This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'TTIP lobbying'.



Ref. Ares(2016)6036878 - 20/10/2016
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
TTIP & HEALTH 
BEUC position 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Contact: Ilaria Passarani – Katrina Perehudoff - 
[email address]  
 
Ref.: BEUC-X-2015-064 - 23/06/2015 
 
 
 
 
 
 
BUREAU EUROPÉEN DES UNIONS DE CONSOMMATEURS AISBL | DER EUROPÄISCHE VERBRAUCHERVERBAND 
Rue d’Arlon 80, B-1040 Brussels • Tel. +32 (0)2 743 15 90 • Fax +32 (0)2 740 28 02 • [email address] • www.beuc.eu 
www.twitter.com/beuc  - EC register for interest representatives: identification number 9505781573-45 
 


 
 
 
Summary 
 
 
Pharmaceuticals and medical devices have been flagged as key areas that will be 
covered  by  the  Trans-Atlantic  Trade  and  Investment  Partnership  (TTIP) 
agreement.  TTIP  is  expected  to  facilitate  trade  and  investment  by  eliminating 
barriers  posed  by  regulation  and  other  rules.  What  would  this  mean  for  the 
health sector in Europe?  Enhancing consumer safety should be the number one 
goal of regulatory cooperation in the health sector. To this end, BEUC welcomes 
the potential for: 
 
  Mutual  recognition  of  inspections  of  manufacturing  plants  based  on 
principles  and  guidelines  defined  as  “Good  Manufacturing  Practices”  to  
achieve more effective use of resources; 
  Reducing  needless  duplication  of  clinical  trials  to  avoid  exposing 
consumers to unnecessary risks; 
  Upwards  harmonisation  of  the  technical  requirements  for  the 
authorization  of  medicines  and  in  particular  for  paediatric  medicines, 
generics  and  biosimilars  to  improve  patient  safety  and  access  to 
medicines; 
  Convergence of systems for identifying medical devices (UDI) to improve 
traceability 
 
 
To  achieve  these  advances  for  consumers,  past  experience  has  shown  that  an 
all-encompassing  agreement  such  as  TTIP  does  not  seem  to  be  essential  to 
promote  regulatory  cooperation.  Moreover,  attention  must  be  paid  to  the 
following, potentially overshadowing, issues: 
 
  EU  governments  should  maintain  full  autonomy  to  make  pricing  and 
reimbursement  decisions  about  pharmaceuticals  and  medical  devices  in 
the public interest; 
 
  The EU recent progress on clinical trials transparency and the EU Clinical 
Trials  Regulation  should  not  be  undermined  by  references  to  trade 
secrets and commercial confidentiality; 
  TTIP should not lead to any extension of intellectual property rights and 
exclusivities applied to medicines in the EU.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



 
 
1.  Introduction 
 
Pharmaceuticals and medical devices have been flagged as key areas covered by 
the Trans-Atlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) agreement. TTIP  is 
expected  to  facilitate  trade  and  investment  by  eliminating  barriers  posed  by 
regulation  and  other  rules.  What  would  this  mean  for  the  health  sector  in 
Europe? The European Consumer Organisation sees both potential  benefits and 
risks for consumers in the TTIP deal. 
 
Although this position paper focuses on the impact of TTIP  on pharmaceuticals 
and medical devices in the EU, there are two overarching challenges that must 
be addressed if TTIP is to be beneficial to consumers. First, BEUC welcomes the 
recent  transparency  initiatives  of  the  Commission  that  increased  access  to 
negotiating texts and information regarding the TTIP negotiations. BEUC calls for 
greater efforts in order to have public access to consolidated texts. Second, the 
Investor-to-State  Dispute  Settlement  (ISDS)  mechanism  would  allow  foreign 
companies  to  sue  a  state  that  allegedly  does  not  respect  the  provisions  of  the 
agreement  under  a  supra-national  arbitration  system.  ISDS  has  been  used  in 
Australia  and  Canada  to  sue  governments  taking  public  protection  measures, 
such  as  introducing  plain  packaging  for  tobacco  products  or  setting  high 
standards for pharmaceutical patents. BEUC believes the ISDS mechanism is too 
flawed to be fixed and advises negotiators to find other means to protect foreign 
investments. Read BEUC’s position paper.  
 
