This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'briefings for ERT meetings june 21-nov22'.


CAB TIMMERMANS - EVP Timmermans 
Ref. Ares(2021)7501986 - 05/12/2021
European Round Table for Industry (RT) Plenary 
Bilbao, 21/11/2021 
General Information 
Event: 
The EVP will give a keynote speech followed by a Q&A with the 
 
 European Round Table for Industry (ERT) membership at 
the (ERT) Plenary on 21/11/2021. ERT provided a first assessment of Fit 
for  55,  pointing  out  some  own  proposals,  and  requiring  some 
clarifications on the package.  
About ERT: 
ERT is a forum bringing together around 60 
 major multinational 
companies  of  EU  parentage  covering  a  wide  range  of  industrial  and 
technological  sectors  ERT  aims  to  promote  the  competitiveness  and 
sustainable growth of Europe’s economy 


CAB TIMMERMANS - EVP Timmermans  
European Round Table for Industry (RT) Plenary  
Bilbao, 21/11/2021  
 
 
Pricing carbon emissions / Global level playing field for carbon 
costs  
 
[ERT 6 (Put a price on all carbon emissions to incentivise reduction and ERT 7 (Ensure a global level 
playing field for carbon costs (CBAM)), pg 9-11]  

 
Revision of the EU Emissions Trading System (ETS) 
Lines to take 
  The  Commission  proposes  to  align  the  existing  ETS  with  the  more  ambitious  2030 
emissions reduction target, by introducing a one-off cap reduction, and by increasing 
the linear reduction factor from 2.2% to 4.2%
 applicable from the year following the 
revised Directive enters into force. We are already almost one year into this decade, so 
there is no time to waste. 
  A separate proposal aims to strengthen the Market Stability Reserve by maintaining 
the  intake  rate  of  24%,  mitigating  threshold  effects  and  changing  allowances’ 
invalidation rules. Supply and demand from  aviation and maritime sectors would also 
be included in the Market Stability Reserve. Adopting the proposal separately from the 
general review of the EU ETS 
is key to ensuring market predictability. 
  The 61% emissions reduction target by 2030 for ETS sectors is ambitious, but it is 
feasible  and  it  can  be  achieved  in  a  cost  effective  way.  The  ETS  revision  proposal 
improves  free  allocation  rules  to  reflect  technological  progress  more  accurately  and 
incentivise low-carbon innovation, and making free allocation conditional on companies 
investing  in  implementing  energy  efficiency  improvements.  The  Innovation  Fund  is 
significantly  increased  in  size
,  and  is  available  to  fund  deployment  of  low-carbon 
technologies. It will also introduce a new Carbon Contract for Difference measure.  
  A new Carbon Border Adjustment Mechanism (CBAM) will address the risk of carbon 
leakage in selected sectors. This measure is an alternative to free allocation. CBAM is 
expected  to  enter  into force  in  2023  as  a  pilot  phase,  then  be  phased-in from  2026 to 
2035  in  a  prudent,  gradual  and  predictable  way  to  provide  businesses  and  countries 
with  legal  certainty  and  stability.  Free  allowances  will  be  gradually  phased  out  for  the 
sectors under CBAM to avoid double carbon leakage protection. Free allowances which 
would have been allocated to the industry sectors covered by the CBAM (estimated as 
280M allowances by 2030) are to be auctioned and added to the Innovation Fund. 
  Fairness  and  solidarity  remain  part  of  the  existing  ETS  architecture.  The  current 
solidarity  redistribution  of  10%  of  the  auctioned  allowances  to  16  lower  income 
Member  States  is  maintained  and  kept  exempt  from  the  Market  Stability  Reserve 
contributions.  In  addition,  the  Modernisation  Fund  is  increased  to  address  energy 
transformation challenges in the 10 Member States currently benefitting from the Fund, 
plus Greece and Portugal.  

 

CAB TIMMERMANS - EVP Timmermans  
European Round Table for Industry (RT) Plenary  
Bilbao, 21/11/2021  
 
  A  combination  of  carbon  pricing  and  regulatory  measures  (e.g.  CO2  emission 
standards for cars, energy efficiency and renewable energy policies…) is proposed as 
the  most  effective  approach  to  achieve  the  2030  emissions  reduction  target.  National 
measures are also key in this path towards the -55% target. 
  All sectors of the economy should contribute. The Commission proposes to include the 
maritime sector  in the  existing  ETS,  and  in  parallel,  set  up  a  new  emissions trading  to 
buildings and road transport, separate from the existing ETS. This new system would 
regulate fuel  suppliers  rather  than  end  users  and  it  would  deliver  a  clear signal  on  the 
emissions reduction ambition. The EU ETS should continue to apply to intra-European 
flights  (‘no  backsliding’),  while  international  flights  should  also  contribute  through 
applying ICAO’s ‘Corsia’ scheme 
  Energy poverty exists in Europe and based on latest data, it affects 31 million people.  
The  proposed  Social  Climate  Fund  would  ensure  a  structural  response  to  address 
energy  and  mobility  poverty.  The  Fund  would  specifically  target  social  impacts  arising 
from  the  new  ETS  on  energy-poor  and  vulnerable  households,  micro-enterprises  and 
transport users.  
  With  the  expansion  of  emissions  trading,  the  Commission  proposes  to  commit  all 
auction  revenues  (from  the  existing  and  the  new  ETS)  flowing  to  Member  States  to 
climate- and energy-related purposes.  Member States report that more than ¾  of ETS 
revenues are already used for tackling climate change. 
On CBAM 
  While the EU is ready to lead on global ambitions, it cannot run this race alone. We need 
to make sure that our partner countries join us in our climate ambition.  
  As  long  as  differences  in  climate  ambition  around  the  world  persist,  we  need  to  put  in 
place measures to ensure that the price of imports reflects more accurately their carbon 
content.  
  This is why we need a Carbon Border Adjustment Mechanism: to help ensure the integrity 
and  effectiveness  of  our  climate  policies  by  addressing  the  risk  of  carbon  leakage  for 
certain industry sectors.  
  The Carbon Border Adjustment Mechanism will enter into force in 2023 as a pilot phase, 
then it will be phased-in from 2026 to 2035 in a prudent, gradual and predictable way, to 
provide businesses and countries with legal certainty and stability.  
  It  will  be  non-discriminatory  and  even-handed  towards  trading  partners  and  economic 
operators from third countries. The need to be compliant with WTO rules is a cornerstone 
of the design of the Carbon Border Adjustment Mechanism.  
  The approach we have taken is balanced, proportionate and fair. CBAM will initially apply 
to a limited number of products – cement, iron, steel, aluminium, fertilisers and electricity 
–  to  minimise  administrative  burden  on  producers  and  traders.  Though  63  industrial 
sectors  are  deemed  at  risk  of  carbon  leakage,  the  selected  products  are  identified  as 
being at the highest risk of carbon leakage and are collectively responsible for almost half 
of EU and global CO2 emissions. 
  Ultimately,  Carbon  Border  Adjustment  Mechanism  will  incentivise  an  industrial 
transformation  towards  greener,  more  sustainable  production  processes.  The  push  for 
decarbonisation 
creates 
new 
opportunities 
for 
industries 
to 
increase 
their 
competitiveness. 
 

