Ceci est une version HTML d'une pièce jointe de la demande d'accès à l'information '4AMLD Notes of the Commission'.


Ref. Ares(2017)5393166 - 06/11/2017
GAMBLING SECTOR: MONEY LAUNDERING RISKS 
1.Introduction 
The purpose of this paper is to explain the Commission’s decision to broaden the scope of the 
Directive to cover the gambling sector and to provide evidence of money laundering risks. It 
complements  the  information  already  included  in  the  Commission’s  Impact  Assessment 
accompanying the Commission’s proposal.  
The  Third  AMLD  includes  "casinos"  within  its  scope  but  without  providing  any  definition. 
Activities  of  obliged  entities  "performed"  on  the  Internet  (recital  14)  are  also  covered.  
However, as indicated in the Commission’s Application Report on Directive 2005/60/EC1, the 
absence  of  a  clear  definition  of  “casino”  leads  to  different  approaches  at  national  level,  and 
leaves  important  areas  of  the  gambling  business  which  may  be  particularly  vulnerable  to 
AML/CFT outside the scope of the preventative framework. 
Obligations upon casino operators and other gambling 
Obligations only upon casino operators 
operators 
Bulgaria 
Austria 
(Casinos, bingo halls, lotteries, sport totalizators, etc.) 
E s t o n i a  
Belgium 
("Organizers of games of chance') 
Czech Republic 
F i n l a n d  
("Any gaming operator and supplier of gaming activities') 
G r e e c e  
("Casino  enterprises,  casinos  operating  on  Greek  ships, 
Germany 
companies,  organizations  and  other  entities  engaged  in  gambling 
activities as well as betting shops (agencies)"). 

F r a n c e  
Hungary 
(Casinos, clubs, groups or companies in charge of games of 
chance, lotteries, betting, sport and horse race forecasts) 
Ireland 
Malta 
(Casinos and private members' clubs) 
I t a l y  
Romania 
(Land based and online casinos, sport betting/forecasts and other 
gambling activities)(Casinos, online sport betting/forecasts) 
L a t v i a  
The Netherlands 
(Lotteries and gambling) 
Lithuania 
United-Kingdom 
("Companies offering gaming") 
 
Luxembourg 
("Casinos and similar premises') 
 
Portugal 
(Casinos, betting and lottery operators) 
 
S l o v e n i a  
(Casinos, gaming halls, sport wagers, online games of chance) 
                                                           
1 COM(2012) 168 final 

 

 
S p a i n  
(Casinos, lotteries and other games of chance) 
 
S w e d e n  
(Casinos, lotteries and other games of chance) 
The  above  table  (annex  IX  of  the  Impact  Assessment2),  compares  the  rules  implementing 
AML rules to casinos and the gambling sector. 8 MS have imposed obligations only on casino 
operators  while  many  others  have  broadened  the  scope  to  include  number  of  different 
gambling service providers.  
 
The  Commission’s  proposal  for  a  4th  AML  Directive  has  broadened  the  scope  to  cover 
“gambling services”, defined as: 
 
any  service  which  involves  wagering  a  stake  with  monetary  value  in  games  of  chance 
including  those  with  an  element  of  skill  such  as  lotteries,  casino  games,  poker  games  and 
betting transactions that are provided at a physical location, or by any means at a distance, 
by  electronic  means  or  any  other  technology  for  facilitating  communication,  and  at  the 
individual request of a recipient of services”.
 
There were two reasons underpinning the Commission’s decision: 
1.  Level playing field concerns: there was strong support from the majority of gambling 
sector representatives3 to apply a broad approach.  
2.  Money laundering risks in the gambling sector are not restricted to casinos. Over the 
course  of  consultations  with  the  private  sector,  the  Commission  was  provided  with 
information suggesting clear indications of risks in other areas.  
The remainder of this note highlights evidence which points to money laundering risks related 
to various parts of the gambling sector not currently covered under the Third AMLD’s scope. 
Risks associated with casinos (including on-line casinos) are not analysed, as they are already 
caught by the existing provisions of the Third AML Directive (AMLD). 
To-date,  while  typology  reports  have  been  carried  out  by  FATF  on  money  laundering  and 
Casinos4,  or  by  Moneyval  on  on-line  gambling,  the  Commission  is  not  aware  of  any  such 
official studies on the specific topic of money laundering and gambling beyond the casino/on-
line sectors. This should not however imply that no such evidence exists. Indeed, on the basis 
of  the  evidence  presented,  supported  by  the  fact  that  a  number  of  EU  Member  States  have 
already  taken  steps  to  broaden  the  coverage  of  their  legal  framework,  the  Commission 
believes that it is appropriate to broaden the scope of the rules to the entire gambling sector.  
                                                           
