This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Eurogas communications'.




March 2017 
Eurogas views on the Energy Efficiency 
Directive and the Energy Performance of 
Buildings Directive  



 
 
Eurogas  is  the  association  representing  the  European  gas  wholesale,  retail  and  distribution 
sectors. Founded in 1990, its members are 43 companies and associations from 22 countries. 
 
Eurogas  represents  the  sectors  towards  the  EU  institutions  and,  as  such,  participates  in  the 
Madrid  Gas  Regulatory  Forum,  the  Gas  Coordination  Group,  the  Citizens  Energy  Forum  and 
other stakeholder groups. 
 
Its members  work together,  analysing the  impact of EU  political  and  legislative  initiatives  on 
their business and communicating their findings and suggestions to the EU stakeholders. 
 
The  association  also  provides  statistics  and  forecasts  on  gas  consumption.  For  this,  the 
association can draw on national data supplied by its member companies and associations. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
For further information contact: 
Tim Cayford – Policy Adviser 
[email address] 
 
© Eurogas 2017 – Position Paper no. 16PP462 
www.eurogas.org 
 
 
 
 Ref. :  16PP442 
Page 2 of 11 



 
Summary of Policy Asks 
 
Energy Efficiency Directive 
 
A.  Energy  Efficiency  measures  are  an  effective  endeavour  to  achieve  well-designed  gains 
toward the principal aim of lowering greenhouse gas emissions – a direction toward which 
Eurogas asks for continued focus. 
 
B.  Further  analysis  is  needed  to  undergird  any  target  proposal.  Sensitivity  analyses  with 
clearly explained assumptions on key factors, including discount rates, and thereby greater 
understanding of effects on the ETS and the power mix are critical. Encouraging more coal 
in the power mix via energy efficiency measures, as the impact assessment shows, would 
be counter-productive.  
 
C.  Costs and funding, i. e. the impact on the consumer, also need to be made clear. 
 
D.  Due  to  the  negative  impacts  on  the  ETS,  the  uptake  of  renewable  energy  sources,  gas 
demand, and consumer prices, which the impact assessment shows, Eurogas advocates a 
non-binding  target  that  does  not  undermine  the  overall  aim  of  the  Union  to  reduce 
greenhouse gas emissions in a cost-effective way. 
 
E.  The  2020  target  based  on  either  primary  energy  consumption  (PEC)  or  final  energy 
consumption (FEC)  should be  maintained, to avoid retroactive  changes  to law that could 
affect investment. 
 
F.  The 2030 target should be based on PEC in order to account for true system-wide energy 
savings. 
 
G.  While Member State choice and decision making is welcomed for article 7, some caution 
and change is needed. The current proposal limits the possibility to use onsite renewables 
and to count energy savings made before 2020 which have an impact beyond 2020. As this 
group  already  includes  the  possible  exclusion  of  the  ETS  sector,  this  is  a  strong  and 
unnecessary limitation and should be removed. This limitation also discourages long-term 
measures.  
 
H.  It  is  not  appropriate  to  continue  Article  7  beyond  2030  at  this  point,  as  the  EU  is 
establishing  a  package  to deliver  the  2030  targets. A  separate  impact  analysis  should  be 
done to assess this in the future. 
 
I.  Savings under pre-2020 measures which go beyond the year 2020 shall also be taken into 
account in the period 2021 to 2030. A transition between the two periods is thus needed, 
and not a sharp division. 
 
J.  Eurogas  supports  the  targeted  use  of  energy  efficiency  measures  to  combat  energy 
poverty. Gas-fired  technologies  are  well  placed to  contribute to this objective.  However, 
 
  Ref. : 16PP462 
Page 3 of 11 



 
the adoption of such energy efficiency measures should be determined by Member States, 
on a cost-benefit basis, and should not be mandatory. 
 
K.  Clarification  of  Article  7a  is  needed.  If  an  obligation  of  widespread  installation  of  smart 
metering is implied, costs and benefits should first be considered. 
 
L.  An approach to accommodate the landlord-tenant relationship will need to be addressed 
very accurately. 
 
M.  Any obligation to install remotely readable meters and cost allocators from 2020 should be 
subject to cost-benefit analyses. 
 