 

CAB TIMMERMANS - EVP Timmermans  
European Round Table for Industry (RT) Plenary  
Bilbao, 21/11/2021  
 
Defensives 
On Free Allocation  
By how much will free allowances be reduced in the next years? 
  Free  allowances  will  remain  an  important  tool  to  protect  against  the  risk  of  carbon 
leakage  until  at  least  2030.  However,  with  the reduction  of the  overall  emissions  cap  in 
line with the -55% Climate Law objective, the overall number of free allowances available 
will also be reduced. 
  At  the  same  time,  maritime  is  proposed  to  be  included  in  the  current  ETS  without  free 
allocations  to  the  shipping  industry.  Therefore  the  impact  of  extending  the  ETS  to  the 
maritime sector will mitigate the decrease in the total number of allowances in the system 
and therefore the total amount of allowances available for free allocation. 
  To  give  stability  to  the  sectors,  the  free  allocations  for  the  period  2021-2025  recently 
decided will remain stable. 
  The proposal also does not change the basic rules for calculating the free allocation. The 
Commission’s  proposal,  however,  aims  to  allocate  free  allowances  in  a  more  targeted 
way, and to incentivise the uptake of innovative low-carbon technologies. The maximum 
annual reduction rate of the benchmark values will increase from 2026 onwards, shifting 
more free allocation to sectors that are harder to decarbonise. 
  The  scope  of  the  ETS  (in  terms  of  the  definition  of  activities)  is  broadened  so  that 
installations using low-carbon or zero-carbon technologies may in the future benefit from 
continued  free  allocation.  It  will  mean  that  the  incentives  for  innovation  are  maintained 
and not reduced from the prospect of losing free allocation when moving to low-carbon or 
zero-emission technologies.  
  Moreover, free allocation will be made conditional on decarbonisation efforts: installations 
not  implementing  cost-efficient  measures  as  recommended  in  energy  audits  will  have 
their free allowances reduced by up to 25% reinforcing energy efficiency instrument and 
ETS. 
 
 
 
Defensives  
Will CBAMs offer sufficient protection for carbon leakage? 
  The EU objective of climate neutrality and the decision to raise the climate ambition for 
2030  lead  to  a  broader  reconsideration  of  existing  measures  against  the  risk  of  carbon 
leakage.  
  This is important to emphasise, as it would mean that EU’s increasingly ambitious GHG 
emissions  reduction  targets  would  reduce  the  overall  number  of  ETS  allowances,  while 
the  overall  free  allocation  will  also  decline  over  time,  in  line  with  the  reduction  of  the 
emission cap. 
  CBAM  is  an  effective  alternative  to  existing  measures  to  address  the  risk  of  carbon 
leakage. 

 

CAB TIMMERMANS - EVP Timmermans  
European Round Table for Industry (RT) Plenary  
Bilbao, 21/11/2021  
 
  Our analysis showed that applying CBAM on the basis of actual emissions could achieve 
a stronger reduction of emissions in the CBAM sectors,  
  Moreover, the impact assessment showed that  emissions would be reduced not only in 
the EU but also in the rest of the world, as CBAM can ultimately incentivise third country 
producers to move towards cleaner production processes.  
 
The  combination  of  CBAM  phasing-in  and  reduction  of  free  allowances  will 
hurt European industrial competitiveness of the covered sectors. How will you 
ensure that it does not ultimately lead to de-industrialisation?  

  The  CBAM  has  been  designed  in  such  a  way  that  its  gradual  implementation  will  give 
maximum predictability to investors and businesses. 
  Introduction of CBAM will take place very gradually over a 10 year period, during which 
free allowances will be reduced each year by an additional 10% for the CBAM sectors. 
  But we must bear in mind that to meet our ambitious climate targets, the emissions of the 
EU industry wil  need to decline. As part of the ‘Fit for 55 Package’ the EU ETS is also 
proposed for revision, which includes a more stringent cap on emissions. 
  Further, the Innovation Fund can be a good tool to help our energy intensive industries 
accelerate  in  their  decarbonisation  efforts  by  investing  in  innovative  low-carbon 
technologies and processes.  
 
 
How will indirect emissions be treated?  
  Indirect  emissions,  i.e.,  emissions  from  electricity  consumed  during  the  production 
process  of  goods,  for  the  moment  are  not  covered  by  the  CBAM  but  for  monitoring 
purposes during the transitional period (2023-2025) importers will be asked to report both 
direct and indirect emissions.  
  The  collection  of  data  in  the  transitional  period  will  form  the  basis  of  a  thorough 
methodology -still to be developed- that would apply to indirect emissions.  
  This  gradual  and  careful  approach  to  indirect  emissions  was  deemed  necessary 
especially in relation to the complexities related to indirect cost compensation. More data 
and further analysis will be needed to address this.  
  At  the  end  of  the  transitional  period  or  later  based  on  further  assessment,  the  EU  may 
extend the application of the CBAM (payment of the financial adjustment) also to indirect 
emissions. 
Shouldn't the CBAM also refund EU exporters for the carbon price paid in the 
EU?  