2 http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=SWD:2013:0021:FIN:EN:PDF 
3 The Commission was in consultation with/received  contributions from the following organisations : European Casino 
Association, EGBA, BETFAIR, European Gaming and Amusement Federation, European Lotteries, Finnish Slot Machine 
Association, Association of British Bookmakers, Bundesverband Privaten Spielbanken, BWIN.Party, Diligent Gaming, La 
Française des Jeux, Fédération française des entreprises de jeux en ligne, Lottomatica Group, Remote Gambling Association. 
See: http://ec.europa.eu/internal_market/company/financial-crime/received_responses/index_en.htm 
4 http://www.fatf-gafi.org/media/fatf/documents/reports/RBA%20for%20Casinos.pdf 

 

However  the  Commission  also  fully  accepts  that  the  degree  of  money  laundering  risk  will 
vary according to a number of different factors. The risk-based approach in the Commission’s 
proposal  will  allow  sufficient  flexibility  to  recognise  lower  risks  where  they  exist,  and  to 
allow for a tailored response at national level. Furthermore, the €2,000 threshold for customer 
due  diligence  should  eliminate  the  need  to  identify  a  significant  proportion  of  gambling 
customers. On the other hand the Commission believes that given this evidence, any approach 
which  placed  certain  activities  outside  the  defined  scope  of  gambling  services,  without  first 
carrying out an assessment of those risks, would be contrary to the risk-based approach.  
2.  Money laundering risks in the gambling sector  
2.1) Bookmakers and betting shops 
Money laundering risks associated with bookmakers have long been understood. In the 1996 
FATF typologies exercise: "Casinos and other businesses associated with gambling, such as 
bookmaking
,  continue  to  be  associated  with  money  laundering,  since  they  provide  a  ready-
made excuse for recently acquired wealth with no apparent legitimate source
". 
In  the  UK,  prior  to  the  introduction  of  the  Money  Laundering  Regulations  2007,  a  paper 
produced by the Centre for the Study of Financial Innovation in the UK5  claimed that “…the 
main  risk  may  lie  with  more  traditional  betting  activities.  The  key  point  is  that  high  street 
betting  shops  will  still  accept  very  large  cash  wagers  without  knowing  the  identity  of  the 
person placing the bet
”.  The study went on to suggest that “cash-based betting is a potential 
loophole that ought to be examined. Bookmaking activities may need to be brought within the 
legislative  framework  to  require  proper  identification  and  record-keeping  in  respect  of 
customer identities and transactions
”. 
Beyond  the  EU,  bookmakers  are  already  covered  by  money  laundering  legislation  in  other 
parts  of  the  world,  most  notably  in  Australia.  Austrac  has  put  together  guidance  and 
typologies: according to Austrac, bookmakers are particularly vulnerable to money laundering 
activities, due in part to the opportunities for cash transacting. Indicators of the use of illicitly 
attained funds in horse racing may include structuring bets below reporting thresholds, the use 
of large amounts of physical currency, and requests for winnings to be paid to third parties. 
2.2) On-course betting 
Similar  risks  of  money  laundering  are  also  present  with  respect  to  on-course  betting.  This 
sector is also specifically covered in Australia, where AML/CTF rules provide that customers 
of  on-course  bookmakers  do  not  need  to  be  identified  unless  they  are  paid  out  winnings  of 
$10,000 or more or if they open an account with the bookmaker. 
However AML/CFT risks are not limited to any specific geographic area and are clearly also 
present  in  the  EU.  By  way  of  example,  in  2005  Irish  authorities  issued  warnings  to 
bookmakers  at  Cheltenham  races  to  be  on  the  lookout  for  persons  trying  to  launder  the 
proceeds of Belfast's £26.5 million Northern Bank robbery.  
 
                                                           
5 Betting on the Future, On-line gambling goes mainstream financial, Centre for the Study of Financial 
Innovation: http://www.zyen.com/PDF/CSFI%20Gambling%20Publication.pdf 

 

2.3) Sports betting 
There are a number of ways in which sports activities may be targeted for money laundering, 
including betting activities (due to the lack of gambling regulation between countries and lack 
of transparency).  
According to the FATF report on money laundering through the football sector6: “Sports that 
could  be  vulnerable  to  money  laundering  problems  are  either  big  sports  (worldwide  like 
football or on a national basis like cricket, basketball or ice hockey), sports like boxing, kick 
boxing and wrestling (sports that have traditionally links with the criminal milieu because of 
the relationship between crime and violence), high value sports (such as horse and car racing 
where there are ample opportunities to launder big sums of money), sports using (high value) 
transfer  of  players,  sports  where  there  is  much  cash  around,  which  give  criminals 
opportunities to turn cash into non-cash assets or to convert small into large bills. This fact 
means that virtually all sports could be targeted by criminals, although for different reasons. 
 
The  FATF  report  explicitly  does  not  cover  sports  betting,  but  concedes  that  “Money 
laundering  through  legal  and  illegal  betting,  especially  on  the  internet,  is  considered  as  a 
huge and increasing problem that should be explored separately in more detail.” 
 
