This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Meetings of Oettinger with VW'.



Ref. Ares(2017)3140390 - 22/06/2017

 
Summary: Analysis & Evidence 
Policy Option 1 
Description:  Open Internet Access SI - Secondary legislation to allow Ofcom the requisite powers to enforce the 
requirements of the Regulation, and to set out an appropriate, proportionate and dissuasive penalties regime in UK law. 
FULL ECONOMIC ASSESSMENT 

Price Base 
PV Base 
Time Period 
Net Benefit (Present Value (PV)) (£m) 
Year  2016 
Year  2016 
Years  10 
Low: Optional 
High: Optional 
Best Estimate: 9.98 
 
COSTS (£m) 
Total Transition  
Average Annual  
Total Cost  
 
(Constant Price) 
Years 
(excl. Transition) (Constant Price) 
(Present Value) 
 
Low  
Optional 
Optional 
Optional 
High  
Optional 
       
Optional 
Optional 
Best Estimate 
N/A 
N/A 
N/A 
Description and scale of key monetised costs by ‘main affected groups’  
N/A 
Other key non-monetised costs by ‘main affected groups’  
Business impact in relation to the statutory instrument enabling Ofcom to monitor and ensure compliance 
with the Regulation is unquantified due to the uncertainty of the exact nature of the information requests, 
but industry consultation has shown that requests from Ofcom will only produce a minimal cost on 
businesses, assuming that the requests will be included in the existing information requests regime. Ofcom 
also intends to work with the industry to minimise the burden of these requests.  
BENEFITS (£m) 
Total Transition  
Average Annual  
Total Benefit  
 
(Constant Price) 
Years 
(excl. Transition) (Constant Price) 
(Present Value) 
 
Low  
 Optional 
Optional 
Optional 
High  
Optional 
       
Optional 
Optional 
Best Estimate 
N/A 
1.0 
10.0 
Description and scale of key monetised benefits by ‘main affected groups’  
When implementing the EU Regulation the UK would not have to face infraction proceedings such as a 
minimum lump sump fine of £9,982,000 as well as daily penalty payments and possible court costs. The 
daily penalty payments depend on the seriousness, the duration of the infringement and the special factor 
'n' corresponding to the GDP and the number of votes it has in the Council of the Member States. 
Other key non-monetised benefits by ‘main affected groups’  
The UK government would also not be liable to legal challenge from parties seeking to redress such 
providers’ practices, which could be substantial.  
Key assumptions/sensitivities/risks 
Discount rate 
 3.5 
(%) 
It is assumed that Ofcom will work in collaboration with industry to ensure that information request reporting 
on traffic management is light touch, subsumed into existing regulatory requests, and serviceable through 
existing business processes - and that (given widespread compliance with the existing voluntary codes on 
open internet) the number of information requests in cases of suspected breach of the Regulation will be 
minimal. Risks should be mitigated by a proportionate approach of the SI. 
 
BUSINESS ASSESSMENT (Option 1) 
Direct impact on business (Equivalent Annual) £m:  
Score for Business Impact Target (qualifying 
provisions only) £m: 

Costs:  0.0 
Benefits: 0.0 
Net: 0.0 
N/A 
2 

 
Evidence Base (for summary sheets) 
 
 
Problem under consideration 
 
The European Commission emphasised the need to monitor market and technological developments in 
relation to “net freedoms” in the European Union to preserve an internet in line with those freedoms, i.e. 
an “open” and “neutral” internet. 
 
The concept of net neutrality is defined in part in the Framework Directive on electronic communications 
as the ability of end-users to access and distribute information or run applications and services of their 
choice. 
 
The concept of net neutrality means that all end-users should have equal access to all kinds of online 
content (such as email and high-quality video) without operators being able to throttle (“slow-down”), 
block or discriminate against any type of content. The issue of net neutrality became increasingly 
important due to the massive expansion of content being downloaded and streamed on the internet. 
There are concerns that major players may try to buy or leverage content prioritisation at the expense of 
smaller companies and start-ups, and that end-users’ rights to access and distribute information might 
be undermined1. 
 