N.  Clarity is needed  in defining billing and billing information for gas, for electricity, and for 
heating and cooling, accepting that remote reading will not be technically possible or cost-
efficient in all cases. 
 
O.  While the opportunity to have a comparison with an average, normalised or benchmarked 
user  can  bring  added-value,  this  can  be  supplied to customers  by  different  channels  and 
need not be prescribed for bills. 
 
P.  Eurogas  supports  the  use  of  primary  energy  factors  (PEFs),  but  care  is  needed  in  their 
calculation.  This  is  and  should  remain  a  reflection  of  the  conversion  of  final  energy  to 
primary  energy.  It  should  not  be  turned  into  a  tool  to  promote  the  use  of  electricity 
because this could compromise the EU’s targets for greenhouse gas emissions reductions 
and energy efficiency. The PEF should therefore be based on the existing fuel mix, not on 
what  that  fuel  mix  could  be  in  2020,  and  then  updated  every  five  years.  Against  this 
background, it should be at least 2.2 for electricity. 
 
 
Energy Performance of Buildings Directive 
 
Q.  Alternative refuelling points for gaseous energy, such as CNG, should be encouraged (not 
just e-mobility refuelling points). 
 
R.  The definition of ‘energy from renewable sources’ should include renewable synthetic gas, 
e.g. from power-to-gas processes.  
 
 
 
 
  Ref. : 16PP462 
Page 4 of 11 



 
Introduction 
 
Eurogas  members  are  strong  supporters  of  energy  efficiency.  It  contributes  to  the 
competitiveness  of  Europe,  has  a  key  role  to  play  in  responding  to  the  challenge  of  climate 
change  and  in  the  transition  to  a  resource  efficient  economy  and  a  sustainable  energy  mix. 
Measures  to  promote  energy  efficiency  should  be  coherent,  proportionate  and  essentially 
market-driven, while also avoiding policy overlap which can carry unintended consequence in 
terms of undermining cost-effective  decarbonisation.  Energy efficiency measures  should also 
give adequate attention to the whole spectrum of the energy system, and not target specific 
energy carriers.  
 
Gas  continues  to  offer  major  affordable  gains  in  both  energy  efficiency  and  greenhouse  gas 
emissions  reductions.  Gas-based  appliances  can  also  induce  greater  renewable  heating  and 
cooling for the sector, as well as sustainable mobility solutions. 
  
Eurogas  supports  the  Commission’s  approach  of  limiting  the  review  to  specific  Articles.  The 
2012 Energy Efficiency Directive only came into force in 2014 and has not yet been completely 
transposed by all Member States. 
 
The  actual  delivery  of  energy  efficiency  gains  is  even  more  complex.  Given  that  it  is  often 
based on individual circumstances, tailored solutions are necessary. Legislation which is overly 
prescriptive or limiting can make it very difficult to deliver projects. The over-arching objective 
as stated by the European Council1 is the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. This should 
not be lost out of sight. 
 
The  proposal  appears  to  favour  energy  efficiency  measures  via  energy  sources,  such  as 
electricity  over  natural  gas,  through  a  lower  Primary  Energy  Factor,  which  is  the  means  to 
compare  the  two.  At  the  same  time,  no  safeguards  are  proposed  to  counter  the  risk  of 
perverse effects, i.e. that highly inefficient direct heating (e.g. electric radiators) is used or gas 
as a heating fuel is replaced with electricity based on coal, which is already the case. The result 
could very well be a decrease in efficiency and an increase in greenhouse gas emissions. 
 