  CBAM is a climate measure, not an industrial one. Export rebates would risk undermining 
the global credibility of the EU’s climate ambitions.  
  Moreover, from a legal point of view, export rebates are likely to be considered prohibited 
subsidies,  at  odds  with  provisions  of  the  Agreement  on  Subsidy  and  Countervailing 
Measures of the WTO.  

 

CAB TIMMERMANS - EVP Timmermans  
European Round Table for Industry (RT) Plenary  
Bilbao, 21/11/2021  
 
  Conversely,  non-specific  horizontal  environmental  subsidies  are  likely  to  be  WTO 
compatible  insofar  they  are  not  contingent  on  export  and  only  compensate  exogenous 
environmental costs. 
 
How much money will the CBAM raise? 
  During its definitive stage, yearly CBAM revenues will depend on the degree of phase-out 
of free allocation and the respective phase-in of the border measure. 
  Based on our estimates, in 2030, total yearly revenues are estimated at around 9 billion 
EUR, of which around 2.1 billion EUR are expected to be raised by the border measure 
and the rest from additional auctioning under the ETS.  
  As agreed by the three institutions last December, a share of the CBAM revenues should 
be  allocated  to  the  EU  Budget,  with  the  exact  amount  to  be  defined  in  the  Own 
Resources Decision.  
 
 
Background 
Carbon  Border  Adjustment  Mechanism  –  main  elements  of  the  Commission’s 
proposals 

The Commission proposal was adopted on 14 July together with the other proposals of the 
Fit for 55 package.  
The  Carbon  Border  Adjustment  Mechanism  (CBAM)  is  an  environmental  policy  tool.  It  will 
ensure that the price of imports reflects more accurately their carbon content and will support 
an  increased  global  use  of  carbon  pricing  as  an  instrument  to  fight  climate  change 
successfully. CBAM will equalise the price of carbon between domestic products and imports 
and ensure the EU’s climate objectives are not undermined. 
The  main  purpose  of  an  EU  CBAM  is  to  address  the  risk  of  carbon  leakage.  As  the  EU 
increases its climate ambition, while less ambitious climate policies remain in third countries, 
there is a risk of carbon leakage i.e. an increase of global emissions due to EU companies 
relocating to  countries  with  less  ambitious  policies  or  EU  products  being replaced  by  more 
carbon-intensive  imports.  The  CBAM  may  contribute  to  reducing  this  risk  by  incentivising 
importers  in  third  countries  to  adopt  measures  of  comparable  ambition  to  the  EU,  thus 
reducing the need for an adjustment at the border. 
The CBAM is compliant with WTO rules and other international obligations. It is designed in 
such a way that it ensures that any level of free allowances under the EU Emissions Trading 
System in the sectors concerned is automatically mirrored – via a proportional discount – in 
the CBAM charge. Therefore, free allocation of allowances will be phased out to assure the 
equal  treatment  of  imported  and  domestic  products. Where  default  values  are  proposed  to 
apply, the importer will still have the opportunity to demonstrate that they perform better than 
the  default,  so  the  CBAM  obligation  will  be  reduced.  If  imported  goods  have  already  been 

 

CAB TIMMERMANS - EVP Timmermans  
European Round Table for Industry (RT) Plenary  
Bilbao, 21/11/2021  
 
subject to a carbon price in the third country producer, importers will be able to deduct the 
difference of the price already paid from the CBAM charge. 
The CBAM will enter into force in 2023. There will be a transitional and preparatory period of 
three  years,  during  which  importers  will  have  to  report  direct  and  indirect  emissions 
embedded  in  their  goods  without  paying  a  financial  adjustment,  giving  time  for  the  final 
system  to  be  put  in  place.  A  review  will  be  carried  out  during  the  transition  phase,  e.g.  on 
whether to address indirect carbon costs in the CBAM and any CBAM charge will be levied 
only as of 2026. Once the full CBAM regime becomes operational in 2026, it will allow for a 
smooth transition where free allowances will be phased out while the CBAM will  be phased 
in over 10 years. 
 
Drive demand, not only supply, to make the business case for 
low-carbon products 
[ERT 9 (Drive demand, not only supply, to make the business case for low-carbon products), pg 14-16]  
Industry 
Scene setter  
  The European Round Table suggests to: 
o  Develop sectoral decarbonisation pathways towards climate neutrality and 
create  markets  for  low  carbon  solution  by  stimulating  demand.  Some 
examples  they  put  forward  are:  adopting  a  lifecycle  approach  for  systems, 
providing  standards  and  labels  for  customers,  enforcing  circular  product 
design
,  promoting  carbon  accounting  standards  and  developing  GHG 
standards for scope 3 
o  With  respect  to  industry,  specific  measures  they  are  in  favour  to  promote 
are:  carbon  contracts  for  difference,  low  carbon  product  standards
system  of  competitiveness  safeguards,  and  the  CCS  and  CCU  as 
mitigation solutions  
  The European Round Table is positive on the following measurement included in the 
FF55:  
o  Expansion of carbon pricing and additional energy-related measures, which 
can promote low carbon alternatives 
o  Sectoral approach: specific targets at study of the impacts at sector level  
  The European Round Table asks for improvements on the following measurements 
included in the FF55: 
o  More actions to stimulate demand-side 
o  Better accounting of GHG emissions reductions by carbon capture 
o  Increased contribution of the agri sector 
Lines to take 

 

CAB TIMMERMANS - EVP Timmermans  
European Round Table for Industry (RT) Plenary  
Bilbao, 21/11/2021  
 
