This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Concepts against "Fake News"'.



 
Ref. Ares(2017)2916818 - 12/06/2017
EUROPEAN COMMISSION 
Directorate-General for Communications Networks, Content and Technology 
 
 
   
 
Brussels,  
BACKGROUND NOTE  
FOR THE ATTENTION OF THE CABINET OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE EUROPEAN 
COMMISSION JEAN-CLAUDE JUNCKER 
Subject: Fake news 
Introduction 
Over recent months, there  has  been intense interest  concerning the spread of fake news 
online, not least in the context of upcoming elections. The term 'fake news' was coined to 
describe deliberately constructed lies, in the form of news articles, meant to mislead the 
public, or to generate online ad revenue. 
While misinformation has always been part of the media landscape and public discourse, 
there is a new concern that social media platforms have enabled easier spreading of such 
misinformation.  A  range  of  commentators  argue  that  such  fake  news  stories  have  the 
ability to weaken the quality of democratic deliberation in what some call a "post-truth" 
society.  
In December 2016, President Juncker called upon online platforms to do more to tackle 
such misinformation. Since then, steps have taken by media and social media platforms 
to tackle misinformation, to identify fake news, and to prevent it from spreading.  
The  fight  against  fake  news  should  go  hand  in  hand  with  the  protection  of  freedom  of 
speech and efforts  to  support media pluralism and  media literacy. 
 
 
 
1. 
Some experts question the exposure of people to fake news and the influence such news 
has  on  them.  The  real  issue,  some  say,  is  the  lack  of  trust  citizens  have  in  news  from 
traditional  media.  This  is  borne  out  by  data  showing  trust  in  established  authorities  or 
institutions  is  declining,  while  trust  in  the  opinion  of  non-expert  peers  is  steadily 
increasing2. Large scale comprehensive data on the nature, scale, evolution and impacts 
                                                 
1Notably, 
 

2      The 2017 Edelman Trust Barometer reveals that trust is in crisis around the world. The general population’s trust 
in all four key institutions — business, government, NGOs, and media — has declined broadly, a phenomenon not 
reported since Edelman  began tracking  trust among this segment in  2012. With the fall  of trust, the majority of 
respondents now lack full belief that the overall system is working for them. In this climate, people’s societal and 
economic  concerns,  including  globalization,  the  pace  of  innovation  and  eroding  social  values,  turn  into  fears, 
spurring the rise of populist actions now playing out  in  several Western-style democracies.  To rebuild trust  and 
 
 
Commission européenne/Europese Commissie, 1049 Bruxelles/Brussel, BELGIQUE/BELGIË - Tel. +32 22991111 

 
of fake news in the EU is currently not available. This was highlighted in recent  public 
hearing with experts in the German Bundestag, and has prompted the UK Parliament to 
open a public inquiry into the matter3. 
Scholarly research based on US data has characterised the spreading dynamics of online 
social  media,  indicating  that  online  communities  can  polarise  opinion,  known  as  the 
"echo  chamber"  effect.  In  such  polarised  communities,  debunking  or  fact  checking  has 
limited effectiveness, as users tend to seek out messages that confirm their prior beliefs. 
Additional  recent  research  on  the  scale  and  impact  of  fake  news  in  the  context  of  the 
2016 US Presidential election found that the impact of such news story on the outcome 
of the election was limited4. 
 
  
The landscape of fake news and policy responses 
The  landscape  of  fake  news  is  variegated,  with  no  clear  boundaries  between  different 
types  of  fake  news  and  misinformation.  Content  such  as  state  propaganda,  satire, 
rumours, or tabloid-style reporting or other forms of legal and illegal speech (such as hate 
speech) all have bearing on fake news.  
Some  distinct  categories  of  fake  news  can  be  identified,  calling  for  different  types  of 
responses. 
1. Fake news versus illegal content  
1.1. Covered by EU legislation / EU initiatives 
Illegal  content  online  –  such  as  incitement  to  hatred,  to  terrorism  or  child  abuse 
material
 - is currently subject to EU legislation that allows online platforms  to be held 
liable unless they  remove  illegal content expeditiously once signalled.  In the context of 
hate speech, a Code of Conduct on illegal online hate speech was signed on 31 May 2016 
with  Facebook,  Twitter  YouTube  and  Microsoft,  backed  by  Council  Framework 
Decision  on  combatting  certain  forms  and  expressions  of  racism  and  xenophobia  by 
means of criminal law. Ongoing monitoring is aiming at ensuring the voluntary measures 
are  effective.  In  the  context  of  incitement  to  terrorism,  the  draft  Terrorism  Directive 
similarly contains provisions that aim to clearly penalize online terrorist content as illegal 
material  online,  backed  by  voluntary  measures  in  the  EU  Internet  Forum  to  curb 
terrorism online.  Illegal content related to child abuse is  covered by the 2011 Directive 
on  combating  sexual  abuse  of  children.  Implementation  reports  were  published  in 
December 2016, showing room for progress to prevention and intervention programmes 
for  offenders,  the  assistance,  support  and  protection  measures  for  child  victims,  the 
                                                                                                                                                 
