2345 
national data were available to be included in this report (using GYTS surveys of students aged 
2346 
13–15 years), all reported some ST use among youth, and 33 reported overall use greater than 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
85 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
2347 
5% among youth. As with adults, ST use is generally higher among males than females.  In many 
2348 
regions, ST products are marketed and sold in ways that may appeal to youth, such as in 
2349 
publications with a high youth readership or next to candies and snacks in street stalls and 
2350 
kiosks.  
2351 
A high prevalence of ST use is also seen among some population subgroups even within 
2352 
countries where overall prevalence is low compared with cigarette smoking, particularly among 
2353 
native populations and recent immigrants. For example, while prevalence of ST use among 
2354 
Alaskan non-Native adults is similar to the U.S. average, prevalence among Alaska Native adults 
2355 
is three times greater. Similarly, in Brazil the use of rapé is rare among urban populations but 
2356 
more common among rural native populations. Immigrants from regions where ST use is 
2357 
prevalent may bring their practices with them. For example, the use of gutka or betel quid with 
2358 
tobacco has been found to be very common among first-generation immigrants from Bangladesh 
2359 
and India living in New York and London. And reports suggest that some youth, such as those in 
2360 
Venezuela and Micronesia, may view ST products as a means to express national identity or 
2361 
traditional culture. 
2362 
2) Smokeless Tobacco is Not Safe  
2363 
There is substantial evidence that ST products cause addiction, precancerous oral lesions, cancer 
2364 
of the oral cavity, esophageal and pancreatic cancer, and adverse reproductive outcomes, 
2365 
including stillbirth, preterm birth, and low birth weight. Data from some countries have 
2366 
demonstrated a link between ST and increased risk of fatal myocardial infarction or stroke. All 
2367 
ST products contain chemicals known to cause harm, such as tobacco-specific nitrosamines 
2368 
(TSNAs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In fact, a well-developed model 
2369 
describes the mechanistic pathway by which the TSNAs N’-nitrosonornicotine (NNN) and 4-
2370 
(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) are metabolically activated and induce 
2371 
primary DNA lesions that may ultimately lead to cancer. Thus, all ST products are hazardous to 
2372 
use. 
2373 
3) Health Impact May Vary Across Countries 
2374 
The total public health impact of ST use is related to the disease risks associated with particular 
2375 
products, their prevalence, the manner of use, and the underlying burden of disease (which may 
2376 
also be influenced by other risk factors). Currently available data are insufficient to support an 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
86 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
2377 
estimate of the total global disease or mortality burden of ST use. Additionally, because 
2378 
smokeless tobacco use is limited or more recent in many countries, particularly in higher income 
2379 
countries, research and data collection have lagged. However, estimates of attributable risk for 
2380 
countries where adequate data are available show wide variation in the attributable disease 
2381 
burden. For example, most studies from Sweden have not shown an association between ST use 
2382 
and oral cancer, but studies in India have shown very high relative risks (from 2 to 14) for oral 
2383 
cancer. These differences may be due in part to differing levels of harmful constituents in the 
2384 
products. For example, reported levels of TSNAs in ST product samples from a variety of 
2385 
countries, and within the same country, vary by many orders of magnitude. One laboratory study 
2386 
comparing samples of products from India found that total TSNA content varied from 0.1 to 
2387 
127.9 µg/g. Likewise, an analysis of U.S. moist snuff products showed a 70-fold difference in 
2388 
NNAL content across leading brand, whereas products in Sweden show less variation in TSNAs 
2389 
because they adhere to specific standards for TSNA levels.  
2390 
In general, the greatest disease burden from ST use occurs in low- and middle-income countries 
2391 
where the highest relative risks have been recorded and the greatest numbers of users live.  Those 
2392 
countries face a multi-pronged challenge: They are home to the most diverse array of products, 
2393 
some of which are extraordinarily high in toxicants, but their ability to regulate ST products and 
2394 
implement effective tobacco control measures is hampered by limited resources and the local, 
2395 
unorganized nature of the tobacco manufacturing and retailing. For example, India experiences 
2396 
high oral cancer rates (Ferlay et al. 2008), and it is estimated that more than 50% of oral cancers 
2397 
in India (and Sudan) can be attributed to ST use (Boffetta et al. 2008). 
2398 
4) Smokeless Tobacco Products Are Diverse 
2399 
The term “smokeless tobacco” covers a large and extremely diverse group of products. They 
2400 
differ in color, appearance, consistency, packaging, and manner of use. They also vary in their 
2401 
mode of manufacture or preparation (premade vs. custom-made), in the scale of production 
2402 
(large-scale manufacturing, cottage industry, or individual vendor preparation), and in their 
2403 
ingredients (type of tobacco leaf, alkaline agents, flavorants, and other non-tobacco content, such 
2404 
as areca nut or tonka bean). The best estimates indicate that, by volume, 91.3% (648.2 billion 
2405 
tons) of ST worldwide (710.2 billion tons) is sold in traditional cottage industry markets 
2406 
(Euromonitor International 2010).  
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
87 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
2407 
ST products also vary greatly in their chemical composition, with some products containing 
2408 
extremely high levels of carcinogens, nicotine, and free nicotine (the most rapidly absorbed 
2409 
form). For example, levels of TSNAs in ST products vary by as much as 400-fold (Stanfill et al. 
2410 
2011). A 2008 survey of 39 top-selling brands of U.S. moist snuff showed a more than 500-fold 
2411 
range in free nicotine (Richter 2008). Levels of toxicity, carcinogens, and free nicotine are 
2412 
influenced by a wide range of factors, including species of tobacco plant used, characteristics of 
2413 
the soil in which the tobacco was grown (e.g., the concentration of nitrite and certain metals), 
2414 
curing methods (air-cured vs. fire-cured), processing methods (pasteurized vs. fermented), 
2415 
addition of certain ingredients (tonka bean, areca nut, alkaline agents), and conditions under 
2416 
which the final products were stored. Based on research to date, steps could be taken to reduce 
2417 
the presence of carcinogens or other toxicants in ST products, including reduction or elimination 
2418 
of the use of fire-cured tobacco, improved prevention of microbial contamination, changes in 
2419 
fermentation, elimination of ingredients such as areca nut and tonka bean, and improvements in 
2420 
storage conditions.  
2421 
Despite this enormous product diversity, some important common cross-product observations 
2422 
can be made. The practice of adding alkaline agents to boost nicotine delivery is commonly 
2423 
found in a number of traditional and manufactured ST products around the world (such as punk 
2424 
ash added to iqmik in Alaska, slaked lime added to khaini in India, or sodium bicarbonate added 
2425 
to toombak in Sudan). Adding flavorings (e.g., menthol, cocoa, licorice, rum, aniseed, cinnamon, 
2426 
clove) and sweeteners (e.g., molasses, honey, dextrose, sorbitol, fruit juices) is also a common 
2427 
practice and may make the product more appealing to youth and new users (Henningfield et al. 
2428 
2011). Additionally, there appears to be a growing emphasis on increased convenience and ease 
2429 
of use in the marketing of ST products in countries at different income levels. Gutka, a dried, 
2430 
prepackaged version of the fresh betel quid traditionally mixed to order by a vendor or user, has 
2431 
become increasingly popular in India and is now a large-scale industry. At the same time, in 
2432 
high-income countries such as the United States, tobacco product manufacturers have packaged 
2433 
