This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Estimating displacement rates of copyrighted content in the EU'.



 
Estimating displacement rates of 
copyrighted content in the EU 

First progress report 
 
Client: European Commission, DG Internal Market and Services 
Rotterdam, 21 March 2014 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



 
Estimating displacement rates of 
copyrighted content in the EU 
 
First progress report 
Client: European Commission, DG Internal Market and Services 
 
 
Robert Haffner 
 
 
 
 
 
Rotterdam, 21 March 2014
 
 
 
 
 
 



 
About Ecorys 
At Ecorys we aim to deliver real benefit to society through the work we do. We offer research, 
consultancy and project management, specialising in economic, social and spatial development. 
Focusing on complex market, policy and management issues we provide our clients in the public, 
private and not-for-profit sectors worldwide with a unique perspective and high-value solutions. 
Ecorys’ remarkable history spans more than 80 years. Our expertise covers economy and 
competitiveness; regions, cities and real estate; energy and water; transport and mobility; social 
policy, education, health and governance. We value our independence, integrity and partnerships. 
Our staff comprises dedicated experts from academia and consultancy, who share best practices 
both within our company and with our partners internationally. 
 
Ecorys Netherlands has an active CSR policy and is ISO14001 certified (the international standard 
for environmental management systems). Our sustainability goals translate into our company policy 
and practical measures for people, planet and profit, such as using a 100% green electricity tariff, 
purchasing carbon offsets for all our flights, incentivising staff to use public transport and printing on 
FSC or PEFC certified paper. Our actions have reduced our carbon footprint by an estimated 80% 
since 2007. 
 
 
ECORYS Nederland BV 
Watermanweg 44 
3067 GG Rotterdam 
 
P.O. Box 4175 
3006 AD Rotterdam 
The Netherlands 
 
T +31 (0)10 453 88 00 
F +31 (0)10 453 07 68 
E [email address] 
Registration no. 24316726 
 
W www.ecorys.nl 
 
 
  
 
 
 
 

NL13-27706 
 
 
 

link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 8 link to page 11 link to page 11 link to page 12 link to page 12 link to page 17 link to page 19 link to page 19 link to page 19 link to page 20 link to page 21 link to page 23 link to page 23 link to page 23 link to page 27 link to page 29 link to page 29 link to page 29 link to page 31 link to page 33 link to page 37 link to page 41 link to page 43 link to page 43 link to page 45
Table of contents 
1  Research questions and scope 

1.1 
Research questions and need to refine the scope 

1.2 
Content 

1.3 
Internet using population 

2  Methodology 

2.1 
Direct regression versus structural demand equation 

2.2 
Limitations of survey data and considerations 
10 
2.3 
Estimating displacement effects 
10 
2.4 
Estimating willingness to pay 
15 
3  Interview preparations 
17 
3.1 
Identification of relevant law 
17 
3.2 
Development of topic lists 
17 
3.3 
Identification of contact persons 
18 
3.4 
Response so far 
19 
4  Literature research 
21 
4.1 
Literature covered 
21 
4.2 
Main findings – displacement rates 
21 
4.3 
Main findings - willingness to pay 
25 
5  Development of Questionnaire 
27 
5.1 
Question blocks 
27 
5.2 
Rationale behind questions and their use in previous literature 
27 
5.3 
Examples of sources 
29 
6  Detailed planning of the work 
31 
7  List of literature 
35 
8  Annex: List of contacted organisations 
39 
9  Interview topic lists 
41 
Questions National Authorities and copyright collecting organisations 
41 
Questions for content providers 
43 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Estimating displacement rates of copyrighted content in the EU 

 
 
 


link to page 7
 
1  Research questions and scope 
1.1  Research questions and need to refine the scope 
The two main research questions are: 
1.  How do online copyright infringements affect sales of copyrighted content (music, audio-visual, 
video games and books)?  
2.  How much are consumers willing to pay for legal content? 
 
Effects of streaming (free or paid for) and of differences in legislation need to be controlled for in the 
estimates of the displacement rate of copyrighted content. To this end, a comparison of the current 
situation is made with a so-called full counterfactual: the full absence of possibilities to download 
content without the permission of the copyright holders. 
 
The research questions are mainly answered on the basis of an online questionnaire among the 
internet using population. To implement the study, the scope of content and the internet using 
population need to be defined in more detail, as is done in the next two sections. 
 
 
1.2  Content  
From desk research and also the summary of Clickstream data provided by JRC – ICPT it has 
become evident that all types of media content can be downloaded and streamed both from legal 
(or “lawful”) and from illegal ( or “unlawful”) sources. In most EU countries, downloading from 
unlawful sources is itself illegal, in a few it is not, but this may soon change depending on a case 
pending at the CJEU.  
 
The research team have considered avoiding the terms “illegal” and even “unlawful”. But we 
consider it crucial to make clear what we mean in the questionnaire. There is a huge variety of 
sources one can download from, and there is a danger that respondents do not correctly recognize 
the examples of sources as being legal or illegal and hence do not classify their own behaviour 
properly. For example, they might think downloading from Mega-upload is legal. Streaming music 
and video from YouTube is legal, but is a lot of material on YouTube that is placed without 
authorisation or consent from copyright holders, which implies that such softer ways to distinguish 
sources in the survey, would most probably lead to over-reporting of ‘illegal’ behaviour without a 
possibility to correct for this. Rather than introducing the respondent into these finer points, we 
consider it best to refer to “unlawful” streaming or downloading to clearly describe this way of using 
internet and to support this with examples.  
 
In this study, “unlawful” consumption is limited to downloading and streaming. Home copies (putting 
copyrighted content on a USB stick to share with friends or family) are beyond the scope of the 
study. This is one limitation of the restriction to online copyright infringements which our literature 
research made us aware of. According to a recent PwC study, the percentage of Dutch internet 
users who have ‘home copied’ music or audio-visual content (from physical carriers such as cd-r, 
dvd-r) for free is roughly half the percentage of free downloads (from both legal and illegal sources): 
18 versus 30 per cent for music and 8 versus 21 per cent for audio-visual.1 This means that the 
                                                           
1 PwC (2012), Thuiskopie, Onderzoek naar gederfde inkomsten door thuiskopieën (Home copies, Research of sales displaced 
by home copies), http://ie-forum.nl/backoffice/uploads/file/IE-
 
Estimating displacement rates of copyrighted content in the EU 

 
 
 


 
outcome of our study can be interpreted as a lower bound estimate because home copied content 
is not included. 
 
We also considered carefully which forms of media consumption could or should be included in the 
study. Most are clearly indicated in the invitation to tender. Certain choices need to be made 
however about how broadly TV should be encompassed, whether to include borrowing books from 
libraries as well and whether to include clones of popular online games. The table below provides 
an overview of our classification of content.  
 
 
Table 1.1 
Classification of media by forms of availability 
 
Online 
Offline 
 
“Lawful” (download & 
“Unlawful” (download & 
Buying or renting is inclusive 
stream) 
stream) 
via web shops) 
Music 
Excluding online concert 
Excluding online concert 
Live concerts  
registrations 
registrations 
Buying/renting CDs, LPs  
Excluding listening to the radio 
Audio-visual – films 
All included 
All included 
Cinema visits 
Buying/renting DVDs, Blu-ray 
disks  
Audio-visual – TV 
Limited to TV-series 
Limited to TV-series 
Buying/renting TV-series 
Exclusive documentaries, 
Exclusive documentaries, 
Excluding watching TV 
porn, sport 
porn, sport 
Books 
Audiobooks and e-books 
Audiobooks and e-books 
Buying books  
Borrowing books and 
audiobooks from a library 
Computer games 
PC / console / online / 
Excluding clone games 
Buying video games 
apps and tablets 
 
 
 
1.3  Internet using population  
The target population of this study is the internet using population and the results of this study need 
to be representative for this population. To ensure its representativeness, the composition of the 
internet using population needs to be known. For the composition of the internet using population, 
we propose to use Eurostat data on internet use, and specifically the answer to when the individual 
used internet for the last time being the last 12 months.  
 
We use a breakdown of internet use by gender and age because gender and age are known for all 
panel members. Education is known for most panel members, but not for recent members recruited 
via social media. The Eurostat data clearly reveal that gender differences in internet use are 
negligible and that age is the determining factor.  
 
The data also reveal that nearly the whole population aged between 16 and 24 years old in the 
countries covered have used internet in the past year. For persons below the age of 15 generally 
no recent data on internet use are available, but older data from 2005 and 2006 indicate that 
internet use is similar to that of persons between 16 and 24 years old; somewhat lower in Poland 
and somewhat higher in Spain. Therefore, when weighting the results, we will assume that the 
                                                                                                                                                               
Forum%20PriceWaterhouseCoopers,%20Thuiskopie%20onderzoek%20naar%20gederfde%20inkomsten%20door%20thui
skopie%C3%ABn,%2023%20oktober%202012_.pdf 
 

Estimating displacement rates of copyrighted content in the EU 
 
 
 


 
same proportion of persons aged between 12-15 use the internet (at least once a year) as those 
aged 16-24, i.e. 99 per cent in the United Kingdom and 98 per cent in the other countries.  
 
 
Table 1.2 
Internet using population by country, age and gender in 2013 (in %) 
 
 
(Last time the individual used internet was in the last 12 months) 
 
France 
Germany 
Poland 
Spain 
Sweden  
UK 
15 or less 
89 b); xx 
97 c) 
79 a); xx 
95 b); xx 
xx 
xx 
16-24 
84 b); 98 
98 
86 a); 98 
86 b); 98 
98 
99 
           Males 
98 
98 
97 
98 
98 
98 
           Females 
98 
99 
98 
98 
99 
100 
25-34 
96 
98 
92 
94 
100 
99 
35-44 
93 
97 
82 
86 
100 
97 
45-54 
86 
91 
62 
74 
99 
93 
55-64 
72 
75 
38 
48 
94 
84 
55-74 
62 
64 
30 
37 
86 
76 
25-54 
96 
95 
79 
84 
100 
96 
           Males 
92 
94 
78 
85 
100 
95 
           Females 
91 
94 
80 
83 
99 
97 
Total 
84 
86 
65 
74 
95 
91 
Source: Eurostat web page, table isoc_ci_ifp_iu 
xx Means: no data available 
a) 
Data for 2005 
b) 
Data for 2006 
c) 
Data for 2012 
 
 
Respondents of the online questionnaire will be admitted to the copyright survey until quota per 
category of age and gender are fulfilled. These quota are calculated as percentages of 4,500 for 
each of the six countries. Based on the above table, the percentages for the quota are calculated, 
resulting in the percentages presented in the table below for the adult sub-population (aged 18-75). 
For the sub-population of minors a specific quotum of 500 per country will be used. 
 
 
Table 1.3 
Percentage distribution of the adult internet using sub-population (in %) 
 
France 
Germany 
Poland 
Spain 
Sweden 
UK 
 












18-24 




12 
12 






25-34 
12 
12 
10 
10 
14 
13 
15 
15 
10 
10 
11 
12 
35-44 
12 
12 
13 
13 
11 
11 
13 
13 
11 
10 
12 
12 
45-54 
10 
10 
10 
10 




10 


10 
55-64 












65-75 












Total 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
 
 
 
 
 
Estimating displacement rates of copyrighted content in the EU 

 
 
 



 
2  Methodology 
2.1  Direct regression versus structural demand equation 
In most of the literature on the displacement of sales by illegal downloading, the following equation 
is estimated: 
 
  = 0 + 1 ×   + 2 ×   + . 
 