restore faith in the system, institutions must step outside of their traditional roles and work toward a new, more 
integrated operating model that puts people — and the addressing of their fears — at the center of everything they 
do. 
3 Deutscher Bundestag, Ausschuss Digitale Agenda, 25 January 2017: "Fake News, Social Bots, Hacks und 
Co.  –  Manipulationsversuche  demokratischer  Willensbildungsprozesse  im  Netz";  UK  Parliament, 
Culture, Media and Sports Committee, Call for written submissions on 'fake news', 30 January 2017  
4  See  "Debunking  in  a  World  of  Tribes",  Oct  2015,  and  Stanford  University  Press  Release,  Jan  2017, 
http://stanford.io/2jA7Xh1 


 
prompt  removal  of  child  sexual  abuse  material  in  Member  States’  territory  and  the 
provision of adequate safeguards when the optional blocking measures are applied. 
Work is continuing also on how to further improve the effectiveness of the removal for 
illegal  content,  as  announced  in  the  Online  Platform  Communication  in  May  2016, 
including  by  assessing  the  need  for  guidance  on  the  liability  of  online  platforms  when 
putting  in  place  voluntary,  good-faith  measures  to  fight  illegal  content  online,  and  by 
reviewing the need for formal notice-and-action procedures. 
The  proposed  revision  of  the  Audiovisual  and  Media  Services  Directive  (AVMSD), 
adopted  by  the  Commission  on  25  May  2016,  includes  video-sharing  platforms  in  the 
scope of the AVMSD only when it comes to combatting hate speech and dissemination 
of harmful content to minors. Platforms which organise and tag a large quantity of videos 
will  have  to  protect  minors  from  harmful  content  and  to  protect  all  citizens  from 
incitement to hatred. 
Whenever  a  piece  of  fake  news  falls  under  one  of  these  categories  of  illegal content,  it 
can  be  considered  illegal  and  the  general  rules  concerning  removal  of  illegal  content 
online will apply.  
1.2. Covered by national legislation 
National  laws  in  the  EU  impose  different  limits  to  freedom  of  expression,  e.g.  in  the 
context of defamation or where these amount to the denial of holocaust.  
Fake news could in some instances be judged under defamation laws. In this context, the 
law  in  EU  Member  States  vary.  According  to  the  International  Press  Institute5  17  EU 
countries  have  criminal  insult  laws,  which  means  that  journalists  can  go  to  prison  if 
found guilty on that basis. In 6 Member States defamation of a public official is punished 
more severely than defamation of a private citizen. A limited number of  Member States 
maintain laws prohibiting insult to the royal family, or "the honour of the state". Five EU 
Member States have repealed criminal defamation and insult laws.  
Finally,  some  Member  States  regulate  speech  crimes  such  as  denial  of  holocaust  under 
the general umbrella of hate speech laws (e.g. Germany), while in other Member States 
this is categorized as a specific crime (e.g. Belgium).  
2. Fake news not related to illegal content per se 
However, as a broad category, fake news does not per se represent illegal content.  
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                 
5 http://legaldb.freemedia.at/defamation-laws-in-europe/ 


 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
  
Other  forms  of  fake  news  can  include  satire  or  tabloid-style  reporting,  but  also 
deliberately planted misinformation as part of a hybrid cyber attack. 
Furthermore,  tools  now  available  in  academia  and  to  audiovisual  professionals  will 
increasingly allow the faking of audio and video as costs fall and technology improves. 
2.1. Action at EU level 
The  Commission  has  mainly  focused  its  efforts  on  supporting  media  pluralism, 
journalism,  media  literacy  and  having  a  sustained  dialogue  with  all  stakeholders, 
including the press, online platforms, civil society.  
The EU already has  developed projects on Media Freedom and Media Pluralism,  based 
on Art 11 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights. These include addressing violations 
of  media  freedom  and  pluralism  within  the  EU  competences,  facilitating  independent 
monitoring and practical solutions to address media freedom violations, and promotion of 
media freedom in enlargement policy and external action.  
Media literacy 
An important element of these  policies is to  strengthen the general ability of  citizens 
for independent critical scrutiny of media information
, especially when shared online. 
Therefore, in the area of media literacy, the European Commission has been facilitating 
the  visibility  and  exchange  of  media  literacy  good  practices  from  Member  States  and 
stakeholders.  In  2017  the  Commission  –  further  to  an  initiative  of  the  Parliament  - 
will also implement two pilot projects on "Media literacy for all"
. Media literacy is 
also  an  element  in  other  EU  policies,  such  as  the  review  of  key  competences  in  formal 
education, youth policy, fight against radicalisation and fostering citizen's participation in 
civic  and  political  life.    The  Commission  is  also  funding  a  pan-European  network  of 
Safer  Internet  Centres  that  promote  media  literacy,  critical  thinking  and  awareness 
raising  to  protect  and  empower  young  users  online,  as  part  of  the  wider  Better  Internet 
for  Kids  strategy. 
 
