This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Concepts against "Fake News"'.



 
Ref. Ares(2017)2916818 - 12/06/2017
EUROPEAN COMMISSION 
Directorate-General for Communications Networks, Content and Technology 
 
 
   
 
Brussels,  
BACKGROUND NOTE  
FOR THE ATTENTION OF THE MEMBERS OF THE EUROPEAN COMMISSION  
Subject: Fake news 
Introduction 
Over recent months, there  has  been intense interest  concerning the spread of fake news 
online, not least in the context of upcoming elections. The term 'fake news' was coined to 
describe deliberately constructed lies, in the form of news articles, meant to mislead the 
public, or to generate online ad revenue. 
While misinformation has always been part of the media landscape and public discourse, 
there is a new concern that social media platforms have enabled easier spreading of such 
misinformation.  A  range  of  commentators  argue  that  such  fake  news  stories  have  the 
ability to weaken the quality of democratic deliberation in what some call a "post-truth" 
society. In December 2016, President Juncker called upon online platforms to do more to 
tackle such misinformation. 
The landscape of fake news 
The  landscape  of  fake  news  is  variegated,  with  no  clear  boundaries  between  different 
types  of  fake  news  and  misinformation.  Content  such  as  state  propaganda,  satire, 
rumours, or tabloid-style reporting or other forms of legal speech all have bearing on fake 
news.  
A number of new drivers have emerged that can amplify the impact of fake news in the 
digital society. For instance, social media is set to overtake TV as the major news source 
for many Europeans in the coming years, and has already done so for younger population 
segments. In particular for children, this issue has been flagged as an emerging issue in 
the  context  of  child  online  safety  by  the  EU-funded  Safer  Internet  Centres.  Fake  new 
stories on social media also often lack any surrounding context that help interpret them, 
unlike for instance established newspapers, whose editorial line is generally well-known. 
They can propagate very fast thanks to network effects.  
However, some experts question the exposure of  people to fake news and the influence 
such  news  has  on  them.  The  real  issue,  some  say,  is  the  lack  of  trust  citizens  have  in 
(real) news and the fact that in some cases they do not accept that news from traditional 
media are much more trustworthy than  news delivered through social networks. This  is 
 
Commission européenne/Europese Commissie, 1049 Bruxelles/Brussel, BELGIQUE/BELGIË - Tel. +32 22991111 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The following sections touch upon possible response options against this background. 
Policy responses in Member States and by Online Platforms 
Several  Member  States  are  considering  policy  responses  to  this  phenomenon.  The 
German Justice Ministry is reported by the media to be working on legal proposals for a 
dedicated centre  where fake  news can be flagged, coupled even with  potential fines for 
non-removal  by  platforms  such  as  Facebook.  In  Italy,  the  head  of  the  competition 
authority has called for an EU-wide approach and the President of the Italian Chamber of 
Deputies is supporting work on real time social media observatory. The French Senate is 
considering an Internet Ombudsman type construction, although not limited specifically 
to  the  issue  of  fake  news.  In  addition,  the  Czech  government  is  setting  up a  specialist 
“anti-fake  news”  unit  to  counter  alleged  Russian  interference  ahead  of  their  upcoming 
elections,  in  collaboration  with  the  Eastern  Neighbourhood  Strategic  Communication 
Task Force under High Representative Mogherini. 
Social  media  platforms  –  notably  Google  and  Facebook  –  have  publicly  declared  their 
intention  to  limit  the  spread  of  fake  news,  and  have  announced  a  series  of  voluntary 
measures.  
These voluntary measures are currently focused on: 
                                                 
1Edelman Trust Barometer 2017 


 
-  depriving  fake  news  websites  of  online  advertising  revenue  ("follow-the-
money").  One  of  the  motives  behind  the  proliferation  of  fake  news  in  the  US 
elections  was  to  provide  ad  income  by  directing  web  traffic  to  fake  news 
websites.  Such  traffic  forms  the  basis  for  calculation  of  advertising  revenue.    If 
this can be stopped, the interest in developing fake news decreases substantially.   
 