Here ε denotes an error term. The most important control variables are for taste for music or audio-
visual, and for other alternatives such as offline purchases or recently, streaming. One drawback of 
this type of equation is that (price) substitution is not measured directly. This is a serious drawback 
and worth devoting attention to in the final report, as below.  
 
Price substitution can be estimated in theory from a structural demand equation, for a example a 
translog generalization of the Cobb-Douglas consumption function. In such an equation, log 
expenditures are often written as a function of log expenditures on the different products, e.g. 
 
ln( ) = 0 + 1 × ln(1) + 2 × ln(2) + 
12 × ln(1) × ln(2) +  
 
Where 1 and 2 indicate goods 1 and 2 respectively, and again ε denotes the error term. An 
estimate of the cross substitution effect between goods 1 and 2 is under certain assumptions a 
function of the coefficient a12 and the prices and quantities of goods 1 and 2 respectively. 
Consumer expenditures are observed for example from household budget surveys. If the 
substitution between bread and cornflakes is to be estimated, a good question would be to ask for 
total expenditures in the last week and expenditures on bread and cornflakes respectively.  
 
A practical problem is that if a consumer buys only bread and not cornflakes, log expenditures on 
cornflakes and therefore its cross product with log expenditures on bread is undefined. In this study, 
the problem is further aggravated by the existence of free illegal but also free legal downloading, in 
which case the price is zero.  
 
Also, one cannot just ask for prices and quantities without being clear what exactly is purchased. A 
big pack of cornflakes naturally costs more than a small pack. The same is true for albums versus 
single tracks, or for films released in the last month versus films released a year ago. One needs to 
ask what exactly is purchased, streamed or downloaded. Respondents are likely to remember 
exactly what they purchased in the last week, but many internet users do not download or stream 
weekly, and this introduces recollection problems. Recollection problems can be solved by asking 
about the last purchase only, but this does not give sufficient data for a structural demand 
estimation. 
 
Finally, music, audio-visual, books and computer games (media content) are not major expenditure 
categories. For purchases in the last week, one can ask the respondent to leave out major 
expenditures such as cars, furniture etc. and ask for total expenditures on daily/weekly items. In this 
study, total expenditure over a longer period of time is likely very high compared to expenditures on 
media content. This introduces the risk that the constant a0 captures all variation in the dependent 
variable, total expenditure in the structural demand estimation approach.  
 
 
Estimating displacement rates of copyrighted content in the EU 

 
 
 

link to page 12
 
Since there are many practical problems in estimating a structural demand equation for purchases 
and (free) downloading and streaming of media content, the common approach of a regression with 
ideally an instrumental variable and otherwise with control variables is the only meaningful 
approach.  
 
 
2.2  Limitations of survey data and considerations 
Danaher et al. (2013) mention on page 10 representativeness, inaccurate recall and obfuscation as 
specific challenges of user surveys. For example the results from a survey among students are 
difficult to extrapolate to the whole population. This study should overcome this aspect by ensuring 
representativeness for the internet using population as discussed in the previous chapter. With 
regard to the second challenge, we make sure to limit the most detailed questions (on willingness to 
pay) to the last download. The risk of confusion about what is lawful or unlawful is reduced by 
providing examples of sources and also by clearly indicating that the second category of sources 
are “unlawful”. 
 
Another limitation of survey data that is more difficult to overcome is that a survey held during a 
short period of time does not allow a before-after comparison. Most before-after comparisons in the 
literature are based on time series data including a particular change at one point in time: 
•  Changes in the availability of content; e.g. NBC’s decision to remove its content from iTunes in 
2008; 
•  Changes in legislation in one country compared to other countries where legislation did not 
change, e.g. the HADOPI becoming effective in France in 2010; 
•  Changes in supply, e.g. the introduction of Napster around 2000 or the shutdown of 
megaupload.com. 
 
Before-after comparisons with survey data are possible if exactly the same questionnaire is sent to 
(possibly different) respondents before and after a major event in the availability of (illegal) content. 
Poort (2013)2 held a survey before and after The Pirate Bay was blocked in the Netherlands and 
concluded that too many alternatives exist for downloading music and other content illegally for 
blocking one site to be effective, because internet users simply downloaded from other sites. 
However, the present study only yield one measurement in time, which implies that no before-after 
comparison can be made. 
 
 
2.3  Estimating displacement effects 
Instrumental variables 
Estimating displacement rates is complicated by the fact that the respondents’ frequency or volume 
of file sharing is likely to be endogenous. To a large extent, file sharing is likely to be driven by the 
same individual characteristics that influence legal consumption: music lovers can be expected to 
buy more music and to download more from illegal sources. Controlling for this by using variables 
or proxies for ‘music loving’ could solve this problem, but possibly not entirely. Moreover, reverse 
causality problems may exist, if legal consumption can lead to more file sharing (a sort of reverse 
sampling effect) or less file sharing (Spotify subscribers stop file sharing music). 
 
Hence, an instrumental variable approach is advised. In our analysis, we will have to look for 
variables/instruments that: 
                                                           
2  
Poort, J., J. Leenheer, J. van der Ham and C. Dumitru (2013), Baywatch: Two Approaches to Measure the Effects of 
Blocking The Pirate Bay, UvA working paper.  
 
10 
Estimating displacement rates of copyrighted content in the EU 
 
 
 


 
1. 
can vary at an individual level [for identification] 
2. 
correlate with downloading/streaming from illegal sources [instrument relevance] 
3. 
do not directly affect legal consumption (or more precisely, does so only through illegal 
consumption) [otherwise, the instrument should be in the model as a control variable] 
4. 
are not affected by legal consumption [instrument exogeneity] 
 
To be certain about exogeneity, it would be ideal if this instrument is ‘randomly distributed’ over the 
population or at least cannot be influenced by the individual. Such ideal instruments are, however, 
hard to find in practice. 
 
To start from the second condition above, it is worthwhile to think more systematically about the 
determinants of an individuals’ file sharing behaviour. Most generally, people will have to be a) 
willing and b) able to file share. We would need instruments that affect either the willingness or the 
ability to file share, without affecting the willingness or ability to purchase physical formats or to 
download or stream from legal sources. 
 
Likely factors underlying willingness to download from unlawful sources: 
Possibly useful 
•  General moral attitude with respect to certain property rights and unlawful behaviour 
that are unrelated to intellectual property. Its weakness is that general moral attitude is 
generally found to be weakly correlated to the specific moral attitude towards unlawful 
downloading in previous literature 
Can be tried 
•  Enforcement level (risk of being caught and sanctions): exogenous, but hard to make a 
parameter for and will only vary between jurisdictions (countries) 
Not useful 
•  Interest in content type: not useful because it also affects legal acquisition 
•  Income: not useful because it also affects legal acquisition  
 
Likely factors underlying ability to download from unlawful sources: 
Possibly useful 
•  General internet skills: if general enough, this is exogenous, but will be a weak 
instrument at best and only useful for estimating displacement of physical sales. An 
example is the use of internet for reading news (DangNguyen, Dejean and Moreau 
2012)  
Can be tried 
•  Available broadband connection is region: exogenous, but probably weak instrument 
and at best only useful for displacement of physical sales of bandwidth-heavy content 
types: films, series and games. In regions where broadband connection is available, 
illegible downloading may displace offline sales. But also, it could replace home 
copying (via usb sticks). If available broadband is used to instrument unlawful 
downloading, a question about home copying should be included.  
Not useful 
•  Availability of illegal sources: exogenous, but hard to make a parameter for and will 
only vary between jurisdictions if at all 
•  Computer skills: could be endogenous. If not endogenous, it seems only to work for 
estimating displacement of physical sales, since there is hardly any difference in the 
computer skills required to download/stream from legal or illegal sources 
•  Computer equipment & actual broadband connection: same as above: probably 
endogenous and even if not, only useful for displacement of physical sales 
 
We have not identified really convincing instrumental variables for the “ease” of unlawful 
downloading which are independent from legal purchases of media content in our literature review 
discussed in Chapter 4 below. Attempts at instrumental variables estimations mostly date from the 
early literature, and later studies are commonly limited to estimates with sophisticated control 
variables and studies that use time series to establish causality.  
 
 
Estimating displacement rates of copyrighted content in the EU 
11 
 
 
 

link to page 14
 
Consultation of academic experts 
An emailing was sent to 26 authors of papers on displacement rates by online copyright 
infringements published in 2010 or later. The following suggestions were offered by Marc Bourreau, 
Tobias Kretschmer, Christian Peukert, Michael Smith, Rahul Telang:  
•  instrument with internet penetration because this is commonly used in the literature; 
•  instrument with regional differences in internet speed 10 years ago and ask for download 
behaviour at that time  
•  instrument with differences in copyright enforcement between countries 
•  instrument with computer skills  
•  ask for the sequence of purchases / visits / downloads for the top 50 movies in the last year and 
repeat this survey two years 
 
The first is one we consider to use, even if differences in internet speed are only sufficiently large in 
Poland and if they only matter for audio-visual and games and in Poland. The second suggestion 
was based on the consideration that high internet speeds are almost ubiquitous. But because 
internet penetration meets the criteria for an instrumental variable as long as there is sufficient 
relevant variation, we propose to try this.  
 
We have some reservation about the third suggestion, because differences in legislation (rather 
than enforcement) was successfully applied to differences in changes in legislation but not to 
differences in legislation itself, e.g. Danaher et al. (2013)3 cited in Danaher’s overview study of 
2013. The effect of differences in legislation or enforcement between countries are likely to be 
indistinguishable from general country effects. Still, at the least, this will be a useful control variable.  
 
The fourth suggested instrumental variable has the drawback that it is not truly exogenous. The last 
suggestion is a novel approach but sensitive to memory imperfections. Two studies, Rob and 
Waldfogel (2007) and Bai and Waldfogel (2009) applied this approach to the top 50 movies, but we 
doubt this approach will also work for music, computer games and books. In addition, Poort has 
unsuccessfully tried a similar approach in the Netherlands, finding that respondents ticked off to 
have watched movies on TV that never had been broadcasted on TV yet.  
 
We also asked professor Marcel Canoy (our quality assurer and econometrician) for suggestions 
and he suggested that social norms in one’s internet community would be a helpful instrument. This 
suggestion has the flaw that people who frequently download from unlawful sites, may choose to be 
active in a community that approves of unlawful downloading, making these social norms indirectly 
endogenous. Nevertheless, this put us back on track on the idea of trying general moral attitudes 
on topics such as: 
•  Travelling without a fare; 
•  Taking a flash picture in a museum; 
•  Taking a pen home from school/club/work; 
•  Hiring a plumber informally; 
•  Crossing roads at red lights; 
 
We propose to offer ten such options with the specific circumstance that no other traveller, visitor 
etcetera is present, and ask how often doing any of these options would be acceptable (never, 
sometimes or always).  
 
 
                                                           
3 Danaher, B., M. Smith, R. Telang, S. Chen. Forthcoming. The Effect of Graduated Response Anti-Piracy Laws on Music 
Sales: Evidence from Event Study in France. Journal of Industrial Economics, Forthcoming.  
 
