This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Consultation and Notification of the German "NetzDG" law'.

Annex : Comments issued by Italy 
Communication from the Commission - TRIS/(2017) 01588 
Directive (EU) 2015/1535 
Notification: 2017/0127/D 
Forwarding of the observations of a Member State (Italy) (article 5, paragraph 2, of Directive 
(EU)  2015/1535).  These  observations  do  not  have  the  effect  of  extending  the  standstill 
period. 
******************** 
1. 
MSG 104 IND  2017 0127 D   EN 28-06-2017 26-06-2017 COM  5.2   28-06-2017 
2. 
Italy 
3A. 
MINISTERO  DELLO  SVILUPPO  ECONOMICO  -  Direzione  Generale  per  il 
mercato, la concorrenza, il consumatore, la vigilanza e la normativa tecnica - Divisione XIII - 
Normativa tecnica  
3B. 
MINISTERO 
DELL'INTERNO 

DIPARTIMENTO 
DELLA 
PUBBLICA 
SICUREZZA  -Diresione  centrale  per  la  polizia  stradale,  ferroviaria,  delle  comunicazioni  e 
per i reparti speciali della polizia di Stato - Servizio Polizia postale e delle comunicazioni  - 
ROMA  -  AUTORITA'  PER  LE  GARANZIE  NELLE  COMUNICAZIONI    -  Direzione 
Contenuti Audiovisivi 
4. 
2017/0127/D - SERV60 
5. 
article 5, paragraph 2, of Directive (EU) 2015/1535 
6. 
In relation to Notification 2017/0127/D on the draft ‘Act improving law enforcement 
on  social  networks  [Netzdurchführungsgesetz  –  NetzDG]’,  the  Italian  Postal  and 
Communications  Police  and  the  Italian  Communications  Authority  submitted  the  following 
comments. 
 Overall the proposed legislation is acceptable, provided the rules of the Budapest Convention 
on  Cybercrime  are  reiterated  in  the  preamble,  requiring  evidence  to  be  sent  to  law 
enforcement  agencies  and  judicial  authorities  to  be  preserved  when  illegal  contents  are 
deleted. 
 The  draft  notified  by  Germany  under  Directive  (EU)  2015/1535,  introducing  legal 
requirements  for  social  networks  is  welcomed  by  the  competent  offices  of  the  Italian 
Communications Authority. 
 The  rationale  of  the  Act  is  to  encourage  social  networks  (the  definition  of  which  remains 
unexplored  by  European  lawmakers  thus  far)  to  process  complaints  concerning  hate  crimes 
and  other  content-related  criminal  offences  faster  and  more  effectively  in  order  to  ensure 
illegal  content  is  removed  promptly.    Moreover,  Italian  lawmakers  also  recently  started  to 
explore the possibility of introducing public enforcement tools, for instance in relation to fake 
news. 
 Against this background, the German draft legislation is deemed especially interesting, also 
in light of the fact that it is the first attempt of its kind in Europe. We agree that relying on 
spontaneous, voluntary action by stakeholders would be insufficient. 

 

Annex : Comments issued by Italy 
 Also of undoubted value is the attempt to provide a first legal definition of ‘social networks’, 
as ‘telemedia service providers which, for profit-making purposes, operate internet platforms 
that enable users to exchange and share any content with other users or to make such content 
available to the public (social networks)’.  In this respect, we agree with the choice to limit 
the subjective  scope of  application only  to  social  networks in  a position to  influence public 
opinion,  by  introducing  a  minimum  threshold  of  active  users  and  by  excluding  journalistic 
platforms from the definition above. 
 However, we believe German lawmakers could provide a clearer definition which highlights, 
among  the  identifying  features  of  social  networks,  the  fact  that  said  social  interaction  and 
sharing  services  are  provided  free  of  charge,  thereby  setting  them  apart  from  Information 
Society  services,  which  do  instead  require  payment  of  a  fee  (cf.  Article  1.1(b)  of  Directive 
(EU)  2015/1535).  From  this  point  of  view,  the  current  scope  of  application  is  deemed  too 
general  in  certain  areas,  even  though  the  punishable  offences  help  understand  the  potential 
targets of deletion orders and the related administrative measures. 
 In terms of the sanctions, the fine of up to 5 million euros is considered a suitable deterrent 
from breaching the obligations imposed. 
 In  conclusion,  the  proposed  measures  are  not  deemed  to  create  obstacles  to  the  free 
movement  of  goods  and  the  free  provision  of  Information  Society  services.  In  fact,  they 
introduce  a  specific  obligation  applicable  to  a  target  group  which  is  currently  exempt  from 
specific liabilities under Directive 2000/31/EC. 
********** 
European Commission 
Contact point Directive (EU) 2015/1535 
Fax: +32 229 98043 
email: [email address]