 
This  paper  sets  out  how  the  proposals  can  be  amended  to  prevent  undesired  effects,  to 
increase  the  range  of  options  and  to  make  the  achievement  of  greenhouse  gas  emissions 
reductions through energy efficiency more cost-efficient. 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                           
1 REGULATION OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL on binding annual greenhouse gas emission reductions by 
Member States from 2021 to 2030 for a resilient Energy Union and to meet commitments under the Paris Agreement and 
amending Regulation No 525/2013 of the European Parliament and the Council on a mechanism for monitoring and reporting 
greenhouse gas emissions and other information relevant to climate change. July 20, 2016. 
https://ec.europa.eu/transparency/regdoc/rep/1/2016/EN/1-2016-482-EN-F1-1.PDF  
 
  Ref. : 16PP462 
Page 5 of 11 



 
 
Energy Efficiency Directive 
 
Article 3 - Energy Efficiency Targets  
 
Key elements in the Impact Assessment resulting in the proposed 30% target require reflection 
 
1.  Eurogas supports the achievement of the agreed 27% target. Consideration of the proposal 
to  increase  this  target  to  30%  is  very  much  contingent  on  the  inputs,  outcomes,  and 
sensitivities  of  the  impact  assessment.  There  are  several  key  elements  within  the  impact 
assessment that require further reflection: 
 
a.  It  would  be  greatly enhanced  by  including  a  sensitivity  analysis  to key  factors,  such  as 
economic growth2, cost of capital and fuel prices. The sensitivity of the impact of these 
parameters  is  demonstrated  by  looking  to  the  past,  where,  as  stated  in  the  impact 
assessment, 35% of energy savings (2008-2012) were due to the economic downturn. 
 
b.  The  higher  target  has  a  very  negative  impact  on  the  EU’s  power  generation  mix. 
According to the Impact Assessment (IA), the percentage of coal in Europe’s energy mix 
actually increases, while all other energy sources including natural gas and renewables 
reduce.  (The  ETS price  is projected to fall by 35% (from 42 –  27 EUR/tonne3), showing 
the impact of overlapping policies).  
 
Gross Inland 
Solid Fuels 
Oil 
Nat Gas 
Nuclear 
Renewables 
consumption 
% change from EU 27% 
+4 
-2 
-10 
-1 
-3 
      Based on Table 6, Energy Efficiency Impact Assessment  
 
c.  It is often not very clear what the key input parameters and indicators in the IA are. For 
example, what is the renovation rate that delivers the target, and how does it compare 
with Europe’s current rate of approximately 1%? 
 
d.  A better explanation of the significant reduction in discount rates for energy investment 
decisions is needed. For example, the discount rate for the energy-intensive industry is 
now on par with that of a regulated monopoly grid operator. Household discount rates 
have dropped from 17.5% in the 2013 reference scenario to a range between 10-12% in 
this Impact Assessment.  
 
e.  A factual assessment of the costs and implications of energy efficiency for consumers is 
needed. This assessment should be the basis for the definition of concrete targets. 
 
                                                           
2 Impact assessment assumes the average EU GDP growth rate is projected to remain relatively low at 1.2% per year for 2010-
2020, down from 1.9% per year during 1995-2010. In the medium to long-term, higher expected growth rates (1.4% per year for 
2020-2030 and 1.5% per year for 2030-2050). 
3 Table 10 EED Impact Assessment  
 
  Ref. : 16PP462 
Page 6 of 11 



 
f.  Greater consideration is needed of the extent to which funding required to support the 
proposals  will  become  available.  The  investment  expenditure  needed to  deliver  a 30% 
target compared with a 27% target is approximately EUR 1904 for every European citizen 
for  the  ten-year  period  (2020  –  2030).  Financing  such  capital  expenditures  presents  a 
unique challenge. 
 
The overall objective of reducing GHG emissions cost-effectively is affected as a binding energy 
efficiency target impacts other objectives and tools. 

  
2.  The European Council decision in October 2014 was to make the reduction of greenhouse 
gas  emissions  the  cornerstone  of  EU  policy.  The  proposal  to  make  the  target  for  energy 
efficiency binding undermines this decision. Europe is on track to reach its energy efficiency 
target  of  20%  by  2020  without  it  being  binding.  It  would  be  more  beneficial  to  focus  on 
addressing  barriers  and  obstacles  to  increase  energy  efficiency  further  since  a  binding 
target  will  not  remove  these.  Due  to  the  negative  impacts  on  the  ETS,  the  uptake  of 
renewable  energy  sources,  gas  demand,  and  consumer  prices,  Eurogas  advocates  a  non-
binding target that does not undermine the overall aim of the Union to reduce greenhouse 
gas emissions in a cost-effective way. 
 