-  flagging  mechanisms  of  fake-news  (i.e.,  users  or  trusted  organisations  flagging 
such  content  to  the  platform),  including  by  working  with  independent,  trusted 
third-party  fact  checkers.  Facebook  has  already  started  cooperating  with 
organisations  that  adhere  to  the  International  Fact-Checking  Network  fact-
checkers’ code of principles2;  
 
-  experiments with warnings and labels aimed at the platforms' users, to highlight 
disputed content to users but without stopping users from accessing fake news or 
sharing it after seeing a warning.   
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
What the EU is already doing 
The EU already has established policies on Media Freedom and Media Pluralism, based 
on Art 11 of the Charter of Fundamental Rights. These include addressing violations of 
media  freedom  and  pluralism  within  the  EU  competences,  facilitating  independent 
monitoring and practical solutions to address media freedom violations, and promotion of 
media freedom in enlargement policy and external action. 
An important element of these policies is to strengthen the general ability of citizens for 
independent  critical  scrutiny  of  media  information,  especially  when  shared  online. 
Therefore, in the area of media literacy, the European Commission has been facilitating 
the  visibility  and  exchange  of  media  literacy  good  practices  from  Member  States  and 
stakeholders.  In  2017 the Commission  – further to  an  initiative of the Parliament  - will 
also  implement  two  pilot  projects  on  "Media  literacy  for  all".  Media  literacy  is  also  an 
element in other EU policies, such as the review of key competences in formal education, 
youth policy, fight against radicalisation and fostering citizen's participation in civic and 
political life.  The Commission is also funding a pan-European network of Safer Internet 
Centres  that  promote  media  literacy,  critical  thinking  and  awareness  raising  to  protect 
and empower young users online, as part of the wider Better Internet for Kids strategy. 
The  Commission  is  also  currently  brokering  an  additional  self-regulatory  initiative,  the 
Alliance to better protect minors online which will scale up awareness raising on online 
safety  including  the  promotion  of  children's  access  to  diversified  online  content, 
opinions, information and knowledge.  
                                                 
2 http://www.poynter.org/fact-checkers-code-of-principles/  


 
As  part  of  the  conclusions  of  the  2016  Annual  Colloquium  on  Fundamental  Rights  
which  focused  on  media  pluralism  and  democracy3,  the  European  Commission 
committed to continue a dialogue on media literacy with digital intermediaries aiming to 
identify  initiatives  and  programmes  to  provide  citizens  with  knowledge  and 
understanding of the functioning of social media. 
The  new  publisher's  right,  proposed  in  the  context  of  the  copyright  reform,  is  also 
relevant in this context, as it aims to strengthen quality journalism, and thus contribute to 
the sustainability of a pluralistic media landscape and traditional media companies. 
Concerning  state-orchestrated  disinformation,  the  External  Action  Service  set  up  a 
dedicated Task Force to address Russia's ongoing disinformation campaigns, following a 
request from the European Council in March 2015.Their objective is to include effective 
communication  and  promotion  of  EU  policies  towards  the  Eastern  Neighbourhood; 
strengthening  the  overall  media  environment  in  the  Eastern  Neighbourhood  and  in  EU 
Member  States,  including  support  for  media  freedom  and  strengthening  independent 
media;  and  improved  EU  capacity  to  forecast,  address  and  respond  to  disinformation 
activities by external actors. 
Moreover,  EU  research  programmes  have  featured  relevant  projects  since  2011 under 
FP7,  continuing  in  the  current  Horizon  2020  programme.  Several  projects  seek  to 
develop  tools  which  assist  with  the  assessment  of  content  integrity,  context,  meaning 
origination  and  propagations  paths,  and  contributor  reputation,  thereby  helping 
journalists to assess the veracity of incoming, raw news items. 
Policy options 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
In  line  with  EU  values,  any  policy  response  must  safeguard  free  speech  online  and 
defend  the  free  press,  and  avoid  either  government  or  private  forms  of  censorship  or 
'Ministries  of  Truth'. 
 
 
 
 
 
    
Concerning  the  illustrative  categories  of  fake  news  identified  above,  specific  responses 
could include the following: 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                 
3 http://ec.europa.eu/newsroom/just/item-detail.cfm?item id=31198  
4Notably, 
 
 




 
Questions 
1. Do you agree with the above analysis and that the Commission should be active in the 
ways suggested to support efforts to counter fake news? 
2. In particular, would you agree with 
 

3. Should the Commission do more to counter fake news about EU matters?