Economic impact 
  The  European Green Deal  sets  a clear goal  of transforming the  EU’s  economy,  by 
putting  in  place  a  set  of  deeply  transformative  policies  across  all  sectors.  It  clearly 
states  the  need  for  mobilisation  of  all  industry  sectors  to  achieve  a  clean  and 
circular economy.  
  Industry will require new technologies, equipment and solutions, with investment and 
innovation  to  match.  This  will  entail  a  shift  from  a  linear  production  to  a  circular 
economy
 that will also contribute to the objective of climate-neutrality by 2050. 
  The Impact Assessment accompanying the 2030 Climate Target Plan found that by 
2030 the investment stimulus and the use of carbon pricing revenue for the reduction 
of  distortionary  taxes  or  green  investment  can  stimulate  GDP  growth  by  up  to 
0.5%,
 but highlighted the asymmetric challenges and opportunities associated with 
structural change. 
  Fossil-fuel  related  sectors,  such  as  coal  and  oil,  will  reduce  their  sectoral  output, 
while others, such as the production of electric goods, will experience an increase in 
their revenues1. 
  The  EU  plans  specific  policy  interventions  in order to  ensure  a  just  transition  and 
support the sectors that are heavily-affected by the shift away from fossil fuel. These 
policies  apply  both  on  the  demand  side,  to  create  market  demand  for  low-carbon 
product, and on the supply side, to promote industrial competitiveness.  
Demand side 
  On  the  demand  side,  we  have  the  EU's  sustainable  product  policy,  ecodesign 
legislation  and  energy  labelling,  as  effective  tools  for  improving  the  energy 
efficiency and sustainability of products.  
  In addition, the EU Ecolabel, promotes circular economy, awarded to products and 
services that meet high environmental standards throughout their life-cycle. 
  These  instruments  act  on  the  demand  side  by  eliminating  the  least  performing 
products  from  the  market  and  creating  demand  for  lower  carbon  products.  They 
support  innovation  by  promoting  the  better  environmental  performance  of  products 
throughout the internal market. 
Supply side [Carbon Contract for Difference] 
  The Carbon Contract for Differences can develop lead markets for basic materials 
and  hydrogen,  and  encourage  the  switch  away  from  fossil  fuels  by  creating 
contracts for difference on the CO2 price. Under the Fit for 55 we have proposed to 
include carbon contracts for difference under the Innovation Fund. 
  Further, the package presented in July 2021 works hand in hand with other proposals 
supporting  a  fair  industrial  transformation  in  the  view  of  the  twin  (digital  and  green) 
transition, such as the renewed Industrial Strategy, published in 2020 and updated 
in May 2021. 
  The  updated  Industrial  Strategy  sets,  together  with  social  partners  and  other 
stakeholders, the co-creation of transition pathways for each industrial ecosystem.  
  Such  pathways  will  offer  a  better  bottom-up  understanding of the scale, cost,  long-
term  benefits  and  conditions  of  the  required  action  to  accompany  the  transition, 
leading to an actionable plan in favour of sustainable competitiveness. 
                                                           
1 SWD(2020)176, Section 6.4.2   

 

CAB TIMMERMANS - EVP Timmermans  
European Round Table for Industry (RT) Plenary  
Bilbao, 21/11/2021  
 
Defensives 
How will you ensure that the European industry remains competitive, following the Fit 
for 55?  

  A  competitive  European  industry  is  a  pre-requisite  for  the  success  of  the  transition 
towards a climate-neutral, circular and digital economy.  
  Our  increased  2030  ambitions  will  accelerate  the  climate  and  energy  transitions,  which 
will help to modernise the whole EU economy and allow European companies to gain a 
competitive advantage. Speeding up the transition will allow European companies to reap 
first  mover  benefits  in  low-carbon  technologies.  As  the  cost  of  low  carbon  technologies 
continues  to  fall,  carbon  intensive  business  models  are  becoming  increasingly 
unsustainable  economically.  These  sectors  will  need  to  undergo  transformations  in  any 
case. 
  The policy package put in place to deliver the 2030  targets of -55% GHG emission will 
create  many  new  opportunities  for  European  businesses,  both  large  and  small,  for 
example  in  low  carbon  technologies,  renewable  energy,  building  renovation,  integrated 
infrastructures, transport systems, batteries, and hydrogen. We want a modern European 
industry that will remain a key enabler for sustainable and inclusive economic growth.  
  In addition, the Commission has proposed the introduction of a carbon border adjustment 
mechanism for certain sectors by 2021 given the different levels of ambition that persist 
globally  and  in  order  to  ensure  a  level-playing  field  between  EU  and  international 
competitors.  
  At  the  same  time,  cooperation  with  our  international  partners  has  to  be  pursued  to 
develop new affordable solutions and to increase the level of ambition of all regions in the 
world w.  
  Overall,  stronger  climate  ambition  will  accelerate  our  transformation  into  a  modern, 
resource-efficient  and  competitive  economy.  It  will  be  the  basis  for  economic  growth  in 
the 21st century and for rising living standards in Europe. 
Background 
Carbon Contract for Difference:  
  CCfDs are a policy instrument which functions in a similar way as current tendering 
systems  for  renewable  power,  but  instead  of  paying  the  difference  between  the 
electricity strike price and the electricity market price, the public authority would  pay 
the  difference  between  the  CO2  strike  price  and  the  actual  CO2  price  in  the 
ETS
.  
  In  analogy  to  the  support  for  renewables,  the  CCfDs  make  projects  market 
competitive  and  would  allow  upscaling  technologies  that  have  already  reduced 
their technology risks.  
  It bridges in an explicit way the gap in costs (linked to the GHG abatement cost of 
the  technology)  between  conventional  and  low  carbon  alternative  technologies  in  a 
technology neutral way.  
  Specific advantages of CCfDs are:  
o  Builds on the ETS, but guaranteeing an investable carbon price to spur early 
deployment  

 