moist snuff in pouches that do not require spitting, marketing them to smokers as a discreet and 
2434 
convenient alternative for settings where they cannot smoke.  
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
88 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
2435 
5) Marketing Strategies Are Made to Appeal to Youth 
2436 
Tobacco industry marketing strategies also show some common trends. Across high-, middle-, 
2437 
and low-income countries, tobacco product manufacturers utilize colorful packaging, suggestive 
2438 
names and slogans, cross-branding with non-tobacco products, price discounts, health or 
2439 
medicinal associations, and lifestyle marketing appeals to sell their products.  
2440 
In middle and low-income countries, marketing strategies may pose a particular challenge for 
2441 
tobacco control efforts by circumventing existing tobacco control measures, using brand names 
2442 
for their nontobacco products, and use of packaging that appeals to youth For example, 
2443 
manufacturers in India use the same brand names for their non-tobacco products as for tobacco-
2444 
containing products in an effort to circumvent India’s ban on tobacco product advertisements on 
2445 
television. Use of small single-use packaging makes products inexpensive and more easily 
2446 
available to youth and may dilute the impact of tobacco taxes. In addition, large-scale marketing 
2447 
campaigns are generally absent for traditional cottage industry products, but large multinational 
2448 
companies have entered markets in some low- and middle-income countries and have begun to 
2449 
produce some traditionally cottage industry products on a larger, commercial scale.  
2450 
5) Smokeless Tobacco Products are Evolving to Capture More Users 
2451 
In high-income countries such as the United States, a number of manufacturers have introduced 
2452 
novel ST products, using new product formulations (e.g., reduced nitrosamines, dissolvable 
2453 
formulations, spit-free pouches, new flavorings) and marketing practices (e.g., targeting current 
2454 
smokers and devising innovative packaging). These products and practices may appeal to new 
2455 
groups of users. For example, novel snus products have been marketed to smokers for use in 
2456 
settings where they cannot or do not want to smoke, using imagery that emphasizes trendiness, 
2457 
urbanity, freedom, and sophistication for both men and women. And U.S. cigarette 
2458 
manufacturers have introduced ST products with popular cigarette brand names such as 
2459 
Marlboro and Camel. These new marketing strategies raise concern because they may increase 
2460 
initiation, deter people from quitting smoking or other tobacco use, or result in dual use or use of 
2461 
multiple tobacco products.  
2462 
6) Interventions and Knowledge about Health Effects Are Limited  
2463 
In all regions, evidence-based interventions tailored to the prevention and cessation of ST use are 
2464 
limited. In some regions, knowledge about the health effects of ST use is limited even among 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
89 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
2465 
health professionals. The existing evidence for treatment programs comes largely from high-
2466 
income countries, and data on smokeless tobacco quit rates are not available for most countries. 
2467 
Thus, there is a particular need to develop and test interventions targeted at low-income 
2468 
populations or countries where the burden of ST use is greatest.  
2469 
7) Smokeless Tobacco Policies Are Varied and Often Weaker than for Smoking 
2470 
A diverse range of programs and policies have been implemented in different countries and 
2471 
municipalities to address ST use; however, limited data are available to evaluate the impact of 
2472 
these interventions. Some countries and municipalities have banned entire classes of tobacco 
2473 
products, such as the ban on gutka sales imposed by some states and subregions in India. In 
2474 
many countries, a lower standard has been applied to ST products compared with cigarettes. For 
2475 
example, in many regions, even those where ST use is highly prevalent, policies and programs 
2476 
aimed at ST use prevention and cessation are generally weaker than those for smoked tobacco 
2477 
products: prices are lower, warning labels are weaker or nonexistent, surveillance is weaker, 
2478 
fewer resources are devoted to prevention and control programs, and fewer proven interventions 
2479 
are available. While restrictions on smoking in public places, even outdoors, have been 
2480 
vigorously pursued in many countries around the world to both smoked and nonsmoked tobacco 
2481 
products, few efforts have been made to apply these rules to all tobacco products.  
2482 
Overall Challenges 
2483 
1) Not Focusing on the Smokeless Tobacco Problem 
2484 
The public health challenge of ST warrants far greater attention and action than it has so far 
2485 
received, considering the magnitude and complexity of the problem, industry marketing, trends 
2486 
in patterns of use, and a lack of effective interventions. According to Euromonitor International, 
2487 
the global market for both modern and traditional snuff products is projected to increase by 24 
2488 
percentage points between 2011 and 2016, compared to only a projected 7 percentage point 
2489 
increase in the market for cigarettes (Euromonitor dataset). Moreover, while the WHO 
2490 
Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) applies to all tobacco products, many of the 
2491 
strategies developed under the Conference of Parties to date are focused on cigarettes, and no 
2492 
specific guidance has been developed regarding ST products.   
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
90 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
2493 
2) Limited Data to Inform Decisions 
2494 
The prevalence of ST use is particularly high in some low- and middle-income countries and 
2495 
among low- income populations. The major challenge that faces these countries is the limited 
2496 
data to help craft policies and programs. For example, data on pricing, tax structures, and sale of 
2497 
ST products and marketing startegies are very limited, especially in those countries where ST use 
2498 
is most prevalent. Cottage industry production makes collection of taxes more challenging and 
2499 
probably less effective. Additionally, information on the cost of health care to treat ST-related 
2500 
diseases is nonexistent. This is a particularly significant gap in the data needed to inform the 
2501 
control of ST use.   
2502 
3) Emerging New Products in High Income Countries 
2503 
While the public health burden falls disproportionately on low- and middle-income countries, the 
2504 
findings and gaps identified in this report have substantial public health importance for high-
2505 
income countries as well. The United States, with 9 million ST users, is among the countries with 
2506 
the largest populations of ST users. Between 2005 and 2010, sales of moist snuff grew by 
2507 
US$2.04 billion following increased marketing of these products (Euromonitor 2011). National 
2508 
surveys also suggest that between 2000 and 2010 ST use in the United States rose among youth, 
2509 
particularly high school males (CDC 2012; Johnston et al. 2011; SAMHSA 2009). The major 
2510 
challenges faced by the U.S. and potentially other high income countries include the number of 
2511 
many different types of tobacco products that are emerging in the market. As noted previously, 
2512 
novel snus-type products using familiar cigarette brand names (Camel and Marlboro snus) are 
2513 
being marketed to smokers for use in settings where they cannot smoke (Timberlake et al. 2011; 
2514 
Mejia and Ling 2010). This trend may adversely impact smoking cessation efforts by 
2515 
encouraging dual use as an alternative to tobacco use cessation. Additionally, dual use of ST and 
2516 
cigarette smoking could have greater health risks than smoking alone (USDHHS 2010, Teo 
2517 
2006), and although cigarette smokers who permanently switched to ST exclusively decreased 
2518 
their risk of some diseases specific to smoke exposure, those who quit tobacco use altogether 
2519 
lowered their mortality rates from lung cancer, coronary heart disease, and stroke more than 
2520 
those who switched to ST use, as evidenced from a single study that examined this effect 
2521 
(Henley 2007). 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
91 



Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
2553 
actual human uptake (absorption and excretion) of nicotine and toxicants as a result of active and 
2554 
secondhand (e.g., fetal) exposure to ST would be valuable. Additionally, attention should be 
2555 
given to non-tobacco products that are frequently used in conjunction with tobacco, such as areca 
2556 
nut. Further research is needed to develop standardized testing methods for diverse products. The 
2557 
laboratory standards being developed by the WHO Tobacco Laboratory Network for testing 
2558 
cigarettes could be expanded and adapted for ST products.  
2559 
3) Health Effects 
2560 
While there is a significant body of research on particular health effects of ST use in a few 
2561 
countries, the diversity of products, practices, and patterns of use precludes broad generalizations 
2562 
about health effects. Most studies of health effects have been conducted in Scandinavian 
2563 
countries, the United States, and India. Because of the diversity in toxicant and nicotine levels 
2564 
across ST products, applying results from one country to another country is problematic. Even 
2565 
within a country, ST products can vary tremendously. Also, mixed results in some studies (such 
2566 
as in cardiovascular disease effects) and small numbers suggest the need for further 
2567 
investigation. The effects of ST use on birth outcomes need further characterization, especially 
2568 
considering the high prevalence of ST use among some subgroups of women of reproductive 
2569 
age. In order to link specific types of products with particular health effects, studies are needed 
2570 
that link the constituent profile and biomarkers of exposure and biomarkers of effect to specific 
2571 
ST products with health consequences; establishing these links may be extremely challenging for 
2572 
custom-made and cottage industry products with little or no standardization. Studies should also 
2573 
investigate the health effects of other ingredients and combinations of ingredients frequently 
2574 
used in ST products, such as areca nut or tonka bean. 
2575 
4) Economics and Marketing 
2576 
Very little information is currently available on pricing and sales volume of ST products in many 
2577 
countries. While many studies have been conducted on the price elasticity of cigarettes, for 
2578 
example, comparable data for ST are very limited. Given the high prevalence of ST use in some 
2579 
low- and middle-income countries and among poor and rural populations, pricing information 
2580 
may be especially important for understanding patterns of use and developing effective public 
2581 
health interventions. Information on price, taxes, affordability, and trade should be collected 
2582 
routinely. Additionally, locally relevant data are needed to demonstrate the economic benefits of 
2583 
tobacco control measures because some countries with active tobacco industries may seek to 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
93 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
2584 
delay or defeat actions to reduce ST use out of concern for the potential impacts on national 
2585 
economies. Lastly, ongoing surveillance of tobacco industry marketing strategies is important, 
2586 
particularly following the implementation of new policies or regulations, or the entrance of new 
2587 
multinational tobacco companies into the market..  
2588 
Building Capacity 
2589 
Enhancing surveillance, pursuing a research agenda, and implementing new policies and 
2590 
interventions to address ST use will require increased scientific and public health capacity in 
2591 
low- and middle-income countries, particularly those that are confronted with high burdens of ST 
2592 
use. Increased in-country capacity to conduct tobacco control research is critical to the 
2593 
development and implementation of effective interventions, as these interventions must be 
2594 
responsive to local populations and contexts. In addition, robust local capacity enhances the 
2595 
sustainability of evidence-based policies and programs, as local researchers and institutions are 
2596 
well positioned to respond to changes in the tobacco control environment over time by 
2597 
generating new relevant knowledge to inform modifications or new approaches. At the same 
2598 
time, greater capacity for communication and collaboration across countries is increasingly 
2599 
important. As tobacco use trends change, innovative policies and interventions are introduced in 
2600 
different countries, and the tobacco industry adopts new marketing strategies, an enormous 
2601 
“natural experiment” is under way that provides unique opportunities for research and 
2602 
evaluation. Making use of these opportunities will require coordinated surveillance, information 
2603 
sharing, and research efforts. With this in mind, the following recommendations are made to 
2604 
enhance collaboration and infrastructure (some of which have been described in Article 20 of the 
2605 
FCTC): 
2606 
1) Regional Clearinghouses 
2607 
Create regional information clearinghouses for ST that can be readily accessed electronically by 
2608 
people from all parts of the world. These clearinghouses can inform stakeholders within and 
2609 
outside a region about ST product characteristics, patterns of use, policies and interventions that 
2610 
have been implemented, and the results of any research or evaluation conducted.  
2611 
2) Infrastructure for Networking, Communication, and Collaboration.  
2612 
One mechanism for facilitating this goal would be to develop a Web portal to serve as a 
2613 