3.  The proposals change the nature of the 2020 target considerably by basing it on both final 
and primary energy consumption and not either of them. This tightening of the target is a 
major change of direction at a late point, rather than a “clarification”. The current target, 
which  is  enshrined  in  law  (option  for  Member  States  to  address  primary  or  final  energy 
consumption), should not be amended, as retroactive changes reduce investor certainty.   
 
For 2030, Eurogas supports one target solely based on primary energy consumption 
 
4.  The new target should be limited to primary energy consumption as this captures all forms 
of  energy.  Two  targets  not  only  cause  unnecessary  complexity,  but  are  particularly 
challenging for cogeneration. This is a highly  efficient  means to deliver savings in primary 
energy, but this is not recognisable from the perspective of final energy consumption. The 
use  of  a  final  energy  target  also  neglects  the  marginal  supply  principle,  where  additional 
electricity needed in the colder winter periods will most likely be provided from coal rather 
than gas or renewables, according to the impact assessment. 
 
Article 7 – End Use Savings  
   
End use savings must be achieved cost-efficiently and with flexibility as the guiding principles 
 
5. 
The key strength of Article 7 lies in its flexibility, which allows Member States to address 
ambitiously  their  individual  challenges  and  opportunities  in  order  to  achieve  the 
necessary  savings  cost-efficiently.  The  least  costly  measures,  or  so  called  low-hanging 
fruit, can be used first. The more is achieved, the more flexibility will be needed to reach 
the remainder of the target, especially if this is also to happen in a cost-efficient way. 
 
                                                           
4 Based on investment expenditure costs of EUR 98 billion in Table 22 of IA, divided by EU population of 508m. System costs 
increase of EUR 9bn from Table 24.  
 
  Ref. : 16PP462 
Page 7 of 11 



 
Member States need to keep all options such as obligation schemes or national measures, or 
both. 
 
6. 
We fully support that Member States can continue to have the choice to use obligation 
schemes  or  national  measures  or  a  combination  of  both.  This  is  essential,  given  the 
different starting points for Member States to deliver energy efficiency gains. Member 
State  decisions  in  energy  sectors,  including  transport,  should  also  thereby  be  able  to 
consider  the effects  of interactions with other regulations in their respective  contexts. 
Furthermore,  the  continued  ability  to  vary  reductions  between  years  must  be 
maintained. In Article 7, paragraph 2 (part d & e), the proposal limits the possibility to 
use  onsite  renewables  and  to  count  energy  savings  made  before  2020  which  have  an 
impact beyond 2020. They are limited because they are included in the group which can 
only reach 25% of the savings. As this group already includes  the possible exclusion of 
the ETS sector, this is a strong and unnecessary limitation and should be removed. This 
limitation also discourages long-term measures.  
 
7. 
It  is  not  appropriate  to  continue  Article  7  beyond  2030  at  this  point,  as  the  EU  is 
establishing a package to deliver the 2030 targets. A separate impact analysis should be 
done to assess this in the future. It is not possible to know today what the circumstances 
will be in over a decade. Furthermore, the governance proposal covers the process for 
the development of long-term strategies by Member States. 
 
8. 
It  is  also  inadequate  that  for  the  period  2021  –  2030  Member  States  may  not  count 
energy  savings  from  long-term  measures  set  before  the  end  of  2020.  This  will  lead  to 
such  measures  being  postponed  because  their  long-term  energy  savings  will  not  be 
counted beyond the end of 2020. Therefore, savings going beyond the year 2020 shall 
also  be  taken  into  account  in  the  period  2021  to  2030.  A  transition  between  the  two 
periods is thus needed, and not a sharp division. 
 