CAB TIMMERMANS - EVP Timmermans  
European Round Table for Industry (RT) Plenary  
Bilbao, 21/11/2021  
 
o  Can  be  allocated  through  cost-effective,  competitive  and  (if  preferred) 
technology neutral tendering processes whereby different projects submit a 
bid reflecting the strike price they need to make their technology competitive  
o  Reduces regulatory risk for investor  
o  Enhances  bankability,  reduces  financing  cost  (lower  interest  rate  for 
financing)  
In  terms  of  implementation,  CCfDs  involve  a  contract  between  a  public  entity  (e.g. 
national government, European institution) and a producer of basic materials 
Transformation of industrial ecosystems: 
  Financial  support  will  be  prioritized  to  the  ecosystem  and  regions  that  are  most 
impacted  by  the  transition.  The  new  Just  Transition  Mechanism  is  our  pledge  of 
solidarity  and  fairness  to  the  EU  regions  most  affected  by  the  climate  transition.  It 
will  mobilize  at  least  €55  billion  of  targeted  support  in  these  regions  as  they 
pursue cleaner economic growth, to make sure we leave no one behind. It supports 
re-skilling  and  helps  SMEs  to  create  new  economic  opportunities,  and  to  invest  in 
the clean energy transition. 
  Furthermore, companies may have to adapt their portfolio of products and services 
and reskill and upskill their employees accordingly. To this aim, there are several EU 
funding  opportunities  available  for  securing  a  skilled  workforce  ready  for  the 
green and digital transition. 
  These  include,  among  others,  the  European  Social  Fund  Plus  (ESF+),  as  well  as 
funds through the Recovery and Resilience Facility, the REACT-EU, and the social 
investments and skills window (SISW) of Invest EU. 
Industrial strategies: 
  A range of strategies was published in 2020 to support their green transition: the 
renewed  Industrial  Strategy  (updated  in  May  2021)  and  Circular  Economy  Action 
Plan in March, the Hydrogen Strategy and the Strategy for Smart Sector Integration 
in  July,  and  the  Action  Plan  on  Critical  Raw  Materials  in  September.  The  Circular 
Economy  Action  Plan  and  the  European  Industrial  Strategy  point  towards 
increased  resource  efficiency  and  the  circular  economy  as  indispensable 
pathways for the decarbonisation of European industry
 
  In research and innovation, several public private partnerships are set up to support 
on clean hydrogen, low-carbon steel and reflect the action of the EU to set up an 
ambitious  framework  for  the  decarbonisation  of  industry
.  The  Commission 
launched  in  July  the  European  Clean  Hydrogen  Alliance,  and  in  September,  we 
launched the new Raw Materials Alliance. The first results of the Battery Alliance 
shows that this approach can work: A recent report (from Fitch Solutions) indicated 
that  in  2020,  more  than  40%  of  global  investments  in  battery  manufacturing  were 
located in Europe. This is a major change as compared to just a few years ago.  
 
 
Road Transport  
Scene setter 
  The European Round Table suggests to: 
o  Provide charging points for alternative fuels 
o  Introduce ambitious vehicle emission performance standards 
10 
 

CAB TIMMERMANS - EVP Timmermans  
European Round Table for Industry (RT) Plenary  
Bilbao, 21/11/2021  
 
o  Incentivize customers to clean vehicles through Green Public Procurement 
(GPP) 
o  Demand  incentives  for  long-lasting  and  cleaner  products  through  tolling 
systems  
o  Align  the  taxation  of  energy  products  and  electricity  through  the  Energy 
Taxation Directive  
  The European Round Table is positive on the following measurement included in the 
FF55:  
o  Concrete targets for recharging pools and H2 refuelling stations 
o  Increased CO2 emissions performance standards for vehicles 
o  Extension of carbon pricing to transport and buildings  
  The European Round Table asks for improvements on the following measurements 
included in the FF55: 
o  Broaden the “zero CO2” emissions not only at tailpipe, but to complete life 
cycle approach 
O  More net separation between passenger road transport and heavy duty 
transport  
 
Lines to take 
 
  To deliver our climate targets, all sectors need to contribute. Transport has a 
key role to play: by 2050, emissions from transport need to decrease by 90% 
compared to 1990.  
  Road transport is responsible for around a fifth of total EU GHG emissions 
and holds great potential to accelerate emission reductions. 
  The  Commission  presented  a  holistic  approach  to  road  transport 
decarbonisation  with  the  different  proposals  included  in  Fit  for  55  package, 
including  the  CO2  Standards  for  Cars  and  Vans,  the  Alternative  Fuels 
Infrastructure  Regulation,  the  Renewable  Energy  Directive,  as  well  as 
emission  trading  for  road  transport  and  buildings.  These  interconnected 
initiatives  tackle  both  the  vehicle  and  fuel  dimension  of  the  transport  sector 
and  cover  new  and  existing  vehicle  fleets,  while  also  securing  the  rollout  of 
sufficient and adequate recharging and refuelling infrastructure. 
  The strengthened CO2 emission standards  will require a reduction of the EU 
fleet-wide average emissions of new cars by 55% and of  new vans by 50 % 
from  2030;  and  by  100%  from  2035  for  both  new  cars  and  new  vans,  all 
compared to 2021 levels. This means that all new cars and vans will be zero-
emission by 2035.  
11 
 

CAB TIMMERMANS - EVP Timmermans  
European Round Table for Industry (RT) Plenary  
Bilbao, 21/11/2021  
 
  The  proposal    provides  a  clear  and  long-term  signal  to  guide  both  the 
automotive sector’s investments in innovative zero-emission technologies, as 
well  as  the  rollout  of  recharging  and  refuelling  infrastructure.  Innovation  in 
zero-emission  mobility  will  be  key  for  maintaining  the  leadership  of  the  EU 
industry  in  automotive  technology,  as  well  as  for  the  employment  of  highly-
skilled workers. 
   