Another  study  on  “Sports  betting  and  corruption  -  How  to  preserve  the  integrity  of  sport”  7 
describes  several  major  examples  of  corruption  in  sport  linked  to  sports  betting  (e.g.  the 
Hansie Cronje Affair (2000) and the Bochum trial (ongoing)). Although such examples focus 
primarily on the corruption element, there are inevitable overlaps with money laundering and 
attempts  to  conceal  illicit  proceeds.  The  study  also  describes  the  role  that  professional 
gamblers and money launders play, and the extent to which they are able to manage the risks 
when betting on sports matches:  
 
One section of the betting public consists of professional gamblers, who act on the betting 
market  as  they  would  on  a  financial  market,  who  perform  statistical  calculations  to 
understand  the  ways  in  which  odds  change  and  take  advantage  of  these  variations  to  place 
“sure bets”.  

A gambler who spreads his risk in this way is assured of winning, irrespective of the issue of 
the  match.  Professional  gamblers  (and  money-launderers)  spot  these  opportunities  and  can 
place extremely large sums and obtain maximum profit without taking the slightest risk. As in 
the less well-regulated financial markets, these players scrutinise the movements of the odds, 
and by substantial and repeated bets, can in fact themselves swing the odds accordingly. This 
group  of  gamblers  also  pays  great  attention  to  information  about  sports  matches.  If  for 
example a person learns that two key players in a team will not take to the pitch, they might 
then decide to bet heavily against the team, even before the operators receive the information 
and  adjust  their  odds  against  this  team.  That  being  the  case,  a  more  or  less  irrational 
variation in the odds may make other professional bidders think that the score of that match 
has been determined in advance and that the drop in odds is the result of corruptors who are 

                                                           
6 http://www.fatf-gafi.org/media/fatf/documents/reports/ML%20through%20the%20Football%20Sector.pdf 
7  By IRIS, University of Salford,  Cabinet PRAXES-Avocats, and  CCLS (Université de Pékin): 
http://www.sportaccord.com/multimedia/docs/2012/02/2012_-_IRIS_-_Etude_Paris_sportifs_et_corruption_-_ENG.pdf 

 

betting massively on one side in the match. They will then also leap into the breach and bid 
massively, before the odds drop too low, which will push the operator - alarmed in the face of 
so many bets on one team – to continue to increase the odds against the team
.” 
 
2.4) Slot machines and gambling halls 
There are diverging views on the level of risk regarding this gaming sector. Some operators in 
the gaming industry argue that this is a low area of risk, and not a viable means for ML. They 
also  argue  that  gambling  halls  involve  lower  amounts  and  are  not  in  the  same  league  as 
casinos.  According  to  Euromat8,  “Gaming  arcades  are  simply  not  in  the  same  league  as 
casinos  in  terms  of  monies  wagered  and  monies  paid  out  ….  The  machines  available  in 
gaming arcades, unlike those available in casinos, entail only low stakes and low payouts and 
thereby represent only very minimum or no AML/CTF risks
”. 
There  is  on  the  other  hand  anecdotal  evidence  of  money  laundering  using  slot  machines9, 
especially  machines  which  accept  bank  notes  or  credit  cards  and  which  take  high  initial 
stakes. Technological solutions which replace coins with vouchers make laundering of higher 
amounts easier10. There have been instances where money launderers feed the machine with 
credit, play for small amount and then claim back the remaining credit as legitimate winnings.  
Given the absence of European legislation in this field, Member States have adopted different 
approaches in respect of controls on gambling activities outside regulated casinos – the types 
of machines, the gambling limits, and hence the potential associated ML risk are understood 
to differ significantly, making it difficult to make generalized assessments about the level of 
risk. 
2.5) Lottery games 
The  level  of  risk  in  lottery  games  has  been  largely  assessed  as  low  by  the  industry  and 
supervisory  authorities  because  it  is  very  difficult  to  launder  money  through  lotteries. 
Nevertheless,  according  to  the  European  lotteries  submission  to  the  Commission’s  public 
consultation, it is important to monitor the identity of winning ticket holders. There are indeed 
concerns that money laundering risks arise with respect to the purchase of winning tickets by 
criminals who are willing to pay a surcharge on the winning ticket amount. 
 
                                                           
8 Euromat’s submission to the Commission’s public consultation http://ec.europa.eu/internal_market/company/financial-
crime/received_responses/responses-to-the-consultation/euromat_en.pdf 
9 See for example  the following news report: http://www.casino.org/news/chinese-laundry-through-the-slots-money-
laundering-alleged-for-med-tech-firm 

10 See FINTRAC report on “Money Laundering and Terrorist Financing Typologies and Trends in Canadian Casinos”:  
http://www.fintrac-canafe.gc.ca/publications/typologies/2009-11-01-eng.asp