Article 7a. Energy Efficiency Obligation Schemes 
 
Energy efficiency measures as a means for addressing poverty should not be imposed solutions 
if they are not economically effective, and they should not be imposed on energy companies 
 
9. 
The  proposed  provision  links  with  savings  obligations  requirements  to  address  energy 
poverty  and  social  housing.  The  Gas  Directive  2009/73  EC  Article  3  underlines  the 
importance of consumer protection. Consumer vulnerability (of which energy poverty is 
arguably  one  category)  is  a  broad  concept,  which  can  be  addressed  by  a  variety  of 
means, including general consumer (non-energy specific) law, self-regulation, and social 
policy.  Eurogas  supports  the  targeted  use  of  energy  efficiency  measures  to  combat 
energy  poverty.  Gas-fired  technologies  are  well  placed  to  contribute  to  this  objective. 
However,  the  adoption  of  such  energy  efficiency  measures  should  be  determined  by 
Member States, on a cost-benefit basis, and should not be mandatory.  
 
 
 

 
  Ref. : 16PP462 
Page 8 of 11 



 
Verification  of  savings  are  important  but  the  systems  for  counting  them  need  to  be  cost-
efficient 
 
10. 
Eurogas supports the need for sound systems  to verify the  savings that count  towards 
the  meeting  of  obligations  at  Member  State  level  as  well  as  alternative  measures.  As 
currently  drafted,  however,  the  requirements  of  Article 7a would  seem  to  presuppose 
the availability of, at the very least, remote reading, which is not technically possible in 
all  cases  with  the  existing  housing  stock.  This  should  be  clarified.  Furthermore,  if  this 
implies  an  obligation  of  widespread  installation  of  smart  metering,  costs  and  benefits 
should first be considered. 
 
11. 
Another concern is that Article 7a5a refers to measures to be implemented as a priority 
in  households  affected  by  energy  poverty.  These  will  be  very  challenging  since 
households  will  generally  not  be  owner-occupiers,  but  shifting  populations  of  tenants. 
An  approach  to  accommodate  the  landlord-tenant  relationship  will  need  to  be 
addressed very accurately. 
 
Article  9a.  Metering,  sub-metering  and  cost-allocation  for  heating  and  cooling  and 
domestic hot water 
 
Any  obligation  to  install  remotely  readable  meters  and  cost  allocators  from  2020  should  be 
subject to cost-benefit analyses
 
 
12. 
The requirements of this Article would apply to gas heating in dwellings in multi-purpose 
buildings  heated  from  a  central  source,  not  using  individual  gas  boilers.  Similar  to  the 
requirements  in  Article  9,  any  obligation  to  install  remotely  readable  meters  and  cost 
allocators  from  2020  should  be  subject  to  cost-benefit  analyses  as  foreseen  for  the 
obligation  in  9a4.  In  some  cases,  it  could  be  technically  impossible  to  refit  all 
installations  for  remote  reading.  Other  options  exist  to  ensure  fair  allocation  of  costs, 
including cost allocators mentioned in Annex VII a. 
 
Annex VIIa 
 
Remote reading will not be technically possible or cost-efficient in all cases 
 
13. 
It is not clear why, if remotely readable meters are in place, the proposal requires that 
“billing or consumption information” has to be made available at least monthly as the 
consumption information is always available to the customer. 
 
14. 
Moreover,  for  the  sake  of  consistency,  the  distinction  between  billing  and  billing 
information contained in the current  Energy Efficiency Directive (EED), and maintained 
in the proposed Article 18 of the Recast Electricity Market Directive, as well as in the EED 
in relation to gas (Article 10 and Annex VII), should be kept for heating and cooling and 
domestic  hot  water.  Clarity  is  needed,  accepting  that  remote  reading  will  not  be 
technically possible or cost-efficient in all cases. 
 
 
  Ref. : 16PP462 
Page 9 of 11 



 
15. 
It should be clear that the reference to billing is in fact to billing information, and should 
not imply that the customer has to pay monthly for actual consumption. 
 
16. 
In para. 3, the requirements, notably 3b and d, are unduly onerous. It is not understood 
why  the  information  on  the  fuel  mix  is  extended  to  include  final  users  supplied  by 
district  heating  and  district  cooling.  If  it  is  to  be  a  requirement on  district  heating  and 
district  cooling  suppliers,  that  should  be  clear.  Also,  while  the  opportunity  to  have  a 
comparison  with  an  average,  normalised  or  benchmarked  user  can  bring  added-value, 
this can be supplied to customers by different channels and need not be prescribed for 
bills. 
 