 
  
As  part  of  the  conclusions  of  the  2016  Annual  Colloquium  on  Fundamental  Rights  
which  focused  on  media  pluralism  and  democracy
6,  the  European  Commission 
committed to continue a dialogue on media literacy with digital intermediaries aiming to 
identify  initiatives  and  programmes  to  provide  citizens  with  knowledge  and 
understanding of the functioning of social media.  
                                                 
6 http://ec.europa.eu/newsroom/just/item-detail.cfm?item id=31198  


 
 
 
 
 
  On  the  specific topic  of  algorithms,  an  Pilot  Project  on  awareness  raising 
and  accountability  of  algorithms  has  been  mandated  by  the  European  Parliament,  and 
will be implemented in 2017 by the Commission in the form a study. 
 
 
 
   
The EU Expert Group on Media Literacy facilitates best practice exchanges, including 
on  how  to  empower  citizens  with  media  literacy  skills  and  tools  to  debunk 
misinformation. 
In 2017, ERGA (The European Regulators Group for Audiovisual Media Services) will 
work on a report that would  describes inspirational practices of self- and co-regulation 
throughout the value chain, including on the video sharing platforms. 
Support to media 
The  new  publisher's  right,  proposed  in  the  context  of  the  copyright  reform,  is  also 
relevant in this context, as it aims to strengthen quality journalism, and thus contribute to 
the sustainability of a pluralistic media landscape and traditional media companies. 
Through  its  Multimedia  Actions  budget  line,  the  Commission  also  encourages  the 
production and dissemination of high-quality  reports and news about EU affairs from  a 
pan-European  perspective  i.e.  showing  more  than  only  a  national  perspective,  while 
respecting complete editorial independence. Current grant recipients are the TV channel 
Euronews,  radio  network  Euranet  Plus  and  two  consortia  focusing  on  production  and 
dissemination of data-driven news.  
Possible guidance on online platforms  
In  the  Communication  on  Online  Platforms7  presented  in  May  2016,  the  Commission 
encouraged  industry  to  step  up  voluntary  efforts  to  prevent  trust-diminishing  practices 
and  recognised  the  need  for  greater  transparency  for  users  to  understand  how  the 
information  presented  to  them  is  filtered,  shaped  or  personalised,  especially  when  it 
influences either purchasing decisions or participation in civic or democratic life.  
While  the  internal  governance  of  social  media  platforms  is  developing  rapidly, 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
                                                 
7 Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic 
and  Social  Committee  and  the  Committee  of  the  Regions  -  Online  Platforms  and  the  Digital  Single 
Market Opportunities and Challenges for Europe (COM(2016)288), May 2016 


 
Research and innovation 
Moreover,  EU  research  programmes  have  featured  relevant  projects  since  2011 under 
the  7th  Framework  Programme  for  Research  (FP7),  continuing  in  the  current  Horizon 
2020 programme. Several projects seek to develop tools which assist with the assessment 
of content integrity, context, meaning origination and propagations paths, and contributor 
reputation,  thereby  helping  journalists  to  assess  the  veracity  of  incoming,  raw  news 
items. 
A joint CONNECT/SANTE working group has been set up to work on e-health. As part 
of the work of the group, cooperative projects on how to counteract fake medical news 
(e.g. on vaccination) will be studied. 
Dedicated Task Force  
Concerning  state-orchestrated  disinformation,  the  External  Action  Service  set  up  a 
dedicated  Task  Force  to  address  Russia's  ongoing  disinformation  campaigns
following  a  request  from  the  European  Council  in  March  2015.Their  objective  is  to 
include  effective  communication  and  promotion  of  EU  policies  towards  the  Eastern 
Neighbourhood;  strengthening  the  overall  media  environment  in  the  Eastern 
Neighbourhood  and  in  EU  Member  States,  including  support  for  media  freedom  and 
strengthening  independent  media;  and  improved  EU  capacity  to  forecast,  address  and 
respond to disinformation activities by external actors. 
2.2. Action by Member States  
Any general obligations to  take  down news from online platforms would  severely limit 
freedom  of  speech  protected  under  Art  11  of  the  Charter  of  Fundamental  Rights.  In 
addition, any national regulation targeting social networks and/or media companies must 
be  in  line  with  EU  legislation,  such  as  the  e-Commerce  Directive,8  which  defines 
exemptions to the liability of online intermediaries, and the Audiovisual Media Services 
Directive9. 
The German Justice Ministry is reported by the media to be working on legal proposals 
for a dedicated centre where fake news can be flagged, coupled even with potential fines 
for  non-removal  by  platforms  such  as  Facebook,  and  the  Bundestag recently  conducted 
an expert hearing on the topic. In Italy, the head of the competition authority has called 
for  an  EU-wide  approach  and  the  President  of  the  Italian  Chamber  of  Deputies  is 
supporting work on real time social media observatory. The French Senate is considering 
an Internet Ombudsman type construction, although not limited specifically to the issue 
of fake news. The UK House of Commons culture, media and sport committee has set up 
an  inquiry  into  fake  news.  In  addition,  the  Czech  government  is  setting  up a  specialist 
“anti-fake  news”  unit  to  counter  alleged  Russian  interference  ahead  of  their  upcoming 
                                                 