    
  .  
  As  part  of  the  policy  package  for  delivering  the  Green  Deal,  the  European 
Commission  proposed  a  new  emissions  trading  system  on  road  transport  and 
buildings: putting a price on carbon for road transport will help to make the  existing 
fleet drive cleaner
.  
  In the same package, . Moreover,.  
  Zero  and  low-emission  vehicles  are  entering  the  mass  market  at  a  dramatically 
accelerating pace. While they still comprise only about 1% of the total EU car fleet, 
around 10%  of new car sales last  year where electric. Sales of battery-electric cars 
more than doubled between 2019 and 2020. During the same period, sales of plug-in 
hybrids more than tripled. 
  In order to sustain and accelerate vehicle uptake, we need, among others, an easy-
to-use,  digitally  connected,  interoperable  and  widely  spread  infrastructure  allowing 
fast and convenient charging. 
  At present, recharging infrastructure remains concentrated in a few Member States. 
Policy action and public financial support are therefore required.  
  Our proposal for the Alternative Fuels Infrastructure Regulation (AFIR), being part of 
the  Fit  for  55  Package  of  14  July  2021,  seeks  to  provide  a  dense,  widespread 
network of publicly accessible alternative fuels infrastructure in the EU.  
  The  proposal for  a  new Regulation  sets forth  binding  requirements for rollout  of  an 
infrastructure with a sufficient amount of minimum recharging and refuelling capacity 
to  ensure  full  cross-border  connectivity  of  light  and  heavy-duty  vehicles  throughout 
the EU.  
  In the meantime, once the new rules on road pricing (Eurovignette Directive) are in 
force  –  hopefully  by  early  next  year  –  they  will  require  Member  States  vary  tolls 
based on CO2 emissions in a revenue neutral manner, i.e. higher tolls for the least 
efficient  vehicles  will  be  counterbalanced  by  significant,  up  to  75%  reductions  (or 
even zero toll until 2025) for zero-emission HDVs. 
  In addition, until a more appropriate instrument, i.e. emission trading, is in place, the 
new road pricing rules will allow Member States to charge heavy-duty vehicles for the 
cost  of  their  CO2  emissions  (on  top  of  the  infrastructure  charge)  as  early  as  next 
year. 
  Furthermore, the Commission is aware of the need to rethink the whole vehicle value 
chain,  in  order  to  make  it  more  sustainable.  The  Sustainable  and  Smart  Mobility 
Strategy
2  published  in  December  2020  will  look  into  enhancing  synergies  with  the 
circular  economic  transition.  And,  as  anticipated  in  the  New  Circular  Economy 
Action  Plan  (CEAP)
  published  in  March  2020,  The  Commission  will  propose  to 
revise  the  rules  on  end-of-life  vehicles  with  a  view  to  promoting  more  circular 
                                                           
2 https://ec.europa.eu/transport/sites/default/files/2021-mobility-strategy-and-action-plan.pdf  
12 
 

CAB TIMMERMANS - EVP Timmermans  
European Round Table for Industry (RT) Plenary  
Bilbao, 21/11/2021  
 
business models by linking design issues to end-of-lie treatment, considering rules 
on mandatory recycled content for certain materials of components and improving 
recycling efficiency3.  
   
Defensives  
With the recent proposal on CO2 standards for cars and vans, are the decarbonisation 
pathways  for  passenger  road  transport  and  heavy-duty  transport  sufficiently 
distinguished? Why are these pathways different from one another? 

  With its new proposal on CO2 standards for cars and vans, the Commission is revising 
the CO2 targets from 2030 onwards exclusively for passenger road transport. 
  In  an  upcoming  review  of  heavy-duty  vehicle  CO2  standards,  the  Commission  will 
consider  the  specificities  of  the  HDV  segments,  including  a  different  state  of  play  in 
terms  of  market  deployment  of  zero-emission  technologies,  possible  different 
technological  options  and  possible  challenges  related  both  to  the  use  cases  for  these 
vehicles as well as to their larger sizes. 
How  can  we  ensure  that  the  roll-out  of  electric  cars  does  not  only  benefit  higher 
income citizens? 
  
  We  need  nearly  all  cars  and  vans  on  the  road  to  be  zero  emission  by  2050.  This  will 
require  such  vehicles  to  be  supplied  to  the  market  at  a  price  that  is  affordable  for  EU 
citizens and businesses.  
  Over the past years, the zero-emission vehicles market has developed much faster than 
expected. Yet, the current purchase prices of zero-emission vehicles are still above those 
of comparable vehicles with internal combustion engines.  
  Stronger  CO2  standards  will  help  to  ensure  that  access  to  individual  zero-emission 
mobility becomes affordable for all consumers. Ambitious targets help create economies 
of scale. They are expected to drive down the production costs over the coming years, in 
particular for batteries. This will increase the number of affordable zero-emission vehicles 
models coming to the market,   
  Also,  as  the  market  expands,  manufacturers  will  add  more  smaller  models  to  their 
portfolio of vehicles, and will thus make zero-emission vehicles more affordable for more 
consumers, including to the second hand market.  
  In  addition,  when  looking  at  the  “total  cost  of  ownership”  of  vehicles,  the  strengthened 
CO2  emission  standards  will  provide  benefits  both  to  first  and  second-hand  users  of 
vehicles,  who  will  benefit  from  less  expenditure  for  the  energy  used  to  propel  their 
vehicles. This is also important for SMEs, using new vans.  
   
What  EU  financial  instruments  can  be  used  to  support  clean  and  sustainable  fuels 
and the relevant infrastructure? 

  The new Next Generation EU recovery fund and its various financial tools will play a key 
role in delivering on the European Green Deal and our vision set out in this Strategy. 
                                                           
3 COM(2020) 98 final 
13 
 

CAB TIMMERMANS - EVP Timmermans  
European Round Table for Industry (RT) Plenary  
Bilbao, 21/11/2021  
 
  Funding  under  the  new  Recovery  and  Resilience  Facility  will  support  more 
environmentally friendly approaches or digitalisation in transport. 
  Under InvestEU, private investments in transport infrastructure as well as fleet renewal 
can be supported. 
  For research and innovation, our Horizon Europe programme offers further opportunities, 
for  instance  for  research  on  sustainable  and  competitive  hydrogen,  electricity  and  low 
carbon fuels.  
  Extended support from our Connecting Europe Facility (CEF) will remain available during 
the 2021-2027 period for the deployment of alternative fuels infrastructure, for example. 
  The Cohesion and structural funds also support our Green Deal agenda by reinforcing 
sustainable regional development, where public transport alternative fuels infrastructure 
play a crucial role.  
Are  you  proposing  a  date  to  ban  internal  combustion  engine  cars  and  vans  in 
Europe? Is this a technology neutral approach?  