Ensuring net neutrality (in particular, a prohibition of blocking and throttling with certain legitimate 
exceptions) would mean that all end-users will have unrestricted access to use and distribute 
applications and services provided over the internet within the limits of contracted data volumes and 
speeds. On the one hand, such a guarantee is particularly important for SMEs and start-ups who 
(compared to large OTT ”Over the Top Technology” providers) mostly do not possess the leverage to 
ensure that ISPs make their services available. On the other hand, the possibility for ISPs to provide 
services other than internet access services, such as specialised services with guaranteed quality of 
service2 creates major opportunities for innovation and delivery of new services3. Different ways of 
regulating traffic management practices create uncertainty which hampers product and business-model 
innovation and, consequently, the introduction of new business models4.  
 
Obstacles to net neutrality include, for example5: 
• 
the blocking or throttling of traffic by certain network operators, which takes the form of restricting 
access to internet services (online television, videoconferences, etc.) or to specific websites, or 
categories of websites. The Body of European Regulators for Electronic Communications 
(BEREC) and the National Regulatory Authorities (NRAs) may receive users’ complaints from 
consumers and/or content and service providers; 
• 
traffic congestion, which requires reasonable management. There are various different traffic 
management techniques to alleviate congestion; 
• 
lack of transparency, which prevents consumers from making informed choices in terms of 
services. NRAs are therefore empowered to set minimum quality of service requirements. 
 
 
Rationale for intervention 

 
EU Regulation (EU) 2015/21206 lays down provisions related to open internet access (“net neutrality”) 
and mobile roaming charges. The latter not the subject of the statutory instrument and thus this impact 
assessment. The open internet access provisions come into effect from 30 April 2016. The Regulation 
                                            
1 Korolyn Rouhani-Arani for Taylor Wessing http://united-kingdom.taylorwessing.com/en/first-eu-wide-net-neutrality-rules-set-to-come-into-effect 
2 Recital 16 of the EC Regulation (https://ec.europa.eu/digital-single-market/en/news/regulation-european-parliament-and-council-laying-down-
measures-concerning-european-single) sets out that providers of internet access services should be free to offer services which are not internet 
access services and which are optimised for specific content, applications or services, or a combination thereof, where the optimisation is 
necessary in order to meet the requirements of the content, applications or services for a specific level of quality. 
3 See more: EU Commission Impact Assessment, http://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=CELEX%3A52013SC0331 
4 See more: EU Commission Impact Assessment, http://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=CELEX%3A52013SC0331 
5 See more: EU Commission Impact Assessment, http://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=CELEX%3A52013SC0331 
6 http://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?qid=1453121314844&uri=CELEX:32015R2120 
 
3 
 
 

 
requires that providers of internet access services to the public must treat all internet traffic equally, 
except for in certain defined circumstances (e.g. reasonable traffic management measures to mitigate 
the effects of exceptional or temporary network congestion). Providers are however allowed to engage in 
blocking content etc. where doing so is necessary to comply with EU or national law (e.g. to block or 
combat illegal activity / content).  
 
There is also an exemption to allow providers to use traffic management to preserve the integrity of the 
network and end-users’ terminal equipment (e.g. to allow for anti-cybercrime, anti-virus and anti-hacking 
measures). Providers must also abide by stipulations related to transparency about levels of service in 
contracts with end-users. 
   
Action on open internet access was proposed by the European Commission on two grounds. Firstly, to 
secure a high level of protection for end-users of electronic communication services, and guarantee the 
continued functioning of the internet ecosystem as an engine of innovation. Secondly, to prevent 
divergence in the regulatory framework following a number of Member States introducing relevant 
domestic legislation.    
 
The Regulation requires that National Regulatory Authorities (NRAs) in Member States should be 
designated to monitor and ensure compliance by providers. It also requires that Member States set out 
an appropriate regime of penalties in cases of breach of the Regulation. As part of their duties, it lays 
down that NRAs must be able to require providers to supply information about their traffic management 
practices.        
 
The UK is obliged to implement the EU regulation (or face infraction proceedings). The Statutory 
Instrument (SI) therefore ensures the Regulation’s provisions can be implemented by designating Ofcom 
as the NRA for the UK, allowing them the necessary powers to monitor and ensure compliance with the 
Regulation, and setting out a penalties regime (consistent with Ofcom’s wider regulatory framework 
supervision). 
 
 
Policy objective 
 
Net neutrality supports the Government’s policy goal of ensuring an open and secure internet that 
supports innovation and growth. The EU Regulation will provide a legal framework to prevent internet 
service providers from exploiting necessary traffic management arrangements over their networks in 
order to gain unfair competitive advantage, by “throttling” (slowing down) or blocking competing services 
(e.g. Skype, by providers of paid-for call services). The UK was central to shaping the negotiations of the 
EU Regulation to deliver an ambitious, consumer focused package. The Regulation presents a 
balanced, principles based package that protects the open internet while supporting innovation. 
 
