This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'TTIP lobbying'.



27th November 2014 
Ref. Ares(2014)4071101 - 04/12/2014
Ref. Ares(2016)6036878 - 20/10/2016
 
Eurocare European Alcohol Policy Alliance  
"Alcohol in All Policies: The unintended consequences of TTIP" 
 
Speakers: 
 (Researcher); 
 (European Commission). 
Conference: 
During  the  discussion 
  and 
  explained  to  the  public  the  key  issues 
concerning TTIP negotiations and tried to reply to the attendant's questions. The focus of the 
session  was  the  impact  that  TTIP  could  have  on  the  implementation  of  effective  alcohol 
policies.  
 explained to the public that FTAs are  not  public health oriented.  However, this 
does not rule out the possibility of  public health impacts caused  by the entry into force of  a 
FTA. TTIP will be one of the largest FTA  to be signed and it will cover a big set of topics that 
range  from  tariff  reduction  to  regulatory  issues.  Some  issues  such  as  the  minimum  price  of 
alcohol may be challenged at the level of international trade. In connection to this, reference 
to the ISDS was made. Some stakeholders are concerned about the possibility of States being 
challenged  if  requirements  on  health  warnings  labeling,  for  instance,  are  put  into  place. 
Nevertheless, 
 reminded that ISDS is not the only mechanism that exists to challenge 
this type of legislative action took by States. 
 illustrated this by referring to the case 
brought by Phillip Morris Asia against Australia Tobacco. The instrument that opened the door 
for this legal challenge was a BIT. Therefore, not including ISDS within TTIP does not preclude 
States  from  being  challenged  by  investors  via  other  agreements.  However,  if  ISDS  is  finally 
dropped of the content of TTIP it might trigger bad consequences in the future of investments. 
Then, 
 referred to other chapters of TTIP that might have an impact on health, namely 
the TBT and IPRs chapters. As regards the TBT chapter, he noted that civil society seems to be 
worried about it so some more info is needed on the content of the negotiation.  Another area 
that  is  related  to  pharmaceutical  and  public  health  issues  is  the  IPR  Chapter. 
 
emphasized that TTIP is thought as a living agreement for which  the EU is aiming to create a 
basic structure but also bodies to work on its continuous reforms. 
 view is that TTIP 
is not a game changer.  
 noted that protection of public health is a priority for the EU has a whole and all 
its  MS.  Nothing  in  TTIP  will  lower  the  protection  of  health.  TTIP  is  not  primarily  focus  on 
alcohol  or  health;  however,  it  can  have  a  positive  impact.  The  ultimate  aim  of  TTIP  is  to 
strengthen  the  economic  partnership  between  the  EU  and  the  US  but  also  to  positively 
influence  the  development (worldwide)  of  regulations  and  standards  based  on  high  levels  of 
consumer  and  environmental  protection.  Given  that  there  are  almost  no  tariffs  on  health 
products (pharmaceuticals, medical devices) the main benefits for those areas will be linked to 
regulatory  aspects. 
  explained  that  TTIP  negotiations  are  built  on  basis  of  three  big 
pillars,  i.e.  market  access,  regulatory  issues  and  rules.  Health  issues  are  not  intended  to  be 
compiled within a chapter of TTIP but are spread all around several chapter of the FTA. Details 

 

27th November 2014 
 
were also provided as regards the negotiators (strong presence of regulators from both sides) 
and  consultation  mechanisms.  In  this  particular  regard,  it  was  noted  that  meetings  with 
stakeholders  (NGOs  included)  are  held  almost  weekly.  As  regards  transparency,  efforts  are 
being  made  by  COM  to  higher  the  transparency levels.  An  example of  this  is  represented  by 
the Transparency Strategy that was been agreed very recently. With respect to the concerns of 
the  public  in  relation  to  services,  public  procurement  and  ISDS,  MS  will  keep  their  right  to 
regulate  these  issues.  The  unprecedented  number  of  results  collected  from  the  public 
consultation on ISDS is being currently scrutinized.  
Q&A: 
The  first  of  the  questions  related  to  the  impact  TTIP  will  have  on  public  health  levels.  In 
particular, the first participant in the Q&A argued that the presentations had not tackled public 
health  issues  in  detail  enough  while  acknowledging  that  it  is  positive  that,  in  general,  public 
health levels will not be lowered by TTIP. In particular COM was asked to clarify what is being 
done in TTIP to prevent people to become sick (prevention of cardiovascular diseases, reducing 
alcohol consumption etc.). 
 clarified that the reason for the methodology followed in 
the  presentation  is  due  to  the  nature  of  a  FTA  in  as  much  as  a  FTA  is  not  a  health  measure 
itself. Moreover, several competences on health protection lay on the MS. Thus, a FTA will not 
prevent EU or MS from regulating on the matter. If the COM decides to regulate for instance 
on  labeling  ingredients  in  alcoholic  drinks  or  health  warnings,  it  will  carry  out  an  impact 
assessment,  public  consultation,  will  propose  a  draft  measure  to  European  Parliament  and 
Council and the proposal will be subject to discussion. TTIP will not change this. Furthermore, 
the US would likely not challenge EU health related measures given the similarity between EU 
and  US  rules  in  the  matter  and  also  the  fact  that  both  sides  face  the  same  challenges  as 
regards health protection (e.g. prevention of non-communicable diseases). 
The second question came from a Scottish health expert. He referred to the tobacco case of 
Australia. According to the speaker, in this case Australian authorities enacted good rules for 
the protection of health but ended up being challenged via a BIT. TTIP should not reinforce this 
possibility especially in relation to tobacco. The speaker's view is to exempt tobacco from TTIP 
ISDS

 reminded the public about the fact that a decision on how to deal with ISDS in 
TTIP  has  not  been  made  yet.  As  it  had  been  highlighted  before,  the  results  of  the  public 
consultation  are  still  being  analyzed.  Moreover,  as  illustrated  by  Phillip  Morris  case,  tobacco 
measures can be challenged in other fora such as BITs or WTO DSU.  Therefore,  TTIP will not 
promote  or  not  promote  ISDS. 
  noted  that  TTIP  is  not  seeking  more  challenges 
through  ISDS.  By  contrast,  TTIP  pursues  to  encourage  trade  by  dismantling technical  barriers 
between EU and US to enable both industries to sell more in each other's markets.  
The last question was whether TTIP would change the precautionary principle. In this regard, 
 emphasized that the precautionary principle leads all EU legislation and this will not 
be changed by TTIP.