repository and index to information on ST product characteristics, constituents and ingredients, 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
94 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
2614 
manufacturing and promotion methods, product price, and packaging and marketing materials. 
2615 
This Web portal could also bring together the regional clearinghouses described above and 
2616 
provide a forum for discussion about research design, research results, and policies. 
2617 
3) Build Collaborations among Scientists, Tobacco Control Advocates, and 
2618 
Policymakers.  
2619 
These collaborations are critical for translating research into policy and ensuring that policy 
2620 
needs inform research studies. Collaborations across countries and regions are especially 
2621 
important to making comparisons between different products, environments, and interventions. 
2622 
Countries with more mature tobacco control programs can provide expertise and assistance to 
2623 
countries that are newly implementing programs and policies. 
2624 
4) Build Research Capacity  
2625 
Develop ways to build research capacity by better leveraging existing resources such as the 
2626 
Tobacco Laboratory Network, the Global Adult Survey and Global Youth Tobacco Survey, and 
2627 
the Tobacco Harm Reduction Network.  Research capacity can also be enhanced by attracting 
2628 
and training new researchers—especially those in middle- and low-income countries—and 
2629 
encouraging collaborations between new and experienced researchers. 
2630 
Intervention and Policy Needs 
2631 
Tobacco control policies, programs, and interventions applied to cigarettes and smoked tobacco 
2632 
products should be applied, enforced, and monitored with equal strength to ST products, 
2633 
particularly in regions where the burden of ST use is high. Prevention and cessation of ST use 
2634 
should form an integral part of every comprehensive tobacco control effort. At the same time, ST 
2635 
products pose some distinct challenges compared with smoked products, and specific policy 
2636 
needs may vary across countries, depending on products, patterns of use, industry marketing, and 
2637 
the tobacco control environment. The following in particular should be addressed for the control 
2638 
of ST products: 
2639 
1) Apply FCTC requirements to Smokeless Tobacco Products  
2640 
Specific guidelines are needed to ensure that the FCTC requirements are applied to ST products 
2641 
as well as cigarettes. For example, the FCTC binds parties to ban or restrict sponsorship and 
2642 
marketing of tobacco products, prohibit sale to minors, and track and monitor illicit trade. 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
95 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
2643 
Additional guidance can help ensure that the FCTC requirements are fully applied to a diverse 
2644 
array of ST products as well. 
2645 
2) Educate the Public about Harms of Smokeless Tobacco 
2646 
In all regions, greater awareness is needed about ST use and its health effects, including 
2647 
education of health professionals, consumers (with particular attention to youth and women of 
2648 
childbearing age), policymakers, and community leaders. Dissemination of information about the 
2649 
toxicity of tobacco products may be particularly important in geographic areas where tobacco 
2650 
products are premade through cottage industries, or custom-made at home or at the point of sale. 
2651 
Greater awareness is also needed among policymakers, health professionals, and the public 
2652 
regarding the public health impact of ST use and changing patterns in industry marketing and 
2653 
consumer use.  
2654 
3) Develop Product Standards for Smokeless Tobacco Producs 
2655 
Product standards for ST products need to be developed, implemented, and evaluated. Levels of 
2656 
known toxicants in ST products vary widely, as does the impact of storage and processing 
2657 
practices on toxicant levels. Feasible measures for reducing levels of toxicants in the product 
2658 
include reducing the use of Nicotiana rustica, limiting bacterial contamination that can promote 
2659 
nitrosation and carcinogen formation, and requiring tobacco to be air-cured, pasteurized, and 
2660 
refrigerated. The WHO Study Group on Tobacco Product Regulation has recommended 
2661 
mandating upper limits on ST toxicants; this would include setting the upper limit of NNN plus 
2662 
NNK at 2 micrograms per gram of dry weight tobacco, and the upper limit for benzo[a]pyrene at 
2663 
5 nanograms per gram of dry weight tobacco.  
2664 
Research is needed that can form the basis for establishing maximum levels of pH in ST 
2665 
products. Additives that increase pH in tobacco products boost the amount of free nicotine 
2666 
available for absorption, and products with higher free nicotine levels are more addictive. 
2667 
4) Consider Ban on Flavorants  
2668 
Some countries, such as the United States and Canada, have banned flavorings in cigarettes 
2669 
(except menthol), but they have placed no such limits on the use of flavorants in ST products. A 
2670 
variety of flavors and other additives are used to enhance the appeal of tobacco products and 
2671 
facilitate uptake (Henningfield et al. 2011, Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee 
2672 
2011). A recent U.S. study showed that more ST users (who were seeking an intervention) had 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
96 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
2673 
initiated with or switched to a mint-flavored ST product than non-flavored products (Oliver et al. 
2674 
2012). Banning or limiting certain additives and flavorants may serve as an effective tool for 
2675 
reducing the attractiveness of ST.  
2676 
