This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Concerning Medical Negligence'.

What to do if Union law has been breached? 
If you are a national of a country of the European Union, or if you live in one of these countries, 
or if you run a business in the European Union, Union law gives you a number of rights. 
If you would like to know more, you can: 
• 
Ask a question about the EU (Europe Direct) 
• 
Find out more about your EU rights when moving around in the EU (Your Europe) 
• 
Ask  a  question  about  your  rights  in  a  situation  you  are  facing  in  the  EU  (Your  Europe 
Advice). 
• 
Find out more about the national justice systems throughout the EU (e-Justice). 
 
If you feel that your rights under Union law have not been respected by the national authorities 
of  a  country  of  the  European  Union,  you  should  first  of  all  take  up  the  matter  with  national 
bodies or authorities. This will often be the quickest and most effective way to resolve the issue. 
Available means of redress at national level 
As stated in the Treaties, public authorities and national courts have the main responsibility for 
the application of Union law. 
Therefore, it is in your  interest to make use  of all possible means of  redress at national level 
(administrative and/or out-of-court mediation mechanisms). 
Depending  on  the  system  of  each  country,  you  may  also  submit  your  file  to  the  national 
ombudsmen or 
regional ombudsmen. 
Or you can bring your matter to the court of the country where the problem occurred. Find out 
more  about  national  judicial  systems  or  going  to  court.  
If  solving  your  problem  requires  the 
annulment  of  a  national  decision,  be  aware  that  only  national  courts  can  annul  it.  If  you  are 
seeking compensation for damage, only national courts have the power, where appropriate, to 
order  national  authorities  to  compensate  individuals  for  losses  they  have  suffered  due  to  a 
breach of Union law. 
Other problem-solving instruments 
Alternatively, you may wish to: 
• 
contact  SOLVIT-  SOLVIT  is  a  service  provided  by  the  national  administration,  which 
deals with cross-border problems related to the misapplication of Union law by national 
public  administrations  in  the  Internal  Market.  There  is  a  SOLVIT  centre  in  every  EU 
country, as well as in Norway, Iceland and Liechtenstein. Your Country will try to solve 
the problem  with the other  Country  concerned. Going through SOLVIT might take less 
time than making a formal complaint to the European Commission and can solve your 
individual  problem.  If  a  problem  goes  unresolved,  or  you  consider  that  the  proposed 
solution  is  unacceptable,  you  can  still  pursue  legal  action  through  a  national  court  or 
lodge  a  formal  complaint  with  the  European  Commission.  Please  be  aware  that 
addressing the issue to SOLVIT does not suspend time limits before national courts. 
Submit your problem to SOLVIT 
• 
contact European Consumer Centres - there is a Europe-wide network of consumer 
centres, which cooperate to help settle disputes between consumers and traders based 
in different EU countries, as well as in Norway, Iceland and Liechtenstein. 
Submit your problem to European Consumer Centres 
• 
contact FIN-Net - which is a network for resolving financial disputes out of court in EU 
countries,  as  well  as  in  Iceland,  Liechtenstein  and  Norway.  They  are  responsible  for 
handling disputes between consumers and financial services providers. 

Submit your problem to FIN-Net 
Available actions at EU Level 
Although you will usually be able to enforce your rights better in the country where you live, the 
European Union may also be able to help you: 
• 
The Committee on Petitions of the European Parliament 
You have the right (Article 227 TFEU) to submit a petition to the European Parliament about the 
application  of  Union  law.  You  may  submit  your  petition  by  post  or  online  via  the  European 
Parliament's website. Y
ou can find out more about petitions to the European Parliament on the 
EU citizenship and free movement website. 