Primary Energy Factor (PEF)  
 
Eurogas supports the use of PEFs, but care is needed in its calculation 
 
17. 
We  support  the  use  of  a PEF,  as  it  is  necessary to  compare  the  use  of  electricity  with 
energies  such  as  natural  gas,  in  a  fair  manner.  Also,  the  flexibility  to  allow  Member 
States to choose their own PEF based on their own fuel mix is needed.  
 
18. 
However,  the  PEF  should  be  based  on  the  existing  fuel  mix  and  not  on  a  potential 
forward looking scenario of 2020, as the future energy mix of Europe is very uncertain 
and impacted by many different factors. Given that the fuel mix is continually changing, 
the  PEF  should be updated every five years, thereby providing stability, while evolving 
over time. 
 
PEF should not be used as a tool to achieve policy objectives
 
 
19. 
Fundamentally, the PEF should reflect reality and should not make the use of electricity 
artificially more attractive than the use of other energy. The PEF should thus not be used 
as  a  tool  to  achieve  policy  objectives,  but  remain  a  derived  calculation  to  reflect  the 
conversion of final energy to primary energy. Therefore, the PEF for electricity should be 
at least 2.2 if the points above are considered. (This is in contrast to the reduction of the 
PEF from 2.5 to 2.0 that is currently sought by the European Commission.) A PEF taking 
account of the marginal use of electricity would give a much higher number, i.e. if more 
electricity is needed in winter months due to a cold spell, baseload coal-fired electricity 
would sharply increase the real PEF in many countries.  
  
20. 
The PEF in this Directive should not be used for energy labelling and eco-design. Energy 
for  heating  is  mainly  used  in  the  winter  and  does  not  represent  an  average  over  the 
year.  Furthermore,  the  reduction  of  the  PEF  for  electricity  should  not  result  in  highly 
inefficient electric appliances, which are currently forbidden under the Ecodesign rules, 
appearing to be more efficient and becoming available for sale again.  
 
Additional Point  
 
21. 
The  definition  of  an  SME  used  for  the  EED  places  an  undue  burden  on  small  energy 
suppliers, which may not be intended and should be amended.  
 
  Ref. : 16PP462 
Page 10 of 11 



 
Energy Performance of Buildings Directive  
 
Buildings are not the only means to decarbonise the EU energy system 
 
22. 
The Member States’ Roadmaps are required to deliver complete decarbonisation of the 
buildings sector by 2050. While this is one means to  decarbonise the energy system to 
meet global climate goals, it is not the only one and reduces the likelihood of emissions 
reductions in other sectors, such as transport or agriculture. 
 
Keep the option open for a gas vehicle refuelling point 
 
23. 
The  proposal  contains  a  requirement  for  Member  States  to  ensure  that  newly  built 
residential  buildings  and  those  undergoing  major  renovations,  with  more  than  ten 
parking spaces, include the pre-cabling to enable the installation of recharging points for 
electric  vehicles  for every parking space. This should be  broadened to alternative  low-
carbon  fuel  and  should  not  be  limited  to  electro-mobility.  The  installation  of  a  gas 
refuelling point in the same building should be an alternative option to electricity. The 
potential to reduce emissions through gas is also significant and existing infrastructures 
can  be  used  rather  than  having  to  invest  heavily  in  new  infrastructures.  This  is 
demonstrated  in  Annex  I,  which  shows  the  potential  reductions  through  gas  and 
electricity are comparable and depend on the specific energy mix employed throughout 
automobile use.  
 
24. 
Deeper consideration of Europe’s renovation rate is warranted in order to focus on the 
barriers that Member States are facing, as also indicated in point 1c. 
 
Renewable gas can also be produced from power-to-gas 
 
25. 
The  definition  of  ‘energy  from  renewable  sources’  should  include  renewable  synthetic 
gas, e.g. from power-to-gas processes.  
 
 
  Ref. : 16PP462 
Page 11 of 11