5) Stronger Public Health Warnings  
2677 
Many countries require health warning labels on ST packaging, but most of these labels contain 
2678 
only textual warnings and lack the graphic images that have been implemented for cigarette 
2679 
labels. For cigarettes, FCTC Article 11 of the FCTC recommends pictorial warning labels and 
2680 
mandates that health warnings cover at least 50% of the cigarette packet. These standards have 
2681 
not been uniformly used with ST products.  
2682 
6) Increase Taxes  
2683 
Taxes on ST products could be increased (Article 6 of the FCTC). WHO expert panel 
2684 
recommended that ST be taxed at “a level sufficient to act as a disincentive, and at least at the 
2685 
level at which cigarettes are taxed” (WHO 1988, p. 64). The same guidelines the WHO FCTC 
2686 
gives for taxing cigarettes can be applied to ST and all other tobacco products. These 
2687 
recommendations include an excise tax that makes up at least 70% of the retail price, with the 
2688 
use of specific excise tax being favored over ad valorem. Having a more uniform tax structure 
2689 
across tobacco products would curtail the practice of substituting other tobacco products, which 
2690 
would be of particular concern in countries that have very toxic ST products. Due to challenges 
2691 
inherent in tax collection in traditional markets, taxation of tobacco leaves or a presumptive tax 
2692 
(compounded levy per manufacturing machine) may be considered. Earmarking a portion of ST 
2693 
tax revenues to fund ST interventions, other tobacco control efforts, or public health in general 
2694 
would increase their overall benefit as well. 
2695 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
97 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
2696 
References 
2697 
Boffetta P, Hecht S, Gray N, Gupta P, Straif K. Smokeless tobacco and cancer. Lancet Oncol. 2008 Jul;9(7):667–75. 
2698 
doi: 10.1016/S1470-2045(08)70173-6 
2699 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance—United States, 2011. MMWR 
2700 
Surveill Summ. 2012 Jun 8; 61(SS-4):1–162. Available from: 2012, http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/ss/ss6104.pdf  
2701 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, World Health Organization. Tobacco questions for surveys. A subset of 
2702 
key questions from the Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS), 2nd ed.; 2011. Available from: 
2703 
http://www.who.int/tobacco/surveillance/tqs/en/index.html  
2704 
Euromonitor International. Global market information database. Smokeless tobacco retail volumes. 2010. 
2705 
Euromonitor International. Tobacco market sizes: Forecast of cigarettes and smokeless tobacco growth in retail 
2706 
volume, 2011-2016 [dataset].   
2707 
Euromonitor International (United States). Country report: smokeless tobacco in the U.S. 2011.  
2708 
Ferlay J, Shin HR, Bray F, Forman D, Mathers C and Parkin DM. GLOBOCAN 2008:  cancer incidence, mortality 
2709 
and prevalence worldwide in 2008. IARC CancerBase No. 10 [Internet]. Lyon, France: International Agency for 
2710 
Research on Cancer; 2010 [cited 2012 Sept 28]. Available from: http://globocan.iarc.fr.  
2711 
Framework Convention Alliance. FCA policy briefing: smokeless tobacco [no date]. Available from: 
2712 
http://fctc.org/images/stories/Smokeless tobacco brief Final.pdf 
2713 
Henley SJ, Connell CJ, Richter P, Husten C, Pechacek T, Calle EE, et al. Tobacco-related disease mortality among 
2714 
men who switched from cigarettes to spit tobacco. Tob Control. 2007;16(1):22–8. doi: 10.1136/tc.2006.018069 
2715 
Henningfield JE, Hatsukami DK, Zeller M, Peters E. Conference on abuse liability and appeal of tobacco products: 
2716 
conclusions and recommendations. Drug Alcohol Depend. 2011;116(1–3):1–7. 
2717 
Johnston LD, O’Malley PM, Bachman JG, Schulenberg JE. Monitoring the Future: national survey results on drug 
2718 
use, 1975–2010. Volume I: Secondary school students. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan, Institute for Social 
2719 
Research; 2011. Available from: http://monitoringthefuture.org/pubs/monographs/mtf-vol1 2010.pdf 
2720 
Mejia AB, Ling PM. Tobacco industry consumer research on smokeless tobacco users and product development. Am 
2721 
J Public Health. 2010;100(1):78–87. 
2722 
Oliver AJ, Jensen JA, Vogel RI, Anderson AJ, Hatsukami DK. Flavored and nonflavored smokeless tobacco 
2723 
products: rate, pattern of use, and effects. Nicotine Tob Res. 2012;15(1):88–92.  Epub 2012 April 22. 
2724 
Richter P, Hodge K, Stanfill S, Zhang L, Watson C. Surveillance of moist snuff: total nicotine, moisture, pH, un-
2725 
ionized nicotine, and tobacco-specific nitrosamines. Nic Tob Res. 2008 Nov;10(11):1645–52. 
2726 
Semba RD, de Pee S, Sun K, Best CM, Sari M, Bloem MW. Paternal smoking and increased risk of infant and 
2727 
under-5 child mortality in Indonesia . Am J Public Health. 2008;98(10):1824-6. Epub 2008 Feb 28. 
2728 
Senn M, Baiwog F, Winmai J, Mueller I, Rogerson S, Senn N. Betel nut chewing during pregnancy, Madang 
2729 
province, Papua New Guinea. Drug and Alcohol Dependence. 2009;105(1–2):126–31. 
2730 
Singh PN, Yel D, Sinn S, Khieng S, Lopez J, Job J, et al. Tobacco use among adults in Cambodia: evidence for a 
2731 
tobacco epidemic among women. Bull World Health Org. 2009;87:905–12. 
2732 
Stanfill SB, Connolly GN, Zhang L, Jia LT, Henningfield JE, Richter P, et al. Global surveillance of oral tobacco 
2733 
products: total nicotine, unionised nicotine and tobacco-specific N-nitrosamines. Tob Control. 2011;20(3):e2. Epub 
2734 
2010 Nov 25.  
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
98 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO 
September 2013  
 