12 
Estimating displacement rates of copyrighted content in the EU 
 
 
 

link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15
 
Econometric implementation of instrumental variables 
 
Since we have not completely given up the instrumental variable approach and because the 
statistical criteria for instrumentation will be tested once the data have been collected, we describe 
econometric implementation of instrumental variables below (with internet penetration as the 
example). The instrumental variables approach we propose to try at least, is to estimate first (with 
“downloads” short for “downloads and streams”): 
 
  = 0 + 1 ×     +   +  
 
Where the hypothesis is that b1 is positive and then estimate the relation (with “lawful consumption” 
covering both online and offline purchases and free downloads and streams provided with 
permission from the copyright holder): 
 
 
= 0 + 1 × (0 + 1 ×    ) +  
+  
 
If unlawful downloads are well instrumented, the estimated displacement rate will be a1. The control 
variables will include variables for “taste” for music, audio-visual, books and computer games 
respectively. The “better” this taste is controlled for (and the more uncorrelated the control variable 
is with the error term), the more negative we expect the coefficient of the instrument to be, to the 
extent that downloading from illegal sources does indeed displace legal consumption. If the control 
variables are perfect, the need for instrumenting unlawful downloads is more or less alleviated. A 
number of control variables have been used in the literature and we propose to include them all and 
test which works best.  
 
This instrumental variables approach requires data on numbers of downloads and streams. In many 
questionnaires on illegal downloading, questions are limited to categories of time since the last 
purchase or download of media content, e.g. “last week”, “last month”, … This provides useful data 
to estimate ordered choice models (e.g. ordered logit or ordered probit), but testing whether the 
requirements for instrumental variables are satisfied becomes very circuitous with ordered choice 
models. For this reason, we extend the questionnaire to cover actual numbers of purchases, 
downloads and streams. A similar approach was adopted earlier by Bastard et al. (2012).  
 
Numbers of purchases allow truncated regressions (e.g. tobit) or by way of approximation standard 
regressions (ordinary least squares), for which the instrumental variables assumptions are relatively 
straightforward to test, using the Wu-Hausman test for endogeneity (testing whether the 
instrumental variable model yields results that are significantly different from OLS/Tobit) and the 
Sargan test in case several candidate instruments are available to test if any of them is 
endogenous). 
 
Operationalization of internet penetration 
Two publications on the internet penetration were analysed, one on the quality of by SamKnows 
(March 2012)4 and one on broadband scoreboards from Point-topic (2013)5. The study of 
SamKnows used data from a report of IDATE (data per December 2010).6 The data from Point-
topic are preferable because they are more recent.  
                                                           
4 ec.europa.eu/digital-agenda/en/news/quality-broadband-services-eu-march-2012 
5 ec.europa.eu/digital-agenda/sites/digital-agenda/files/DAE%20SCOREBOARD%202013%20-%202-
BROADBAND%20MARKETS%20.pdf,  
 
ec.europa.eu/digital-agenda/sites/digital-agenda/files/scoreboard_broadband_markets.pdf 
6 ec.europa.eu/digital-agenda/sites/digital-agenda/files/broadband_coverage_2010.pdf 
 
Estimating displacement rates of copyrighted content in the EU 
13 
 
 
 


 
 
Internet penetration rates are presented per country in the scoreboard data of Point-topic by the 
breakdown into rural and urban areas, based on the NUTS-3 classification of regions by Eurostat 
and the classification of these regions into rural, semi-rural and urban.  
 
The region in which the respondents live, will be based on the postal codes of their home address. 
The postal codes are linked to regions via national postal code tables linking these codes to the 
national equivalent of the NUTS-3 regions: 
•  France - 95 départements (excluding DOM) 
•  Germany – 429 Kreise 
•  Poland - 65 Podregiony 
•  Spain - 56 provincias + islas (excluding Ceuta en Melilla) 
•  Sweden - 21 Län 
•  United Kingdom - 139 unitary authorities or districts 
 
At the least, we will classify these regions into rural, semi-rural and urban according to the Eurostat 
classification, and check whether instrumenting with the internet penetration (if this variable meets 
the statistical criteria for instrumentation) according to whether the region of the respondent was 
rural or urban yields the same estimate of displacement rates for respondents in different broad 
areas of the country (e.g. north and south or east and west). But preferably, we use the internet 
penetration in the specific region of the respondent to have more variation in the internet 
penetration variable, and we hope that Point-topic will provide the internet penetration per NUTS-3 
region.  
 
Fall-back: control variables 
If the requirements for an instrumental variables are not met, the fall-back option is to estimate an 
equation with control variables for “taste” for media content. The equation to be estimated then 
becomes: 
 
  = 0 + 1 ×   +   +  
 
If the control variables work well, the estimated displacement rate of lawful consumption is again a1. 
The above model can be estimated with a truncated regression model (tobit), again after testing 
which control variables for “taste” for media content work best, as well as average regional internet 
speed to capture one aspect of ease of illegal downloading which is likely not correlated with the 
error term. We expect that the better the control variables are, the more negative the coefficient of 
unlawful downloads is, to the extent that downloading from unlawful sources does indeed displace 
legal consumption. The survey will generate a lot of data to test varying model specifications. Also, 
the number of respondents is likely sufficient to test for specific effects of for example free lawful 
supply of streams and downloads on purchases – they are included in the dependent variable in the 
base model. But since free lawful supply generates no sales, they might be included among 
independent variables as well if one seeks to analyse the displacement of sales. 
 
Displacement of sales 
The above model estimations provide the substitution rates in terms of quantities. In theory, one 
can estimate displacement of sales by weighting the displaced quantities with average prices. 
Implicit in the estimated displacement rates, is that purchases at the going prices are displaced by 
unlawful downloads. Thus, the displacement of sales (in millions of euros) can be estimated as 
follows: 
 
Displaced sales = (Number of unlawful downloads) x (Displacement rate) x (Market price). 
 
14 
Estimating displacement rates of copyrighted content in the EU 
 
 
 

link to page 23 link to page 17
 
 
This approach is adopted for example in the PWC study cited above. One thing one needs to 
control for, is that unlawfully downloaded content can be different from lawfully downloaded content. 
If films are downloaded lawfully shortly after their release at premium prices and films are 
downloaded unlawfully later, when market prices have dropped, the lower prices should be applied. 
Of course, the premium prices need to be applied if most films are downloaded unlawfully shortly 
after the release.  
 
Nevertheless, this approach does not tell the whole story because people who have downloaded 
unlawfully may be willing to pay for content but only for lower than going prices. Therefore, 
questions about the price one is willing to pay for downloads or streams need to be included to 
estimate the willingness to pay.  
 
 
2.4  Estimating willingness to pay 
The method to estimate willingness to pay is based on the study of Schlereth et al.7 discussed 
further in Chapter 4. It consists of offering respondents choices to access content with varying 
attributes at certain price ranges (so-called “preference classes”) with the question to indicate the 
likelihood to pay for the content on a Likert scale from never/very unlikely to always/very likely (so-
called “scale classes”). The resulting survey data can be used to estimate a “scale-adjusted latent 
class” (SALC) model. This model consists of a likelihood function which is a generalization of the 
multinomial logit model, with: 
•  variables that explain the probability of a scale of likelihood (some respondents may be less 
likely to respondent “very” likely or unlikely regardless of the question) and  
•  variables that explain the probability of preferences (young persons may have different 
preferences than older persons, perhaps).  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                           
7  
Schlereth et al. (2012), ‘Using discrete choice experiments to estimate willingness to pay intervals’, 
Marketing Letters 23(3), 761-776 
 
Estimating displacement rates of copyrighted content in the EU 
15 
 
 
 



 
3  Interview preparations 
Ecorys will interview national authorities (or copyright collecting organisations) and content 
providers to obtain input for developing the questionnaires and to enrich our analysis to estimate 
displacement rates. We focus on these two types of stakeholders for two reasons: 
•  to learn more from national authorities about copyright regulation, enforcement and policy 
alternatives in order to be able to assess the impact of regulations on consumer behaviour and 
internet piracy.  
•  to learn more from content providers about price ranges, distribution channels and private anti-
piracy policies.  
 
These interviews will be held in the six countries of the study: France, Germany, Poland, Spain, 
Sweden and the United Kingdom. 
 
 
3.1  Identification of relevant law  
We identified for each of the 6 countries the main law on copyright. These laws will be analysed by 
Ecorys. Moreover, we have asked the national authorities to identify any other important copyright 
laws as well as to describe the main issues presented in those laws.  
 
The table below presents the main laws that we identified: 
Country 
Regulation 
Reference 
Germany 
Gesetz über Urheberrecht und verwandte 
"Urheberrechtsgesetz vom 9. September 1965 
Schutzrechte (UrhG) 
(BGBl. I S. 1273), das durch Artikel 1 des 
Gesetzes vom 1. Oktober 
2013 (BGBl. I S. 3728) geändert worden ist" 
Stand: Zuletzt geändert durch Art. 8 G v. 
1.10.2013 I 3714” 
Spain 
Ley de derecho de autor 
LEY FEDERAL DEL DERECHO DE AUTOR 
Nueva Ley publicada en el Diario Oficial de la 
Federación el 24 de diciembre de 1996 
TEXTO VIGENTE 
Última reforma publicada DOF 10-06-2013 
France 
HADOPI law 
LOI n° 2009-669 du 12 juin 2009 favorisant la 
diffusion et la protection de la création sur internet 
Poland 
Prawie autorskim i prawach pokrewnych 
Dz.U. 1994 Nr 24 poz. 83 
(Act on Copyright) 
UK 
Digital Economy Act 2010 
Digital Economy Act 2010 (c. 24) 
Sweden 
Lag (1960:729) om upphovsrätt till 
Lag (1960:729) 
litterära och konstnärliga verk 
Modified: 2013:691 
 
 
3.2  Development of topic lists  
We developed two distinct topic lists for the interviews (1) on national regulation and enforcement 
for the national authorities (2) on the range of media sales and realistic price ranges for the content 
providers. These topic lists are already reviewed by the European Commission. Ecorys revised the 
 
Estimating displacement rates of copyrighted content in the EU 
17 
 
 
 


 
lists based on the comments of the European Commission. 
 
Topic list national authorities 
A cross-country study, like the Ecorys study, offers the opportunity to assess the impact of 
regulations on consumer behaviour and internet piracy. In order to take differences in regulations 
into account, we need to map the regulations of each of the six countries. Through interviews with 
national authorities, we seek to identify variation in the regulation. Therefore we focus the 
interviews with national authorities on the following topics: 
 
• 
Main relevant national regulations 
• 
Key elements of relevant national regulations (what is considered to be (il)legal) 
• 
Available actions to combat internet piracy 
• 
Possibilities to start a civil procedure against infringement 
• 
Ways of enforcement 
• 
Main difficulties faces in enforcement 
• 
Legal and non-legal actions that have taken place 
• 
Main developments that require new legislation 
• 
Possible flaws in current regulation 
 
Interviews with content providers 
We need information from content providers on realistic price ranges and the whole range of media 
sales as input for the survey questionnaire. Therefore we focus the interviews on the following 
topics: 
 
Interview topics for content providers: 
•  Available international and country specific media distribution channels (and the characteristics 
of those) 
•  Main price and product categories used in the branch and shares of sales amongst those 
•  Price ranges per price/product category 
•  Actions taken by content providers to protect copyright content 
•  Impact of reduced piracy on prices/ quality and diversity of copyrighted content 
•  Position towards current legislation 
•  Possible improvements in legislation 
 
The topic lists are presented in annex 7. 
 
 
3.3  Identification of contact persons  
National authorities and copyright collecting organisations:  
For interviews about legal aspects and enforcement, the Commission identified a number of contact 
persons at ministries which they shared with Ecorys. Ecorys contacted the European umbrella 
organisation of copyright collecting organisations (CISAC), which provided the contact data of the 
national organisations of the six countries. 
 
For each of the 6 countries we have invited a contact person at the national authority as well as a 
contact person at the national copyright collecting organisation for an interview. Ecorys offered 
them the choice between a phone interview, filling in the questionnaire and a follow-up call, or a 
visit to their location. 
 