  Road transport has a vital role to play in the transition towards climate neutrality by 2050. 
Nearly all cars and vans on the roads will need to be zero-emission by that time.  
  The Commission therefore proposes more ambitious targets for cars and vans to apply 
from 2030 onwards. By 2035, all new cars and vans will need to be zero-emission.  
  It will be for manufacturers to decide which technologies they use to achieve this target. 
The legislation is technology neutral.  
  Vehicle  manufacturers  are  already  actively  preparing  for  the  switch  to  zero-emission 
vehicles, as illustrated by the surge in battery electric car registrations in 2020 and their 
recent ambitious pledges on carbon-neutrality. Other innovation cannot be excluded. It is 
up  to  industry  to  respond  to  that  and find their way  to  meet  the  target; our  approach  is 
technology-neutral, but not results-neutral. 
  We realise that this transition is formidable. That’s why we build in novel elements in the 
standards, to ensure that we track progress in the transition and possibly take any further 
measures to facilitate that transition, be it industrial support, support for reskilling workers 
or  reconverting  activities  and  of  course  the charging  infrastructure. The sister  proposal, 
the AFIR, is very ambitious and will ensure that in each Member State and for each zero 
emission car that comes to market, there is enough charging capacity.  
  The proposal therefore sends a clear signal to EU industry to invest in innovative zero-
emission technologies. This will be key to maintaining the EU’s technological leadership 
and  supporting  the  employment  of  highly-skilled  workers.  And  a  focus  on  tailpipe 
emissions will boost air quality that cannot be delivered by combustion engines  
 
Background  
CO2 standards for cars and vans 
  A  combination  of  measures  is  necessary  to  address  emissions  in  road  transport.  In 
addition  to  the  introduction  of  carbon  pricing,  the  Commission  has  proposed 
strengthened CO2 emission performance standards for cars and vans 
  The proposal will require a reduction of the EU fleet-wide average emissions of new 
cars by 55% and of new vans by 50 % from 2030; and by 100% from 2035 for both new 
14 
 

CAB TIMMERMANS - EVP Timmermans  
European Round Table for Industry (RT) Plenary  
Bilbao, 21/11/2021  
 
cars  and  new  vans,  all  compared  to  2021  levels  –  and  meaning  all  new  cars  and  vans 
being zero-emission by 2035.  
Energy Tax Directive 
  The new proposal on Energy Taxation aims to align the taxation of energy products with 
EU  energy  and  climate  policies,  promote  clean  technologies  and  remove  outdated 
exemptions  and  reduced  rates  that  currently  encourage  the  use  of  fossil  fuels.  In  this 
way, we can reduce the harmful effects of energy tax competition, and help secure 
revenues for Member States from green taxes, which are less detrimental to growth than 
taxes on labour. 
Alternative Fuels Infrastructure Regulation 
  The  Alternative  Fuels  Infrastructure  Regulation  will  ensure  the  timely  availability  of  the 
recharging  and  refuelling  infrastructure  for  the  zero-emission  vehicles  that  the  CO2 
standards will bring on the market. The goal is to install a sufficient number of points in 
all countries that are easy to access and use. 
  This  is  needed  to  encourage  people  to  use  low-  and  zero-emission  vehicles  in  much 
greater numbers than currently – one of the EU’s climate objectives in the new European 
Green Deal. 
 
Green Public Procurement 
  GPP  is  defined  as:  a  process  whereby  public  authorities  seek  to  procure  goods, 
services  and  works  with  a  reduced  environmental  impact  throughout  their  life  cycle 
when  compared  to  goods,  services  and  works  with  the  same  primary  function  that 
would otherwise be procured. 
  Although GPP is a voluntary instrument, it has a key role to play in the EU's efforts to 
become  a  more  resource-efficient  economy.  It  can  help  stimulate  a  critical  mass  of 
demand
 for more sustainable goods and services which otherwise would be difficult to 
get onto the market. GPP is therefore a strong stimulus for eco-innovation. 
  Also,  by  promoting  and  using  GPP,  public  authorities  can  provide  industry  with  real 
incentives for developing green technologies and products. In some sectors, public 
purchasers  command  a  significant  share  of  the  market  (e.g.  public  transport  and 
construction,  health  services  and  education)  and  so  their  decisions  have  considerable 
impact. 
  To  be  effective,  GPP  requires  the  inclusion  of  clear  and  verifiable  environmental 
criteria  for  products  and  services  in  the  public  procurement  process.  The  European 
Commission  and  a  number  of  European  countries  have  developed  guidance  in  this 
area, in the form of national GPP criteria. The challenge of furthering take- up by more 
public sector bodies so that GPP becomes common practice still remains. As does the 
challenge  of  ensuring  that  green  purchasing  requirements  are  somewhat  compatible 
between  Member  States  -  thus  helping  create  a  level  playing  field  that  will  accelerate 
and help drive the single market for environmentally sound goods and services. 
 
 
Aviation  
Scene setter 
  The European Round Table suggests to: 
15 
 

CAB TIMMERMANS - EVP Timmermans  
European Round Table for Industry (RT) Plenary  
Bilbao, 21/11/2021  
 