 
September 2013   
2735 
Stepanov I, Biener L, Knezevich A, Nyman AL, Bliss R, Jensen J, Hecht SS, Hatsukami DK. Monitoring tobacco-
2736 
specific N-nitrosamines and nicotine in novel Marlboro and Camel smokeless tobacco products: findings from round 
2737 
1 of the New Product Watch. Nicotine Tob Res. 2012 Mar;14(3):274–81. 
2738 
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Smokeless tobacco use, initiation, and relationship to 
2739 
cigarette smoking: 2002 to 2007. The NSDUH Report. Rockville, MD: Office of Applied Studies; 2009 March 5. 
2740 
Available from: http://www.oas.samhsa.gov/2k9/smokelessTobacco/smokelessTobacco.pdf  
2741 
Teo KK, Ounpuu S, Hawken S, Pandey MR, Valentin V, Hunt D, et al. Tobacco use and risk of myocardial infarction 
2742 
in 52 countries in the INTERHEART study: a case-control study. Lancet. 2006 Aug 19;368(9536):647–58. 
2743 
Timberlake DS, Pechmann C, Tran SY, Au V. A content analysis of Camel snus advertisements in print media. 
2744 
Nicotine Tob Res. 2011 Jun;13(6):431–9.  
2745 
Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee. Menthol cigarettes and the public health: review of the scientific 
2746 
evidence and recommendations. Washington, DC: U.S. Food and Drug Administration; 2011 July 21. Available 
2747 
from: 
2748 
http://www.fda.gov/downloads/AdvisoryCommittees/CommitteesMeetingMaterials/TobaccoProductsScientificAdvi
2749 
soryCommittee/UCM269697.pdf 
2750 
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. How tobacco smoke causes disease: the biology and behavioral 
2751 
basis for smoking-attributable disease: A report of the Surgeon General. Rockville, MD: U.S. Department of Health 
2752 
and Human Services, Public Health Service, Office of the Surgeon General; 2010. Available from: 
2753 
http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/library/reports/tobaccosmoke/full report.pdf 
2754 
World Health Organization, Conference of the Parties to the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, fifth 
2755 
session. Control and prevention of smokeless tobacco products. Report by the Convention Secretariat. Seoul, 
2756 
Republic of Korea: World Health Organization; 2012a. Available from: 
2757 
http://apps.who.int/gb/fctc/PDF/cop5/FCTC COP5 12-en.pdf  
2758 
World Health Organization, Conference of the Parties to the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, fifth 
2759 
session. Decision: FCTC/COP5(10) Control and prevention of smokeless tobacco products and electronic nicotine 
2760 
delivery systems, including electronic cigarettes. Seoul, Republic of Korea: World Health Organization; 2012b. 
2761 
Available at: http://apps.who.int/gb/fctc/PDF/cop5/FCTC COP5(10)-en.pdf 
2762 
World Health Organization Study Group on Smokeless Tobacco Control. Smokeless tobacco control: report of a 
2763 
WHO study group. Geneva: World Health Organization; 1988. 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
99 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO  
September 2013 
2764 
Description of Representative Products From the Four Broad Categories of the Smokeless 
2765 
Tobacco Products Used Globally 
Product category  
(other names) 

