This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'EU correspondence with and funding of Syria White Helmets aka Syria Civil Defence'.


 
EUROPEAN COMMISSION 
 
 
Brussels, 29.8.2016 
C(2016) 5608 final 
 
Ms Vanessa BEELEY 
Fressanges 
F - 87160 Arnac La Poste 
 
Copy by e-mail: 
[FOI #3007 email] 
 
 

DECISION OF THE SECRETARY-GENERAL IN ACCORDANCE WITH ARTICLE 4 OF THE 
IMPLEMENTING PROVISIONS OF REGULATION (EC) NO 1049/20011 
 
Subject: 
Your  confirmatory  applications  for  access  to  documents  under 
Regulation (EC) No 1049/2001 - GESTDEM 2016/3147 

Dear Ms Beeley, 
I  refer  to  your  e-mail  dated  19  July  2016,  registered  on  28  July  2016,  in  which  you 
submit a confirmatory application in accordance with Article 7(2) of Regulation (EC) No 
1049/2001  regarding  public  access  to  European  Parliament,  Council  and  Commission 
documents2 (hereafter ‘Regulation 1049/2001’). 
1. 
SCOPE OF YOUR APPLICATION 
In  your  initial  application  of  7  June  2016,  you  requested  access  to  all  documents 
appertaining to EU funding, training and correspondence with or about the Syria White 
Helmets

Through its initial reply dated 19 June 2016, the Directorate-General for European Civil 
Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations (hereafter 'ECHO') identified one document 
as 
falling 
under 
the 
scope 
of 
your 
request, 
namely 
grant 
agreement 
ECHO/SYR/BUD/2015/91057  consisting  in  an  interim  report  submitted  by  the 
humanitarian non-governmental organisation (hereafter 'NGO'). 
                                                 

Official Journal L 345 of 29.12.2001, p. 94. 

Official Journal L 145 of 31.5.2001, p. 43. 
 
Commission européenne/Europese Commissie, 1049 Bruxelles/Brussel, BELGIQUE/BELGIË - Tel. +32 22991111 
http://ec.europa.eu/dgs/secretariat_general/ 

After  consultation  of  the  third  party  in  question  in  accordance  with  Article  4(4)  of 
Regulation 1049/2001, who marked its opposition to disclosure of this document, ECHO 
refused access to it, based on the exceptions of Article 4 of Regulation 1049/2001.  
It explained that its release would pose security and safety risks to the third party's staff 
and the staff of the implementing partner. 
Through your confirmatory application, you request a review of ECHO's position. 
2. 
ASSESSMENT AND CONCLUSIONS UNDER REGULATION 1049/2001 
When  assessing  a  confirmatory  application  for  access  to  documents  submitted  pursuant 
to  Regulation  1049/2001,  the  Secretariat-General  conducts  a  fresh  review  of  the  reply 
given by the service concerned at the initial stage in light of the provisions of Regulation 
1049/2001. 
Having  examined  your  confirmatory  application,  I  would  like  to  inform  you  that  the 
decision of ECHO to refuse access to the document in question has to be confirmed on 
the basis of Article 4(1)(a), first indent (protection of the public interest as regards public 
security), Article 4(2), first indent (protection of commercial interests of a natural or legal 
person) and Article 4(1)(b) (protection of the privacy and the integrity of the individual) 
of Regulation 1049/2001, for the reasons set out below. 
2.1.  Protection of the public interest as regards public security 
Article 4(1)(a), first indent of Regulation 1049/2001 provides that [t]he institutions shall 
refuse access to a document where disclosure would undermine the protection of 
[…] the 
public interest as regards 
[…] public security. 
The  requested  document  is  an  interim  report  submitted  by  the  NGO  with  regard  to  the 
humanitarian project it is conducting in Syria. This document analyses the issues at stake, 
reports on and proposes concrete actions, and contains descriptions of partners and their 
working  methods  as  well  as  budget  projections.  It  is  a  global  report  on  the  project  in 
question, where a reference to the Syrian Civil Defence ('Syria White Helmets') is made 
in only one paragraph. 
With  regard  to  descriptions  of  partners,  their  working  methods  as  well  as  concrete 
actions,  which  allow  to  locate  precisely  staff  and  areas  of  intervention,  this  constitutes 
confidential  and  sensitive  information,  whose  disclosure  would  pose  an  important 
security risk, particularly in Syria, to the NGO's and implementing partner's staff as well 
as to the whole operation in general. Given the complex nature of programming in Syria 
and the important  daily operational and  security challenges implementing partners face, 
all  detailed  information  regarding  them,  including  the  locations  they  work  on  and  the 
staff they employ, must remain confidential in order to ensure the safety of implementing 
staff as well as the effectiveness of humanitarian aid operations in Syria. 
Having regard to the above, I consider that the use of the exception under Article 4(1)(a), 
first  indent  of  Regulation  1049/2001  (protection  of  the  public interest  as  regards  public 