 
2.  Existing regulatory cooperation without TTIP 
 
It  is  noteworthy  that  in  many  aspects  of  pharmaceutical  regulation  and 
investment,  the  EU  and  the  USA  are  already  engaged  in  global  or  bilateral 
cooperation.  The  Transatlantic  Administrative  Simplification  Action  Plan1  signed 
in 2007, aims to remove administrative burdens to the interaction between EMA 
and FDA. These Agencies share information on market authorisation procedures, 
changes  to  market  authorisations  and  post-authorisation  surveillance  for 
products under review both in the USA and in the EU, through: 
 
-  The exchange of assessment reports and review documents; 
-  Regular  videoconferences  on  specific  topics  and  classes  of  medicines, 
such  as  oncology,  orphan  medicines,  paediatrics,  vaccines,  blood 
products,  pharmacogenomics,  advanced  therapies,  veterinary  medicines 
and biosimilar medicines; 
-  Ad hoc teleconferences between USA and EU experts. 
 
The two Agencies have developed common procedures for  Good Manufacturing 
Practice2  and  Good  Clinical  Practice  inspections  and  for  applications  for  orphan 
designation. They also share information on pharmacovigilance, scientific advice, 
biomarkers,  inspection  planning  and  reporting  and  preparedness  for  pandemic 
influenza. Moreover, the confidentiality agreements between the EU and the FDA 
were  extended  in  2005  and  again  in  2010.  They  are  now  effective  for  an 
indefinite period without the need for further renewal.  
                                           
1   http://ec.europa.eu/health/files/international/doc/eu_fda_action_plan_200806_en.pdf 
2   http://www.ema.europa.eu/docs/en_GB/document_library/Other/2011/12/WC500118766.pdf 
 



 
 
Therefore,  an  all-encompassing  agreement  such  as  TTIP  does  not  seem  to  be 
essential to promote regulatory cooperation. 
 
 

3.  Mutual  recognition  of  Good  Manufacturing  Practices  can 
enhance efficiency and safety 
 
Currently, European and American authorities conduct inspections of companies’ 
facilities  on  their  territories  and  third  countries  to  check  compliance  with  good 
manufacturing  practices  (GMP)  and  verify  the  quality  of  products.  Closer 
cooperation  between  EMA  and  FDA  could  avoid  duplicating  such  inspections, 
thereby more effectively using resources.  
 
EMA does not currently have an operational Mutual Recognition Agreement with 
the  USA  for  Good  Manufacturing  Practices.  However,  Mutual  Recognition 
Agreements  do  not  require  a  partnership  such  as  TTIP,  as  the  EMA  already 
maintains  agreements  with  Australia,  Canada,  Israel,  Japan,  New  Zealand  and 
Switzerland3. 
 
The  formal  recognition  of  manufacturers  quality  management  system  audits 
(QMS) could also reduce costs for inspections for medical devices. However, the 
EU  and  the  US  are  already  working  together  in  the  international  initiative 
'Medical Device Single Audit Programme - MDSAP' and developed the concept of 
“single audit” by which, when auditing a facility, QMS auditors check compliance 
with the requirements of several jurisdictions at the same time. 
 
 
4.  Harmonised  requirements  for  the  authorization  of 
medicines  can  reduce  needless  duplication  of  clinical  trials 
and facilitate access to medicines 
 
The  upwards  harmonisation  of  the  technical  requirements  to  demonstrate 
quality, safety and efficacy of medicines  can facilitate the recognition of clinical 
trials on both sides of the Atlantic, saving resources and sparing more patients 
from  the  risky  process  of  experimenting  with  medicines.  This  is  particularly 
important especially with regard to medicines for children. In this respect BEUC 
would support the revision of the International Conference on Harmonisation of 
Technical  Requirements  for  Registration  of  Pharmaceuticals  for  Human  Use 
(ICH) guidelines on paediatrics as, at the moment, there are some differences in 
the  conduct  of  paediatrics  trials  that  make  it  difficult  to  compare  data  and 
mutually accept studies. BEUC also supports the convergence of the systems for 
the authorization of biosimilars and generics. 
 