Region/country of use * 
Mode of use   Production ‡  Form/type of tobacco 
Added ingredients 
 
Category 1. Tobacco with little or no alkaline agents (generally <pH7) (with or without flavorants) 
 
Loose leaf 
AMR: United States  
C, S, H 
Commercial 
Tobacco leaves (air-cured) 
Sugar and/or  licorice and other sweeteners 
Mishri (masheri, 
SEAR: India 
A, D, S 
Cottage; 
Tobacco (powdered) 
 
misri) 
Custom 
Nicotine chewing 
WPR: Guam, Japan 

Commercial 
Tobacco (finely ground) 
Chewing gum base, xylitol 
gum 
Plug 
AMR: United States 
C, S, H 
Commercial 
Tobacco leaves 
Licorice, sweeteners 
Tobacco leaf 
SEAR: India, Bangladesh, Myanmar, Bhutan  C, IN 
Custom 
Tobacco leaves 
 
Twist 
AMR: United States 
C, H 
Commercial 
Tobacco (dark and air-
Tobacco leaf extracts and sometimes sweeter or 
cured leaf) 
flavorings 
Red toothpowder (lal  SEAR: India 
A, D 
Commercial 
Tobacco (powdered) 
Herbs, flavorings. Additional plant-related 
dant manjan) 
ingredients such as ginger, pepper, and camphor, 
among others, may be used. 
Tapkeer ( bajjar, dry 
SEAR: India 
A, H, N 
Custom 
Tobacco (fermented fire-
Flavorings may be added. 
snuff) 
cured) 
Watery tobacco 
SEAR: Myanmar 

Cottage 
Tobacco 
Water 
Kiwam (qiwam, 
EMR: Pakistan 
C, H, IN 
Commercial  
Tobacco 
Spices (cardamom, saffron, and/or aniseed), 
kimam) 
SEAR: Nepal, India, Bangladesh 
 
additives such as musk, and may contain silver 
flecks 
Tombol (bitter 
EMR: Middle East 
C, H 
Custom 
Tobacco 
Areca nut (fofal), slaked lime, noura, betel leaf 
tombol) 
(tombol leaf), catechu, and flavorings such as 
clove oil, cardamom, or herbal medicine 
Hogesoppu (leaf 
SEAR: India 
C, IN 
Cottage 
Unprocessed tobacco 
  
tobacco) 
bundled in long strands 
Kaddipudi 
SEAR: India 
C, IN 
Cottage 
Powdered sticks of raw 
Sometimes molasses and water 
tobacco stalks and petioles 
Gundi (kadapan) 
SEAR: India 
C, IN 
Cottage 
Tobacco (coarsely 
Coriander seeds, other spices and aromatic, 
powdered)  
resinous oils 
Pattiwalla without 
SEAR: India 
C, IN 
Cottage 
Tobacco (Sun-dried flaked)  
  
lime 
Snus 
EUR: Sweden, Norway, Finland, Denmark, 

Commercial 
Tobacco (heat-treated, 
Sodium carbonate,  moisturizers, salt (sodium 
Iceland  
pasteurized) 
chloride), sweeteners, flavorings, water  
AMR: United States, Canada, Brazil  
AFR: South Africa 
 
Category 2. Tobacco with appreciable amounts of alkaline agents (>pH 7) 
 
Iqmik 
AMR: United States (Alaska) 

Custom 
Tobacco 
Tree fungus ash (also known as punk, araq, or 
buluq ash) or other ash derived from burning drift 
wood or willow bushes 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
Page 100 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO  
September 2013 
Product category  
(other names) 

Region/country of use * 
Mode of use   Production ‡  Form/type of tobacco 
Added ingredients 
Nass (naswar)  
EMR: Pakistan, Iran, Afghanistan,  United 
C, S, H 
Cottage;  
Tobacco 
Nass: ash, cotton or sesame oil, water, and 
Arab Emirates  
Custom 
sometimes lime or gum 
AFR: South Africa  
Naswar: slaked lime, ash, indigo (or other coloring 
EUR: Turkmenistan 
agent), oil, water, and sometimes flavorings such 
as cardamom and menthol 
Chimó 
AMR: Venezuela, Columbia 
H, S 
Commercial;  
Tobacco leaf 
Baking soda (sodium bicarbonate), brown sugar, 
Cottage 
ashes from the Mamón tree (Meliccoca bijuga), 
and vanilla and anisette flavoring. Ingredients vary 
by region.  
Shammah 
EMR: Saudi Arabia, Yemen  
H, S 
Cottage;  
Tobacco 
Slaked lime, ash, black pepper, oil, flavorings, and 
AFR: Algeria 
Custom 
bombosa (sodium carbonate) 
Nasway (nasvay) 
EUR: Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan 
H, S 
Cottage;  
Tobacco leaves (sun- and 
Tobacco leaves, slaked lime, water, and 
Custom 
heat-dried) 
sometimes ash from tree bark, butter or oil, 
flavorings, or coloring agents 
Toombak  
EMR: Sudan 
H, N, S 
Cottage;  
Tobacco (fermented, sun-
Atrun (sodium bicarbonate) 
Custom 
dried) 
Creamy snuff 
SEAR: India 

Commercial 
Tobacco 
Clove oil, glycerin, spearmint, menthol, camphor, 
water 
Gudakhu/Gudakha 
SEAR: India 
A, H 
Commercial; 
Tobacco (powdered) 
Molasses, red soil, slaked lime 
Custom 
Gul 
SEAR: India, Bangladesh 
A, D 
Commercial 
Pyrolysed tobacco leaves 
Sugar or molasses, alkaline modifiers, and other 
unknown ingredients 
Dry snuff 
AMR: Canada, United States  
H, S, N 
Commercial 
Tobacco (fermented fire-
Flavorings 
AFR: South Africa, Nigeria  
cured) 
EUR: Germany  
Ghana traditional 
AFR: Ghana 
H, N 
Cottage; 
Tobacco leaves (dry) 
Saltpeter (potassium nitrate), ashes 
snuff (tawa) 
Custom 
Neffa 
EMR: Libya, Tunisia  

Cottage; 
Tobacco (dry) 
  
AFR: Algeria 
Custom 
Tumbaco 
AFR: Congo  

Cottage 
Tobacco (dry) 
  