 
 
18 
Estimating displacement rates of copyrighted content in the EU 
 
 
 


 
Content providers 
 
Music:  
(1)  Record companies: there are five “big” international record companies in the world, all with 
headquarters outside Europe, including the British company EMI which was acquired by 
Universal Music Group in 2012. We contacted two European offices of them.  
(2)  Record labels: they are interesting because they are likely to have the best market 
information on live concerts. They are mostly national organisations. Ecorys contacted the 
European umbrella organisations for record labels (IMPALA) to ask for personal contact 
data of national companies. We chose this approach because people are more likely to 
cooperate if they are asked personally to do so in stead of via a general email address. 
Moreover we are now certain that we contacted people who are informed on the subject.  
IMPALA provided many contact details, we invited those contact persons.  
 
Audio-visual: 
(1)  Producer representatives: Ecorys identified a list of national film producer representatives 
of all European countries (including personal contact data). For each of the countries 
included in our study, we invited up to 4 representatives (at least 1 per country). We asked 
them to either provide information for their country, or to suggest contact persons of 
producer companies. 
(2)  Cinemas: we invited 2 cinemas to participate in the study. 
(3)  Pay-tv: we invited HBO to participate in the study. 
(4)  Producers: we invited 5 producers to fill out our questionnaire. 
 
Video games:  
It turned out that almost all the major video game developers and distributors are located in the 
USA and Japan. Ecorys invited the European umbrella organisation of video game producers and 
the umbrella organisation of video game distributors, as well as three game developers. 
(1)  Umbrella organisations: The European Games Developer Federation and Europe 
Distribution 
(2)  Game developers: two European games developers and Blizzard (based in USA) were 
invited to participate in the study. 
 
Books  
We contacted the Publishers Association Limited. They provided us personal contact details of 5 
publishers. Also, we asked them to fill out the survey themselves.  
 
These above mentioned content providers were asked to fill in the questionnaire and return it to 
Ecorys.  
 
In the annex we provide a list of all organisations of all content types that we contacted.  
 
 
3.4  Response so far 
Interviews that are already finalised: 
 
Type of content 
Country 
Organisation 
Type of organisation 
Music (5) 
Germany 
K7 
Record label 
 
Germany 
CitySlang 
Record label 
 
Spain 
Everlasting Records 
Record label 
 
Estimating displacement rates of copyrighted content in the EU 
19 
 
 
 


 
Type of content 
Country 
Organisation 
Type of organisation 
 
Sweden 
Playground Music 
Record label 
 
United Kingdom 
Beggars 
Record label 
Audio-visual (0) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Games (0) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Books (1) 
United Kingdom 
The Publishers 
Publisher 
 
From the games industry, we have received one response from the European Games Developer 
Federation giving a detailed explanation how new business models are being developed based on 
free (online) games, with options to pay for extra items or extra levels, making the risk of illegal 
downloading irrelevant.  
 
From the films industry we have received one response from the Polish national film producer 
representative body, who have committed to complete the questionnaire within the next week. 
 
 
20 
Estimating displacement rates of copyrighted content in the EU 
 
 
 


 
4  Literature research 
4.1  Literature covered 
Two types of econometric literature have been reviewed: 
•  Studies estimating displacement rates of copyrighted content by online infringements; 
•  Studies estimating overall effect of online copyright infringement on the music, games, movies 
and book industries. 
•  Willingness to pay studies. 
•  Studies using a survey to explore underlying motives for online piracy; 
•  The studies reviewed include those suggested by the Commission, those listed in the 
bibliography of recent overview studies. We have not restricted the literature to peer-reviewed 
papers, because other papers may offer novel ideas as well.  
 
 
4.2  Main findings – displacement rates 
A total of 62 papers has been reviewed, however 10 of these were not further used after a first 
reading, for example because the results were based on a very small sample size. Most of the 
remaining 52 studies aim to quantify the displacement rate of legal purchases due to illegal 
copying, however some studies with another focus have been included in the review if they applied 
a methodology or approach that could be useful to improve our own methodology. The reviewed 
papers can be roughly divided in those based on a survey (23), evaluating a time series (18) or 
making a cross country or cross region comparison (5). The main findings of the papers will be 
shortly discussed according to this division. It should be noted that some papers apply multiple 
strategies. 
 
Survey-based studies 
The conducted surveys can be roughly divided in those performed in writing (offline) and those sent 
to participants online. A majority of the offline surveys involved students, with a sample size ranging 
between 160 and 2,000 respondents. A notable exception is the research of Makonnen et al. 
(2009), which employed 14 semi-structured interviews. Some online surveys were sent to personal 
e-mail addresses of University students, but most of the online surveys were conducted with the 
use of pre-existing panels. These online panel surveys had on average a much higher number of 
respondents, approximately ranging between 700 up to 10,000. With the exception of Makonnen et 
al. (2009), all surveys yielded significant results. 
 
Due to the illegal nature of file sharing respondents might be reluctant to give honest answers on 
their downloading behaviour. Therefore, how survey questions on illegal downloading are worded in 
the reviewed studies is of interest. Only two surveys used words such as illegal and piracy, the 
others avoided any terms that might have a negative connotation. Instead most surveys used the 
term free downloading. Furthermore practically every survey ensured respondents that their reply 
would be treated confidentially and anonymous. In one paper (Huygen et al., 2009) the 
questionnaire was introduced to respondents as dealing with consumers feelings about music, films 
and games. This particular survey started with a series of general questions about music 
preferences, listening behaviour and purchasing behaviour and only then touching on file sharing. 
 
Most of the survey based studies took into account variables on the respondents, two papers 
however perform a regression analysis using characteristics of downloaded albums and songs and 
 
Estimating displacement rates of copyrighted content in the EU 
21 
 
 
 


 
one paper includes the characteristics of downloaded movies as control variables. These variables 
include gender of artist, position in the charts, genre, availability in China (Bai & Waldfogel, 2009) 
and whether it is released by a major or minor label. The variables for movies used are number of 
screens on which a movie was released (a proxy for the studio’s marketing efforts); attendance in 
German theatres (a proxy for word of mouth); average user rating on the Internet Movie Database 
(IMDb; a proxy for the valence of word of mouth) (Henning-Thurau et al., 2007).  
 
Those studies that used respondent specific variables often included the following control variables: 
gender, age, occupation, family income, race, broadband access and in case of students major. 
One French study included the size of a city someone is living in, as a proxy for access to live 
music (Dang Nguyen et al., 2012). Poort & Rutten (2011) and Andersen & Frenz (2010) both ask 
questions about the reason for buying or pirating music. Andersen & Frenz (2010), first asked for 
the total number of downloads after which the respondents were presented with four motives for 
downloading (‘album too expensive’, ‘hear before buying’, ‘not available elsewhere’, and  ‘do not 
want the whole album’). Respondents had to indicate which portion of their total downloads they 
associated with each of these four motives. Poort & Rutten (2011) asked their respondents a 
yes/no question whether they used file-sharing to discover new genres, actors, bands, games or to 
make social contacts.  
 
Various studies use time spent on the internet or ability to navigate on the internet/download as a 
proxy for internet skills, though as a control variable rather than an instrumental variable, e.g. Bouni 
et al. (2005).  
 
Other variables are based to indicate the attitude towards unlawful downloading, for example 
through the use of scenarios (Lysonski & Durvarsula 2008); or by asking whether respondents 
believe that downloading reduces chances of success for upcoming artists (Lysonski & Durvarsula 
2008). The four scenarios presented by Lysonsli & Durvarsula (2008) are:  
1.  Stealing a CD from a music store with 100 percent certainty of not getting caught; 
2.  Stealing a CD from a music store with some risk that an invisible security camera observes you 
3.  Not paying for downloading music from a new CD from a major successful artist who you 
believe is very rich because of two previous successful CDs 
4.  Not paying for downloading music from a new CD from an independent artist who is very artistic 
but has not made much money on his/ her previous CD 
 
For each scenario the respondents had to indicate what would do and what they expected their 
peers to do. Chiang & Asana (2009) asked if piracy is unfair and whether P2P sites should be shut 
down. 
 
The majority of the 23 papers using a survey are focussing on music content, namely 14. Of these 
14 publications 1 compares the effects of piracy on video games to music (Bastard et al., 2012), 
while another (Huygen et al., 2007) makes the comparison with copyright content in films. 4 papers 
focussed exclusively on movies and only one took only video games into account. 
 
The academic debate whether file sharing even reduces or increases legal demand for music is not 
settled. Although an increase appears to be counterintuitive it might be achieved through so called ‘ 
sampling’ or ‘exploring’, were consumers use downloading to sample song from a particular album 
or artist before purchasing the music legally. Although various surveys found some evidence of 
sampling (3 out of 14), the net result of file sharing on music sales is considered negative in most 
papers (6 studies found a negative effect on purchases and only 1 discerned a positive effect). If 
the studies are restricted to peer-reviewed papers, only those with negative or insignificant 
estimated displacement rates remain.  
 
22 
Estimating displacement rates of copyrighted content in the EU 
 
 
 


 
 
Survey based results - Music 
The reported displacement rate per downloaded album or song ranges between 0.04% (Maloney, 
2012) up to 30% (Zentner, 2006). Rob & Waldfogel (2007) explained that even for individuals 
displacement rates can be between 0 and 1 (but not exactly 0 or 1), depending on whether the 
price of a lawful download is above or below his willingness to pay. One study found a positive 
effect of file sharing on legal purchases of 0.44 CD per downloaded content. This positive result 
was attributed to sampling (Andersen & Frenz, 2007). However, Barker & Maloney (2012) criticized 
this paper for fundamental weaknesses in the estimation models. Analysing the same data with 
different models, they find a significantly negative effect.  
 
The practice of streaming (where consumers do not acquire the music permanently, but can access 
it online), was found to have no significant effect on CD purchases, but is a complement to buying 
music online and live music attendance (Dang Nguyen et al., 2012). Dang Nguyen et al. (2012), 
applies the frequency with which people use online news sources as an instrumental variable for 
their overall internet usage. 
 
Survey based results - Audio-visual 
From the 5 survey based papers on the effect of file sharing on the purchases of movies that we 
analysed, 1 found a positive effect (Bouni et al., 2005) while the other 4 report a negative effect. 
Bouni et al. (2005) asked respondents whether illegal downloading increased their demand for legal 
movie purchases, furthermore the frequency of downloading and purchasing movies legally had to 
be filled in. The effect on cinema visits is considered by 3 papers. One paper concluded a positive 
effect, one a negative effect and the third discerned no effect. These three papers determine legal 
and illegal consumption by presenting respondents with a list of movies and ask whether these 
were consumed paid or unpaid, how often and in which order. One of the papers (Rob & Waldfogel, 
2007) compared the movie industry with the music industry and concluded that while the overall 
loss due to downloading is larger for music, the displacement rate is much higher (close to one) for 
movies. This high displacement rate for movies was explained by referring to the longer 
downloading time and searching effort for movies, which results in downloads by people who really 
want to see a particular movie, the lower overall losses in movie sales are explained by the lower 
number of downloads. 
 
Survey based results - Audio-visual 
Only two surveys included video-games. Interestingly one of these surveys (Bastard et al., 2012) 
ask for the digital and physical consumption of several types of cultural goods in the last 12 months 
(CDs, DVD, Games, etc.). If respondents indicate that the acquired digital goods it was asked 
whether this was done legally or not. Bastard et al. (2012) state that piracy affects the music 
industry negatively while the effect on video game purchases is positive (Bastard et al., 2012). 
Bastard et al. (2012) state that the cause for this difference is probably vertical product 
differentiation in the video game industry, since hacking a video game does not allow access to the 
same practices as buying a game legally. The other survey focused on video games (Fukugawa 
2011). He asked respondents ask how familiar they are with downloading games and whether they 
actually do this. Fukugawa (2011) did not find a negative effect of downloading on games sales, 
and noted that although approximately 40% of surveyed users know how to download and play 
pirated videogames for free, most of them do not actually download pirated versions. Fukugawa 
(2011) also applies ownership of game playing devices as a control variable for interest in games. 
 