security) is justified, and that access to the document in question must be refused on that 
basis. 
2.2.  Protection of commercial interests 
Article  4(2),  first  indent  of  Regulation  1049/2001  provides  that  [t]he  institutions  shall 
refuse  access  to  a  document  where  disclosure  would  undermine  the  protection  of  
[…] 
commercial  interests  of  a  natural  or  legal  person,  including  intellectual  property,  […] 
unless there is an overriding public interest in disclosure. 
As  explained  under  point  2.1,  the  requested  interim  report  analyses  the  issues  at  stake, 
reports on and proposes concrete actions and contains budget projections. The disclosure 
of  this  sensitive  and  confidential  information  would  undermine  the  protection  of  the 
commercial interests of  the  NGO.  Public disclosure of the  document in question  would 
indeed  deprive  the  NGO  of  its  ability  to  exercise  its  humanitarian  activities  in  Syria 
effectively. 
The  Commission  cannot  elaborate  any  further  on  the  underlying  justification  without 
revealing the contents of the sensitive commercial information contained in the document 
and without thereby depriving the applicable exception for the protection of commercial 
interests of its very purpose. 
Having regard  to the above,  I  consider  that the use  of the  exception under  Article 4(2), 
first indent of Regulation 1049/2001 (protection of commercial interests) is justified, and 
that access to the document in question must be refused on that basis. 
2.3.   Protection of privacy and the integrity of the individual 
Article 4(1)(b) of Regulation 1049/2001 provides that the institutions shall refuse access 
to a document where disclosure would undermine the protection of (…) privacy and the 
integrity  of  the  individual,  in  particular  in  accordance  with  Community  legislation 
regarding the protection of personal data

The  document  requested  contains  personal  data,  such  as  names,  e-mail  addresses  and 
telephone numbers of NGO staff. 
In  this  respect,  Article  4(1)(b)  of  Regulation  1049/2001  provides  that  access  to 
documents  is  refused  where  disclosure  would  undermine  the  protection  of  privacy  and 
integrity  of  the  individual,  in  particular  in  accordance  with  Community  legislation 
regarding the protection of personal data
.  
In its judgment in the Bavarian Lager case, the Court of Justice ruled that when a request 
is made for access to documents containing personal data, Regulation (EC) No. 45/20013 
(hereafter 'Data Protection Regulation') becomes fully applicable4. 
                                                 
3    Regulation (EC) No 45/2001 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 18 December 2000 on 
the  protection  of  individuals  with  regard  to  the  processing  of  personal  data  by  the  Community 


Article  2(a)  of  the  Data  Protection  Regulation  provides  that  'personal  data'  shall  mean 
any  information  relating  to  an  identified  or  identifiable  person  
[…].  According  to  the 
Court  of  Justice,  there  is  no  reason  of  principle  to  justify  excluding  activities  of  a 
professional  […]  nature  from  the  notion  of  “private  life"
5.  The  names6  of  the  persons 
concerned  as  well  as  other  data  such  as  e-mail  addresses  and  telephone  numbers,  from 
which their identity can be deduced, undoubtedly constitute personal data in the meaning 
of Article 2(a) of the Data Protection Regulation. It follows that public disclosure of the 
above-mentioned data would constitute processing (transfer) of personal data within the 
meaning of Article 8(b) of Regulation 45/2001. 
Pursuant  to  Article  8(b)  of  the  Data  Protection  Regulation,  the  Commission  can  only 
transmit  personal  data  to  a  recipient  subject  to  Directive  95/46/EC  if  the  recipient 
establishes the necessity of having the data transferred and if there is no reason to assume 
that the data subject's legitimate interests might be prejudiced. Those two conditions are 
cumulative.  Only  fulfilment  of  both  conditions,  and  the  lawfulness  of  processing  as 
required  by  Article  5  of  Regulation  45/2001,  enables  one  to  consider  the  processing 
(transfer) of personal data as compliant with the requirement of Regulation 45/2001. 
In  the  recent  judgment  in  the  ClientEarth  case,  the  Court  of  Justice  ruled  that  whoever 
requests such a transfer must first establish that it is necessary. If it is demonstrated to be 
necessary, it is then for the institution concerned to determine that there is no reason to 
assume  that  that  transfer  might  prejudice  the  legitimate  interests  of  the  data  subject.  If 
there is no such reason, the transfer requested must be made, whereas, if there is such a 
reason, the institution concerned must weigh the various competing interests in order to 
decide  on  the  request  for  access7
.  I  refer  also  to  the  Strack  case,  where  the  Court  of 
Justice ruled that the Institution does not have to examine by itself the existence of a need 
for transferring personal data8.  
In  your  confirmatory  request,  you  do  not  establish  the  necessity  of  having  the  data  in 
question  transferred  to  you.  Your  confirmatory  application  does  indeed  not  contain  any 
considerations  establishing  that,  in  order  to  attain  the  objectives  for  the  purposes  of 
which you are requesting disclosure of the document in question, it is necessary to obtain 
disclosure of these personal data9. 
According  to  constant  case-law,  if  an  applicant  has  not  established  the  necessity  of 
having  the  data  transferred,  the  institution  does  not  have  to  examine  the  absence  of 
prejudice to the data subject's legitimate interests10. 
                                                                                                                                                 