Nigerian traditional 
AFR: Nigeria, Cameroon, Senegal, Chad, 
H, S, N 
Cottage;  
Tobacco (dry fermented) 
Natron (a mixture of sodium bicarbonate and 
snuff (taaba) 
Uganda 
Custom 
sodium chloride) 
Traditional South 
AFRO: South Africa, Lesotho, Swaziland 
S, N 
Cottage; 
Tobacco leaf (sun dried) 
Ash from local plants (e.g., amaranthus, aloe vera 
African snuff (snuif) 
Custom 
leaves) 
Dissolvables 
AMR: United States 
DI, S, H 
Commercial 
Tobacco pressed into 
Alkaline agents, humectants, preservatives, 
tablet, strip or sticks 
flavorings 
Tobacco water 
SEAR: India 
G, H 
Cottage; 
Tobacco smoke 
Water, alkaline agents 
(tuiber) 
Custom 
Moist snuff  
AMR: United States, Canada, Mexico 
H, S 
Commercial 
Tobacco (fermented air- or 
Flavorings (spices, essential oils, extracts), 
AFRO: South Africa 
fire-cured) 
sweeteners, inorganic salts, humectants, 
preservatives 
Khaini  
SEAR: India, Bangladesh, Nepal, Bhutan 
S, C, H 
Commercial; 
Tobacco 
Slaked lime paste and sometimes areca nut 
Custom 
Zarda  
SEAR: India, Bangladesh, Myanmar, Nepal, 
C, IN 
Commercial 
Tobacco 
Slaked lime or other alkaline agents, spices, 
Bhutan  
vegetable dyes, and sometimes areca nut and/or 
EMR: Yemen 
silver flecks 
 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
Page 101 

Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective, Summary for WHO  
September 2013 
Product category  
(other names) 

Region/country of use * 
Mode of use   Production ‡  Form/type of tobacco 
Added ingredients 
Category 3. Tobacco with various alkaline modifiers and areca nut 
 
Dohra 
SEAR: India 

Custom 
Tobacco 
Areca nut, slaked lime or other alkaline agents, 
and other ingredients such as catechu, 
peppermint, cardamom 
Gutka 
SEAR: India, Bangladesh, Nepal, Myanmar, 
C, H 
Commercial; 
Tobacco 
Areca nut, slaked lime or other alkaline agents, 
Sri Lanka  
Cottage 
catechu, sweeteners, and flavorings 
EMR: Pakistan  
Mainpuri (kapoori) 
SEAR: India  
C, H, IN 
Cottage; 
Tobacco 
Slaked lime or other alkaline agents, areca nut, 
 
Custom 
camphor, and other spices 
Mawa 
SEAR: India 

Cottage; 
Tobacco 
Slaked lime, areca nut 
Custom 
Betel quid (paan) 
SEAR: India, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, 
C, H 
Cottage;  
Tobacco; 
Areca nut, slaked lime, betel leaf, and often 
Myanmar, Thailand, Indonesia, Nepal, 
Custom 
Other smokeless tobacco 
catechu  
Maldives  
products may be used 
Other ingredients vary regionally: cardamom, 
EMR: Pakistan, United Arab Emirates  
such as kiwam and zarda 
saffron, cloves, aniseed, turmeric, mustard, 
WPR: Lao Democratic People’s Republic, 
sweeteners 
Palau, Cambodia, Malaysia, Vietnam, 
Federal States of Micronesia  
Tombol (sweet 
EMR: Yemen  
C, H 
 Custom 
Tobacco 
Areca nut (fofal), slaked lime, noura, betel leaf 
tombol) 
(tombol leaf), catechu, and sweeteners such as 
coconut 
 
Category 4. Tobacco with other plant material (tonka bean, cinnamon, clove, etc.) containing toxicants (coumarin, camphor, eugenol), stimulants (khat, caffeine), etc. 
 
Rapé and NuNu 
AMR: Brazil 

Cottage 
Tobacco leaf (dried) 
One or more ingredients: tonka bean, clover, 
cinnamon powder, camphor, Peruvian cocoa, 
cassava, ashes from select trees 
Tombol with khat 
EMR: Yemen 
C, I 
Custom 
Tobacco 
Areca nut (fofal), slaked lime, noura, betel leaf 
(tombol leaf), catechu, and khat 
Caffeinated moist 
AMR: United States 

Commercial 
Tobacco (fermented air- or 
Caffeine, flavorings (spices, essential oils, 
snuff 
fire-cured) 
extracts), sweeteners, inorganic salts, humectants, 
preservatives, ginseng, B and C vitamins 
2766 
Notes: Categories are based on product constituents (labels, known 
2781 
S=Sucked 
2767 
ingredients) and available pH data. 
2782 
G=Gargled 
2768 
* World Health Organization Regions: 
2783 
N=Nasal Use 
2769 
AFR: African Region 
2784 
I=Ingredient in betel quid or other custom-made product 
2770 
AMR: Region of the Americas 
2785 
‡ Production Category Definitions: 
2771 
EMR: Eastern Mediterranean Region 
2786 
Custom: Product is prepared by a vendor or at the home. 
2772 
EUR: European Region 
2787 
Commercial: Product is commercially manufactured (large-scale, branded). 
2773 
SEAR: South-East Asia Region 
2788 
Cottage: Product is manufactured by local, small-scale industry (sometimes 
2774 
WPR: Western Pacific Region 
2789 
family run business, not branded). 
2775 
† Mode of Use Categories: 
2776 
A=Applied to the teeth or gums 
2777 
C=Chewed 
2778 
D=Dentifrice (teeth cleaning)  
2779 
DI=Dissolves in the mouth 
2780 
H=Held in mouth 
Confidential Review Draft: Not for Attribution or Distribution 
Page 102