Like most of the surveys applied in the reviewed literature, in our own survey we will guarantee full 
anonymity of respondents and a reporting of nationwide results only. Furthermore the term illegal 
will be avoided and replaced with unlawful. Although this new term still has some negative 
 
Estimating displacement rates of copyrighted content in the EU 
23 
 
 
 


 
connotation, the alternative used in most studies, ´free downloading´ might result in an 
overstatement of the illegal category. Since people might confuse free streaming and legal 
downloads, with illegal free downloading. An instrumental variable that will be adopted from Dang 
Nguyen et al. (2012) is the frequency of using online news sources as a proxy for online activity. 
Control variables from previous surveys that will be included are interest in music compared to 
peers, genre of music last downloaded or streamed and ownership of several devices for playing 
games, watching movies, listening music or reading e-books. 
 
 
Studies based on time series analysis 
From the 18 papers that apply a time series method, one includes a questionnaire. Although some 
papers just compare sales versus downloads over a given period, most reviewed studies involve a 
sudden event, such as the shutdown of popular file sharing website Megaupload, the introduction of 
stricter regulation or the removal of NBC content from iTunes.  
 
Of the reviewed studies 10 aim to quantify the effect of file sharing on sales. Two out of this 10 
studies find a positive effect, one mentions that the effect is significant but very small (0.02% more 
purchases due to one click on a P2P site), streaming has a slightly more pronounced effect of 
0.07% (Aguiar & Martens, 2013). A paper of Peukert et al. (2013), reports mixed effects of file 
sharing on album survival in the charts, positive for popular and female artists while negative for 
others. From the 8 surveys that report a negative effect, one reports only a very small effect (0,1%), 
another study (Adermon & Liang, 2010) mentions that although music sales are negatively affected, 
movie sales is not. One study from Danahar et al. (2010) does not look at the effects of piracy on 
legal purchases, but rather at the effect of legal downloading on physical sales, they conclude that 
legal downloading reduces piracy, but hardly competes with physical sales. An interesting approach 
is applied by Goel et al. (2009), this study compares stock prices of media companies before and 
after the introduction of stricter regulation under the Pirate Act in the US and observe a rise in stock 
prices of several media stocks.  
 
Control variables that are often applied in the time series studies are among others: birth year; 
gender; class and major of students; occupation; overall online activity; household income; 
household size; presence of children in the household and region of residence. 
 
Based on the results of Danaher et al. (2010) it becomes clear that a division in our survey between 
online and offline legal purchases is relevant, the same holds true for free downloading versus 
streaming. Hours of internet access per week will be used as an instrumental variable for internet 
familiarity and hence ease of downloading. Asking respondents how often they use internet for a list 
of several purposes will be used to mimic the ´clicks on content information sites´ applied by Aguiar 
& Martens (2013) as an control variable for content taste. Education level rendered relevant result 
is a control variable in al time series studies reviewed and will therefore be included in our 
questionnaire. 
 
 
Studies based on cross country and cross region analysis 
A cross country or region method was applied by only 5 of the reviewed studies, although several 
time series and surveys based papers also took country specific effects into account. From these 5 
studies 3 found a negative effect of file sharing on music sales, while the other two mention that 
there is no net effect. All 3 studies that discerned a negative effect mention that this explains the 
drop in legal sales only partially, ranging from a 2% revenue drop for the music industry (Peitz & 
Waelbroeck, 2006) up to a 6,6% decline (Hui & PnG, 2001). One of the studies that mentioned no 
net effect, stated that the positive sampling effect and the negative piracy effect cancel each other 
out (Andersen & Frenz, 2010). 
 
24 
Estimating displacement rates of copyrighted content in the EU 
 
 
 

link to page 27
 
 
All five studies apply GDP as proxy for economic environment other used variables are: percentage 
of downloading adults; broadband access; CD players per household; Number of purchased 
DVDs/video games/ movie tickets/ live concerts; average price of legal content and expected 
penalties for illegal downloading. Two studies use the annual number of cassettes sold divided by 
the number of CDs sold as a measure for the technological phase a country is in. 
 
Our own research will include the average internet speed per region as a proxy for “affordable 
internet speed”. Which will be tested as a quite exogenous variable that eases (illegal) 
downloading. 
 
 
4.3  Main findings - willingness to pay 
Five studies on willingness to pay have been reviewed, and the insights of four have been used to 
develop the questionnaire. We searched for one overview study comparing different methods to 
estimate willingness to pay and discussing the pros and cons of each method, two recent studies to 
make certain what is the current state of the art and as many useful studies that apply willingness to 
pay estimates to online media content. This search resulted in the following studies: 
 
Table 4.1 
Overview of willingness to pay studies. 
Type of study 
Study 
Overview study 
Breidert et al. (2006), ‘A review of methods for measuring willingness-to-pay’, 
Innovative Marketing, vol.2, issue 4, 8-32 
State of the art 
Schlereth et al. (2012), ‘Using discrete choice experiments to estimate willingness to 
pay intervals’, Marketing Letters 23(3), 761-776  
 
Dost, F. and R. Wilken (2012), ‘Measuring willingness to pay as a price range: When 
should we care?’, International Journal of Research in Marketing, 29(2), 148-166 
Application to online 
Sinha et al. (2010), ‘Don’t think twice, It’s alright: Music piracy and pricing in a DRM-
media content 
free environment’, Journal of Marketing, vol. 74, 40-54. 
 
The study which caught our attention but which we did not use in the end was De Pelsmacker et al. 
(2005)8, who applied a conjoint analysis. Since the Breidert study overall argues against a (pure) 
conjoint analysis and the two recent state-of-the-art studies use a discrete choice approach, we 
decided against the approach of a conjoint analysis. But in the end, the difference between a 
conjoint analysis and a discrete choice model practically vanishes if discrete choices are offered 
sequentially for products with different attributes, as is the case in state-of-the-art studies.  
 
Breidert et.al (2006) have reviewed willingness to pay studies, which they classify into studies of 
market data, experiments, direct and indirect surveys. In direct surveys respondents are asked 
directly about their willingness to pay (at which price?) and in indirect surveys they are asked 
whether they would buy a given product at a given price. Breidert et al. argue that the main 
drawback of direct questions is that it usually is not exactly clear for which product the willingness to 
pay is measured because the exact product is not described, limiting the validity of the 
measurement.  
 
Measurements of willingness to pay based on indirect surveys fall in one of two classes: discrete 
choice or conjoint. A drawback of a pure conjoint analysis is that actual purchase behaviour is not 
                                                           
8  
De Pelsmacker, P., L. Driessen and G. Rayp (2005), Do Consumers Care about Ethics? Willingness to pay for Fair-Trade 
Coffee, The Journal of Consumer Affairs, 39(2), pp. 363-385. 
 
Estimating displacement rates of copyrighted content in the EU 
25 
 
 
 


 
observed at all. For this reason we center the willingness to pay questions around the last 
download or stream.  
 
Sinha et al. (2010) asks respondent about their willingness to pay with a sequence of two bids, with 
and without DRM (Digital Rights Management). DRM enables online content providers to make it 
difficult or impossible for end users to copy the content, for example making it impossible to store 
the content physically on the PC or tablet. Respondents are asked whether they would purchase a 
music track at one of five random point prices for accessing music with DRM (yes or no), and then 
for music with DRM removed, at a price based on the first answer.  
 
Two recent papers on willingness to pay, Schlereth et al. (2012) and Dost and Wilken (2012) argue 
that asking to indicate the likelihood of buying a certain good on a Likert scale, from “unlikely” to 
“likely” reflects consumer choices best. In addition, both papers argue that such questions with a 
price range rather than a point price are more likely to capture the price range in which consumers 
are willing to pay for a good. Schlereth et al. finally argue that an “attractiveness indicator” is 
needed to capture a higher willingness to pay for a product with more attractive attributes. In this 
view, the study of Sinha et al. is state-of-the-art in capturing the willingness to pay for a more 
attractive alternative, but willingness to pay may perhaps be measured even more accurately with a 
Likert scale of likelihoods instead of yes or no and with price ranges instead of point prices.  
 
Schlereth et al. applied their model to an online survey with 122 completed questionnaires. They 
first ask respondents about their familiarity with netbooks and their likelihood to buy a netbook in 
the next twelve months. They then continue with a discrete choice experiment concluding with the 
question to rate the difficulty to make the choices, and finally ask after age and gender to use as 
explanatory variables (co-variates), with age turning out a relevant control variable but not gender.  
 
 
 
 
26 
Estimating displacement rates of copyrighted content in the EU 
 
 
 

link to page 29
 
5  Development of Questionnaire 
5.1  Question blocks  
After reviewing the literature and considering which data would be ideal to estimate displacement 
rates, we concluded that more questions are needed to estimate displacement effects than 
anticipated. At the same time, the impact of legislation and of streaming were clarified during the 
kick-off meeting as factors to take account of, but not as additional research questions.  
 
To reduce the length of the questionnaire, we limited the number of question blocks, now consisting 
of: 
1.  Internet behaviour and “taste for content”; 
2.  Numbers of purchases, downloads and streams; 
3.  Questions about the last download or stream; 
4.  A final question on level of education. 
 
The question blocks are arranged in this order to minimize the risk of nonresponse. For this reason, 
the question about level of education is moved to the end of the survey, as it could be sensitive. In 
the second and third block, the questions are designed to conduct the respondent to increasingly 
detailed questions about increasingly recent purchases, downloads and/or streams.  
 
In block 2, the questions start with when the last purchase, download or stream took place. The 
respondent is then asked about numbers of purchases, downloads and streams in the last year for 
those content types for which the last transaction took place longer than 3 months ago. Block 2 
ends with questions about numbers of purchases, downloads and streams in the last 3 months 
when the last transaction took place in that period.  
 
Block 3 then continues with questions around the last transaction.  
 
 
5.2  Rationale behind questions and their use in previous literature 
First block: control variables 
The first block of the questionnaire mainly covers questions that have been used in the literature. 
One type of variable has been used to instrument illegal downloading is the ease, speed or 
familiarity of internet use. The speed of internet needs to be the maximum available speed in the 
region where the respondent lives to be potentially used as an instrumental variable, because 
individual internet speed is likely to be higher for persons who frequently download media content 
(lawfully and unlawfully), whereas the maximum available internet speed is not related to individual 
preferences. As discussed earlier, high speed internet is available nearly universally in the west of 
Europe, but still it looks worthwhile to try this potential instrument for Poland. A number of other 
studies ask after the frequency of using internet in general, but then rather as a control variable. 
DangNguyen, Dejean and Moreau (2012)9 use more precisely the frequency of using internet to 
read news as an instrumental variable for general use of internet which is unrelated to accessing 
music or audio-visual content. We propose to include all three questions in the questionnaire in 
order to make comparisons with results from previous literature.  
                                                           
9 DangNguyen, Dejean, & Moreau, 2012, Are Streaming and Other Music Consumption Modes Substitutes or 
Complements?, Working paper, March 2012. Available @ http://ssrn.com/abstract=2025071 
 
Estimating displacement rates of copyrighted content in the EU 
27 
 
 
 


 
 
 
From our (Poort’s) previous empirical experience, we know it is very important to have 
unambiguous and more or less exogenous control variables for taste, and here again we propose 
more than one potential control variable to choose which works best. To control for “taste” for 
content, three types of questions are commonly asked in previous literature:  
•  to rate one’s average in content to that of the “average” person, e.g. in Poort and Rutten (2011); 
•  the use of internet to search general information on music, films etcetera without necessarily an 
intent to purchase, e.g. Aguiar and Martens (2013) ; 
•  ownership of devices.  
 