 
                                           
3http://www.ema.europa.eu/ema/index.jsp?curl=pages/regulation/document_listing/document_listing
_000248.jsp&mid=WC0b01ac058005f8ac 
 



 
 
5.  Medicines  and  medical  devices  pricing  &  reimbursement 
have no place in an EU-US trade deal 
 
EU  governments  should  maintain  full  autonomy  to  make  pricing  and 
reimbursement  decisions  about  pharmaceuticals  and  medical  devices  in  the 
public interest. BEUC welcomes the EU commitment indicating that “neither TTIP 
nor any other  EU trade deal would affect  EU governments' right to decide how 
much  people  have  to  pay  or  how  they're  reimbursed”.  However  further 
clarification  is  needed  with  regard  to  the  reference  to  the  transparency  of 
decision  making4.  While  we  support  the  principle  that  regulatory  decisions 
should be made in a “clear and open way”7, we oppose the inclusion of an Annex 
on transparency and procedural fairness provisions similar to those introduced in 
the Korea-US5 and Australia-US agreements. 
 
BEUC  supports  balanced  stakeholder  involvement  in  decision  making  at  all 
levels. At the same time, BEUC finds that local, national and  European fora are 
better suited to such exchanges that impact on European consumer protection, 
rather  than  an  EU-US  trade  partnership.  Expanding  the  role  of  stakeholders 
through  the  mandatory  exchange  of  information  can  increase  the  pressure  on 
decision makers, particularly from foreign investors. Indeed, corporate pressure 
has played an influential role in past decisions to reimburse unproven medicines 
at the cost of consumers and EU health systems6.  
 
 
6.  Safeguard progress on access to clinical trials data 
 

The newly adopted European Regulation on clinical trials (n. 536/2014) and the 
new  EMA  policy  on  publication  and  access  to  clinical  trials  data7  put  Europe  at 
the  fore  front  with  regard  to  regulatory  transparency  and  accountability. 
European  consumers  expect  that  the  EU’s  high  standards  for  clinical  data 
disclosure  are  upheld  by  TTIP.  In  this  context  BEUC  welcomes  the  EU 
commitment7 not to negotiate - neither in TTIP nor in other EU trade deals – any 
rules that will impact “in any way” the EU Regulation on clinical trials.  
 
With regard to the exchange of information about the safety, efficacy and quality 
of medicines between EMA and FDA, BEUC supports the highest possible level of 
information  sharing  and  the  narrowest  definition  of  commercial  confidentiality 
and trade secrets. According to EU law, any information received or held by the 
EMA will be subject to European legislation on Access to Documents (Regulation 
n. 1049/2001) and Data Protection (Directive n. 95/46/EC).  
 
 
                                           
4   http://trade.ec.europa.eu/doclib/docs/2015/january/tradoc_153010.4.7%20Pharmaceuticals.pdf 
5  Final  Text  of  the  Pharmaceuticals  and  Medical  Devices  chapter  in  the  KORUS  FTA 
https://ustr.gov/sites/default/files/uploads/agreements/fta/korus/asset_upload_file899_12703.pdf  
6   Van  Herck,  P.,  Annemans,  L.,  Sermeus,  W.,  &  Ramaekers,  D.  (2013).  Evidence-based  health  care 
policy  in  reimbursement  decisions:  lessons  from  a  series  of  six  equivocal  case-studies.  PloS  one
8(10), e78662. 
7http://www.ema.europa.eu/ema/index.jsp?curl=pages/special_topics/general/general_content_000
555.jsp&mid=WC0b01ac0580607bfa  
 



 
 
7.  No  extension  of  the  intellectual  property  protection  that 
keeps medicines prices high 
 
The  EU  already  has  20  years  of  patent  protection  and  a  number  of  other 
exclusivities  granted  to  certain  medicinal  products.  In  general,  longer  patent 
protection or exclusivity delays competition from  generics and keeps medicines 
prices  high,  at  the  expense  of  the  healthcare  system  and,  ultimately,  the 
consumer.  
 
TTIP  should  not  lead  to  any  extension  of  the  intellectual  property  rights  and 
exclusivities  already  applied  in  the  EU.  BEUC  notes  that  existing  EU  laws, 
notably  the  Bolar  exemption  in  Directive  2004/27/EC8,  must  be  respected  by 
TTIP.  Concerning  intellectual  property  protection,  BEUC  welcomes  the  EU’s 
commitment “not to negotiate anything in TTIP which would … increase costs for 
EU countries’ national health systems, which are already stretched”9 . 
 