 
Description of options considered 
 
•  Option 0: Do nothing: Not legislating to designate Ofcom as the NRA, allow them the necessary 
powers to ensure compliance, and to set out a penalties regime for breaches would result in infraction 
proceedings by the European Commission (and open the UK to legal challenge).  
 
•  Option 1: Preferred Option: Secondary legislation to allow Ofcom the requisite powers to enforce 
the requirements of the Regulation, and to set out an appropriate, proportionate and dissuasive 
penalties regime in UK law.      
 
4 
 
 

 
 
Monetised and non-monetised costs and benefits of Option 1 
 
Monetised costs by ‘main-affected groups 
 
 
Non-monetised costs by ‘main-affected groups’ 
 
The impact of the EU Regulation itself on business and the UK market for internet services is not within 
scope of this assessment. However, potential business impact in relation to the Statutory Instrument (SI) 
enabling Ofcom to monitor and ensure compliance with the Regulation is in scope. Thus, the main 
affected groups are internet service providers. 
 
In effect, the only costs to business will be incurred where Ofcom requests information from providers of 
internet access services to the public about their internet traffic management practices. 
 
Ofcom have advised that their information requests would take two broad forms. Firstly, general regular 
monitoring of internet access providers’ traffic management. Secondly, specific investigations of 
particular providers where a breach of the Regulation is suspected.  
 
On general monitoring, Ofcom are likely to make periodic requests to operators for information about the 
capacity and utilisation of their networks, and of the ways in which traffic management policies are 
applied to manage that capacity. Ofcom have stated they would expect that this information would be 
generated as a matter of course as part of operators' network management, and would expect to work in 
collaboration with the industry to ensure this is the case as the approach to regular monitoring is defined. 
 
On specific investigations, where Ofcom may have reason to believe practices at an operator may be in 
conflict with the EU Regulation, they may wish to issue more detailed requests covering network 
capacity / utilisation etc., and details of the function and impact of traffic management policies which may 
affect end-users' ability to access services of their choice. Again, Ofcom advise that they would expect 
such information to be available from the network management technologies employed by operators. 
 
We have consulted the main internet access providers (incl. Sky, BT, Talk Talk, Telefonica, Virgin and 
Three) on Ofcom’s proposed approach to information requests as above. Their responses have 
confirmed Ofcom’s view that this information should be relatively easily supplied. Although they could not 
monetise compliance with such information requests, they have confirmed that costs should be 
negligible and the impact minor provided that Ofcom subsume these requests into their existing 
information requests regime (as part of the normal regulatory process). Where costs could escalate 
would be if Ofcom were to increase the frequency and levels of detail of reporting to such an extent that 
new and bespoke data collections systems and processes would be required. However, Ofcom have 
confirmed that they intend to work with the industry to minimise the burden of these requests. They are 
already in informal discussion with providers about including these requests in the existing reporting for 
Ofcom’s annual Connected Nations report (this is a suggestion from the providers).  
 
In the draft SI we have included a caveat on information requests that “Ofcom are not to require the 
provision of information under this regulation except...where the making of a demand for the information 
is proportionate to the use to which the information is to be put in carrying out Ofcom’s functions”. This 
will provide an avenue of challenge for providers in any case of disproportionate costs.   
 
In assessing the proportionality of exercising its formal information gathering powers in any particular 
case, Ofcom will ordinarily consider: 
• 
the extent to which the information sought is necessary in order for Ofcom to exercise properly its 
functions, and likely to be relevant to the exercise of those functions; 
• 
whether the information is obtainable from other sources and/or in alternative formats that would 
cause less of a burden on recipients;  
• 
whether any burden imposed on the recipient of a request is, in the relevant circumstances, 
proportionate to the reasons for gathering the information. 
  
5 
 
 

 
In some cases, it may be necessary to request comparable information from a range of network 
operators - as far as possible Ofcom will work with network operators to design such requests so as to 
allow them to provide comparable data which is available from the network management technologies 
they employ. 
 