Ownership of devices is not directly (unambiguously) related to “taste” for content and was criticized 
by Rob and Waldfogel (2007) so we suggest to leave this out from the questionnaire.  
 
Second block: consumption of media content 
In the second block we ask first for the last time different types of media content were purchases, 
downloaded or streamed. This type of questions has proven to be relatively easy to respond on. 
Ideally however, we like to use more precise information about actual numbers of purchases, 
downloads and streams, which should yield better information. To reduce the risk of recollection 
problems, we ask those respondents who purchased, downloaded or streamed a certain type of 
content in the last three months for numbers in that period, and to ask for numbers in the last year 
otherwise. The combination of asking after time since last download and numbers of downloads 
has been used previously by Bastard et al. (2012).  
 
Third block: last download 
Questions about willingness to pay is centered around the last download or stream, to make certain 
exactly what type of content has been accessed, for example an album or a single track for music. 
The reason is that the price range or the willingness to pay may be different depending on such and 
other attributes.  
 
Until sufficient numbers of respondents are covered for e-books and computer games, respondents 
who have downloaded or streamed content in those categories are asked about their last online 
transaction in that specific category. Once sufficient numbers of respondents in those categories 
are covered, the respondent is asked about their last online transaction across all content 
categories.  
 
In state-of-the-art willingness to pay literature, respondents are offered a number of choices 
between products with different attributes and the choice whether they would buy the product within 
a certain price range (or at a certain point price). This raises the question what attributes are 
relevant for downloads or streams of music, films, tv, e-books and computer games. We have 
considered a number of alternatives: 
•  DRM (Digital Rights Management). DRM makes it difficult or impossible to copy content and this 
attribute is used by Sinha (2010).  
•  Download speed.  
•  The presence of advertisements.  
•  The availability of content.  
 
For all four characteristics, unlawful sources may offer better usability or quality at no price than 
lawful sources. The relevant question for willingness to pay would then be if the respondent is 
willing to pay for the content if only the legal sources did not have DRM, low bitrates or 
compression rates, few content or advertisements.  
 
28 
Estimating displacement rates of copyrighted content in the EU 
 
 
 


 
 
Sites that compare download or streaming platforms typically indicate whether the platform is ad-
free and the availability of content (e.g., number of music tracks) so we propose to use the latter 
two. The drawback of download speed is that all major sites offer high download speeds, and the 
drawback of DRM is that this technology is not (yet) common.  
 
In behavioural economics, it is common practice to conclude a series of choice questions with a 
wrap-up question to rate the difficulty to make those choices, as an explanatory variable that flags 
the reliability of the answers.  
 
Fourth block: question about educational level 
Potentially identifying questions about age, gender and educational level are generally reserved for 
the end, because they are sensitive and risk non-response. Age, gender and region of residence 
are known for all panel members, hence the fourth block is limited to a question about educational 
level, which is known for most panel members but not for all, and may also change over time.  
 
 
5.3  Examples of sources 
To clarify the distinction between lawful and unlawful sources in the questionnaire, examples will be 
used for lawful and unlawful sources. The two tables below show the most frequently used sources 
for unlawful downloading and unlawful streaming of music respectively. 
 
 
Table 5.1 
Top 20 most clicked-on sites offering music downloads without the permission of  
 
 
copyright holders, per country 
 
France 
Germany 
Spain 
UK 

Megaupload.com 
Canna Power 
Megaupload.com 
isoHunt 

Torrent411.com 
RapidShare 
RapidShare 
Btjunkie.org 

Dilandau 
Torrent.to 
Dilandau 
Torrentz 

iMesh 
Megaupload.com 
EliteTorrent 
BearShare 

Btjunkie.org 
iMesh 
VidToMP3 
Kick Ass Torrents 

search-torrent.com 
Tube2mp3.de 
iMesh 
Demonoid.me 

Torrentz 
YaBeat 
Mejor Torrent 
iMesh 

RapidShare 
SharePlace.com 
Lokotorrents.com 
YouTube mp3 

Emule-box.com 
SockShare 
Puntotorrent.com 
Megaupload.com 
10 
isoHunt 
BearShare 
Torrentz 
SockShare 
11 
Kick Ass Torrents 
ZippyShare 
bitshare.com 
ExtraTorrent.com 
12 
YouTube mp3 
isoHunt 
Contorrent.com 
VidToMP3 
13 
MultiUpload 
Convert2mp3.net 
MP3XD 
BeeMp3 
14 
Omg Torrent 
Mp3-kostenlos-
MultiUpload 
RapidShare 
downloaden.de 
15 
Cliptomp3 
Ddl-music 
Taringa Mp3 
Mp3Skull 
16 
ZippyShare 
bitshare.com 
muchoMP3.net 
Mp3Raid.com 
17 
Mininova.org 
YouTube mp3 
ZippyShare 
torrenty.org 
18 
4Megaupload.com 
MultiUpload 
Wupload 
ZippyShare 
19 
BearShare 
Rnb4u.in 
Kick Ass Torrents 
Torrent Day 
20 
BeeMp3 
MzHipHop.com 
Por Megaupload.com 
TorrentReactor 
Source: data provided by Aguiar and Martens based on the Clickstream 2013 data. 
 
 
Estimating displacement rates of copyrighted content in the EU 
29 
 
 
 


 
 
Table 5.2 
Top 20 most clicked-on sites offering music streams without the permission of  
 
 
copyright holders, per country 
 
France 
Germany 
Spain 
UK 

Hypster.com 
Jukebox-heroes-
FullTono.COM 
Hypster.com 
radio.de 

Musicplayon 
Hypster.com 
NOSEQ.COM 
Musicindiaonline 

NOSEQ.COM 
Musicplayon 
Enladisco.com 
Musicplayon 

Buenamusicagratis.com 
NOSEQ.COM 
SonicoMusica 
NOSEQ.COM 

FullTono.COM 
SonicoMusica 
Buenamusicagratis.com 
SonicoMusica 

Musica4All 
Musicindiaonline 
Hypster.com 
Ascoltare Musica 

SonicoMusica 
FullTono.COM 
MusicaTono.com 
--- 

Ascoltare Musica 
--- 
Musica4All 
--- 

--- 
--- 
Musicplayon 
--- 
10 
--- 
--- 
Musicindiaonline 
--- 
11-
--- 
--- 
--- 
--- 
20 
Source: data provided by Aguiar and Martens based on the Clickstream 2013 data. 
--- Means: no further sites offering illegal music streams are clicked on by the sample of roughly 5,000 panel 
members of the Clickstream data. 
 
 
 
 
 
30 
Estimating displacement rates of copyrighted content in the EU 
 
 
 


 
6  Detailed planning of the work 
 
 
 
Estimating displacement rates of copyrighted content in the EU 
31 
 
 
 


 
jan 2014
feb 2014
mrt 2014
apr 2014
mei 2014
jun 2014
jul 2014
aug 2014
sep 2014
ID
Task Name
Start
Finish
Duration 19-1 26-1 2-2 9-2 16-2 23-2 2-3 9-3 16-3 23-3 30-3 6-4 13-4 20-4 27-4 4-5 11-5 18-5 25-5 1-6 8-6 15-6 22-6 29-6 6-7 13-7 20-7 27-7 3-8 10-8 17-8 24-8 31-8 7-9 14-9 21-9
1
Kick-off meeting
21-1-2014
21-1-2014
1d
2
Phase 1a – Desk Research
27-1-2014
18-3-2014
37d
3
Econometric literature + statistics
27-1-2014
3-3-2014
26d
Questionnaire / interviews with 
4
27-1-2014
18-3-2014
37d
authorities and content providers
5
Develop econometric model
3-2-2014
18-3-2014
32d
6
Develop instrumental variables
3-2-2014
18-3-2014
32d
7
Develop questionnaire (adults & 
3-2-2014
18-3-2014
32d
minors)
8
Progress Check 1a
3-3-2014
4-4-2014
25d
9
First progress report
3-3-2014
21-3-2014
15d
10
EC review + meeting
24-3-2014
26-3-2014
3d
Draft final model, IV & questionnaires 
11
27-3-2014
2-4-2014
5d
(adults & minors)
12
EC approval of questionnaires (adults 
3-4-2014
4-4-2014
2d
& minors)
13 Phase 1b – Programming & Soft Launch
7-4-2014
25-4-2014
15d
14
Program questionnaires: adults & 
7-4-2014
11-4-2014
5d
minors (English only)
15
Pilot questionnaires prior to soft 
14-4-2014
18-4-2014
5d
launch
16
Soft launch: adults & minors (English 
21-4-2014
25-4-2014
5d
only)
17 Progress Check 1b
21-4-2014
9-5-2014
15d
18
Second progress report + adjusted 
21-4-2014
2-5-2014
10d
questionnaires based on soft launch
19
EC review of progress report + meeting
5-5-2014
9-5-2014
5d
20
EC approval of final questionnaires
5-5-2014
9-5-2014
5d
21 Phase 2 – Questionnaire Launch & 
12-5-2014
13-6-2014
25d
Monitoring
22
Translation of questionnaires
12-5-2014
16-5-2014
5d
23
Questionnaire launch and monitoring
19-5-2014
13-6-2014
20d
24 Interim Stage
9-6-2014
11-7-2014
25d
25
Draft interim report
9-6-2014
20-6-2014
10d
26
EC review + meeting
23-6-2014
4-7-2014
10d
27
Final interim report
7-7-2014
11-7-2014
5d
28 Phase 3 – Data & Econometric Analysis 
30-6-2014
1-8-2014
25d
29 Phase 4 - Reporting
28-7-2014
3-10-2014
50d
30
Draft final report
28-7-2014
8-8-2014
10d
31
EC review + meeting
1-9-2014
12-9-2014
10d
32
Final report
15-9-2014
26-9-2014
10d
33
Presentation of final report
29-9-2014
3-10-2014
5d
 
Ecorys Action
European Commission Action
SSI
Meeting
Draft document
Final document
32 
Estimating displacement rates of copyrighted content in the EU 
 
 
 


 
 
 
 
Estimating displacement rates of copyrighted content in the EU 
33 
 
 
 



 
7  List of literature 
Adermon and Liang (2010) Piracy, Music, and Movies: A Natural Experiment. Uppsala Universitat, 
Working Paper 2010:18 
 
Aguiar and Martens (2013) Digital Music Consumption on the Internet: Evidence from Clickstream 
Data. Institute for Prospective Technological Studies, Digital Economy Working Paper 2013/04 
 
Andersen and Frenz (2007) The Impact of Music Downloads and P2P File-Sharing on the Purchase 
of Music: A Study for Industry Canada. Department of Management Birkbeck, University of London 
 
Andersen and Frenz (2010) Don’t blame the P2P file-sharers: the impact of free music downloads 
on the purchase of music CDs in Canada. J Evolutionary Economics (2010), volume 20, pages 
715–740 
 
Bai and Waldfogel (2009) Movie Piracy and Sales Displacement in Two Samples of Chinese 
consumers. Information Economics and Policy, volume 24, issues 3–4, pages 187–196 
 
Barker and Maloney (2012) The Impact of Free Music Downloads on the Purchase of Music CDs in 
Canada. Australian National University College of Law Legal Studies Research Paper Series, 
volume 4 
 