8   Directive 2000/31/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 8 June 2000 on certain legal 
aspects  of  information  society  services,  in  particular  electronic  commerce,  in  the  Internal  Market 
('Directive on electronic commerce'), OJ L 178, 17.7.2000, p. 1–16  
9   Directive  2010/13/EU  of  the  European  Parliament  and  of  the  Council  of  10  March  2010  on  the 
coordination  of  certain  provisions  laid  down  by  law,  regulation  or  administrative  action  in  Member 
States concerning the provision of audiovisual media services (Audiovisual Media Services Directive) 
(Text with EEA relevance), OJ L 95, 15.4.2010, p. 1–24  


 
elections,  in  collaboration  with  the  Eastern  Neighbourhood  Strategic  Communication 
Task  Force  under  High  Representative  Mogherini.  Such  national  legal  initiatives 
targeting  the  provision  of  information  society  services  need  to  be  notified  to  the 
Commission  before  adoption  under  the  conditions  established  under  the  Transparency 
Directive.10 
2.3. Action by media and social media platforms  
Social  media  platforms  –  notably  Google  and  Facebook  –  have  publicly  declared  their 
intention  to  limit  the  spread  of  fake  news,  and  have  announced  a  series  of  voluntary 
measures.  
These voluntary measures are currently focused on: 
-  depriving  fake  news  websites  of  online  advertising  revenue  ("follow-the-
money").  One  of  the  motives  behind  the  proliferation  of  fake  news  in  the  US 
elections  was  to  provide  ad  income  by  directing  web  traffic  to  fake  news 
websites.  Such  traffic  forms  the  basis  for  calculation  of  advertising  revenue.    If 
this can be stopped, the interest in developing fake news decreases substantially.   
 
-  flagging  mechanisms  of  fake-news  (i.e.,  users  or  trusted  organisations  flagging 
such  content  to  the  platform),  including  by  working  with  independent,  trusted 
third-party  fact  checkers.  Facebook  has  already  started  cooperating  with 
organisations  that  adhere  to  the  International  Fact-Checking  Network  fact-
checkers’ code of principles11;  
 
-  experiments with warnings and labels aimed at the platforms' users, to highlight 
disputed content to users but without stopping users from accessing fake news or 
sharing it after seeing a warning.   
Several  media,  such  as  BBC  and  Le  Monde12,  have  also  announced  they  would  take 
measures  to  reinforce fact  checking, identify fake news and  propose tools to  help users 
analyse information.  
Suggested approach 
We  suggest  to  initially  set  up  a  discussion  with  Commissioners  involved, 
 
  
The  Commission  is  at  present  in  contact  with  online  platforms  to  follow-up  on  the 
efficiency  and  impact  of  their  proposed  voluntary  measures,  as  well  as  with  Member 
States known to be active in this domain. Furthermore, ongoing and future EU research 
projects will continue to add to a deeper understanding of the nature of the phenomenon. 
                                                 
10   Directive (EU) 2015/1535 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 9 September 2015 laying 
down a procedure for the provision of information in the field of technical regulations and of rules on 
Information Society services. 
11 http://www.poynter.org/fact-checkers-code-of-principles/  
12 BBC sets up team to debunk fake news (12 January 2017); Le Monde déclenche son offensive contre les "fake news" 
(25 janvier 2017).  


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
   
It is essential to avoid either government or private forms of censorship or 'Ministries of 
Truth'. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
    
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
                                                 
13Notably,  the  Cyberspace  Administration  of  China  announced  in  July  that  using  information  from  social  media  in 
mainstream media was forbidden, and calling for punishments to those who publish fake news. 
14E.g.  the  Euromyths  blog  of  the  EC  representation  in  the  UK:  http://blogs.ec.europa.eu/ECintheUK/euromyths-a-z-
index/ . However, there is evidence that impactful mythbusting in social media is very difficult to achieve.