This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Consultation and Notification of the German "NetzDG" law'.

Annex : Comments issued by Sweden 
Communication from the Commission - TRIS/(2017) 01610 
Directive (EU) 2015/1535 
Notification: 2017/0127/D 
Forwarding  of  the  observations  of  a  Member  State  (Sweden)  (article  5,  paragraph  2,  of 
Directive  (EU)  2015/1535).  These  observations  do  not  have  the  effect  of  extending  the 
standstill period. 
******************** 
1. 
MSG 104 IND  2017 0127 D   EN   28-06-2017 28-06-2017 COM  5.2     28-06-2017 
2. 
Sweden 
3A. 
Kommerskollegium  
3B. 
Utrikesdepartementet 
4. 
2017/0127/D - SERV60 
5. 
article 5, paragraph 2, of Directive (EU) 2015/1535 
6. 
Sweden, while in essence supporting Germany's ambition to improve compliance with 
the  current  legislation  on  social  networks,  wishes  to  submit  the  following  questions  and 
comments with regard to certain details of the notified draft act: 
- The structure and scope of the act 
The draft act shall apply to certain social networks. These are defined as ‘telemedia service 
providers’  who  for  profit-making  purposes  use  internet  platforms  which  allow  users  to 
exchange and share content with other users or to make such content available to the public. 
Since  the  proposed  act  partly  creates  extraterritorial  application  of  German  law  to  service 
providers  not  established  in  Germany  (e.g.  as  regards  the  legislative  acts  listed  in  § 1(3) 
which  define  ‘unlawful  content’)  and  partly  introduces  extensive  reporting  requirements  in 
German, as well as an obligation to appoint a national representative, it is desirable that the 
scope  of  the  act  be  limited  to  the  kinds  of  social  networks  that  have  the  issues  that  the  act 
aims to counteract. In view of this, Sweden wishes to ask whether Germany intends to limit 
the  scope  of  the  act  and  exempt  from  it,  for  example,  digital  music  services  or  gaming 
platforms or other platforms where the same issues do not exist? 
If the act is also to be applied to digital music services or gaming platforms, Sweden wishes 
to convey that questions may arise whether the regular reporting (besides having to be made 
in  German),  the  requirement  to  assess  within  short  time  limits,  that  which  is  meant  by 
‘manifestly unlawful’ or ‘unlawful’ according to German legislation, as well as the obligation 
to  designate  a  national  representative  could  be  considered  disproportionate  for  service 
providers who are not established in Germany. 
- National data storage requirements 
In accordance with § 3(2), point 4 of the proposed draft act, social networks are required to 
store  removed  content  within  Germany  for  a  period  of  10  weeks.  In  Sweden's  assessment, 
this  is  a  burdensome  obligation,  especially  for  service  providers  who  are  not  established  in 
German, as well as an obstacle to the freedom to provide data storage services in the EU. 

 

Annex : Comments issued by Sweden 
In  view  of  the  above,  Sweden  wishes  to  ask  Germany  if  there  might  be  alternative,  less 
invasive measures - e.g. an obligation to save and, upon request, hand over removed content 
to  German  authorities  -  which  would  achieve  the  same  purpose  without  restricting  the  free 
movement of services in this area? 
- Relation to the e-Commerce Directive's rules 
According to § 3(2) , points 2 and 3 of the draft act, social networks are required to delete or 
block ‘manifestly unlawful’ and ‘unlawful’ content within 24 hours and 7 days respectively 
from the date the network received complaints about the content. As stated in the paragraph 
on EU legal compatibility of the impact assessment linked to the draft act, these obligations 
should be read in light of the e-Commerce Directive's (Directive 2000/31/EC) provisions on 
the  protection  of  hosting  services  from  liability  for  information  stored  at  the  request  of  a 
recipient of the service. This protection is limited in accordance with Article 14(1)(b) of the 
e-Commerce Directive when the service provider becomes aware of the occurrence of illegal 
information,  with  a  special  regulation  requiring  awareness  when  it  concerns  claims  for 
damages. 
As,  inter  alia,  stated  in  the  paragraph  on  EU  legal  compatibility  of  the  impact  assessment 
linked to the  draft act, it is assessed that the draft act's regulation of obligations for hosting 
services  constitutes  a  restriction  on  the  free  movement  of  information  society  services. 
Although  it  can  be  justified  by  reference  to  public  order,  it  may  in  the  long  term  adversely 
affect  the  European  Commission's  and  the  Member  States'  common  objectives  for  a 
functioning  digital  internal  market,  as  well  as  the  overall  objective  of  the  e-Commerce 
Directive to ensure the free movement of information society services. 
In view of the above  - and for a clearer understanding of how the draft act relates to the e-
Commerce  Directive  -  Sweden  wishes  to  ask  Germany  how  § 3(2),  points  2  and  3  of  the 
proposal relate to Article 14 of the e-Commerce Directive, and in particular whether receipt 
of a complaint (which may need to be investigated) indicates knowledge of the existence of 
unlawful activity or illegal information? 
********** 
European Commission 
Contact point Directive (EU) 2015/1535 
Fax: +32 229 98043 
email: [email address]