Bastard et al. (2012) The impact of piracy on the purchase and legal download: a comparison of 
four channels culturelles. Revue Economique, volume 11 
 
Bhattacharjee et al. (2003) Digital Music and Online Sharing: Software Piracy 2.0? Communications 
of the ACM, volume 46, issue. 7, pages 107-111 
 
Bhattacharjee et al. (2007) The Effect of Digital Sharing Technologies on Music Markets: A Survival 
Analysis of Albums on Ranking Charts. Management Science, volume 53, issue 9, pages 1359-
1374  
 
Blackburn (2004) On-line Piracy and Recorded Music Sales. (Draft) 
 
Boorstin (2004) Music Sales in the Age of File Sharing. Princeton University Department of 
Economics, Princeton, USA 
 
Bouni et al. (2006) Piracy and Demands for Films: Analysis of Piracy Behaviour in French 
Universities. Review of Economic Research on Copyright Issues, volume 3, issue 2, pages 15-27 
 
Bouni et al. (2005) Pirates or Explorers? Analysis of Music Consumption in French Graduate 
Schools. Telecom Paris Economics, Working Paper No. EC-05-01  
 
Chiang and Assane (2009) Estimating the Willingness to Pay for Digital Music. Contemporary 
Economic Policy, volume 27, issue 4, pages 512–522 

Danaher and Smith (2013) Gone in 60 Seconds: The Impact of the Megaupload Shutdown on 
Movie Sales. Department of Economics, Wellesley College, Wellesley and School of Information 
Systems and Management, Heinz College, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh 
 
Estimating displacement rates of copyrighted content in the EU 
35 
 
 
 


 
 
Danaher et al. (2010) Converting Pirates without Cannibalizing Purchasers: The Impact of Digital 
Distribution on Physical Sales and Internet Piracy. Heinz Research, paper volume 57 
 
Danaher et al. (2012) The Effect of Graduated Response Anti-Piracy Laws on Music Sales: 
Evidence from an Event Study in France. Social Science Electronic Publishing 
 
Dan Nguyen et al. (2012) Are streaming and other music consumption modes substitutes or 
complements? Telecom Bretagne and Université de Bretagne Occidentale, France 
 
El Gamal (2012) The Evolution of the Music Industry in the Post-Internet Era. CMC Senior Theses, 
paper 532 
 
Ferri (2012) A Detailed Look Inside the Illegal Movie Market. (preliminary version) 
 
Fukugawa (2011) How Serious is Piracy in the Videogame Industry? Tohoku University - Graduate 
School of Engineering, Sendai, Japan 
 
Giletti (2012) Why pay if it’s free? Streaming, downloading, and digital music consumption in the 
“iTunes era”. MEDIA@LSE Electronic MSc Dissertation Series 
 
Goel et al. (2010) The impact of Illegal Peer-to-peer File sharing on the media Industry. California 
Management Review, volume 52, issue 3 
 
Hammond (2013) Profit Leak? Pre-Release File Sharing and the Music Industry. North Carolina 
State University, USA 
 
Henning-Thurau et al. (2007) Consumer File Sharing of Motion Pictures. Journal of Marketing, 
volume 71, issue 4, pages 1-18.  
 
Hui and Png (2001) Piracy and the Legitimate Demand for Recorded Music. The B.E. Journals in 
Economic Analysis & Policy 2.1 
 
Huygen et al. (2009) Economic and cultural effects of file sharing on music, film and games. TNO-
report 34782 
 
King and Lampe (2002) Network externalities, price discrimination and profitable piracy. Information 
Economics and Policy, volume 15, issue 3, pages 271–290 
 
Leibowitz (2006) File-Sharing: Creative Destruction or Just Plain Destruction? Center for the 
Analysis of Property Rights, Working Paper No. 04-03  
 
Liebowitz (2010) The Oberholzer-Gee/Strumpf File-sharing Instrument Fails the Laugh Test. 
University of Texas, Dallas, USA 
 
Liebowitz (2011) The Metric is the Message: How much of the Decline in Sound Recording Sales is 
due to File-Sharing? University of Texas, Dallas, USA 
 
Lysonski and Durvasula (2008) Digital Piracy of MP3s: Consumer and Ethical Predispositions. 
Journal of Consumer Marketing, volume 25, issue 3, pages 167-178 
 
 
36 
Estimating displacement rates of copyrighted content in the EU 
 
 
 


 
Maffioletti and Ramello (2004) Should we Put Them in Jail? Copyright Infringement, Penalties and 
Consumer Behaviour: Insights from Experimental Data. Review of Economic Research on 
Copyright Issues, volume 1(2), pages 81-95 
 
Makkonen et al. (2011) Exploring the Acquisition and Consumption Behaviour of Modern Recorded 
Music Consumers: Findings from a Finnish Interview Study. International Journal of Computer 
Information Systems and Industrial Management Applications, volume 3, pages 894–904 
 
Mateus and Peha (2011) P2P on Campus: Who, What, and How Much. I/S: A Journal of Law and 
Policy for the Information Society, volume 7, issue 2 
 
McKenzie (2009) Illegal Music Downloading and its Impact on Legitimate Sales: Australian 
Empirical Evidence. Australian Economic Papers, volume 48, issue 4, pages 296–307 
 
Oberholzer-Gee & Strumpf (2007) The Effect of File Sharing on Record Sales: An Empirical 
Analysis. Journal of Political Economy, volume 115, pages 1-42 
 
Peitz & Waelbroeck (2003) The Effect of Internet Piracy on CD Sales: Cross-Section Evidence.  
 
Peitz and Waelbroeck (2004) The Effect of Internet Piracy on CD Sales: Cross-section Evidence. 
CESifo Working Paper Series No. 1122  
 
Peukert et al. (2013) Piracy and Movie Revenues: Evidence from Megaupload. A Tale of the Long 
Tail? LMU Munich, Germany 
 
Poort and Rutten (2011) File Sharing and it's Impact on Business Models in Music. E.R.Leukveldt & 
W.Ph.Stol (Eds.), Cyber Safety: An Introduction, pages 143-155 
 
Poort et al. (2013) Baywatch: two Approaches to Measure the Effects of Blocking Access to The 
Pirate Bay. University of Amsterdam - Institute for Information Law (IViR), the Netherlands 
 
Rob and Waldfogel (2007) Piracy on the high C's: Music downloading sales, sales displacement 
and social welfare in a sample of college students. NBER Working Paper No. 10874 
 
Rob and Waldfogel (2007) Piracy on the Silver Screen. NBER Working Paper No. 12010 
 
Setiawan and Tjiptono (2013) Determinants of Consumer Intention to Pirate Digital Products. 
International Journal of Marketing Studies, volume 5, issue 3 
 
Sinha et al. (2010) Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right: Music Piracy and Pricing in a DRMFree 
Environment. Journal of Marketing, volume 74, issue 2, pages 40-54 
 
Smith and Telang (2012) Assessing the Academic Literature Regarding the Impact of Media Piracy 
on Sales. Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, USA 
 
Tanaka (2004) Does file sharing reduce music CD sales?: A case of Japan. Institute of Innovation 
Research, Hitotsubashi University, IIR Working Paper 01/2004 
 
Waelbroeck et al. (2012) Fighting Free with Free: Streaming vs. Piracy. (Preliminary draft) 
 
 
Estimating displacement rates of copyrighted content in the EU 
37 
 
 
 


 
Waldfogel (2010) The Four P’s of Digital Distribution in the Internet Era: Piracy, Pricing, Pie-
Splitting, and Pipe Dreams. Paper prepared for 2010 Meetings of the Society for Economic 
Research on Copyright Issues, Cartagena, Columbia 
 
Xia et al. (2006) Unravel the Drivers of Online Sharing Communities: An Empirical Investigation. 
College of Business 2006 Working Papers 
 
Zentner (2006) Measuring the Effect of file sharing on Music Purchases. Measuring the Effect of file 
sharing on Music Purchases 
 
 
 
 
38 
Estimating displacement rates of copyrighted content in the EU 
 
 
 


 
8  Annex: List of contacted organisations 
Table 8.1 contacted national authorities and copyright collecting organisations 
Country 
 
France 
Ministère de la Culture et de la Communication,  
Bureau de la Propriété Intellectuelle 
 
SACEM (Société des auteurs, compositeurs et éditeurs de musique) 
Germany 
Ministry of Justice 
 
GEMA (Gesellschaft für musikalische Aufführungs- und mechanische 
Vervielfältigungsrechte) 
Poland 
Polish Permanent Representation to the EU, 
Education, Youth, Culture, Sport and Tourism 
 
ZPAV (Związek Producentów Audio Video) 
Spain 
Ministry of Education, Culture and Sports, 
Directorate General for Intellectual Property 
 
SGAE (Sociedad General de Autores y Editores) 
Sweden 
Copyright expert 
 
COPYSWEDE 
United Kingdom 
Senior Policy Officer, 
Intellectual Property Office 
 
ALCS (The Authors' Licensing and Collecting Society) 
 
Table 8.2  contacted music content providers 
Company 
Type 
Country 
EMI 
Record company 
All 
BMG 
Record company 
All 
Kompakt 
Record label 
Germany 
Mushroom Pillow 
Record label 
Germany 
Polskie Nagrania Sp. 
Record label 
Poland 
Mystic Production 
Record label 
Poland 
Blanco y Negra Music 
Record label 
Spain 
City Slang 
Record label 
Germany 
K7 
Record label 
Germany 
Everlasting Records and Popstock 
Record label 
Germany 
Distribuciones 
Cosmos Music Group 
Record label 
Sweden 
Playground Music Scandinavia 
Record label 
Sweden 
Beggars Group 
Record label 
United Kingdom 
Wall of Sound 
Record label 
United Kingdom 
 
Table 8.3  Contacted Producer associations Audio-visual 
Company 
Type 
country 
AFPF 
national film producer representatives 
France 
SPFA 
national film producer representatives 
France 
Bundesverband produktion 
national film producer representatives 
Germany 
Film+fernseh produzentenverband 
national film producer representatives 
Germany 
Verband Seutscher Filmproduzenten 
national film producer representatives 
Germany 
 
Estimating displacement rates of copyrighted content in the EU 
39 
 
 
 


 
Company 
Type 
country 
Bundesverband Deutscher Film + AV 
national film producer representatives 
Germany 
Produzenten 
KIPA-Polish Audiovisual producers 
national film producer representatives 
Poland 
chamber of commerce 
Barcelona Audiovisual 
national film producer representatives 
Spain 
PAC-Producers Audiovisuels de 
national film producer representatives 
Spain 
Catalunya 
The Swedish Film & TV producers 
national film producer representatives 
Sweden 
PACT 
national film producer representatives 
United Kingdom 
TAC- Welsh Independent Producers 
national film producer representatives 
United Kingdom 
 
Table 8.4  Contacted audio-visual companies 
Company 
Type 
Country 
Pathe 
Cinema 
France 
Todocine 
Cinema 
Spain 
HBO 
Pay-tv 
All 
Arte France Cinema 
Producer 
France 
Constatin Film 
Producer 
Germany 
Se-Ma-For 
Producer 
Poland 
Filmlance International 
Producer 
Sweden 
Ugly Duckling Films 
Producer 
United Kingdom 
Zephyr 
Producer 
United Kingdom 
 
Table 8.5 Contacted computer games developers 
Company 
Type 
Country 
Paradox Interactive 
Developer 
All 
Jagex 
Developer 
All 
Blizzard 
Developer 
All 
 
Table 8.6  Contacted book publishers 
Company 
Type 
Country 
Random House 
Publisher 
Germany 
Bonnier 
Publisher 
Germany, Poland, Sweden 
Grupo Planeta 
Publisher 
Spain 
Holtzbrinck 
Publisher 
All 
Wiley VCH 
Publisher 
All 
The Publishers Association Limited 
Association 
United Kingdom 
 
 
40 
Estimating displacement rates of copyrighted content in the EU 
 
 
 


 
9  Interview topic lists 
Questions National Authorities and copyright collecting organisations 
Regulations 
•  What are the main regulations in your country on the issue of copyright?  