o  Speed  up  research  and  development  initiatives  for  innovative  green  aircraft 
and helicopters 
o  Consider an ambitious Sustainable Aviation Fuels (SAF) mandate  
  The European Round Table is positive on the following measurement included in the 
FF55:  
o  Blending target for sustainable aviation fuel+fuelEU maritime  
o  Review of Energy taxation Directive – no longer based on volume, fewer 
exemptions  
Lines to take  
  Air connectivity is an essential driver of mobility for EU citizens, of development for 
EU regions and of growth for the economy as a whole. However, as transport is the 
only sector where emissions have been increasing in the last years and air transport 
activity  is  projected  to  growth  in  the  following  decades,  a  solid  EU  intervention  is 
needed  to  revert  the  emission  trend  while  maintaining  the  competitiveness  of  the 
aviation industry. There should be a carbon price, and all sectors should contribute to 
climate  action.  The  EU  ETS-funded  Innovation  Fund  can  already  support  the 
commercial  deployment  of  aviation  technologies,  and  help  achieve  the  necessary 
transformation,  including  for  electric/hybrid  aircraft  and  helicopters.  The  EU  ETS 
gives a price incentive of around €200/ tonne sustainable alternative fuel, through its 
zero rating. 
  It is for this reason that in February 2021 the Commission has launched, as part of 
the  EU  Horizon  Europe  Framework  programme  for  research  and  innovation,  the 
European Partnership for Clean Aviation 
  Clean  Aviation  will  accelerate  the  development  of  disrupting  concepts  for  aircraft 
design  and  propulsion  configuration  with  the  aim  of  minimising  the  aviation  sector’s 
environmental impact.  
  Moreover, the ReFuelEU Aviation will promote sustainable aviation fuel by obliging 
fuel  suppliers  to  blend  an  increasingly  high  level  of  sustainable  aviation  fuels  into 
existing  jet  fuel  uploaded  at  EU  airports,  as  well  as  incentivise  the  uptake  of 
synthetic fuels, known as e-fuels. The obligation would commence from 2025 at 2% 
SAF,  gradually  increasing  to  63%  in  2050.  The  proposal  also  includes  a  sub-
obligation of 0.7% for e-kerosene from 2030, and increasing up to 28% in 2050. 
  Aviation  needs  to  reduce  its  emissions  to  contribute  to  newly  adopted  EU  climate 
goals.  The  sector  is  considered  ‘hard  to  decarbonise’,  since  it  has  very  limited 
options  to  do  so,  compared  to  others.  However,  transitioning  away  from fossil  fuels 
and  moving  to  sustainable  aviation  fuels  (SAF)  has  significant  potential  to  reduce 
emissions along fleet modernisation that would allow for more resource efficient use 
of  SAF.  SAF  are  technologically  ready,  but  need  a  strong  policy  push  to  become  a 
reality.  
  The  market-based  measures  in  the  Fit  for  55  package  related  to  the  increased 
ambition  of  the  EU  ETS  and  introduction  of  kerosene  taxation  under  the  Energy 
Taxation Directive, will incentivise shift to cleaner fuels and fleets. 
  The objective is to launch new products and services by 2035, replace 75 % of the 
operating fleet by 2050 and developing an innovative, reliable, safe and cost-effective 
European  aviation  system  that  is  able  to  meet  the  objective  of  climate  neutrality  at 
the latest by 2050. 
16 
 

CAB TIMMERMANS - EVP Timmermans  
European Round Table for Industry (RT) Plenary  
Bilbao, 21/11/2021  
 
  Concretely,  the  new  partnership  will  invest  in  development  and  demonstration  of 
hybrid-electric regional aircraft, small- and medium range aircraft with the capacity to 
fly  on  100%  sustainable  fuels,  and  researching  accompanying  technologies  for 
hydrogen powered aviation.  
  In  terms  of  industrial  policy,  the  Commission  has  launched  a  public  consultation  to 
set-up  an  Alliance  for  Zero-Emission  Aviation.  Industry  is  encouraged  to  contribute 
and participate in this alliance in order to identify and improve conditions for market 
uptake of innovative products. 
 
 
Buildings  
 
Scene setter 
  The European Round Table suggests to: 
o  Triple the renovation rate.  
o  Provide  measures  to  phase  out  worst  performing  buildings  in  the  next 
decade, for instance with the introduction of Minimum Energy Performance 
Standard
s on existing buildings.  
o  Tap into the potential of public procurement 
  The European Round Table is positive on the following measurement included in the 
FF55:  
o  Renovation target public buildings  
  The European Round Table asks for improvements on the following measurements 
included in the FF55: 
o  Continue stimulating renovation (revision of the EPBD) 
o  Address further the public procurement by assessing its potential 
o  Involve local authorities to identify local opportunities 
o  Look at the export dimension of low carbon solutions 
Lines to take  
Buildings 
  Buildings are responsible for about 40% of the EU's energy consumption, and 36% of 
greenhouse gas emissions from energy (*). But only 1% of buildings undergo energy 
efficient  renovation  every  year,  so  effective  action  is crucial  to  making  Europe 
climate-neutral by 2050
.  
  The  current  measurements,  i.e.  the  Energy  Performance  of  Building  Directive 
(EPBD)  adopted  in  2010  and  amended  in  2018,  is  not  enough  to  reach  the  -55% 
target.  The  EU  announced  additional  measurements  with  the  publication  of  the 
Renovation  Wave  Communication  in  October  2020  and  the  Energy  Efficiency 
Directive
  (EED)  in  July  2021  and  is  actively  working  on  a  further  revision  of  the 
EPBD,  to  be  adopted  in  December  2021,  and  on  the  revision  of  the  Green  Public 
Procurement
 (GPP) criteria for Office Buildings, which will be published by the end 
of 2022.  
17 
 

CAB TIMMERMANS - EVP Timmermans  
European Round Table for Industry (RT) Plenary  
Bilbao, 21/11/2021  
 
  Objectives  of  the  Renovation  Wave  are  to  at  least  double  the  annual  energy 
renovation  rate  of  residential  and  non-residential  buildings  by  2030  and  to  foster 
deep  energy  renovations.  Furthermore,  to  maintain  the  exemplary  role  of  public 
sector,  the  EED  proposal  includes  an  obligation  for  annual  renovation  of  3%  of 
useful floor area of public buildings
 above 250m2.  
  Moreover,  as  announced  in  the  Renovation  Wave4,  the  revision  of  the  EPBD  will 
study  a  stronger  obligation  to  have  Energy  Performance  Certificates  alongside  a 
possible  phased  introduction  of  mandatory  minimum  energy  performance 
standards
  for  existing  buildings.  If  adopted,  similarly  to  the  introduction  of  the  new 
ETS for  buildings  and  road  transport  and  the  Social  Climate  Fund,  these  measures 
will need to be accompanied by ad-hoc financial buffers for low income households, 
in order to mitigate their different distributional impacts.  
  All  these  current  and  upcoming  policies  will  provide  a  comprehensive  set  of 
measurement  to  foster  EU  deep  renovation  of  buildings  and,  hence,  decrease  their 
emissions in line with EU targets. 
 
                                                           
4 COM(2020) 662 final 
18