 
8.   No US-style medicines promotion 
 

The  EU  and  the  USA  take  different  approaches  to  the  promotion  of 
pharmaceuticals.  Given  TTIP’s  ambitions  to  enhance  regulatory  cooperation,  it 
must  be  said  that  TTIP  needs  to  be  in  line  with  Directive  2001/83/EC  on 
medicinal  products  for  human  use,  which  prohibits  advertising  of  prescription 
medicines and governs the acceptable role of industry in information production 
and dissemination to patients10. 
 
 
9.   Safer medical devices 
 

BEUC supports the main elements of possible cooperation in the medical devices 
sector as outlined in the EU position on medical devices in TTIP11, including the 
recognition  of  manufacturers  quality  management  system  (QMS)  audits  (  see 
also point 3), convergence of system for identifying and tracing medical devices 
(Unique Device Identification – UDI) and of models form marketing submission 
(Regulated  Product  submission).  However  we  regret  that  the  harmonisation  of 
the  approval  system  of  devices  in  the  EU  and  the  USA  is  ruled  out.  European 
consumers are  often considered as ‘guinea pigs’ for medical devices, especially 
in  comparison  to  consumers  in  the  United  States12.  Many  products  used  in 
Europe were never approved in the USA as they were considered dangerous and 
ineffective13.  While  in  the  USA  high  risk  devices  are  subject  to  a  form  of 
marketing authorisation and are assessed by the Food and Drug Administration 
on the basis of valid clinical evidence to prove their safety and effectiveness, in 
Europe they can enter the market after a CE certification by private companies 
                                           
8    Directive 2004/27/EC Article 10(6). 
9    http://trade.ec.europa.eu/doclib/docs/2015/january/tradoc_153010.4.7%20Pharmaceuticals.pdf 
10   Directive 2001/83/EC Articles 86-90.   
11   http://trade.ec.europa.eu/doclib/docs/2015/april/tradoc_153349.4.5%20Med%20devices.pdf 
12  It is worth noting that only one in five of the 8.500 medical devices companies in Europe have 
approached the USA market. In addition, more devices of a particular type are often marketed in 
Europe compared to the US, e.g. 28 drug eluting stents are CE marketed while only five obtained 
FDA approval. 
13  Unsafe and ineffective devices approved in the EU that were not approved in the US, Food and 
Drug Administration, May 2012. 
 



 
 
called  “notified  bodies”  on  the  basis  of  limited  evidence  and  often  without 
significant studies in humans14,15.  
 
European consumers should not be involuntarily partaking in what is effectively 
a large, uncontrolled experiment16. The current system is unethical and exposes 
consumers to unjustified risks. BEUC considers TTIP as a useful opportunity for 
an upward harmonisation of safety requirements for medical devices in Europe. 
When  finalising  the  long  awaited  Regulation  on  medical  devices  that  has  been 
pending  since  2012,  EU  legislators  should  ensure  European  consumers  are 
granted the same level of protection as their American counterparts. 
 
 

10.   Health services should be excluded from TTIP 
 
According  to  Article  168  of  the  Treaty  the  management,  organisation  and 
delivery  of  health  care  is  a  sole  responsibility  of  Member  States  and  it  should 
remain  as  such.  On  several  occasions  EU  negotiators17  confirmed  that  health 
services  will  be  exempt  from  TTIP.  Rather  than  an  exemption  BEUC  calls  for  a 
hard exclusion or a “carve out” of health services from the scope of application 
of TTIP. 
 
 
END 
  
                                           
14  D.  Kramer  et.  Al,  Regulation  of  Medical  devices  in  the  United  States  and  European  Union,  New 
England Journal of Medicine, March 2012. 
15  D.  Zuckerman  et  al.,  Public  health  implications  of  differences  in  USA  and  European  Union 
regulatory policies for breast implants, Reproductive Health Matters, 2012. 
16   Dispositifs médicaux: le patient sert de cobaye, Test-Achats, Test-Santé n. 106, Décembre 2011. 
17   http://trade.ec.europa.eu/doclib/docs/2014/july/tradoc_152665.pdf  
 
http://europa.eu/rapid/press-release_STATEMENT-15-4646_en.htm