Please summarise the key elements of the relevant regulation. 
 
•  In the application of national regulations, is the consumption of copyright infringing content by 
end-users considered to be illegal or is it only the unauthorized dissemination of such content 
that is considered to be illegal? 
 
•  What types of online sources for end users to stream/acquire music, films/TV-series, video 
games, e-books do you consider to be legal in your country? 
 
What types of online sources for end users to stream/acquire music, films/TV-series, video 
games, e-books do you consider to be illegal in your country?  
 
•  Which actions to combat internet piracy are available under civil law? 
 
•  Which actions to combat internet piracy are available under criminal law? 
 
•  Do available actions differ depending on the type of copyrighted product (music, films/TV-series, 
video games, e-books)? If yes, what are the differences? What is the rationale behind these 
differences? 
 
•  Is there a difference in regulation between uploading and downloading material? 
 
•  Are the provisions in the law with regard to copyright different for children (aged below 16) as 
compared to adults? If yes, what are the differences?  
•  For example are children accountable or their parents?  
•  And are penalties different for illegal downloads of children (e.g. due to juvenile justice)? 
 
•  Are incidental and frequent illegal downloads treated differently? If yes, how? 
 
•  Are downloads for commercial purposes treated differently than other downloads? If yes, how? 
 
•  Who besides copyright owners is entitled to start a civil procedure against copyright 
infringements?  

For example: Content providers? Private enforcement bodies? Other persons or bodies? 
 
Enforcement 
•  How is copyright enforced by public enforcement bodies? And what role do private enforcement 
organisations play? 
 
•  How strictly do you feel that public enforcement is done (e.g. professionalism/ much time and 
money spent on enforcement)? Are there differences in enforcement efforts by type of 
copyrighted product (music, films/TV-series, video games, e-books)?  
 
 
Estimating displacement rates of copyrighted content in the EU 
41 
 
 
 


 
•  What are the main difficulties faced in enforcement? 
 
•  What are the competences of public enforcement officers to monitor internet activities and what 
are the conditions for monitoring these?  

And what are the competences and conditions for private enforcers? 
 
•  Can you provide concrete examples of recent enforcement actions? Have these received 
attention in the media (if so, how and to what extent)? 
 
•  Have any legal action, like law-suits, taken place? Who initiated there actions? Who were 
defendants in these lawsuits? Could you provide a reference / describe the outcome if the 
lawsuit was decided? 
 
•  Have any non-legal actions, like information campaigns, taken place? Who initiated these 
actions? Who financed these actions? 
 
Developments and policy alternatives 
•  What are new developments in online availability of copyrighted content that require new 
legislation? 
 
•  What are the positions of various stakeholders with regard to the current legislation? 
 
•  Are there perhaps flaws in the current legislation? What are these main flaws? 
 
•  If the current legislation would be revised, what do you think could be major changes? 
 
Other 
•  Do you have any suggestions for sources of statistics on volume and sales for each type of 
content and each type of distribution channel (e.g. CD’s, DVD’s)? 
 
•  Do you have any suggestions for national-level studies/ data on sizes of legal offer, illegal offer 
and their interaction? 
 
•  Are there any other issues not yet discussed? 
 
 
 
 
42 
Estimating displacement rates of copyrighted content in the EU 
 
 
 


 
Questions for content providers 
 
•  Our research focusses on several types of content i.e. music, films, tv-series, video-games, 
books, music and theatre attendance. Please fill out the questionnaire for only one of the 
content types. For which of the content types are you going to fill out the questionnaire? 
 
•  What international media distribution channels are available? We are already aware of many 
distribution channels including Spotify, Netflix, YouTube, Canal+. In the appendix of this 
document we included a list with the major online channels we are aware of. If we have missed 
major international online channels in the EU please indicate them in the table below.  
 

Please also fill out in the above table if these additional channels are: 
• 
Free or paid for by the end-user 
• 
Download/streaming/ subscription 

Are there differences in legality of these distribution channels within the EU (if yes, please 
indicate main differences)? 
 
•  What country specific online distribution channels are used in the 6 countries covered by this 
study (France, Germany, Poland, Spain, Sweden and the UK)? 
Note: The annex includes mostly UK specific channels but we are happy to learn about other 
country specific channels. As in the previous question, we mainly seek to make sure we miss no 
major online distribution channels.  
 
•  What are the main price/product categories used by your branch e.g.  
Music:  
Singles / albums / streaming / live concerts (music) 
Film:  
Blockbusters/ arthouse / premium / cinema / dvd rent and purchase  
Videogames:  MORPG / console games / subscriptions or micro transactions 
Books: 
Hardcopy / paperback, audio books / ebooks 
 
etc.? Is your organisation active in these price/product categories? 
 
•  What would you estimate is the share of sales of each main price/product category filled in 
under question 4 for each country?  For example in the UK the share of blockbusters in sales is 
60% and of niche content 40% or in Sweden the share of blockbusters in sales is 70% and of 
niche content is 30%.  
 
•  What are the price ranges of the price/product categories filled in under question 4 for each 
country (please use the local currency)?  
 
•  What legal actions do you or other private stakeholders take to protect copyrighted content? 
Note: like the previous questions, this applies to the type of content (music, film, tv, video 
games or book/ebooks) for which you answer the questionnaire.  
• 
To what extent have they been successful? 
 
•  Have any non-legal actions, like information campaigns, taken place? Who initiated these 
actions? Who financed these actions? 
 
•  Can you provide specific examples of recent public or private enforcement actions? Have these 
received attention in the media (if so, how and to what extent)? Please mention whether it is a 
public or private action 
 
Estimating displacement rates of copyrighted content in the EU 
43 
 
 
 


 
 
•  What do you think would be the impact of reduced internet piracy on: 
1)  the prices of copyrighted 
 
content 
 
2)  the quality of copyrighted 
 
content  
 
3)  the diversity of copyrighted 
 
content 
 
 
• 
What would be the impact of reduced internet piracy for bestsellers as compared to 
niche content? 
 
•  Compared to several years ago, what are new developments in the revenues of copyrighted 
content? 
 
•  What is your position with regard to the current legislation on copyright (especially in France, 
Germany, Poland, Spain, Sweden and the UK)? 
 
•  What can be improved in legislation, if any? 
 
Other 
•  Do you have any suggestions for sources of statistics on volume and sales for each type of 
content and each type of distribution channel (e.g. CD’s, DVD’s)? And the turnover of online 
content providers? 
 
•  Are there any other issues which would be relevant for our study not yet discussed? 
 
Attachment to the questionnaire of content providers: List media distribution channels 
 
Music 
TYPE 
FREE/PAID FOR 
LEGAL/ILLEGAL 
MAJOR ONLINE CHANNEL 
Streaming 
Subscription 
Legal 
Spotify, Deezer Premium 
Streaming 
Rent or Buy 
Legal 
iTunes, Amazon MP3 
Streaming 
Subscription 
Legal 
Simfy, rara.com, Rdio 
Streaming 
Free 
Legal 
Deezer, Pandora Internet Radio, 
Grooveshark 
Filesharing 
Free 
Illegal 
The Pirate Bay, Torrents, Usenet, Mp3skull 
and variants; cyberlockers 
 
Audio-visual 
TYPE 
FREE/PAID FOR 
LEGAL/ILLEGAL 
MAJOR ONLINE CHANNEL 
specific 
countries 
Streaming 
Free 
Legal 
YouTube (e.g. Machinima),  Hulu Basic 
 
Streaming 
Free / Subscription 
Legal 
Sky Go 
UK 
 
44 
Estimating displacement rates of copyrighted content in the EU 
 
 
 


 
TYPE 
FREE/PAID FOR 
LEGAL/ILLEGAL 
MAJOR ONLINE CHANNEL 
specific 
countries 
Streaming 
Subscription 
Legal 
Netflix 
 
Streaming 
Rent or Buy 
Legal 
Vudu, Amazon Instant, iTunes, iCloud 
 
Streaming 
pay-tv 
Legal 
HBO Go 
 
Streaming 
pay-tv 
Legal 
ESPN 
 
Streaming 
Free 
Legal 
Channel 4, BBC iPlayer, Pathé Archives 
UK 
stream or 
Buy or rent movies 
Legal 
 BlinkBox,  
UK 
download 
online, paid for per 
video 
Streaming 
Pay-tv 
Legal 
Canal+ 
ES,FR,PL 
Streaming 
Pay-tv 
Legal 
Sky Deutschland 
DE 
Streaming 
Pay-tv 
Legal 
Canalsat, Numericable 
FR 
Streaming 
Pay-tv 
Legal 
Cyfrowy Polsat, Cinemax 
PL 
Streaming 
Pay-tv 
Legal 
C More, Viasat Film 
SE 
Streaming 
Pay-tv 
Legal 
Sky Digital, Smallworld Cable, BT, Talk 
UK 
Talk Plus Tv 
Filesharing 
Free 
Illegal 
The Pirate Bay, Torrents, Usenet, 
 
cyberlockers 
 
Videogames 
TYPE 
FREE/PAID FOR 
LEGAL/ILLEGAL 
MAJOR ONLINE CHANNEL 
specific 
countries 
Cloud 
Subscription 
Legal 
Gaikai, Onlive 
Onlive: UK 
Streaming 
Console shops 
Paid for 
Legal 
Playstation, Kinekt, Xbox, Nintendo 
 
Mass online 
Subscription 
Legal 
Final Fantasy XIV, World of Warcraft 
 
Mass online 
Freemium 
Legal 
Everquest, 
 
Download 
Free 
Illegal 
Top 10 Games, Aomine, Icore Games, 
 
Platform 
Goomia 
Filesharing 
Free 
Illegal 
Fullypcgames, Torrents 
 
 
Books 
TYPE 
FREE/PAID FOR 
LEGAL/ILLEGAL 
MAJOR ONLINE CHANNEL 
Downloads 
Paid for 
Legal 
Bol.com, Ebooks.com, Amazon 
Downloads 
Free 
Legal, if terms 
Free-ebooks 
and conditions 
are followed 
Download 
Free 
Illegal 
Maha Copia, My Entertainment Point, 
Platform 
Scribid 
 
Estimating displacement rates of copyrighted content in the EU 
45 
 
 
 


 
TYPE 
FREE/PAID FOR 
LEGAL/ILLEGAL 
MAJOR ONLINE CHANNEL 
Filesharing 
Free 
Illegal 
ebookbrowse, 2shared, slideshare 
 
 
 
 
 
 
46 
Estimating displacement rates of copyrighted content in the EU 
 
 
 



 
P.O. Box 4175 
3006 AD Rotterdam 
The Netherlands 
 
Watermanweg 44 
3067 GG Rotterdam 
The Netherlands 
 
T +31 (0)10 453 88 00 
F +31 (0)10 453 07 68 
E [email address] 
 
W www.ecorys.nl 
 
Sound analysis, inspiring ideas 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
BELGIUM – BULGARIA – CROATIA - HUNGARY – INDIA – THE NETHERLANDS – POLAND – RUSSIAN FEDERATION – SPAIN – TURKEY – UNITED KINGDOM 
 
 
 

Document Outline