In the UK all the major UK providers of internet access services are thought to be largely in compliance 
with most of the open internet provisions of the EU Regulation, through the existing voluntary framework 
of the Open Internet Codes of Practice. There is little or no evidence of current traffic management 
practices that would breach the Regulation. It is unlikely therefore that there will be many instances 
where Ofcom will need to undertake specific investigations requiring a more detailed level of information 
from providers. However, as Ofcom have suggested and providers consulted have confirmed, this 
information should still be easily obtainable.     
 
Monetised Benefits for ‘main affected groups’  
 
When implementing the Regulation the UK would not have to face infraction proceedings such as a 
minimum lump-sum fine of £9,982,000 well as daily penalty payments and possible court costs. The 
daily penalty payments depend on the seriousness, the duration of the infringement and the special 
factor 'n' corresponding to the GDP and the number of votes it has in the Council of the Member State.   
 
To date the UK has never been fined for non-compliance with an EU Directive or as a result of any other 
type of infraction cases - a record we are very keen to maintain. 
 
Non-Monetised benefits for ‘main affected groups’ 
 
The UK government would also not be liable to legal challenge from parties seeking to redress such 
providers’ practices which could be substantial. 
 
 
Rationale and evidence that justify the level of analysis used in the IA (proportionality approach) 
 
Any costs to business are limited to those related to servicing Ofcom’s information requests about their 
traffic management practices. The main provider base is small, and is used to supplying information to 
Ofcom as part of the existing information requests regime. Providers should be able to access the 
information easily (as it is generated by them as a matter of course), and reporting can be subsumed into 
existing reporting mechanisms to Ofcom. It is therefore deemed that these costs should be negligible, 
and significantly below the £1m p.a. threshold to qualify for the fast-track Better Regulation process.    
    
 
Risks and assumptions 
 

• 
It is assumed that Ofcom (as they have stated) will work in collaboration with the industry to 
ensure that information request reporting in traffic management is light touch, subsumed into 
existing regulatory requests, and serviceable through existing business processes.  
• 
It is assumed that given widespread compliance with the existing voluntary codes on open 
internet, the number of information requests in cases of suspected breach of the Regulation will 
be minimal.  
• 
The risks of burdensome information requests should be mitigated by the SI’s requirement for 
such requests to be proportionate.        
 
 
Small and Micro-Businesses Assessment 
 
Analysis of small business impacts makes clear that there are potential costs for smaller businesses (up 
to  50  employees,  and/or  less  than  10  million  Euros  turnover),  including  micro-businesses  (up  to  10 
employees,  and/or  less  than  2  million  Euros  turnover),  but  these  are  likely  to  be  minimal.  In  the  EU 
regulation there is no option to exempt small and micro businesses from this new regulatory measures. 
 
6 
 
 

 
Furthermore,  the  impact  on  those  businesses  will  be  very  limited,  since  the  great  majority  of  internet 
service  providers  are  larger  businesses.  No  data  is  available  on  the  number  of  small  and  micro-
businesses in this sector but there is evidence that the number is small. The Internet Service Providers 
Association (ISPA) represents 144 individual members (not including virtual ISPs), the majority of whom 
(126)  focus  on  delivering  internet  connectivity.  This  includes  the  4  largest  consumer-facing  ISPs  that 
collectively serve about 90%+ of fixed-line consumer subscribers (Sky, Talk Talk, BT and Virgin); a large 
number  of  ISPs  that  specialise  in  delivering  communications  services  to  businesses,  with  different 
services for SMEs and large corporates; and niche providers that focus on a targeted area (e.g. a rural 
location)  or  customer  base  (e.g.  student  or  military  accommodation). Within  this  number,  there  are 
providers that resell connectivity from wholesale providers and those that build and operate their own 
networks using a variety of technologies. 
 
Furthermore,  in the  UK  it  is  best-practice that  providers  of  internet  access  are  in  compliance  with  the 
open  internet  provisions  of  the  EU  Regulation  and  with  non-compliance  small  and  micro-businesses 
would be prone to legal challenges of bigger providers. Ofcom and Broadband Stakeholder Group studies 
have confirmed there is little or no evidence of current traffic management practices that would breach 
the Regulation. 
 
 
Wider impacts 
 
The Statutory Instrument (SI) will provide a legislative basis to enforce the EU regulation in the UK, 
which will be of general benefit for UK consumers (as end-users of internet access services) and 
businesses that wish to ensure their services are not blocked (helping protect innovation in digital 
markets).  
 
 
 
 
7