• 
The European Commission 
You  can  contact  the  European  Commission  about  any  measure  (law,  regulation  or 
administrative action), absence of measure or practice by a country of the European Union that 
you think is against Union law. 
The European Commission can only take up your complaint if it is about a breach of Union law 
by authorities in an EU country. If your complaint is about the action of a private individual or 
body (unless you can show that national authorities are somehow involved), you have to try to 
solve it at national level (courts or other ways of settling disputes). The European Commission 
cannot follow up matters that only involve private individuals or bodies, and that do not involve 
public authorities. 
If you are not an expert in Union law, you may find it difficult to find out exactly which Union 
law  you  think  has  been  breached.  You  can  get  advice  quickly  and  informally  from  the  Your 
Europe Advice service, in your own language. 
• 
The European Ombudsman 
If  you  consider  that  the  European  Commission  has  not  dealt  with  your  request  properly,  you 
may contact the European Ombudsman (Articles 24 and 228 TFEU). 
How to submit a complaint to the European Commission 
You must submit your complaint via the standard complaint form, which you can fill out in any 
official EU language. Pl
ease make sure you include the following details: 
• 
Describe exactly how you believe that national authorities have infringed Union law, and 
which is the Union law that you believe they have infringed. 
• 
Give details of any steps you have already taken to obtain redress. 
What does the European Commission do with your complaint? 
  The European Commission will confirm to you that it has received your complaint within 15 
working days. 
  The European Commission will invite you to resubmit your complaint in case you have not 
used the standard complaint form. 
  Within  the  following  12  months,  the  European  Commission  will  assess  your  complaint  and 
aim  to  decide  whether  to  initiate  a  formal  infringement  procedure  against  the  country  in 
question.  If  the  issue  that  you  raise  is  especially  complicated,  or  if  the  European 
Commission needs to ask you or others for more information or details, it may take longer 
than  12  months  to  reach  a  decision.  You  will  be  informed  if  the  assessment  takes  longer 
than  12  months.  If  the  European  Commission  decides  that  your  complaint  is  founded  and 
initiates a formal infringement procedure against the country in question, it will inform you 
and let you know how the case progresses. 
  Should the Commission contact the authorities of the country against which you have made 
your  complaint,  it  will  not  disclose  your  identity  unless  you  have  given  your  express 

permission to do so. 
  If the  European  Commission thinks that your  problem  could be solved more  effectively  by 
any of the available informal or out-of-court problem-solving services, it may propose to you 
that your file be transferred to those services. 
  If  the  Commission  decides  your  problem  does  not  involve  a  breach  of  Union  law,  it  will 
inform you by letter before it closes your file. 
  At  any  time,  you  may  give  the  European  Commission  additional  material  about  your 
complaint or ask to meet representatives of the European Commission. 
Find  out  more  about  how  the  European  Commission  handles  its  relations  with  complainants: 
Communication on the handling of relations with the complainant in respect of the application of 
Union law. 

There are two ways of submitting a complaint: 
  via internet: [email address]  
  by post:  
 
European Commission Secretary-General  
B-1049 Brussels BELGIUM  
Or 
EU Commission office in your country 
Or 
by fax: 3222964335 
What the Commission can and cannot do 
After examining the facts of your complaint, the Commission will decide whether further action 
should  be  taken.  The  Commission  may  decide  not  to  open  a  formal  infringement  procedure, 
even  if  it  considers  that  a  breach  of  EU  law  has  occurred.  For  instance,  the  Commission  may 
consider that a national or EU level redress mechanism is in a better position to deal with your 
complaint.  
In 2017, the Commission closed complaints received in the area of gambling. The Commission 
did not consider it a priority to use its enforcement powers to promote an EU Single Market in 
the area of online gambling services.  Complaints in the gambling sector can be handled more 
efficiently by national courts than by the Commission. 
On the other hand, if the Commission takes a country to the Court of Justice and wins the case, 
the country will have to take all actions to remedy the violations.  
If  the  Commission  brings  the  case  before  the  Court  of  Justice  of  the  European  Union,  it  may 
take several years for the Court of Justice to hand down its judgment. Judgments of the Court 
of Justice differ from those of national courts. The Court of Justice delivers a judgment stating 
whether  there  has  been  an  infringement  of  European  Union  law.  The  Court  of  Justice  cannot 
annul a national provision which is incompatible with European Union law, nor force a national 
administration to respond to the request of an individual, nor order the country to pay damages 
to  an  individual  adversely  affected  by  an  infringement  of  European  Union  law.  To  seek 
compensation, complainants must still take their case to a national court within the time limit 
set out in national law. 
Multiple complaints 
Where a number of complaints are lodged in relation to the same grievance, the Commission 
may register them under the same number. 
Individual acknowledgements and letters may be replaced by a notice on the Europa website. 
Multiple complaints receipt confirmations 