institutions  and  bodies  and  on  the  free  movement  of  such  data,  Official  Journal  L  8  of  12  January 
2001, page 1. 
4   Judgment of 29 June 2010, Commission v Bavarian Lager, C-28/08P, EU:C:2010:378, paragraph 63. 
5   Judgment  of  20  May  2003,  Rechnungshof  v  Österreichischer  Rundfunk  and  Others,  C-465/00,  C-
138/01 and C-139/01, EU:C:2003:294, paragraph 73. 
6   Judgment in Commission v Bavarian Lager, cited above, EU:C:2010:378, paragraph 68. 
7   Judgment of 16 July 2015, ClientEarth v EFSA, C-615/13P, EU:C:2015:489, paragraph 47. 
8  
Judgment of 2 October 2014, Strack v Commission, C-127/13 P, EU:C:2014:2250, paragraph 106. 
9   Judgment of 23 November 2011, Dennekamp v Parliament, T-82/09, EU:T:2011:688, paragraph 34. 
10   Judgment in Strack v Commission, cited above, EU:C:2014:2250, paragraphs 107 to 110. 


On a subsidiary basis, I consider, however, that there is also no reason to think that the 
legitimate rights of the individuals concerned would not be prejudiced by the transfer of 
their personal data. 
The  fact  that,  contrary  to  the  exceptions  of  Article  4(2)  and  (3),  Article  4(1)(b)  of 
Regulation 1049/2001 is an absolute exception which does not require the institution to 
balance the exception defined therein against a possible public interest in disclosure, only 
reinforces this conclusion. 
Therefore, I have to conclude that the transfer of the personal data in question cannot be 
considered as fulfilling the requirements of Regulation 45/2001. In consequence, the use 
of the exception under Article 4(1)(b) of Regulation 1049/2001 is justified, as there is no 
need to publicly disclose the personal data in question, and it cannot be assumed that the 
legitimate  rights  of  the  data  subjects  concerned  would  not  be  prejudiced  by  such 
disclosure. 
3. 
NO PARTIAL ACCESS 
I  have  also  examined  the  possibility  of  granting  partial  access  to  the  documents 
concerned, in accordance with Article 4(6) of Regulation 1049/2001. However, it follows 
from the assessment made above under points 2.1 and 2.2, that the document which falls 
within the scope of your request is manifestly and entirely covered by the exceptions laid 
down  in  Article  4(1)(a),  first  indent  and  Article  4(2),  first  indent  of  Regulation 
1049/2001. 
4. 
OVERRIDING PUBLIC INTEREST IN DISCLOSURE 
The exceptions laid down in Article 4(2) must be waived if there is an overriding public 
interest in disclosure. Such an interest must, firstly, be public and, secondly, outweigh the 
harm caused by disclosure. 
In your confirmatory application, you do not invoke any such overriding public interest. 
Nor have I been able, based on the elements at my disposal, to establish the existence of 
any  possible  overriding  public  interest  in  disclosure  of  the  requested  document.  In 
consequence, I consider that in this case there is no overriding public interest that would 
outweigh  the  interest  in  safeguarding  the  protection  of  Article  4(2),  first  indent  of 
Regulation 1049/2001 (protection of commercial interests). 
The  fact  that  the  document  relates  to  an  administrative  procedure  and  not  to  any 
legislative  act,  for  which  the  Court  of  Justice  has  acknowledged  the  existence  of  wider 
openness, provides further support to this conclusion. 
Please  also  note  that  the  exceptions  laid  down  in  Article  4(1)  of  Regulation  1049/2001 
are  absolute  exceptions  which  do  not  require  the  institution  to  balance  the  exception 
defined therein against a possible public interest in disclosure. 




5. 
MEANS OF REDRESS 
Finally,  I  would  like  to  draw  your  attention  to  the  means  of  redress  that  are  available 
against  this  decision,  that  is,  judicial  proceedings  and  complaints  to  the  Ombudsman 
under the conditions specified respectively in Articles 263 and 228 of the Treaty on the 
Functioning of the European Union. 
Yours sincerely, 
 
 
 
 
For the Commission 

 
Alexander ITALIANER 
 
Secretary-General 
 
 

 
 


Document Outline