Decisions taken on multiple complaints 
 
 


EUROPEAN COMMISSION 
 
Complaint – Infringement of EU law 
 
Before filling in this form, please read ‘How to submit a complaint to the European Commission’:  
https://ec.europa.eu/assets/sg/report-a-breach/complaints_en/  
All fields with * are mandatory. Please be concise and if necessary continue on a separate page. 
 
1. Identity & contact details 
 
Complainant* 
Your representative (if applicable
Title* Mr/Ms/Mrs 
 
 
First name* 
 
 
Surname* 
 
 
Organisation: 
 
 
Address* 
 
 
Town/City * 
 
 
Postcode* 
 
 
Country* 
 
 
Telephone 
 
 
E-mail 
 
 
Language* 
 
 
Should we send 
correspondence to you or 
☐ 
☐ 
your representative*: 
 
2. How has EU law been infringed?* 
 
Authority or body you are complaining about: 
Name* 
 
Address 
 
Town/City 
 
Postcode 
 
EU Country* 
 
Telephone 
 
Mobile 
 
E-mail 
 
 
2.1 Which national measure(s) do you think are in breach of EU law and why?* 
 
 
2.2 Which is the EU law in question? 
 

2.3 Describe the problem, providing facts and reasons for your complaint* (max. 7000 characters): 
 
 
2.4 Does the Country concerned receive (or could it receive in future) EU funding relating to the subject of 
your complaint?    
 Yes, please specify below            No                    I don't know 
 
 
2.5 Does your complaint relate to a breach of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights?  
The Commission can only investigate such cases if the breach is due to national implementation of EU law. 
 Yes, please specify below              No   
  I don't know 
 
 
 
3. Previous action taken to solve the problem* 
Have you already taken any action in the Country in question to solve the problem?* 
 
  IF YES, was it:   Administrative        Legal ? 
 
 
  3.1 Please describe: (a) the body/authority/court that was involved and the type of decision that 
  resulted; (b) any other action you are aware of. 
   
 
 
 
 
  3.2 Was your complaint settled by the body/authority/court or is it still pending? If pending, when 
  can a decision be expected?* 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



 
 
  IF NOT please specify below as appropriate 
   Another case on the same issue is pending before a national or EU Court 
   No remedy is available for the problem 
   A remedy exists, but is too costly 
   Time limit for action has expired 
 
   No legal standing (not legally entitled to bring an action before the Court) please indicate why: 
 
 
 
 
 
   No legal aid/no lawyer 
   I do not know which remedies are available for the problem 
   Other – specify 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
4. If you have already contacted any of the  EU institutions dealing with problems of this 
type, please give the reference for your file/corr
 
 
espondence: 
 Petition to the European Parliament – Ref:………………
  ………………….. 
 
 European Commission – Ref:……………………………………….  
 
 European Ombudsman – Ref:……………………………………
  ……….. 
 Other – name the institution or body you contacted 
 
and the reference for your complaint (e.g. SOLVIT, 
FIN-Net, European Consumer Centres) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
5. List any supporting documents/evidence which you could  – if requested – send to the 
Commission.  
 Don’t enclose any documents at this stage. 
 
6. Personal data* 
Do  you  authorise  the  Commission  to  disclose  your  identity  in  its  contacts  with  the  authorities  you  are 
lodging a complaint against? 
 Yes              No 
 In some cases, disclosing your identity may make it easier for us to deal with your complaint.